Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 4.101
Filtrar
1.
Rev Soc Bras Med Trop ; 53: e20200504, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33174962

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first officially described in Brazil on February 26th, 2020. The accumulation of reports of concomitant infections with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and pathogens that cause diseases endemic to tropical countries, such as dengue and chikungunya fever, has started to draw attention. Chagas disease and leprosy remain public health problems in many developing countries, such as Brazil. In this manuscript, we describe a case of concomitant leprosy, Chagas disease, and COVID-19, highlighting the cutaneous manifestations of SARS-CoV-2 infection and the clinical behavior of household contacts who previously received prophylactic Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccines.


Assuntos
Doença de Chagas/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Hanseníase Dimorfa/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus , Brasil , Características da Família , Humanos , Pandemias
3.
Vaccine ; 38(48): 7581-7584, 2020 11 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33071005

RESUMO

Today, Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global public health emergency and vaccination measures to counter its diffusion are deemed necessary. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of the disease, unleashes a T-helper 2 immune response in those patients requiring intensive care. Here, we illustrate the immunological mechanism to train the immune system towards a more effective and less symptomatic T-helper 1 immune response, to be exploited against SARS-CoV-2.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Vacinas Bacterianas/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Imunidade Inata/efeitos dos fármacos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Propionibacteriaceae/imunologia , Betacoronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Corynebacterium , Humanos , Esquemas de Imunização , Imunogenicidade da Vacina , Interleucinas/genética , Interleucinas/imunologia , Segurança do Paciente , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Células Th1/efeitos dos fármacos , Células Th1/imunologia , Células Th1/virologia , Equilíbrio Th1-Th2/efeitos dos fármacos , Células Th2/efeitos dos fármacos , Células Th2/imunologia , Células Th2/virologia , Vacinação , Vacinas Virais/administração & dosagem , Vacinas Virais/biossíntese
4.
Trials ; 21(1): 881, 2020 Oct 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33106170

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The BCG vaccine, widely used in Brazil in new-borns, induces adjuvant protection for several diseases, including childhood virus infections. BCG activates monocytes and innate memory NK cells which are crucial for the antiviral immune response. Therefore, strategies to prevent COVID-19 in health workers (HW) should be carried out to prevent them becoming unwell so that they can continue to work during the pandemic. The hypothesis is that BCG will improve the innate immune response and prevent symptomatic infection or COVID-19 severity. The primary objective is to verify the effectiveness and safety of the BCG vaccine to prevent or reduce incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the city of Goiânia (Brazil) among HW previously vaccinated with BCG and also its severity and mortality during the pandemic of the disease. Secondary objectives are to estimate the incidence of COVID-19 among these professionals and the innate immune response elicited to BCG. TRIAL DESIGN: This a phase II trial for repositioning BCG as a preventive strategy against COVID-19. The trial is an open-label, parallel-group randomised clinical trial, comparing HW vaccinated with BCG and HW not vaccinated. PARTICIPANTS: The trial will recruit 800 HW of Goiânia - Goiás, Brazil to reach a total of 400 HW included after comorbidities questioning and laboratorial evaluation. Eligibility criteria: Any HW presenting BCG vaccination scar with direct contact with suspected COVID-19 patients for at least 8 hours per week, whether in hospital beds, ICU, or in transportation or admission (nurses, doctors, physiotherapists, nutritionists, receptionists, etc.) who have negative IgM and IgG COVID-19 test. Participants with any of the following characteristics will be excluded: - Have had in the last fifteen days any signs or symptoms of virus infection, including COVID-19; - Have had fever in the last fifteen days; - Have been vaccinated fifteen days before the inclusion; - Have a history or confirmation of any immunosuppressive disease such as HIV, presented solid tumour in the last two years or autoimmune diseases; - Are under preventive medication with antibiotics, steroid anti-inflammatories, or chemotherapy; - Have less than 500 neutrophils per mL of blood; - Have previously been diagnosed with tuberculosis; - Are breastfeeding or pregnant; - Are younger than 18 years old; - Are participating as an investigator in this clinical trial. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: HW will be randomized into the BCG vaccinated group or the BCG unvaccinated control group. The BCG vaccinated group will receive in the right arm, intradermally, a one off dose of 0.1 mL corresponding to approximately 2 x105 to 8 x105 CFU of live, freeze-dried, attenuated BCG Moscow 361-I, Bacillus Calmette Guerin vaccine (Serum Institute of India PVT. LTD.). The unvaccinated control group will not be vaccinated. The HW allocated in both groups will be followed up at specific times points until 180 days post inclusion. The vaccinated and control groups will be compared according to COVID-19 related outcomes. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary outcomes are the incidence coefficient of infection by SARS-CoV-2 determined by RT-PCR of naso-oropharyngeal swab specimen or rapid lateral flow IgG and IgM test, and presence of general COVID-19 symptoms, disease severity and admission to hospital during the 180 days of follow up. The secondary outcome is the innate immune response elicited 15-20 days after vaccination. RANDOMISATION: The vaccine vial contains approximately 10 doses. In order to optimize the vaccine use, the randomisation was performed in blocks of 20 participants using the platform randomization.com [ http://www.jerrydallal.com/random/permute.htm ]. The randomization was prepared before any HW inclusion. The results were printed and inserted in sealed envelopes that were numbered with BCG-001 to BCG-400. The printed results as well the envelopes had the same numbers. At the time of the randomisation, each participant that meets the inclusion criteria will receive a consecutive participant number [BCG-001-BCG-400]. The sealed envelope with the assigned number, blinded to the researchers, will be opened in front of the participant and the arm allocation will be known. BLINDING (MASKING): There is no masking for the participants or for the healthcare providers. The study will be blinded to the laboratory researchers and to those who will be evaluating the outcomes and performing the statistical analyses. In this case, only the participant identification number will be available. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): Four hundred heath workers will be randomised in two groups. Two hundred participants will be vaccinated, and 200 participants will not be vaccinated. TRIAL STATUS: The protocol approved by the Brazilian Ethical Committee is the seventh version, number CAAE: 31783720.0.0000.5078. The trial has been recruiting since September 20th, 2020. The clinical trial protocol was registered on August 5th, 2020. It is estimated that recruitment will finish by March 2021. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The protocol number was registered on August 5th, 2020 at REBEC (Registro Brasileiro de Ensaios Clínicos). Register number: RBR-4kjqtg and WHO trial registration number UTN: U1111-1256-3892. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Imunidade Inata/imunologia , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Brasil/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Proteção Cruzada/imunologia , Seguimentos , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Imunização Secundária/métodos , Imunoglobulina G/sangue , Imunoglobulina M/sangue , Incidência , Injeções Intradérmicas , Células Matadoras Naturais/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa/métodos , Segurança , Resultado do Tratamento
5.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 18377, 2020 10 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33110184

RESUMO

The Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine provides protection against tuberculosis (TB), and is thought to provide protection against non-TB infectious diseases. BCG vaccination has recently been proposed as a strategy to prevent infection with SARS-CoV-2 (CoV-2) to combat the COVID-19 outbreak, supported by its potential to boost innate immunity and initial epidemiological analyses which observed reduced severity of COVID-19 in countries with universal BCG vaccination policies. Seventeen clinical trials are currently registered to inform on the benefits of BCG vaccinations upon exposure to CoV-2. Numerous epidemiological analyses showed a correlation between incidence of COVID-19 and BCG vaccination policies. These studies were not systematically corrected for confounding variables. We observed that after correction for confounding variables, most notably testing rates, there was no association between BCG vaccination policy and COVD-19 spread rate or percent mortality. Moreover, we found variables describing co-morbidities, including cardiovascular death rate and smoking prevalence, were significantly associated COVID-19 spread rate and percent mortality, respectively. While reporting biases may confound our observations, our epidemiological findings do not provide evidence to correlate overall BCG vaccination policy with the spread of CoV-2 and its associated mortality.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Vacinação em Massa/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Tuberculose/prevenção & controle , Vacina BCG/uso terapêutico , Correlação de Dados , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Pandemias
6.
Pharm Res ; 37(11): 212, 2020 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33025261

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is expected to continue to cause worldwide fatalities until the World population develops 'herd immunity', or until a vaccine is developed and used as a prevention. Meanwhile, there is an urgent need to identify alternative means of antiviral defense. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine that has been recognized for its off-target beneficial effects on the immune system can be exploited to boast immunity and protect from emerging novel viruses. METHODS: We developed and employed a systems biology workflow capable of identifying small-molecule antiviral drugs and vaccines that can boast immunity and affect a wide variety of viral disease pathways to protect from the fatal consequences of emerging viruses. RESULTS: Our analysis demonstrates that BCG vaccine affects the production and maturation of naïve T cells resulting in enhanced, long-lasting trained innate immune responses that can provide protection against novel viruses. We have identified small-molecule BCG mimics, including antiviral drugs such as raltegravir and lopinavir as high confidence hits. Strikingly, our top hits emetine and lopinavir were independently validated by recent experimental findings that these compounds inhibit the growth of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide systems biology support for using BCG and small-molecule BCG mimics as putative vaccine and drug candidates against emergent viruses including SARS-CoV-2.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Materiais Biomiméticos/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Reposicionamento de Medicamentos/métodos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Bibliotecas de Moléculas Pequenas/administração & dosagem , Vacinas Virais/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/imunologia , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Humanos , Imunidade Inata , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Biologia de Sistemas/métodos , Vacinas Virais/imunologia , Fluxo de Trabalho
7.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5225, 2020 10 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33067434

RESUMO

Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have a lower risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, progression from infection to tuberculosis (TB) disease, TB morality and TB recurrence, when being treated with metformin. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of these protective effects is lacking. Here, we use mass cytometry to show that metformin treatment expands a population of memory-like antigen-inexperienced CD8+CXCR3+ T cells in naive mice, and in healthy individuals and patients with T2D. Metformin-educated CD8+ T cells have increased (i) mitochondrial mass, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid oxidation; (ii) survival capacity; and (iii) anti-mycobacterial properties. CD8+ T cells from Cxcr3-/- mice do not exhibit this metformin-mediated metabolic programming. In BCG-vaccinated mice and guinea pigs, metformin enhances immunogenicity and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis challenge. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important function of CD8+ T cells in metformin-derived host metabolic-fitness towards M. tuberculosis infection.


Assuntos
Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/efeitos dos fármacos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/tratamento farmacológico , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Metformina/administração & dosagem , Animais , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/imunologia , Linfócitos T CD8-Positivos/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/imunologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/metabolismo , Feminino , Cobaias , Humanos , Masculino , Camundongos , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/efeitos dos fármacos , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/imunologia , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/fisiologia , Tuberculose/etiologia , Tuberculose/imunologia , Tuberculose/microbiologia , Tuberculose/prevenção & controle
8.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(710): 1920-1923, 2020 Oct 14.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33058578

RESUMO

Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy is currently the most effective treatment for non-infiltrating bladder tumors. Although rare, « BCGitis ¼, local or disseminated, is a serious complication of this therapy. The diagnosis is difficult and often delayed but the infection may progress to multi-systemic failure and can be fatal. The microbiological samples are often negative, and biopsies sometimes do not help. Treatment consists of antimycobacterial agents in combination with corticosteroids in case of severe presentation.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/efeitos adversos , Imunoterapia/efeitos adversos , Inflamação/induzido quimicamente , Administração Intravesical , Corticosteroides/uso terapêutico , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Inflamação/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias da Bexiga Urinária/terapia
9.
Trials ; 21(1): 799, 2020 Sep 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32943115

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine against tuberculosis is associated with non- specific protective effects against other infections, and significant reductions in all-cause morbidity and mortality have been reported. We aim to test whether BCG vaccination may reduce susceptibility to and/or the severity of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases in health care workers (HCW) and thus prevent work absenteeism.The primary objective is to reduce absenteeism due to illness among HCW during the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary objectives are to reduce the number of HCW that are infected with SARS-CoV-2, and to reduce the number of hospital admissions among HCW during the COVID-19 pandemic. HYPOTHESIS: BCG vaccination of HCW will reduce absenteeism by 20% over a period of 6 months. TRIAL DESIGN: Placebo-controlled, single-blinded, randomised controlled trial, recruiting study participants at several geographic locations. The BCG vaccine is used in this study on a different indication than the one it has been approved for by the Danish Medicines Agency, therefore this is classified as a phase III study. PARTICIPANTS: The trial will recruit 1,500 HCW at Danish hospitals.To be eligible for participation, a subject must meet the following criteria: Adult (≥18 years); Hospital personnel working at a participating hospital for more than 22 hours per week.A potential subject who meets any of the following criteria will be excluded from participation in this study: Known allergy to components of the BCG vaccine or serious adverse events to prior BCG administration Known prior active or latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) or other mycobacterial species Previous confirmed COVID-19 Fever (>38 C) within the past 24 hours Suspicion of active viral or bacterial infection Pregnancy Breastfeeding Vaccination with other live attenuated vaccine within the last 4 weeks Severely immunocompromised subjects. This exclusion category comprises: a) subjects with known infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) b) subjects with solid organ transplantation c) subjects with bone marrow transplantation d) subjects under chemotherapy e) subjects with primary immunodeficiency f) subjects under treatment with any anti-cytokine therapy within the last year g) subjects under treatment with oral or intravenous steroids defined as daily doses of 10 mg prednisone or equivalent for longer than 3 months h) Active solid or non-solid malignancy or lymphoma within the prior two years Direct involvement in the design or the execution of the BCG-DENMARK-COVID trial Intervention and comparator: Participants will be randomised to BCG vaccine (BCG-Denmark, AJ Vaccines, Copenhagen, Denmark) or placebo (saline). An adult dose of 0.1 ml of resuspended BCG vaccine (intervention) or 0.1 ml of sterile 0.9% NaCl solution (control) is administered intradermally in the upper deltoid area of the right arm. All participants will receive one injection at inclusion, and no further treatment of study participants will take place. MAIN OUTCOMES: Main study endpoint: Days of unplanned absenteeism due to illness within 180 days of randomisation.Secondary study endpoints: The cumulative incidence of documented COVID-19 and the cumulative incidence of hospital admission for any reason within 180 days of randomisation.Randomisation: Randomisation will be done centrally using the REDCap tool with stratification by hospital, sex and age groups (+/- 45 years of age) in random blocks of 4 and 6. The allocation ratio is 1:1.Blinding (masking): Participants will be blinded to treatment. The participant will be asked to leave the room while the allocated treatment is prepared. Once ready for injection, vaccine and placebo will look similar, and the participant will not be able to tell the difference.The physicians administering the treatment are not blinded.Numbers to be randomised (sample size): Sample size: N=1,500. The 1,500 participants will be randomised 1:1 to BCG or placebo with 750 participants in each group.Trial Status: Current protocol version 5.1, from July 6, 2020.Recruitment of study participants started on May 18, 2020 and we anticipate having finished recruiting by the end of December 2020. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered with EudraCT on April 16, 2020, EudraCT number: 2020-001888-90, and with ClinicalTrials.gov on May 1, 2020, registration number NCT04373291.Full protocol: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trialswebsite (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Pessoal de Saúde , Saúde do Trabalhador , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Vacinação , Absenteísmo , Vacina BCG/efeitos adversos , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Dinamarca , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Admissão do Paciente , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Licença Médica , Método Simples-Cego , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
10.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 66Suppl 2(Suppl 2): 91-95, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32965364

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate the frequency of COVID-19 in patients with and without BCG application due to bladder tumors. METHODS: The presence of COVID-19 was investigated in 167 patients with BCG and 167 without bladder cancer. All patients were compatible with COVID-19 infection. Patients with RT-PCR positive for SARS-CoV-2 and/or Chest CT positive for viral pneumonia between March and May 2020 were included in the study. RESULTS: A total of 334 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the 167 patients in the study group was 71.1±14.2 1 (min. 38.0- max. 98.0 years), 141 (84.4%) were male. The mean age of the 167 patients in the control group was 70.5±13.8 years (min. 41.0- max. 96.0 years), and 149 were male (p> 0.05). COVID-19 was detected in 5 patients in the BCG group and in 4 patients in the control group (P> 0.05). CONCLUSION: Intravesical BCG administration does not decrease the frequency of COVID-19 infection.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/efeitos adversos , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
11.
Cell ; 183(2): 315-323.e9, 2020 10 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941801

RESUMO

BCG vaccination in children protects against heterologous infections and improves survival independently of tuberculosis prevention. The phase III ACTIVATE trial assessed whether BCG has similar effects in the elderly. In this double-blind, randomized trial, elderly patients (n = 198) received BCG or placebo vaccine at hospital discharge and were followed for 12 months for new infections. At interim analysis, BCG vaccination significantly increased the time to first infection (median 16 weeks compared to 11 weeks after placebo). The incidence of new infections was 42.3% (95% CIs 31.9%-53.4%) after placebo vaccination and 25.0% (95% CIs 16.4%-36.1%) after BCG vaccination; most of the protection was against respiratory tract infections of probable viral origin (hazard ratio 0.21, p = 0.013). No difference in the frequency of adverse effects was found. Data show that BCG vaccination is safe and can protect the elderly against infections. Larger studies are needed to assess protection against respiratory infections, including COVID-19 (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03296423).


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/efeitos adversos , Vacina BCG/imunologia , Infecções Respiratórias/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Hospitalização , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infecções Respiratórias/imunologia , Viroses/imunologia , Viroses/prevenção & controle
12.
Vaccine ; 38(45): 7146-7155, 2020 10 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32943265

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has affected routine immunization globally. Impact will likely be higher in low and middle-income countries with limited healthcare resources and fragile health systems. We quantified the impact, spatial heterogeneity, and determinants for childhood immunizations of 48 million population affected in the Sindh province of Pakistan. METHODS: We extracted individual immunization records from real-time provincial Electronic Immunization Registry from September 23, 2019, to July 11, 2020. Comparing baseline (6 months preceding the lockdown) and the COVID-19 lockdown period, we analyzed the impact on daily immunization coverage rate for each antigen by geographical area. We used multivariable logistic regression to explore the predictors associated with immunizations during the lockdown. RESULTS: There was a 52.5% decline in the daily average total number of vaccinations administered during lockdown compared to baseline. The highest decline was seen for Bacille Cal-mette Guérin (BCG) (40.6% (958/2360) immunization at fixed sites. Around 8438 children/day were missing immunization during the lockdown. Enrollments declined furthest in rural districts, urban sub-districts with large slums, and polio-endemic super high-risk sub-districts. Pentavalent-3 (penta-3) immunization rates were higher in infants born in hospitals (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15) and those with mothers having higher education (RR: 1.19-1.50; 95% CI: 1.13-1.65). Likelihood of penta-3 immunization was reduced by 5% for each week of delayed enrollment into the immunization program. CONCLUSION: One out of every two children in Sindh province has missed their routine vaccinations during the provincial COVID-19 lockdown. The pool of un-immunized children is expanding during lockdown, leaving them susceptible to vaccine-preventable diseases. There is a need for tailored interventions to promote immunization visits and safe service delivery. Higher maternal education, facility-based births, and early enrollment into the immunization program continue to show a positive association with immunization uptake, even during a challenging lockdown.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Sarampo/prevenção & controle , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Quarentena , Infecções por Rotavirus/prevenção & controle , Tuberculose Pulmonar/prevenção & controle , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Processamento Eletrônico de Dados , Feminino , Humanos , Programas de Imunização/estatística & dados numéricos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Sarampo/epidemiologia , Sarampo/imunologia , Vacina contra Sarampo/administração & dosagem , Paquistão/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Sistema de Registros , Infecções por Rotavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rotavirus/imunologia , Vacinas contra Rotavirus/administração & dosagem , População Rural , Tuberculose Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Tuberculose Pulmonar/imunologia , População Urbana , Vacinação/psicologia , Cobertura Vacinal/estatística & dados numéricos , Vacinas Atenuadas/administração & dosagem
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 708, 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993546

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Intravesical administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proven useful for treatment and prevention of recurrence of superficial bladder cancer and in situ carcinoma. However, fatal side effects such as disseminated infections may occur. Early diagnosis and accurate therapy for interstitial pneumonitis (IP) are important because exacerbation of IP triggered by infections is the major cause of death. Although some fatality reports have suggested newly appeared IP after intravesical BCG treatment, to our knowledge, there are no reports which have demonstrated acute exacerbation of existing IP. Moreover, autopsy is lacking in previous reports. We report the case of a patient with fatal IP exacerbation after BCG instillation and the pathological findings of the autopsy. CASE PRESENTATION: A 77-year-old man with a medical history of IP was referred to our hospital because of fever and malaise. He had received an intravesical injection of BCG 1 day before the admission. His fever reduced after the use of antituberculosis drugs, so he was discharged home. He was referred to our hospital again because of a high fever 7 days after discharge. On hospitalisation, he showed high fever and systemic exanthema. Hepatosplenomegaly and myelosuppression were also observed. Biopsies revealed multiple epithelioid cell granulomas with Langhans giant cells of the liver and bone marrow. Biopsy DNA analyses of Mycobacterium bovis in the bone marrow, sputum, and blood were negative. His oxygen demand worsened drastically, and the ground-glass shadow expanded on the computed tomography scan. He was diagnosed with acute exacerbation of existing IP. We recommenced the antituberculosis drugs with steroid pulse therapy, but he died on day 35 because of respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed a diffuse appearance of multiple epithelioid cell granulomas with Langhans giant cells in multiple organs, although BCG was not evident. CONCLUSIONS: We report the first case of acute exacerbation of chronic IP by BCG infection. This is also the first case of autopsy of a patient with acute exacerbation of existing IP induced by intravesical BCG treatment. Whether the trigger of acute IP exacerbation is infection or hypersensitivity to BCG is still controversial, because pathological evidence confirming BCG infection is lacking. Physicians who administer BCG against bladder cancer should be vigilant for acute exacerbation of IP.


Assuntos
Antituberculosos/uso terapêutico , Vacina BCG/efeitos adversos , Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais/etiologia , Infecções por Mycobacterium não Tuberculosas/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Mycobacterium não Tuberculosas/etiologia , Esteroides/uso terapêutico , Exacerbação dos Sintomas , Administração Intravesical , Idoso , Autopsia , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/uso terapêutico , Carcinoma in Situ/tratamento farmacológico , Carcinoma in Situ/prevenção & controle , Evolução Fatal , Humanos , Doenças Pulmonares Intersticiais/microbiologia , Masculino , Infecções por Mycobacterium não Tuberculosas/diagnóstico , Mycobacterium bovis/genética , Resultados Negativos , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/tratamento farmacológico , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/prevenção & controle , Pulsoterapia , Resultado do Tratamento , Neoplasias da Bexiga Urinária/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias da Bexiga Urinária/prevenção & controle
14.
Pharmazie ; 75(8): 375-380, 2020 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32758336

RESUMO

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the major risk factors for COVID-19 complications as it is one of the chronic immune-compromising conditions especially if patients have uncontrolled diabetes, poor HbA1c and/or irregular blood glucose levels. Diabetic patients' mortality rates with COVID-19 are higher than those of cardiovascular or cancer patients. Recently, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has shown successful results in reversing diabetes in both rats and clinical trials based on different mechanisms from aerobic glycolysis to beta cells regeneration. BCG is a multi-face vaccine that has been used extensively in protection from tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy and has been repositioned for treatment of bladder cancer, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Recently, COVID-19 epidemiological studies confirmed that universal BCG vaccination reduced morbidity and mortality in certain geographical areas. Countries without universal policies of BCG vaccination (Italy, Nederland, USA) have been more severely affected compared to countries with universal and long-standing BCG policies that have shown low numbers of reported COVID-19 cases. Some countries have started clinical trials that included a single dose BCG vaccine as prophylaxis from COVID-19 or an attempt to minimize its side effects. This proposed research aims to use BCG vaccine as a double-edged weapon countering both COVID-19 and diabetes, not only as protection but also as therapeutic vaccination. The work includes a case study of regenerated pancreatic beta cells based on improved C-peptide and PCPRI laboratory findings after BCG vaccination for a 9 year old patient. The patient was re-vaccinated based on a negative tuberculin test and no scar at the site of injection of the 1st BCG vaccination at birth. The authors suggest and invite the scientific community to take into consideration the concept of direct BCG re-vaccination (after 4 weeks) because of the reported gene expressions and exaggerated innate immunity consequently. As the diabetic MODY-5 patient (mutation of HNF1B, Val2Leu) was on low dose Riomet® while eliminating insulin gradually, a simple analytical method for metformin assay was recommended to ensure its concentration before use as it is not approved yet by the Egyptian QC labs.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Diabetes Mellitus/imunologia , Células Secretoras de Insulina/citologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Animais , Vacina BCG/imunologia , Criança , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Ratos , Regeneração/imunologia , Fatores de Risco , Vacinação/métodos
16.
Lett Appl Microbiol ; 71(5): 498-505, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734625

RESUMO

The reported numbers of Covid-19 cases and deaths were compared for 18 countries (14 in Western Europe, plus Australia, Brazil, Israel and the USA) to assess the effect of historic and current national BCG immunizations. In view of the high death rate for Covid-19 patients over 70 years of age, and given the fact that BCG vaccination is typically given early in life, we compared countries that had introduced BCG in the 1950s with those that had not. No effect on Covid-19 case fatality rate (CFR) or number of deaths per population could be demonstrated. Since some countries test for Covid-19 more than others, the effect of tests performed per million population on reported deaths per million was also assessed, but again did not demonstrate an effect of BCG vaccination in the 1950s. Whether countries had never used the vaccine, had historically used it but since ceased to do so, or were presently vaccinating with BCG did not correlate with national total number of deaths or CFR. We conclude that there is currently no evidence for a beneficial effect of BCG vaccination on Covid-19 reported cases or fatalities.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Austrália/epidemiologia , Vacina BCG/imunologia , Brasil/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Vacinação
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32756371

RESUMO

Ecological studies have suggested fewer COVID-19 morbidities and mortalities in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated countries than BCG-non-vaccinated countries. However, these studies obtained data during the early phase of the pandemic and did not adjust for potential confounders, including PCR-test numbers per population (PCR-tests). Currently-more than four months after declaration of the pandemic-the BCG-hypothesis needs reexamining. An ecological study was conducted by obtaining data of 61 factors in 173 countries, including BCG vaccine coverage (%), using morbidity and mortality as outcomes, obtained from open resources. 'Urban population (%)' and 'insufficient physical activity (%)' in each country was positively associated with morbidity, but not mortality, after adjustment for PCR-tests. On the other hand, recent BCG vaccine coverage (%) was negatively associated with mortality, but not morbidity, even with adjustment for percentage of the population ≥ 60 years of age, morbidity, PCR-tests and other factors. The results of this study generated a hypothesis that a national BCG vaccination program seems to be associated with reduced mortality of COVID-19, although this needs to be further examined and proved by randomized clinical trials.


Assuntos
Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Projetos de Pesquisa , Vacinação/métodos
19.
Dermatol Online J ; 26(3)2020 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: New treatment options for warts include intralesional wart injection with agents such as vitamin D, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine antigen, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) antigen, and candida antigen but there have been limited studies to compare their efficacies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to compare the efficacy and safety of injectable agents used for the treatment of warts. METHODS: A PubMed search included terms "intralesional wart therapy," "wart injection" and "verruca injection." Articles reviewed were published over 10 years. RESULTS: A total of 43 articles were reviewed; 30 covered studies with more than 10 participants and 13 were case reports, case series, and reviews. In comparison studies intralesional agents have equal or superior efficacy (66%-94.9%) compared to first-line salicylic acid or cryotherapy (65.5-76.5%). One advantage of intralesional injections is the rate of complete resolution of distant warts. LIMITATIONS: Each study varied in their agents, treatment interval, and treatment dose, making comparisons difficult. CONCLUSIONS: Intralesional wart injections are safe, affordable, and efficacious treatments for warts. Physicians should consider intralesional injections for patients with refractory warts, multiple warts, or warts in sensitive areas.


Assuntos
Injeções Intralesionais , Verrugas/tratamento farmacológico , Ácido Aminolevulínico/administração & dosagem , Antibacterianos/administração & dosagem , Antivirais/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Vacinas Bacterianas/administração & dosagem , Humanos , Interferon-alfa/administração & dosagem , Mycobacterium , Tuberculina/administração & dosagem , Vitamina D/administração & dosagem
20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(30): 17720-17726, 2020 07 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32647056

RESUMO

A series of epidemiological explorations has suggested a negative association between national bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination policy and the prevalence and mortality of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, these comparisons are difficult to validate due to broad differences between countries such as socioeconomic status, demographic structure, rural vs. urban settings, time of arrival of the pandemic, number of diagnostic tests and criteria for testing, and national control strategies to limit the spread of COVID-19. We review evidence for a potential biological basis of BCG cross-protection from severe COVID-19, and refine the epidemiological analysis to mitigate effects of potentially confounding factors (e.g., stage of the COVID-19 epidemic, development, rurality, population density, and age structure). A strong correlation between the BCG index, an estimation of the degree of universal BCG vaccination deployment in a country, and COVID-19 mortality in different socially similar European countries was observed (r 2 = 0.88; P = 8 × 10-7), indicating that every 10% increase in the BCG index was associated with a 10.4% reduction in COVID-19 mortality. Results fail to confirm the null hypothesis of no association between BCG vaccination and COVID-19 mortality, and suggest that BCG could have a protective effect. Nevertheless, the analyses are restricted to coarse-scale signals and should be considered with caution. BCG vaccination clinical trials are required to corroborate the patterns detected here, and to establish causality between BCG vaccination and protection from severe COVID-19. Public health implications of a plausible BCG cross-protection from severe COVID-19 are discussed.


Assuntos
Adjuvantes Imunológicos/administração & dosagem , Vacina BCG/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus/imunologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Betacoronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Prognóstico , Taxa de Sobrevida , Vacinação
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA