Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 6.758
Filtrar
1.
Euro Surveill ; 26(11)2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33739256

RESUMO

Between weeks 40 2020 and 8 2021, the World Health Organization European Region experienced a 99.8% reduction in sentinel influenza virus positive detections (33/25,606 tested; 0.1%) relative to an average of 14,966/39,407 (38.0%; p < 0.001) over the same time in the previous six seasons. COVID-19 pandemic public health and physical distancing measures may have extinguished the 2020/21 European seasonal influenza epidemic with just a few sporadic detections of all viral subtypes. This might possibly continue during the remainder of the influenza season.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Influenza Humana/prevenção & controle , Pandemias , Estações do Ano , Organização Mundial da Saúde
2.
J Osteopath Med ; 121(2): 211-220, 2021 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33567082

RESUMO

Context: While the data generated by medical students at schools that require electronic patient encounter logs is primarily used to monitor their training progress, it can also be a great source of public health data. Specifically, it can be used for syndromic surveillance, a method used to analyze instantaneous health data for early detection of disease outbreaks. Objective: To analyze how the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes input by medical students at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine into the Clinical Rotation Evaluation and Documentation Organizer (CREDO) patient encounter logging system could act as a new syndromic surveillance tool. Methods: A CREDO database query was conducted for ICD-10 codes entered between November 1, 2019 and March 13, 2020 using the World Health Organization's 2011 revised case definitions for Influenza Like Illness (ILI). During that period, medical students had an approximated mean of 3,000 patient encounters per day from over 1,500 clinical sites. A cumulative sum technique was applied to the data to generate alert thresholds. Breast cancer, a disease with a stable incidence during the specified timeframe, was used as a control. Results: Total ILI daily ICD-10 counts that exceeded alert thresholds represented unusual levels of disease occurred 11 times from November 20, 2020 through February 28, 2020. This analysis is consistent with the COVID-19 pandemic timeline. The first statistically significant ILI increase occurred nine days prior to the first laboratory confirmed case in the country. Conclusion: Syndromic surveillance can be timelier than traditional surveillance methods, which require laboratory testing to confirm disease. As a result of this study, we are installing a real-time alert for ILI into CREDO, so rates can be monitored continuously as an indicator of possible future new infectious disease outbreaks.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Estágio Clínico , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Estudantes de Medicina , Surtos de Doenças , Feminino , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Classificação Internacional de Doenças , Masculino , Vigilância da População/métodos , Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4660, 2021 02 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33633250

RESUMO

Coronavirus SARS-COV-2 infections continue to spread across the world, yet effective large-scale disease detection and prediction remain limited. COVID Control: A Johns Hopkins University Study, is a novel syndromic surveillance approach, which collects body temperature and COVID-like illness (CLI) symptoms across the US using a smartphone app and applies spatio-temporal clustering techniques and cross-correlation analysis to create maps of abnormal symptomatology incidence that are made publicly available. The results of the cross-correlation analysis identify optimal temporal lags between symptoms and a range of COVID-19 outcomes, with new taste/smell loss showing the highest correlations. We also identified temporal clusters of change in taste/smell entries and confirmed COVID-19 incidence in Baltimore City and County. Further, we utilized an extended simulated dataset to showcase our analytics in Maryland. The resulting clusters can serve as indicators of emerging COVID-19 outbreaks, and support syndromic surveillance as an early warning system for disease prevention and control.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Aplicativos Móveis , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Ageusia/epidemiologia , Temperatura Corporal , Análise por Conglomerados , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Smartphone , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
5.
Appl Environ Microbiol ; 87(7)2021 03 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33483313

RESUMO

Two large wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), covering around 2.7 million inhabitants, which represents around 85% of the metropolitan area of Barcelona, were sampled before, during, and after the implementation of a complete lockdown. Five one-step reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assays, targeting the polymerase (IP2 and IP4), the envelope (E), and the nucleoprotein (N1 and N2) genome regions, were employed for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA detection in 24-h composite wastewater samples concentrated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in a sewage sample collected 41 days ahead of the declaration of the first COVID-19 case. The evolution of SARS-CoV-2 genome copies in wastewater evidenced the validity of water-based epidemiology (WBE) to anticipate COVID-19 outbreaks, to evaluate the impact of control measures, and even to estimate the burden of shedders, including presymptomatic, asymptomatic, symptomatic, and undiagnosed cases. For the latter objective, a model was applied for the estimation of the total number of shedders, evidencing a high proportion of asymptomatic infected individuals. In this way, an infection prevalence of 2.0 to 6.5% was figured. On the other hand, proportions of around 0.12% and 0.09% of the total population were determined to be required for positive detection in the two WWTPs. At the end of the lockdown, SARS-CoV-2 RNA apparently disappeared in the WWTPs but could still be detected in grab samples from four urban sewers. Sewer monitoring allowed for location of specific hot spots of COVID-19, enabling the rapid adoption of appropriate mitigation measures.IMPORTANCE Water-based epidemiology (WBE) is a valuable early warning tool for tracking the circulation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among the population, including not only symptomatic patients but also asymptomatic, presymptomatic, and misdiagnosed carriers, which represent a high proportion of the infected population. In the specific case of Barcelona, wastewater surveillance anticipated by several weeks not only the original COVID-19 pandemic wave but also the onset of the second wave. In addition, SARS-CoV-2 occurrence in wastewater evidenced the efficacy of the adopted lockdown measures on the circulation of the virus. Health authorities profited from WBE to complement other inputs and adopt rapid and adequate measures to mitigate the effects of the pandemic. For example, sentinel surveillance of specific sewers helped to locate COVID-19 hot spots and to conduct massive numbers of RT-PCR tests among the population.


Assuntos
/virologia , Evolução Molecular , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Águas Residuárias/virologia , Infecções Assintomáticas/epidemiologia , Cidades , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Prevalência , Espanha/epidemiologia , Eliminação de Partículas Virais , Instalações de Eliminação de Resíduos
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 52, 2021 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33430793

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Workplace absenteeism increases significantly during influenza epidemics. Sick leave records may facilitate more timely detection of influenza outbreaks, as trends in increased sick leave may precede alerts issued by sentinel surveillance systems by days or weeks. Sick leave data have not been comprehensively evaluated in comparison to traditional surveillance methods. The aim of this paper is to study the performance and the feasibility of using a detection system based on sick leave data to detect influenza outbreaks. METHODS: Sick leave records were extracted from private French health insurance data, covering on average 209,932 companies per year across a wide range of sizes and sectors. We used linear regression to estimate the weekly number of new sick leave spells between 2016 and 2017 in 12 French regions, adjusting for trend, seasonality and worker leaves on historical data from 2010 to 2015. Outbreaks were detected using a 95%-prediction interval. This method was compared to results from the French Sentinelles network, a gold-standard primary care surveillance system currently in place. RESULTS: Using sick leave data, we detected 92% of reported influenza outbreaks between 2016 and 2017, on average 5.88 weeks prior to outbreak peaks. Compared to the existing Sentinelles model, our method had high sensitivity (89%) and positive predictive value (86%), and detected outbreaks on average 2.5 weeks earlier. CONCLUSION: Sick leave surveillance could be a sensitive, specific and timely tool for detection of influenza outbreaks.


Assuntos
Absenteísmo , Epidemias , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Vigilância em Saúde Pública/métodos , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Licença Médica , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Influenza Humana/virologia , Seguro Saúde , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos Estatísticos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Local de Trabalho
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 31, 2021 Jan 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33413174

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa. However, a lack of epidemiological data remains for this pathology, and the performances of the influenza-like illness (ILI) case definitions used for sentinel surveillance have never been evaluated in Senegal. This study aimed to i) assess the performance of three different ILI case definitions, adopted by the WHO, USA-CDC (CDC) and European-CDC (ECDC) and ii) identify clinical factors associated with a positive diagnosis for Influenza in order to develop an algorithm fitted for the Senegalese context. METHODS: All 657 patients with a febrile pathological episode (FPE) between January 2013 and December 2016 were followed in a cohort study in two rural villages in Senegal, accounting for 1653 FPE observations with nasopharyngeal sampling and influenza virus screening by rRT-PCR. For each FPE, general characteristics and clinical signs presented by patients were collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV) and Negative Predictive Value (NPV) for the three ILI case definitions were assessed using PCR result as the reference test. Associations between clinical signs and influenza infection were analyzed using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Sore throat, arthralgia or myalgia were missing for children under 5 years. RESULTS: WHO, CDC and ECDC case definitions had similar sensitivity (81.0%; 95%CI: 77.0-85.0) and NPV (91.0%; 95%CI: 89.0-93.1) while the WHO and CDC ILI case definitions had the highest specificity (52.0%; 95%CI: 49.1-54.5) and PPV (32.0%; 95%CI: 30.0-35.0). These performances varied by age groups. In children < 5 years, the significant predictors of influenza virus infection were cough and nasal discharge. In patients from 5 years, cough, nasal discharge, sore throat and asthenia grade 3 best predicted influenza infection. The addition of "nasal discharge" as a symptom to the WHO case definition decreased sensitivity but increased specificity, particularly in the pediatric population. CONCLUSION: In summary, all three definitions studies (WHO, ECDC & CDC) have similar performance, even by age group. The revised WHO ILI definition could be chosen for surveillance purposes for its simplicity. Symptomatic predictors of influenza virus infection vary according the age group.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/etiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Tosse/etiologia , Tosse/virologia , Feminino , Febre/etiologia , Febre/virologia , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nasofaringe/virologia , Faringite/complicações , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Senegal/epidemiologia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Estados Unidos , Organização Mundial da Saúde , Adulto Jovem
9.
Porto Alegre; CEVS/RS; 26 fev. 2021. 1-30 p. ilus., graf., tab., mapas.
Monografia em Português | Coleciona SUS, CONASS, SES-RS | ID: biblio-1148323

RESUMO

Neste boletim são apresentados: situação mundial, ocorrência de hospitalizações confirmadas para sars-cov-2, perfil das pessoas, distribuição espacial, Síndrome Inflamatória Multissistêmica Pediátrica (SIM-P), povos indígenas, descrição de surtos, trabalhadores da saúde, Vigilância sentinela de síndrome gripal e tabelas de descrição do surto. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Gravidez , Recém-Nascido , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Perfil de Saúde , Surtos de Doenças/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Hospitalar/etnologia , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Saúde de Populações Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Betacoronavirus
10.
Porto Alegre; CEVS/RS; 28 jan. 2021. 1-28 p. ilus., graf., tab., mapas.
Monografia em Português | Coleciona SUS, CONASS, SES-RS | ID: biblio-1148332

RESUMO

Neste boletim são apresentados: situação mundial, ocorrência de hospitalizações confirmadas para sars-cov-2, perfil das pessoas, distribuição espacial, Síndrome Inflamatória Multissistêmica Pediátrica (SIM-P), povos indígenas, descrição de surtos, trabalhadores da saúde, Vigilância sentinela de síndrome gripal e tabelas de descrição do surto. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Gravidez , Recém-Nascido , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Perfil de Saúde , Surtos de Doenças/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Hospitalar/etnologia , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Saúde de Populações Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Betacoronavirus , Inflamação/virologia
11.
Porto Alegre; CEVS/RS; 14 jan. 2021. 1-30 p. ilus., graf., tab., mapas.
Monografia em Português | Coleciona SUS, CONASS, SES-RS | ID: biblio-1148336

RESUMO

Neste boletim são apresentados: situação mundial, ocorrência de hospitalizações confirmadas para sars-cov-2, perfil das pessoas, distribuição espacial, Síndrome Inflamatória Multissistêmica Pediátrica (SIM-P), povos indígenas, descrição de surtos, trabalhadores da saúde, Vigilância sentinela de síndrome gripal e tabelas de descrição do surto. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Gravidez , Recém-Nascido , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Perfil de Saúde , Surtos de Doenças/estatística & dados numéricos , Mortalidade Hospitalar/etnologia , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Populacionais/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Saúde de Populações Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Betacoronavirus , Inflamação/virologia
12.
Porto Alegre; CEVS/RS; 26 mar. 2021. 1-33 p. ilus., graf., tab., mapas.
Monografia em Português | Coleciona SUS, CONASS, SES-RS | ID: biblio-1151664
13.
J Biomed Inform ; 113: 103660, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33321199

RESUMO

Coronavirus Disease 2019 has emerged as a significant global concern, triggering harsh public health restrictions in a successful bid to curb its exponential growth. As discussion shifts towards relaxation of these restrictions, there is significant concern of second-wave resurgence. The key to managing these outbreaks is early detection and intervention, and yet there is a significant lag time associated with usage of laboratory confirmed cases for surveillance purposes. To address this, syndromic surveillance can be considered to provide a timelier alternative for first-line screening. Existing syndromic surveillance solutions are however typically focused around a known disease and have limited capability to distinguish between outbreaks of individual diseases sharing similar syndromes. This poses a challenge for surveillance of COVID-19 as its active periods tend to overlap temporally with other influenza-like illnesses. In this study we explore performing sentinel syndromic surveillance for COVID-19 and other influenza-like illnesses using a deep learning-based approach. Our methods are based on aberration detection utilizing autoencoders that leverages symptom prevalence distributions to distinguish outbreaks of two ongoing diseases that share similar syndromes, even if they occur concurrently. We first demonstrate that this approach works for detection of outbreaks of influenza, which has known temporal boundaries. We then demonstrate that the autoencoder can be trained to not alert on known and well-managed influenza-like illnesses such as the common cold and influenza. Finally, we applied our approach to 2019-2020 data in the context of a COVID-19 syndromic surveillance task to demonstrate how implementation of such a system could have provided early warning of an outbreak of a novel influenza-like illness that did not match the symptom prevalence profile of influenza and other known influenza-like illnesses.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , /virologia , Aprendizado Profundo , Surtos de Doenças , Humanos , /isolamento & purificação
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(12): e2031349, 2020 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33369661

RESUMO

Importance: Active surveillance (AS) is now recognized as the preferred management option for most low-risk prostate cancers to minimize risks of overtreatment. Despite increasing use of AS in the US, wide regional variability has been observed, and these regional variations in contemporary practice have not been well described. Objective: To explore variations between county and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) regions in AS in the US. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cohort study using the SEER Prostate with Watchful Waiting (WW) database linked to the County Area Health Resource File for detailed county-level demographics and physician distribution data was conducted from January 2010 to December 2015. Analysis was performed in October 2020. A total of 79 825 men with clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer eligible for AS or WW were included. Exposures: Multiple patient-, county-, and SEER region-level factors, including age, year of diagnosis, county-level densities of urologists, radiation oncologists, primary care physicians, and SEER registry region. Main Outcomes and Measures: Use of AS or WW as the initial reported treatment strategy were noted. Hierarchical mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to evaluate clustered random regional variation on use of AS or WW. Temporal trends by year in proportions of initial treatment type, as well as county-level local variation, were also estimated. Results: Of 79 825 men (mean [SD] age, 62.8 [7.6] years, 11 292 [14.1%] non-Hispanic Black, 7506 [9.4%] Hispanic) with low-risk prostate cancer, the mean annualized percent increase in AS rates from 2010 to 2015 ranged from 6.3% in New Mexico to 81.0% in New Jersey. Differences across SEER regions accounted for 17% of the total variation in AS. Increasing age (51-60 years: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% CI, 1.21-1.46; 61-70 years: OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.70-2.04; 71-80 years: OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 2.05-2.50) was associated with greater odds of AS. Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.74-0.85), T category (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.73-0.84), and Medicaid enrollment (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.66-0.81) were associated with lower odds of AS. Black race, county-level socioeconomic factors (household income, educational level, and city type), and specialist densities were not associated with AS use. Conclusions and Relevance: In this US cohort study based on the SEER-WW database, although the use of AS increased, considerable practice variation appeared to be associated with geographic location, but use of AS was not associated with Black race, specialty professional density, or socioeconomic factors. This small area variation underlies the broader national trends in AS practice and may inform policies aimed at continuing to affect risk-appropriate care for men throughout the US.


Assuntos
Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias da Próstata/terapia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Conduta Expectante/estatística & dados numéricos , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Grupos Étnicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Geografia , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Razão de Chances , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias da Próstata/etnologia , Fatores de Risco , Programa de SEER , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos
15.
East Mediterr Health J ; 26(12): 1570-1575, 2020 Dec 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33355398

RESUMO

Background: During the 2019 Hajj, the Ministry of Health in Saudi Arabia implemented for the first time a health early warning system for rapid detection and response to health threats. Aims: This study aimed to describe the early warning findings at the Hajj to highlight the pattern of health risks and the potential benefits of the disease surveillance system. Methods: Using syndromic surveillance and event-based surveillance data, the health early warning system generated automated alarms for public health events, triggered alerts for rapid epidemiological investigations and facilitated the monitoring of health events. Results: During the deployment period (4 July-31 August 2019), a total of 121 automated alarms were generated, of which 2 events (heat-related illnesses and injuries/trauma) were confirmed by the response teams. Conclusion: The surveillance system potentially improved the timeliness and situational awareness for health events, including non-infectious threats. In the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, a health early warning system could enhance case detection and facilitate monitoring of the disease geographical spread and the effectiveness of control measures.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Islamismo , Administração em Saúde Pública/métodos , Vigilância em Saúde Pública/métodos , Aglomeração , Planejamento em Saúde/organização & administração , Humanos , Comportamento de Massa , Região do Mediterrâneo/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Arábia Saudita/epidemiologia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Viagem
17.
Brasília, D.F.; OPAS; 2020-11-05. (OPAS-W/BRA/PHE/COVID-19/20-140).
em Português | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-52985

RESUMO

A vigilância sentinela para COVID-19 ajuda no cumprimento de alguns dos objetivos da vigilância geral para COVID-19, delineados no documento Surveillance strategies for COVID-19 human infection document, [Estratégias de vigilância para infecção humana pela COVID-19], e complementa a vigilância e as investigações de surtos. A vigilância sentinela é uma forma eficiente de coletar dados de alta qualidade e oportunos, de forma sistemática e rotineira, de representantes da população que estejam sob vigilância, para que as informações coletadas possam ser aplicadas à população ou entre subpopulações com maior risco de desenvolver quadro grave da doença. A vigilância sentinela para COVID-19 usando o GISRS complementa as atividades de vigilância da COVID-19 no contexto da resposta à pandemia, e configura um método eficiente e custo-efetivo, na medida em que utiliza os sistemas nacionais e subnacionais já existentes de vigilância da influenza.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus , Vigilância , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Pandemias , Gestão de Recursos da Equipe de Assistência à Saúde , Surtos de Doenças
18.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239886, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33006990

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Syndromic surveillance through web or phone-based polling has been used to track the course of infectious diseases worldwide. Our study objective was to describe the characteristics, symptoms, and self-reported testing rates of respondents in three different COVID-19 symptom surveys in Canada. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using three distinct Canada-wide web-based surveys, and phone polling in Ontario. All three sources contained self-reported information on COVID-19 symptoms and testing. In addition to describing respondent characteristics, we examined symptom frequency and the testing rate among the symptomatic, as well as rates of symptoms and testing across respondent groups. RESULTS: We found that over March- April 2020, 1.6% of respondents experienced a symptom on the day of their survey, 15% of Ontario households had a symptom in the previous week, and 44% of Canada-wide respondents had a symptom in the previous month. Across the three surveys, SARS-CoV-2-testing was reported in 2-9% of symptomatic responses. Women, younger and middle-aged adults (versus older adults) and Indigenous/First nations/Inuit/Métis were more likely to report at least one symptom, and visible minorities were more likely to report the combination of fever with cough or shortness of breath. INTERPRETATION: The low rate of testing among those reporting symptoms suggests significant opportunity to expand testing among community-dwelling residents of Canada. Syndromic surveillance data can supplement public health reports and provide much-needed context to gauge the adequacy of SARS-CoV-2 testing rates.


Assuntos
Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Autorrelato/estatística & dados numéricos , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , Adulto , Idoso , Canadá/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Prevalência , Telefone
19.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(10): e0008758, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33001985

RESUMO

SYNOPSIS: Early identification of the emergence of an outbreak of a novel infectious disease is critical to generating a timely response. The traditional monitoring system is adequate for detecting the outbreak of common diseases; however, it is insufficient for the discovery of novel infectious diseases. In this study, we used COVID-19 as an example to compare the delay time of different tools for identifying disease outbreaks. The results showed that both the abnormal spike in influenza-like illnesses and the peak of online searches of key terms could provide early signals. We emphasize the importance of testing these findings and discussing the broader potential to use syndromic surveillance, internet searches, and social media data together with traditional disease surveillance systems for early detection and understanding of novel emerging infectious diseases.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Notificação de Doenças/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Vigilância de Evento Sentinela , China/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Humanos , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Mídias Sociais
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...