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1.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(11): 562-566, 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33161739

RESUMO

In December 2019, a new species of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was identified in a number of patients presenting with pneumonias of unknown aetiology in WuHan Province, China. Early epidemiological indications were of a zoonotic origin: many of the initial patients confirmed contact with a local wet market and the genomic sequencing showed similar characteristics with coronaviruses known to be carried by bats. The theory of subsequent human to human transmission became evident once global epidemiological reporting of COVID infection was established. Confirmation of the origins of infections caused by SARS-CoV-2 was enabled by the early sharing of the initial genomic sequence by China in January 2020 and since developed collaboratively on a globally accessible database, supported by the World Health Organization (https://tinyurl.com/rj32fp3).


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Evolução Biológica , Infecções por Coronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Genômica , Pneumonia Viral/genética , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/genética , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
2.
Virol J ; 17(1): 143, 2020 10 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008410

RESUMO

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced Corona Virus Disease (COVID-19), a disease caused by a pathogen called Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a pandemic. This ongoing pandemic has now been reported in 215 countries with more than 23 million confirmed cases and more than 803 thousand deaths worldwide as of August 22, 2020. Although efforts are undergoing, there is no approved vaccine or any specific antiretroviral drug to treat COVID-19 so far. It is now known that SARS-CoV-2 can affect not only humans but also pets and other domestic and wild animals, making it a one health global problem. Several published scientific evidence has shown that bats are the initial reservoir hosts of SARS-CoV-2, and pangolins are suggested as an intermediate hosts. So far, little is known concerning the role of pets and other animals in the transmission of COVID-19. Therefore, updated knowledge about the potential role of pets in the current outbreak will be of paramount importance for effective prevention and control of the disease. This review summarized the current evidence about the role of pets and other animals in the transmission of COVID-19.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Animais Domésticos/virologia , Animais Selvagens/virologia , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Zoonoses/virologia
3.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 9(1): 140, 2020 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33028426

RESUMO

Most human pathogens originate from non-human hosts and certain pathogens persist in animal reservoirs. The transmission of such pathogens to humans may lead to self-sustaining chains of transmission. These pathogens represent the highest risk for future pandemics. For their prevention, the transmission over the species barrier - although rare - should, by all means, be avoided. In the current COVID-19 pandemic, surprisingly though, most of the current research concentrates on the control by drugs and vaccines, while comparatively little scientific inquiry focuses on future prevention. Already in 2012, the World Bank recommended to engage in a systemic One Health approach for zoonoses control, considering integrated surveillance-response and control of human and animal diseases for primarily economic reasons. First examples, like integrated West Nile virus surveillance in mosquitos, wild birds, horses and humans in Italy show evidence of financial savings from a closer cooperation of human and animal health sectors. Provided a zoonotic origin can be ascertained for the COVID-19 pandemic, integrated wildlife, domestic animal and humans disease surveillance-response may contribute to prevent future outbreaks. In conclusion, the earlier a zoonotic pathogen can be detected in the environment, in wildlife or in domestic animals; and the better human, animal and environmental surveillance communicate with each other to prevent an outbreak, the lower are the cumulative costs.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Doenças dos Animais/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Animais/prevenção & controle , Doenças dos Animais/transmissão , Animais , Betacoronavirus , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Monitoramento Epidemiológico/veterinária , Humanos , Itália/epidemiologia , Saúde Única , Pandemias/economia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
4.
Trop Doct ; 50(4): 285-291, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32998656

RESUMO

Although human toxocariasis can lead to serious complications including neurological, ocular and visceral complications, there is a lack of comprehensive epidemiological information about the seroprevalence of Toxocara species in humans. In the present study, we analysed and reviewed the overall seroprevalence of human toxocariasis in Iran. The data collection was systematically undertaken on published articles using the PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and Scopus databases. A total of 27 studies from the past two decades reporting seroprevalence of human toxocariasis met our eligibility criteria. The pooled proportion of Toxocara infection was estimated as 6.58% (95% confidence interval = 3.98-9.77). A wide variation between different studies was observed (Q statistic = 799.37, df = 26, P < 0.0001, and I2 = 96.7%). The seroprevalence rate of toxocariasis in the Iranian population is relatively high; contamination of the environment by eggs from the host as well as from household dogs and cats should be blamed.


Assuntos
Larva Migrans Visceral/epidemiologia , Larva Migrans Visceral/transmissão , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Gatos , Cães , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Larva Migrans Visceral/parasitologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Toxocara/imunologia , Toxocara/isolamento & purificação , Toxocaríase/epidemiologia , Toxocaríase/parasitologia , Toxocaríase/transmissão , Zoonoses/parasitologia
5.
Viruses ; 12(11)2020 10 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33105685

RESUMO

The origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic has not yet been fully determined. Despite the consensus about the SARS-CoV-2 origin from bat CoV RaTG13, discrepancy to host tropism to other human Coronaviruses exist. SARS-CoV-2 also possesses some differences in its S protein receptor-binding domain, glycan-binding N-terminal domain and the surface of the sialic acid-binding domain. Despite similarities based on cryo-EM and biochemical studies, the SARS-CoV-2 shows higher stability and binding affinity to the ACE2 receptor. The SARS-CoV-2 does not appear to present a mutational "hot spot" as only the D614G mutation has been identified from clinical isolates. As laboratory manipulation is highly unlikely for the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the current possibilities comprise either natural selection in animal host before zoonotic transfer or natural selection in humans following zoonotic transfer. In the former case, despite SARS-CoV-2 and bat RaTG13 showing 96% identity some pangolin Coronaviruses exhibit very high similarity to particularly the receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV-2. In the latter case, it can be hypothesized that the SARS-CoV-2 genome has adapted during human-to-human transmission and based on available data, the isolated SARS-CoV-2 genomes derive from a common origin. Before the origin of SARS-CoV-2 can be confirmed additional research is required.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Genoma Viral , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Animais , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Genoma Viral/genética , Humanos , Mutação , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Domínios Proteicos , Seleção Genética , Proteínas Virais/química , Proteínas Virais/genética , Zoonoses/transmissão , Zoonoses/virologia
6.
mBio ; 11(5)2020 10 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33051368

RESUMO

Despite numerous barriers to transmission, zoonoses are the major cause of emerging infectious diseases in humans. Among these, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and ebolaviruses have killed thousands; the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has killed millions. Zoonoses and human-to-animal cross-species transmission are driven by human actions and have important management, conservation, and public health implications. The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, which presumably originated from an animal reservoir, has killed more than half a million people around the world and cases continue to rise. In March 2020, New York City was a global epicenter for SARS-CoV-2 infections. During this time, four tigers and three lions at the Bronx Zoo, NY, developed mild, abnormal respiratory signs. We detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in respiratory secretions and/or feces from all seven animals, live virus in three, and colocalized viral RNA with cellular damage in one. We produced nine whole SARS-CoV-2 genomes from the animals and keepers and identified different SARS-CoV-2 genotypes in the tigers and lions. Epidemiologic and genomic data indicated human-to-tiger transmission. These were the first confirmed cases of natural SARS-CoV-2 animal infections in the United States and the first in nondomestic species in the world. We highlight disease transmission at a nontraditional interface and provide information that contributes to understanding SARS-CoV-2 transmission across species.IMPORTANCE The human-animal-environment interface of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an important aspect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that requires robust One Health-based investigations. Despite this, few reports describe natural infections in animals or directly link them to human infections using genomic data. In the present study, we describe the first cases of natural SARS-CoV-2 infection in tigers and lions in the United States and provide epidemiological and genetic evidence for human-to-animal transmission of the virus. Our data show that tigers and lions were infected with different genotypes of SARS-CoV-2, indicating two independent transmission events to the animals. Importantly, infected animals shed infectious virus in respiratory secretions and feces. A better understanding of the susceptibility of animal species to SARS-CoV-2 may help to elucidate transmission mechanisms and identify potential reservoirs and sources of infection that are important in both animal and human health.


Assuntos
Animais de Zoológico/virologia , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Panthera/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Genoma Viral/genética , Haplótipos , Humanos , Cidade de Nova Iorque/epidemiologia , Saúde Única , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Zoonoses/virologia
7.
Mol Biol Evol ; 37(9): 2463-2464, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32893295

RESUMO

Identifying the origin of SARS-CoV-2, the etiological agent of the current COVID-19 pandemic, may help us to avoid future epidemics of coronavirus and other zoonoses. Several theories about the zoonotic origin of SARS-CoV-2 have recently been proposed. Although Betacoronavirus found in Rhinolophus bats from China have been broadly implicated, their genetic dissimilarity to SARS-CoV-2 is so high that they are highly unlikely to be its direct ancestors. Thus, an intermediary host is suspected to link bat to human coronaviruses. Based on genomic CpG dinucleotide patterns in different coronaviruses from different hosts, it was suggested that SARS-CoV-2 might have evolved in a canid gastrointestinal tract prior to transmission to humans. However, similar CpG patterns are now reported in coronaviruses from other hosts, including bats themselves and pangolins. Therefore, reduced genomic CpG alone is not a highly predictive biomarker, suggesting a need for additional biomarkers to reveal intermediate hosts or tissues. The hunt for the zoonotic origin of SARS-CoV-2 continues.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Genoma Viral , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Proteínas Virais/genética , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Ilhas de CpG , Eutérios/virologia , Evolução Molecular , Expressão Gênica , Mutação , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Vírus Reordenados/classificação , Vírus Reordenados/genética , Vírus Reordenados/patogenicidade , Recombinação Genética , Proteínas Virais/metabolismo , Zoonoses/transmissão , Zoonoses/virologia
8.
Vet Res Commun ; 44(3-4): 119-130, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32926266

RESUMO

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are known to infect both humans and animals. However, the evidence of inter-transmission of coronavirus between humans and companion animals is still a debatable issue. There is substantial evidence that the virus outbreak is fueled by zoonotic transmission because this new virus belongs to the same family of viruses as SARS-CoV associated with civet cats, and MERS-CoV associated with dromedary camels. While the whole world is investigating the possibility about the transmission of this virus, the transmission among humans is established, but the interface between humans and animals is not much evident. Not only are the lives of human beings at risk, but there is an equal potential threat to the animal world. With multiple reports claiming about much possibility of transmission of COVID-19 from humans to animals, there has been a significant increase in the number of pets being abandoned by their owners. Additionally, the risk of reverse transmission of COVID-19 virus from companion pets like cats and dogs at home is yet another area of concern. The present article highlights different evidence of human-animal interface and necessitates the precautionary measures required to combat with the consequences of this interface. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have suggested various ways to promote awareness and corroborate practices for helping people as well as animals to stay secure and healthy.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Gatos/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Cães/virologia , Furões/virologia , Humanos , Pandemias/veterinária , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Aves Domésticas/virologia , Suínos/virologia , Zoonoses/virologia
9.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0239599, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32986741

RESUMO

The harvest of bushmeat is widespread in the tropics and sub-tropics. Often in these communities, there is a dependence on bushmeat for both food security and basic income. Despite the importance of bushmeat for households worldwide, the practice raises concern for transmission of zoonotic pathogens through hunting, food preparation, and consumption. In Uganda, harvest of wildlife is illegal, but bushmeat hunting, is commonplace. We interviewed 292 women who cook for their households and 180 self-identified hunters from 21 villages bordering Murchison Falls National Park in Uganda to gain insights into bushmeat preferences, opportunity for zoonotic pathogen transmission, and awareness of common wildlife-associated zoonoses. Both hunters and women who cook considered primates to be the most likely wildlife species to carry diseases humans can catch. Among common zoonotic pathogens, the greatest proportions of women who cook and hunters believed that pathogens causing stomach ache or diarrhea and monkeypox can be transmitted by wildlife. Neither women who cook nor hunters report being frequently injury during cooking, butchering, or hunting, and few report taking precautions while handling bushmeat. The majority of women who cook believe that hunters and dealers never or rarely disguise primate meat as another kind of meat in market, while the majority of hunters report that they usually disguise primate meat as another kind of meat. These data play a crucial role in our understanding of potential for exposure to and infection with zoonotic pathogens in the bushmeat trade. Expanding our knowledge of awareness, perceptions and risks enables us to identify opportunities to mitigate infections and injury risk and promote safe handling practices.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Saúde , Conscientização , Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos/microbiologia , Carne/microbiologia , Zoonoses/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Culinária , Feminino , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos/epidemiologia , Humanos , Renda , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Parques Recreativos , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Uganda/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
10.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 2222-2235, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967592

RESUMO

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are enveloped, positive sense, single-stranded RNA viruses. The viruses have adapted to infect a large number of animal species, ranging from bats to camels. At present, seven CoVs infect humans, of which Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for causing the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in humans. Since its emergence in late 2019, SARS-CoV-2 has spread rapidly across the globe. Healthcare systems around the globe have been stretched beyond their limits posing new challenges to emergency healthcare services and critical care. The outbreak continues to jeopardize human health, social life and economy. All known human CoVs have zoonotic origins. Recent detection of SARS-CoV-2 in pet, zoo and certain farm animals has highlighted its potential for reverse zoonosis. This scenario is particularly alarming, since these animals could be potential reservoirs for secondary zoonotic infections. In this article, we highlight interspecies SARS-CoV-2 infections and focus on the reverse zoonotic potential of this virus. We also emphasize the importance of potential secondary zoonotic events and the One-Health and One-World approach to tackle such future pandemics.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Zoonoses/virologia , Animais , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Camelus/virologia , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
11.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 358, 2020 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957995

RESUMO

COVID-19 caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) originated in Wuhan (Hubei province, China) during late 2019. It has spread across the globe affecting nearly 21 million people with a toll of 0.75 million deaths and restricting the movement of most of the world population during the past 6 months. COVID-19 became the leading health, economic, and humanitarian challenge of the twenty-first century. In addition to the considerable COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in humans, several cases of SARS-CoV-2 infections in animal hosts (dog, cat, tiger, lion, and mink) have been reported. Thus, the concern of pet owners is increasing. Moreover, the dynamics of the disease requires further explanation, mainly concerning the transmission of the virus from humans to animals and vice versa. Therefore, this study aimed to gather information about the reported cases of COVID-19 transmission in animals through a literary review of works published in scientific journals and perform genomic and phylogenetic analyses of SARS-CoV-2 isolated from animal hosts. Although many instances of transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 have been reported, caution and further studies are necessary to avoid the occurrence of maltreatment in animals, and to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of the disease in the environment, humans, and animals. Future research in the animal-human interface can help formulate and implement preventive measures to combat the further transmission of COVID-19.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Zoonoses/transmissão , Criação de Animais Domésticos , Animais , Betacoronavirus/classificação , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Gatos , Coronavirus/classificação , Coronavirus/genética , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Cães , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Vison/virologia , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Exposição Ocupacional , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Filogenia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/genética , Pesquisa Médica Translacional , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
12.
Rev Esp Salud Publica ; 942020 Sep 30.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32994390

RESUMO

In the midst of the SARS-CoV-2 public-health pandemic emergency, it is important to understand its zoonotic origin and how an animal virus finally infects humans. Identifying the circumstances in which a virus jumps species boundaries to infect humans so productively is objective of this work and will help us to determine the epidemiology and pathogenisis of this agent. Nowadays, it is known that bats serve as reservoir hosts for virus progenitor, but determine the possibility of a potential intermediate host of SARS-CoV-2 is still a challenge. Scientific investigations stablish the natural selection theory as the most probable (natural selection in an animal host before zoonotic transfer or acquired mutations in humans following crossing species barrier). It is necessary to find out how SARS-CoV-2 emerged, its rapidly spreads within a community and the optimal context in which this virus binds to human receptor. One Health is a multisectoral, collaborative and transdisciplinary approach which allows a cooperative working between animal and human health that will help us to introduce some possible control measures that might reduce the spread of the virus; improving sanitary management, identifying new outbreaks and preventing future zoonotic and pandemic events.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Quirópteros/virologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Betacoronavirus/genética , Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Saúde Global , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Seleção Genética , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/virologia
13.
Vet Microbiol ; 247: 108777, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32768223

RESUMO

Coronaviruses (CoVs) cause disease in a range of agricultural and companion animal species, and can be important causes of zoonotic infections. In humans, several coronaviruses circulate seasonally. Recently, a novel zoonotic CoV named SARS-CoV-2 emerged from a bat reservoir, resulting in the COVID-19 pandemic. With a focus on felines, we review here the evidence for SARS-CoV-2 infection in cats, ferrets and dogs, describe the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 and the natural coronaviruses known to infect these species, and provide a rationale for the relative susceptibility of these species to SARS-CoV-2 through comparative analysis of the ACE-2 receptor.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/virologia , Evolução Molecular , Pandemias/veterinária , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Betacoronavirus , Gatos/virologia , Cães/virologia , Furões/virologia , Humanos , Peptidil Dipeptidase A/metabolismo , Receptores Virais/genética , Zoonoses/virologia
15.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237129, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32776964

RESUMO

Outbreaks of emerging coronaviruses in the past two decades and the current pandemic of a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that emerged in China highlight the importance of this viral family as a zoonotic public health threat. To gain a better understanding of coronavirus presence and diversity in wildlife at wildlife-human interfaces in three southern provinces in Viet Nam 2013-2014, we used consensus Polymerase Chain Reactions to detect coronavirus sequences. In comparison to previous studies, we observed high proportions of positive samples among field rats (34.0%, 239/702) destined for human consumption and insectivorous bats in guano farms (74.8%, 234/313) adjacent to human dwellings. Most notably among field rats, the odds of coronavirus RNA detection significantly increased along the supply chain from field rats sold by traders (reference group; 20.7% positivity, 39/188) by a factor of 2.2 for field rats sold in large markets (32.0%, 116/363) and 10.0 for field rats sold and served in restaurants (55.6%, 84/151). Coronaviruses were also detected in rodents on the majority of wildlife farms sampled (60.7%, 17/28). These coronaviruses were found in the Malayan porcupines (6.0%, 20/331) and bamboo rats (6.3%, 6/96) that are raised on wildlife farms for human consumption as food. We identified six known coronaviruses in bats and rodents, clustered in three Coronaviridae genera, including the Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammacoronaviruses. Our analysis also suggested either mixing of animal excreta in the environment or interspecies transmission of coronaviruses, as both bat and avian coronaviruses were detected in rodent feces on wildlife farms. The mixing of multiple coronaviruses, and their apparent amplification along the wildlife supply chain into restaurants, suggests maximal risk for end consumers and likely underpins the mechanisms of zoonotic spillover to people.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Coronavirus/genética , Carne/virologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Quirópteros/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Fezes/virologia , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Humanos , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , Porcos-Espinhos/virologia , RNA Viral/genética , Ratos , Risco , Vietnã/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/diagnóstico , Zoonoses/virologia
16.
Geroscience ; 42(5): 1229-1236, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32766998

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious infectious disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). From the epidemiological data, the picture emerges that the more severe etiopathologies among COVID-19 patients are found in elderly people. The risk of death due to COVID-19 increases exponentially with age. Eight out of 10 COVID-19 related deaths occur in people older than 65 years of age. Older patients with comorbid conditions such as hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer have a much higher case fatality rate. Governments and public health authorities all over the world have realized that protections of vulnerable older adults should be a priority during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 is a zoonotic disease. The SARS-CoV-2 virus was originally transmitted likely from a bat or a pangolin to humans. Recent evidence suggests that SARS-CoV-2, similar to other coronaviruses, can infect several species of animals, including companion animals such as dogs, cats, and ferrets although their viral loads remain low. While the main source of infection transmission therefore is human to human, there are a few rare cases of pets contracting the infection from a SARS-CoV-2-infected human. Although there is no evidence that pets actively transmit SARS-CoV-2 via animal-to-human transmission, senior pet ownership potentially may pose a small risk to older adults by (1) potentially enabling animal-to-human transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in the most vulnerable population and (2) by increasing the exposition risk for the elderly due to the necessity to care for the pet and, in the case of dogs, to take them outside the house several times per day. In this overview, the available evidence on SARS-CoV-2 infection in pets is considered and the potential for spread of COVID-19 from companion animals to older individuals and the importance of prevention are discussed.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
17.
Nature ; 584(7821): 398-402, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32759999

RESUMO

Land use change-for example, the conversion of natural habitats to agricultural or urban ecosystems-is widely recognized to influence the risk and emergence of zoonotic disease in humans1,2. However, whether such changes in risk are underpinned by predictable ecological changes remains unclear. It has been suggested that habitat disturbance might cause predictable changes in the local diversity and taxonomic composition of potential reservoir hosts, owing to systematic, trait-mediated differences in species resilience to human pressures3,4. Here we analyse 6,801 ecological assemblages and 376 host species worldwide, controlling for research effort, and show that land use has global and systematic effects on local zoonotic host communities. Known wildlife hosts of human-shared pathogens and parasites overall comprise a greater proportion of local species richness (18-72% higher) and total abundance (21-144% higher) in sites under substantial human use (secondary, agricultural and urban ecosystems) compared with nearby undisturbed habitats. The magnitude of this effect varies taxonomically and is strongest for rodent, bat and passerine bird zoonotic host species, which may be one factor that underpins the global importance of these taxa as zoonotic reservoirs. We further show that mammal species that harbour more pathogens overall (either human-shared or non-human-shared) are more likely to occur in human-managed ecosystems, suggesting that these trends may be mediated by ecological or life-history traits that influence both host status and tolerance to human disturbance5,6. Our results suggest that global changes in the mode and the intensity of land use are creating expanding hazardous interfaces between people, livestock and wildlife reservoirs of zoonotic disease.


Assuntos
Biodiversidade , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/virologia , Animais , Aves/microbiologia , Aves/parasitologia , Aves/virologia , Humanos , Mamíferos/microbiologia , Mamíferos/parasitologia , Mamíferos/virologia , Especificidade da Espécie , Zoonoses/transmissão
18.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237780, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845922

RESUMO

Modeling the behavior of zoonotic pandemic threats is a key component of their control. Many emerging zoonoses, such as SARS, Nipah, and Hendra, mutated from their wild type while circulating in an intermediate host population, usually a domestic species, to become more transmissible among humans, and this transmission route will only become more likely as agriculture and trade intensifies around the world. Passage through an intermediate host enables many otherwise rare diseases to become better adapted to humans, and so understanding this process with accurate mathematical models is necessary to prevent epidemics of emerging zoonoses, guide policy interventions in public health, and predict the behavior of an epidemic. In this paper, we account for a zoonotic disease mutating in an intermediate host by introducing a new mathematical model for disease transmission among three species. We present a model of these disease dynamics, including the equilibria of the system and the basic reproductive number of the pathogen, finding that in the presence of biologically realistic interspecies transmission parameters, a zoonotic disease with the capacity to mutate in an intermediate host population can establish itself in humans even if its R0 in humans is less than 1. This result and model can be used to predict the behavior of any zoonosis with an intermediate host and assist efforts to protect public health.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/microbiologia , Modelos Biológicos , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Animais , Animais Domésticos/microbiologia , Animais Selvagens/microbiologia , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/patogenicidade , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/microbiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/prevenção & controle , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Surtos de Doenças/prevenção & controle , Vetores de Doenças , Especificidade de Hospedeiro/genética , Humanos , Taxa de Mutação , Vírus/genética , Vírus/patogenicidade , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle , Zoonoses/transmissão
19.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008338, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32790670

RESUMO

Pathogens originating from wildlife (zoonoses) pose a significant public health burden, comprising the majority of emerging infectious diseases. Efforts to control and prevent zoonotic disease have traditionally focused on animal-to-human transmission, or "spillover." However, in the modern era, increasing international mobility and commerce facilitate the spread of infected humans, nonhuman animals (hereafter animals), and their products worldwide, thereby increasing the risk that zoonoses will be introduced to new geographic areas. Imported zoonoses can potentially "spill back" to infect local wildlife-a danger magnified by urbanization and other anthropogenic pressures that increase contacts between human and wildlife populations. In this way, humans can function as vectors, dispersing zoonoses from their ancestral enzootic systems to establish reservoirs elsewhere in novel animal host populations. Once established, these enzootic cycles are largely unassailable by standard control measures and have the potential to feed human epidemics. Understanding when and why translocated zoonoses establish novel enzootic cycles requires disentangling ecologically complex and stochastic interactions between the zoonosis, the human population, and the natural ecosystem. In this Review, we address this challenge by delineating potential ecological mechanisms affecting each stage of enzootic establishment-wildlife exposure, enzootic infection, and persistence-applying existing ecological concepts from epidemiology, invasion biology, and population ecology. We ground our discussion in the neotropics, where four arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) of zoonotic origin-yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses-have separately been introduced into the human population. This paper is a step towards developing a framework for predicting and preventing novel enzootic cycles in the face of zoonotic translocations.


Assuntos
Infecções por Arbovirus/epidemiologia , Arbovirus , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , América , Animais , Animais Selvagens/virologia , Infecções por Arbovirus/transmissão , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/transmissão , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/virologia , Ecossistema , Humanos , Mosquitos Vetores , Clima Tropical , Zoonoses/transmissão , Zoonoses/virologia
20.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(8): e1008699, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32764827

RESUMO

São Paulo, a densely inhabited state in southeast Brazil that contains the fourth most populated city in the world, recently experienced its largest yellow fever virus (YFV) outbreak in decades. YFV does not normally circulate extensively in São Paulo, so most people were unvaccinated when the outbreak began. Surveillance in non-human primates (NHPs) is important for determining the magnitude and geographic extent of an epizootic, thereby helping to evaluate the risk of YFV spillover to humans. Data from infected NHPs can give more accurate insights into YFV spread than when using data from human cases alone. To contextualise human cases, identify epizootic foci and uncover the rate and direction of YFV spread in São Paulo, we generated and analysed virus genomic data and epizootic case data from NHPs in São Paulo. We report the occurrence of three spatiotemporally distinct phases of the outbreak in São Paulo prior to February 2018. We generated 51 new virus genomes from YFV positive cases identified in 23 different municipalities in São Paulo, mostly sampled from NHPs between October 2016 and January 2018. Although we observe substantial heterogeneity in lineage dispersal velocities between phylogenetic branches, continuous phylogeographic analyses of generated YFV genomes suggest that YFV lineages spread in São Paulo at a mean rate of approximately 1km per day during all phases of the outbreak. Viral lineages from the first epizootic phase in northern São Paulo subsequently dispersed towards the south of the state to cause the second and third epizootic phases there. This alters our understanding of how YFV was introduced into the densely populated south of São Paulo state. Our results shed light on the sylvatic transmission of YFV in highly fragmented forested regions in São Paulo state and highlight the importance of continued surveillance of zoonotic pathogens in sentinel species.


Assuntos
Genoma Viral , Doenças dos Primatas/virologia , Febre Amarela/veterinária , Febre Amarela/virologia , Vírus da Febre Amarela/genética , Zoonoses/virologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Genômica , Humanos , Filogenia , Filogeografia , Doenças dos Primatas/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Primatas/transmissão , Primatas/virologia , Febre Amarela/epidemiologia , Febre Amarela/transmissão , Vírus da Febre Amarela/classificação , Vírus da Febre Amarela/isolamento & purificação , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
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