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1.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2022-01-11. (PAHO/HSS/HS/21-0014).
Non-conventional in English | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-55564

ABSTRACT

The measurement of health spending and the monitoring of resources through the SHA 2011 health accounts system represent invaluable tools for decision-making and the adoption of health policies. Knowing how much is being spent and how it is being spent allows, for example, to verify whether spending is linked to a country's policy priorities; if the resources of the system are translated into greater and better health benefits; and if the resources are allocated according to the specific health needs and therefore achieve the maximum potential for the population. This strategic information facilitates the monitoring of progress towards the objectives of access and universal coverage of the system from financing, with efficiency, equity and sustainability. This publication describes the data from a survey of health accountants in the Region of the Americas, with the objective of analyzing the key elements to improve the institutionalization strategies of health accounts in the countries. Thus, it was found that the frequency of staff turnover and insufficient resources represent obstacles to full institutionalization. The background to the establishment and expansion of the accounts in Latin America, and the disclosure practices of the most frequent results, are also described. It concludes with final thoughts and recommendations.


Subject(s)
Health Systems , Health Services , Health Priorities , Decision Making , Financial Resources in Health , Health System Financing , Americas
2.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35040154

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malnutrition is under-recognized and under-diagnosed, despite high prevalence rates and associated poor clinical outcomes. The involvement of clinical nutrition experts, especially physicians, in the care of high-risk patients with malnutrition remains low, despite evidence demonstrating lower complication rates with nutrition support team (NST) management. To facilitate solutions, a survey was designed to elucidate the nature of NSTs and physician involvement and identify needs for novel nutrition support care models. METHODS: This survey assessed demographics of NSTs, factors contributing to the success of NSTs, elements of nutrition education, and other barriers to professional growth. RESULTS: Of 255 respondents, 235 complete surveys were analyzed. The geographic distribution of respondents correlated with population concentrations of the United States (r = 90.8%, p-value <0.0001). Most responding physicians (80.7%) reported being a member of NSTs, compared with 56.5% of dietitians. Of those not practicing in NSTs (N = 81, 34.4%), 12.3% reported an NST was previously present at their institution but had been disbanded. Regarding NSTs, financial concerns were common (48.9%), followed by leadership (30.6%), and healthcare professional (HCP) interest (23.4%). A majority (73.6%) of all respondents wanted additional training in nutrition, but reported insufficient protected time, ability to travel, or support from administrators or other HCPs. CONCLUSION: Core actions resulting from this survey focused on formalizing physician roles, increasing inter-disciplinary nutrition support expertise, utilizing cost-effective screening for malnutrition, and implementing intervention protocols. Additional actions included increasing funding for clinical practice, education, and research, all within an expanded portfolio of pragmatic nutrition support care models. CLINICAL RELEVANCY STATEMENT: Physician engagement in nutrition support continues to remain low despite the increasing prevalence of malnutrition. This problem, and the working solution, is in the context of decreased engagement of other healthcare professionals in nutrition support, as well as declining Nutrition Support Team utilization. To address these issues, the ASPEN Physician Engagement Committee (PEC) conducted a survey of healthcare professionals (HCPs) involved in nutrition support. Key findings include: (1) lack of financial support and physician champions with financial knowledge; (2) inadequate valuation of physicians and other nutrition support HCPs and NSTs, and their impact on clinical outcomes; and (3) significant barriers to primary and supplementary training for physicians in nutrition. Accordingly, the PEC recommends: (1) development of cost-effective screening and intervention for malnutrition; (2) expansion of nutrition support care models appropriately scaled to the available resources and expertise; and (3) development of a knowledge translation platform to foster transmission of novel breakthroughs while addressing research, knowledge, and practice gaps. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

3.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 10, 2022 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35033096

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The institutionalization of evidence-informed health policy-making (EIHP) is complex and complicated. It is complex because it has many players and is complicated because its institutionalization will require many changes that will be challenging to make. Like many other issues, strengthening EIHP needs a road map, which should consider challenges and address them through effective, harmonized and contextualized strategies. This study aims to develop a road map for enhancing EIHP in Iran based on steps of planning. METHODS: This study consisted of three phases: (1) identifying barriers to EIHP, (2) recognizing interventions and (3) measuring the use of evidence in Iran's health policy-making. A set of activities was established for conducting these, including foresight, systematic review and policy dialogue, to identify the current and potential barriers for the first phase. For the second phase, an evidence synthesis was performed through a scoping review, by searching the websites of benchmark institutions which had good examples of EIHP practices in order to extract and identify interventions, and through eight policy dialogues and two broad opinion polls to contextualize the list of interventions. Simultaneously, two qualitative-quantitative studies were conducted to design and use a tool for assessing EIHP in the third phase. RESULTS: We identified 97 barriers to EIHP and categorized them into three groups, including 35 barriers on the "generation of evidence" (push side), 41 on the "use of evidence" (pull side) and 21 on the "interaction between these two" (exchange side). The list of 41 interventions identified through evidence synthesis and eight policy dialogues was reduced to 32 interventions after two expert opinion polling rounds. These interventions were classified into four main strategies for strengthening (1) the education and training system (6 interventions), (2) the incentives programmes (7 interventions), (3) the structure of policy support organizations (4 interventions) and (4) the enabling processes to support EIHP (15 interventions). CONCLUSION: The policy options developed in the study provide a comprehensive framework to chart a path for strengthening the country's EIHP considering both global practices and the context of Iran. It is recommended that operational plans be prepared for road map interventions, and the necessary resources provided for their implementation. The implementation of the road map will require attention to the principles of good governance, with a focus on transparency and accountability. Video abstract.


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Policy Making , Humans , Iran , Motivation , Social Responsibility
4.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 19(1): 153, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34963496

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, policy-makers face challenges to using evidence in health decision-making, particularly lack of interaction between research and policy. Knowledge-brokering mechanisms can fill research-policy gaps and facilitate evidence-informed policy-making. In Myanmar, the need to promote evidence-informed policy is significant, and thus a mechanism was set up for this purpose. This paper discusses lessons learned from the development of the Knowledge Broker Group-Myanmar (KBG-M), supported by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Applied Mental Health Research Group (JHU) and Community Partners International (CPI). METHODS: Sixteen stakeholders were interviewed to explore challenges in formulating evidence-informed policy. Two workshops were held: the first to further understand the needs of policy-makers and discuss knowledge-brokering approaches, and the second to co-create the KBG-M structure and process. The KBG-M was then envisioned as an independent body, with former officials of the Ministry of Health and Sports (MoHS) and representatives from the nongovernmental sector actively engaging in the health sector, with an official collaboration with the MoHS. RESULTS: A development task force that served as an advisory committee was established. Then, steps were taken to establish the KBG-M and obtain official recognition from the MoHS. Finally, when the technical agreement with the MoHS was nearly complete, the process stopped because of the military coup on 1 February 2021, and is now on hold indefinitely. CONCLUSIONS: Learning from this process may be helpful for future or current knowledge-brokering efforts, particularly in fragile, conflict-affected settings. Experienced and committed advisory committee members enhanced stakeholder relationships. Responsive coordination mechanisms allowed for adjustments to a changing bureaucratic landscape. Coordination with similar initiatives avoided overlap and identified areas needing technical support. Recommendations to continue the work of the KBG-M itself or similar platforms include the following: increase resilience to contextual changes by ensuring diverse partnerships, maintain advisory committee members experienced and influential in the policy-making process, ensure strong organizational and funding support for effective functioning and sustainability, have budget and timeline flexibility to allow sufficient time and resources for establishment, organize ongoing needs assessments to identify areas needing technical support and to develop responsive corrective approaches, and conduct information sharing and collaboration between stakeholders to ensure alignment.


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Policy Making , Administrative Personnel , Humans , Myanmar , Public Health
5.
J Can Assoc Gastroenterol ; 4(Suppl 2): S1-S9, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34755033

ABSTRACT

Persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) make up more than 0.75% of the Canadian population in 2021. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals with IBD, particularly those on immunosuppressive therapies, were concerned that their health status may place them at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 or experiencing more severe disease course if infected with SARS-CoV-2. In response, Crohn's and Colitis Canada developed the COVID-19 and IBD Taskforce in March 2020 to rapidly synthesize the evolving knowledge of COVID-19 as relevant to Canadians with IBD. The Taskforce communicated expert information directly to the Canadian IBD community through online tools and a webinar series. In order to understand the full impact of COVID-19 on the IBD community, Crohn's and Colitis Canada commissioned a policy report that was informed through a systematic literature review and synthesized across working groups along the following domains: Epidemiology, Children and Expectant Mothers with IBD, Seniors with IBD, Mental Health, Risk Factors and Medications, Vaccines, and Healthcare Delivery during the Pandemic and the Future Model of IBD Care. This report from Canadian physicians, researchers, and IBD community representatives highlights the physical, mental, and health systems impact of COVID-19 on the entire spectrum of the IBD community, including children, adolescents, adults, seniors, and pregnant people with IBD. This executive summary provides an overview of the crucial information from each of the chapters of the policy report, supplemented with additional information made available through Crohn's and Colitis Canada's webinar-based knowledge translation platform.

6.
J Can Assoc Gastroenterol ; 4(Suppl 2): S10-S19, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34755034

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, in Canada, is over 0.75% in 2021. Many individuals with IBD are immunocompromised. Consequently, the World Health Organization's declaration of a global pandemic uniquely impacted those with IBD. Crohn's and Colitis Canada (CCC) formed the COVID-19 and IBD Taskforce to provide evidence-based guidance during the pandemic to individuals with IBD and their families. The Taskforce met regularly through the course of the pandemic, synthesizing available information on the impact of COVID-19 on IBD. At first, the information was extrapolated from expert consensus guidelines, but eventually, recommendations were adapted for an international registry of worldwide cases of COVID-19 in people with IBD. The task force launched a knowledge translation initiative consisting of a webinar series and online resources to communicate information directly to the IBD community. Taskforce recommendations were posted to CCC's website and included guidance such as risk stratification, management of immunosuppressant medications, physical distancing, and mental health. A weekly webinar series communicated critical information directly to the IBD community. During the pandemic, traffic to CCC's website increased with 484,755 unique views of the COVID-19 webpages and 126,187 views of the 23 webinars, including their video clips. CCC's COVID-19 and IBD Taskforce provided critical guidance to the IBD community as the pandemic emerged, the nation underwent a lockdown, the economy reopened, and the second wave ensued. By integrating public health guidance through the unique prism of a vulnerable population, CCC's knowledge translation platform informed and protected the IBD community.

10.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 44: e165, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33346235

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate capacities, organizational arrangements, and barriers to the implementation of Evidence Centers (NEvs) as part of Brazil's Evidence-Informed Policy Network (EVIPNet). Method: A mixed methods descriptive-analytical, multiple-case exploratory study was performed. Coordinators of active NEvs answered a questionnaire in three parts: participant characteristics, assessment of the capacity to "acquire, assess, adapt, and apply" evidence (4A), and open questions addressing organizational arrangements and barriers to the implementation of NEvs. Results: The study included 15 NEvs, mostly from the Midwest; 73.3% were based in universities, while 20% were installed in state/city health departments or in the Ministry of Health. All coordinators had completed graduate training and 80% reported 1 to 5 years' experience with evidence-based policies as well as proficiency in English. None of the participants worked exclusively as NEv coordinator. NEv teams included health care professionals, students (undergraduate/graduate), professors, and civil servants from health departments. The data revealed high capacity to "acquire" and "assess" evidence, and low capacity to "adapt" and "apply" evidence. On average, three activities or products were developed yearly by each NEv, especially knowledge translation initiatives (systematic reviews and deliberative dialogues) and training for health care professionals, managers and undergraduate/graduate students. Five barrier categories were described: 1) financing, 2) network integration, 3) institutionalization of demands, 4) adaptive capacity, and 5) research communication skills to recommend actions at the local level. Conclusions: Trained human resources associated with academic and research institutions are available to support evidence-informed policies. However, the sustainability of NEvs depends on coordinated action to ensure the capacity to adapt and apply evidence.

11.
Implement Sci Commun ; 1(1): 111, 2020 Dec 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33308316

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contextualised evidence to generate local solutions on the progressive path to universal health coverage is essential. However, this evidence must be translated into action. Knowledge translation (KT) experts have highlighted the plausible mechanisms to foster the uptake of evidence. The objective of this study was to assess the extent to which structures are in place to boost uptake of evidence, in countries of the WHO African Region. METHODS: Employing a cross-sectional survey, we collected data on the availability of structures to foster the uptake of evidence into policy in 35 out of the 47 member states of the WHO African Region. Data were analysed using a simple counting of the presence or absence of such structures. RESULTS: Less than half of the countries had evidence collation and synthesis mechanisms. The lack of such mechanisms presents a missed opportunity to identify comprehensive solutions that can respond to health sector challenges. Close to 50% of the countries had KT platforms in place. However, the availability of these was in several forms, as an institution-based platform, as an annual event to disseminate evidence and as a series of conferences at the national level. In some countries, KT was mainstreamed into routine health sector performance review processes. Several challenges impacted the functionality of the KT platforms including inadequate funding and lack of dedicated personnel. Regarding dissemination of evidence, sharing reports, scientific publications and one-off presentations in meetings were the main approaches employed. CONCLUSION: The availability of KT platforms in the WHO African countries can be described as at best and non-existent at the worst. The current structures, where these exist, cannot adequately foster KT. Knowledge translation platforms need to be viewed as sector-wide platforms and mainstreamed in routine health sector performance reviews and policymaking processes. Funds for their functionality must be planned for as part of the health sector budget. Dissemination of evidence needs to be viewed differently to embrace the concept of "disseminate for impact". Further, funding for dissemination activities needs to be planned for as part of the evidence generation plan.

12.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 18(1): 127, 2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge translation (KT) platforms are organisations, initiatives and networks that focus on supporting evidence-informed policy-making at least in part about the health-system arrangements that determine whether the right programmes, services and products get to those who need them. Many descriptions and evaluations of KT platforms in low- and middle-income countries have been produced but, to date, they have not been systematically reviewed. METHODS: We identified potentially relevant studies through a search of five electronic databases and a variety of approaches to identify grey literature. We used four criteria to select eligible empirical studies. We extracted data about seven characteristics of included studies and about key findings. We used explicit criteria to assess study quality. In synthesising the findings, we gave greater attention to themes that emerged from multiple studies, higher-quality studies and different contexts. RESULTS: Country was the most common jurisdictional focus of KT platforms, EVIPNet the most common name and high turnover among staff a common infrastructural feature. Evidence briefs and deliberative dialogues were the activities/outputs that were the most extensively studied and viewed as helpful, while rapid evidence services were the next most studied but only in a single jurisdiction. None of the summative evaluations used a pre-post design or a control group and, with the exception of the evaluations of the influence of briefs and dialogues on intentions to act, none of the evaluations achieved a high quality score. CONCLUSIONS: A large and growing volume of research evidence suggests that KT platforms offer promise in supporting evidence-informed policy-making in low- and middle-income countries. KT platforms should consider as next steps expanding their current, relatively limited portfolio of activities and outputs, building bridges to complementary groups, and planning for evaluations that examine 'what works' for 'what types of issues' in 'what types of contexts'.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Government Programs , Health Policy , Humans , Policy Making
13.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 18(1): 109, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32972421

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Evidence-informed Policy Network (EVIPNet) is one of the key mechanisms introduced by WHO to reduce the research-to-policy gap. EVIPNet Europe was launched in 2012. We evaluated the performance and achievements of EVIPNet Europe with the overall aims (1) to inform future developments and strategic planning of EVIPNet Europe and (2) to contribute to the evidence base for organisational knowledge translation activities by sharing the lessons learnt. METHODS: The evaluation covered the WHO Secretariat of EVIPNet Europe and its 21 member countries, from its inception to mid-2018. A mixed methods design was used to assess changes in three domains, including triangulation of quantitative and qualitative methods, based on the EVIPNet Europe Monitoring & Evaluation framework and theory of change. Data were collected between August and October 2018. Data collection comprised documentary review, social media analysis, online country evaluation, key informant interviews and validated tools. Two case studies were also developed. RESULTS: The evaluation showed promising results as well as lessons to guide the future development of EVIPNet in the WHO European Region and other regions of the world. EVIPNet Europe appears to be filling a niche in promoting the capacity of Network member countries for evidence-informed policy-making. There is evidence that EVIPNet Europe's capacity-building programme of work is improving knowledge and skills at the individual level. There has been an increase in activity and outputs since its establishment and evidence has been used to inform new policies in some member countries. However, the speed at which member countries are developing or publishing products varies greatly and no formalised knowledge translation platforms have yet been created. Financial and human resources are limited and staff turnover is a cause for concern, both at the WHO Secretariat and country team levels. CONCLUSIONS: Six years since the launch of EVIPNet Europe, the Network has grown quickly, is clearly valued and has had some successes. However, more work and support are needed if it is to achieve its vision of a Europe in which high-quality, context-sensitive evidence routinely informs health decision-making processes that ultimately serve to strengthen health outcomes across the Region.


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Policy Making , Capacity Building , Europe , Humans , World Health Organization
14.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 18(1): 93, 2020 Aug 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32831095

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge translation (KT) is currently endorsed by global health policy actors as a means to improve outcomes by institutionalising evidence-informed policy-making. Organisational knowledge brokers, comprised of researchers, policy-makers and other stakeholders, are increasingly being used to undertake and promote KT at all levels of health policy-making, though few resources exist to guide the evaluation of these efforts. Using a scoping review methodology, we identified, synthesised and assessed indicators that have been used to evaluate KT infrastructure and capacity-building activities in a health policy context in order to inform the evaluation of organisational knowledge brokers. METHODS: A scoping review methodology was used. This included the search of Medline, Global Health and the WHO Library databases for studies regarding the evaluation of KT infrastructure and capacity-building activities between health research and policy, published in English from 2005 to 2016. Data on study characteristics, outputs and outcomes measured, related indicators, mode of verification, duration and/or frequency of collection, indicator methods, KT model, and targeted capacity level were extracted and charted for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1073 unique articles were obtained and 176 articles were qualified to be screened in full-text; 32 articles were included in the analysis. Of a total 213 indicators extracted, we identified 174 (174/213; 81.7%) indicators to evaluate the KT infrastructure and capacity-building that have been developed using methods beyond expert opinion. Four validated instruments were identified. The 174 indicators are presented in 8 domains based on an adaptation of the domains of the Lavis et al. framework of linking research to action - general climate, production of research, push efforts, pull efforts, exchange efforts, integrated efforts, evaluation and capacity-building. CONCLUSION: This review presents a total of 174 method-based indicators to evaluate KT infrastructure and capacity-building. The presented indicators can be used or adapted globally by organisational knowledge brokers and other stakeholders in their monitoring and evaluation work.


Subject(s)
Capacity Building , Health Policy , Humans , Knowledge , Policy Making
15.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e15121, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32706653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite extensive literature describing the use of social media in health research, a gap exists around best practices in establishing, implementing, and evaluating an effective social media knowledge translation (KT) and exchange strategies. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine successes, challenges, and lessons learned from using social media within health research and to create practical considerations to guide other researchers. METHODS: The Knowledge Translation Platform of the Alberta Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research SUPPORT Unit formed a national working group involving platform staff, academics, and a parent representative with experience using social media for health research. We collected and analyzed 4 case studies that used a variety of social media platforms and evaluation methods. The case studies covered a spectrum of initiatives from participant recruitment and data collection to dissemination, engagement, and evaluation. Methods and findings from each case study as well as barriers and facilitators encountered were summarized. Through iterative discussions, we converged on recommendations and considerations for health researchers planning to use social media for KT. RESULTS: We provide recommendations for elements to consider when developing a social media KT strategy: (1) set a clear goal and identify a theory, framework, or model that aligns with the project goals and objectives; (2) understand the intended audience (use social network mapping to learn what platforms and social influences are available); (3) choose a platform or platforms that meet the needs of the intended audience and align well with the research team's capabilities (can you tap into an existing network, and what mode of communication does it support?); (4) tailor messages to meet user needs and platform requirements (eg, plain language and word restrictions); (5) consider timing, frequency, and duration of messaging as well as the nature of interactions (ie, social filtering and negotiated awareness); (6) ensure adequate resources and personnel are available (eg, content creators, project coordinators, communications experts, and audience stakeholder or patient advocate); (7) develop an evaluation plan a priori driven by goals and types of data available (ie, quantitative and qualitative); and (8) consider ethical approvals needed (driven by evaluation and type of data collection). CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of a comprehensive framework to guide health researchers using social media for KT, we provide several key considerations. Future research will help validate the proposed components and create a body of evidence around best practices for using and evaluating social media as part of a KT strategy.


Subject(s)
Research Personnel/standards , Social Media , /methods , Health Resources , Humans , Research Personnel/psychology
16.
Inquiry ; 57: 46958020924920, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513029

ABSTRACT

Planning and administering Universal Health Coverage (UHC) policies involve complex and critical decisions, especially in resource-scarce and densely populated settings such as Indonesia. Increasing investments alone do not ensure success and sustainability of UHC, and defining priorities is imperative. In 2013, Indonesia formally embarked on its journey of institutionalizing priority setting with technical assistance from the International Decision Support Initiative (iDSI), which is a global network of organizations in pursuit of evidence-based priority setting. This article provides a perspective for countries in pursuit of institutionalization of evidence-informed policy setting systems and sheds light on the factors conducive to the development of health technology assessment (HTA). It explores the main actors and the context of priority setting in Indonesia and articulates strategies and key outcomes and impact using the theory of change (ToC).


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Technology Assessment, Biomedical , Universal Health Insurance/organization & administration , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Decision Support Techniques , Health Planning , Humans , Indonesia
17.
J Interprof Care ; 34(4): 528-536, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32064972

ABSTRACT

Collaboration has achieved widespread acceptance as an indispensable element of healthcare delivery in recent decades, despite modest evidence for its impact on healthcare outcomes. Attempts to understand this seeming paradox have been based mostly in functionalist or conflict-theoretical approaches. Currently lacking, however, is an articulation of how collaborative ideals are embedded in broadly shared beliefs about what healthcare is and how it operates. In this article, we examine how language used in the CanMEDS competency framework and in two guides for Family Health Teams construct idealized versions of rational, autonomous physicians and primary care organizations, respectively. Informed by phenomenological sociology and neo-institutional theory, we characterize these documents as elements of formal structure, the putative "blueprints" for healthcare planning and activity. Drawing on this analysis, we argue that these documents and "collaborative" formal structures in general, not only function as tools to make healthcare more collaborative, but also create an appearance of "real" collaboration, independently of the realities of practice. We argue that they thus instill confidence that the current healthcare system functions according to deep-seated societal values of justice and progress. We conclude by emphasizing the potentially distorting influence of this on efforts to understand and improve healthcare.


Subject(s)
Cooperative Behavior , Interprofessional Relations , Organizational Culture , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Clinical Competence , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Language , Patient Care Team/standards , Professional Role
19.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 31(9): G136-G138, 2019 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31814007

ABSTRACT

Quality improvement initiatives can be fragmented and short-term, leading to missed opportunities to improve quality in a systemic and sustainable manner. An overarching national policy or strategy on quality, informed by frontline implementation, can provide direction for quality initiatives across all levels of the health system. This can strengthen service delivery along with strong leadership, resources, and infrastructure as essential building blocks for the health system. This article draws on the proceedings of an ISQua conference exploring factors for institutionalizing quality of care within national systems. Active learning, inclusive of peer-to-peer learning and exchange, mentoring and coaching, emerged as a critical success factor to creating a culture of quality. When coupled by reinforcing elements like strong partnerships and coordination across multiple levels, engagement at all health system levels and strong political commitment, this culture can be cascaded to all levels requiring policy, leadership, and the capabilities for delivering quality healthcare.


Subject(s)
Health Policy , Problem-Based Learning , Quality of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Humans , Organizational Culture , Quality Improvement , Quality of Health Care/standards
20.
Estud. pesqui. psicol. (Impr.) ; 19(3): 826-846, dez. 2019.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS, Index Psychology - journals | ID: biblio-1046086

ABSTRACT

A Psicologia Política (PP) é um campo de conhecimentos heterogêneo e plural, ainda em consolidação. O objetivo deste artigo é conhecer os trabalhos que realizam um histórico sobre a PP, para discutir as diferentes narrativas dos autores da Europa, Estados Unidos e América Latina e redigir uma integração entre elas. Como método realizamos uma revisão bibliográfica sobre artigos, livros e capítulos que abordam a história da PP. Separamos a discussão em quatro tópicos: precursores da PP, fundação da PP, institucionalização da PP e a PP contemporânea na América Latina. Constatamos a constituição de um campo heterogêneo, marcado pelas diferenças regionais de como fazer pesquisas em PP. Percebemos que as narrativas históricas tendem a privilegiar os trabalhos de sua região e que o pensamento norte-americano não foi o protagonista para a criação da PP, mas sim o europeu. Já na América Latina se assume uma perspectiva crítica e uma implicação com a transformação social.(AU)


Political Psychology (PP) is a heterogeneous and plural field of knowledge, still in consolidation. The purpose of this article is to know the works that make a history about PP, to discuss the different narratives of the authors of Europe, United States and Latin America, and write an integration between them. As a method, we carry out a bibliographical review on articles, books and chapters which refer to the history of PP. We divided the discussion into four sections: precursors of PP, foundation of PP, institutionalization of PP and PP in Latin America. We see the constitution of a heterogeneous field, marked by regional. We perceive that historical narratives tends to privilege the works of their region and that American thought was not the protagonist for the creation of PP, but the European. In Latin America, a critical perspective and an implication with social change is assumed.(AU)


La Psicología Política (PP) es un campo de conocimientos heterogéneo y plural, aún en consolidación. El objetivo de este artículo es conocer los trabajos que realizan un histórico sobre la PP, para discutir las diferentes narrativas de los autores de Europa, Estados Unidos y Latinoamérica y redactar un intento de integración entre ellas. Como método realizamos una revisión bibliográfica sobre artículos, libros y capítulos que abordan la historia de la PP. Dividimos la discusión en cuatro apartados: precursores de la PP, fundación de la PP, institucionalización de la PP y la PP contemporánea en Latinoamérica. Constatamos la constitución de un campo heterogéneo, marcado por las diferencias regionales do cómo hacer las investigaciones en PP. Percibimos que las narrativas privilegian los trabajos de su región y que el pensamiento estadounidense no fue el protagonista para la creación de la PP, pero si el europeo. En Latinoamérica se asume una perspectiva crítica e una implicación con el cambio social.(AU)


Subject(s)
Psychology/history , Latin America
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