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1.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(1)2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33514593

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on political leadership around the world. Differences in how leaders address the pandemic through public messages have practical implications for building trust and an effective response within a country. METHODS: We analysed the speeches made by 20 heads of government around the world (Bangladesh, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Russia, South Africa, Scotland, Sint Maarten, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan) to highlight the differences between men and women leaders in discussing COVID-19. We used an inductive analytical approach, coding speeches for specific themes based on language and content. FINDINGS: Five primary themes emerged across a total of 122 speeches on COVID-19, made by heads of government: economics and financial relief, social welfare and vulnerable populations, nationalism, responsibility and paternalism, and emotional appeals. While all leaders described the economic impact of the pandemic, women spoke more frequently about the impact on the individual scale. Women leaders were also more often found describing a wider range of social welfare services, including: mental health, substance abuse and domestic violence. Both men and women from lower-resource settings described detailed financial relief and social welfare support that would impact the majority of their populations. While 17 of the 20 leaders used war metaphors to describe COVID-19 and the response, men largely used these with greater volume and frequency. CONCLUSION: While this analysis does not attempt to answer whether men or women are more effective leaders in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, it does provide insight into the rhetorical tools and types of language used by different leaders during a national and international crisis. This analysis provides additional evidence on the differences in political leaders' messages and priorities to inspire citizens' adhesion to the social contract in the adoption of response and recovery measures. However, it does not consider the influence of contexts, such as the public audience, on leaders' strategic communication approaches.


Subject(s)
Government , Health Communication , Leadership , /epidemiology , Female , Global Health , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Politics , Sex Factors
2.
Preprint | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-20187427

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on political leadership and decision-making around the world. Differences in how leaders address the pandemic through public messages have practical implications for building trust and an effective response within a country. Methods: We analyzed the public statements and speeches made by 20 heads of government around the world (Bangladesh, Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Finland, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Russia, South Africa, Scotland, Sint Maarten, United Kingdom, United States, Taiwan) to highlight the differences between men and women leaders in discussing COVID-19 and pandemic response. We used a deductive analytical approach, coding speeches for specific themes based on language used and content discussed. Findings: Five primary themes emerged across a total of 122 speeches on COVID-19 made by heads of government: economics and financial relief, social welfare and vulnerable populations, nationalism, responsibility and paternalism, and emotional appeals. While all leaders described the economic impact of the pandemic, women leaders spoke more frequently about the impact on local or individual scale. Women leaders were also more often found describing a wider range of social welfare services, including addressing to: mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence. Both men and women from lower-resource settings described detailed financial relief and social welfare support that would impact the majority of their citizen population. While 17 of the 20 leaders used war metaphors to describe the COVID-19 virus and response, men largely used these with greater volume and frequency. Conclusion: While this analysis does not attempt to answer whether men or women are more effective leaders in responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, it does provide insight into the rhetorical tools and types of language used by different leaders during a national and international crisis. This language is important because it influences how leaders inspire citizens to adhere to the social contract, and the priorities they highlight and the words they use are meant to resonate with the rest of the nation.

3.
Geneva; World Health Organization; 2020-04-04.
in English | WHO IRIS | ID: who-331688
4.
Terminology | DeCS - Descriptors in Health Sciences | ID: 057347

ABSTRACT

Dutch part of the island of Saint Martin in the Caribbean Sea; Sint Maarten lies east of the US Virgin Islands.


Parte holandesa de la isla de San Martín en el Mar Caribe. Se encuentra al este de las Islas Vírgenes de los Estados Unidos.


Parte holandesa da ilha de São Martinho no Mar do Caribe. Encontra-se a leste das Ilhas Virgens dos Estados Unidos.

5.
Terminology | DeCS - Descriptors in Health Sciences | ID: 009619

ABSTRACT

Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, and Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.


País ubicado en EUROPA. Está bordeado por el MAR DEL NORTE, BÉLGICA Y ALEMANIA. Áreas constituyentes son Aruba, Curasao y Sint Maarten, anteriormente incluidas en las ANTILLAS HOLANDESAS.


País localizado na EUROPA. Faz fronteira com o MAR DO NORTE, BÉLGICA e ALEMANHA. As áreas ultramarinas que os constituem são Aruba, Curaçao, São Martinho, antigamente incluído nas ANTILHAS HOLANDESAS.

6.
Disasters ; 2019 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31733112

ABSTRACT

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 and the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals call for action to build back better in ways that leave no one behind. At the same time, ensuring a local voice is increasingly central to humanitarian engagement. These aims contrast with limited analysis of how local actors might be supported in these respects during response and recovery, and how far recommendations are specific or generalisable across richer and poorer national contexts. The paper begins by comparing lessons learnt by survivors and community organisations in Sint Maarten, Dutch Caribbean, following a high-income state-led response to Hurricane Irma in 2017 with the priorities of lower income, humanitarian-led endeavours. The differences reveal the importance of economic resources as the basis for individual self-reliance and a fragmented civil society with limited leadership ambitions in Sint Maarten. Strong cross-cultural alignment nevertheless allows for a globally-relevant and yet contextually-sensitive framework for survivor-led action and reconstruction.

7.
J Environ Manage ; 248: 109317, 2019 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31394474

ABSTRACT

Disaster risk reduction is a major concern of small island developing states. Measures to reduce risk should not only be based on the magnitude of physical hazard, but also on the exposure and vulnerability of communities. In this article, we examine flood risk management policies in the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten using coupled agent-based and flood models. The agent-based model is used to model actors' behaviour in relation to urban building development and policies that are designed to reduce flood hazard and communities' vulnerability and exposure. The policies considered in the model are a Beach Policy, a Building and Housing Ordinance, a Flood Zoning policy and hazard mitigation structural measures. The flood model is used to simulate coastal and pluvial floods on the island. Agent behaviour such as building new houses and implementing hazard reduction measures affect the flood model as these actions affect the rainfall-runoff process. The flood maps generated from the updated flood model simulations are then used to assess the impact and update agents' attributes and behaviour. The simulations results show that low-lying areas are populated, which increases the exposure, and the number of vulnerable houses is also high. Hence, out of the four policies, implementing hazard reduction measures is the most important. Reducing the flood hazard by widening existing drainage channels, constructing new ones and building dykes as coastal flood defence would reduce the hazard, hence reducing the number of flooded houses. As it affects all households on the island, the Building and Housing Ordinance is an important policy to reduce vulnerability. In general, the coupled model outputs can be used to inform policy decision making and provide insights to policymakers on the island.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Floods , City Planning , Risk Management , Sint Maarten
8.
BMC Fam Pract ; 20(1): 47, 2019 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30927914

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To describe the supply, distribution, and characteristics of international medical graduates (IMGs) in family medicine who provide patient care in the U.S. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design, using descriptive statistics on combined data from the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates and the American Medical Association, including medical school attended, country of medical school, and citizenship when entering medical school. RESULTS: In total, 118,817 physicians in family medicine were identified, with IMGs representing 23.8% (n = 28,227) of the U.S. patient care workforce. Of all 9579 residents in family medicine, 36.0% (n = 3452) are IMGS. In total, 35.9% of IMGs attended medical school in the Caribbean (n = 10,136); 19.9% in South-Central Asia (n = 5607) and 9.1% in South-Eastern Asia (n = 2565). The most common countries of medical school training were Dominica, Mexico, and Sint Maarten. Of all IMGs in family medicine who attended medical school in the Caribbean, 74.5% were U.S. citizens. In total, 40.5% of all IMGs in family medicine held U.S. citizenship at entry to medical school. IMGs comprise almost 40% of the family medicine workforce in Florida, New Jersey and New York. CONCLUSIONS: IMGs play an important role in the U.S. family medicine workforce. Many IMGs are U.S. citizens who studied abroad and then returned to the U.S. for graduate training. Given the shortage of family physicians, and the large number of IMGs in graduate training programs, IMGs will continue to play a role in the U.S. physician workforce for some time to come. Many factors, including the supply of residency training positions, could eventually restrict the number of IMGs entering the U.S., including those contributing to family practice.


Subject(s)
Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Family Practice/statistics & numerical data , Foreign Medical Graduates/supply & distribution , Physicians, Family/supply & distribution , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Practice/education , Female , Foreign Medical Graduates/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians, Family/statistics & numerical data , United States
9.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 4(1)2019 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30708966

ABSTRACT

Schistosomiasis elimination status in the Caribbean is reviewed with information on historical disease background, attempts to control it and current situation for each locality in the region where transmission has been eliminated (Sint Maarten, Saint Kitts, Vieques), eliminated but not yet verified (Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Antigua, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, Martinique) and still ongoing (Saint Lucia, Suriname). Integrated control initiatives based on selective and mass treatment and snail control using environmental, chemical and biological methods along with public service improvements (housing, safe water, sanitation) and changes in demography (urbanization) and economy (change from sugarcane and banana production to tourism) have resulted in reduction in the burden of schistosomiasis over the past century. Introduction of Biomphalaria-competitor snails into the region as a cost-effective, low maintenance control method appears to have had the most sustainable impact on transmission reduction. A regional inventory of B. glabrata, other Biomphalaria species and Biomphalaria-competitor snails as well as investigation of possible animal reservoir hosts in persisting endemic areas would be helpful for control. Elimination of schistosomiasis appears achievable in the Caribbean. However, a regional surveillance and monitoring program is needed to verify elimination in the various localities and identify and monitor areas still endemic or at risk.

10.
J Vector Borne Dis ; 55(2): 137-143, 2018.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30280712

ABSTRACT

Background & objectives: The first chikungunya (CHIK) epidemic in the Americas was reported in December 2013. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes an acute febrile illness and is transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. Although earlier studies have described long-term clinical manifestations of CHIK patients infected with the East/Central/South African (ECSA) genotype, little is known about persistent manifestations in the Caribbean region, for which the Asian genotype is responsible. The objective of this study was to describe the presence of persisting clinical manifestations, specifically arthralgia, in CHIKV-infected patients on the Caribbean Island, Sint Maarten, 15 months after onset of the disease. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included confirmed CHIK patients that were recorded by the participating general practitioners (GPs) during the chikungunya outbreak in 2014 in Sint Maarten. Between March and July 2015, 15 months after the onset of disease, patients were interviewed via telephone about the presence, duration and impact of clinical CHIKV manifestations. Results: In total, 56 patients were interviewed (median age 47 yr), of which 30 (54%) were females. Out of the total interviewed patients, 52 (93%) reported arthralgia for the first three months after the disease onset, of which 23 (44%) patients reported to have persistent arthralgia, 15 months after the disease onset. Pain intensity of persistent arthralgia was perceived as mild in the majority of patients (n = 14; 60%), moderate in 7 (30%) patients and severe in 2 (9%) patients. During the acute phase of disease, most patients had to miss school or work (n = 39; 72%) due to clinical CHIKV manifestations and reported a negative impact on daily activities (n = 36; 57%). Interpretation & conclusion: Results suggested that persisting arthralgia is a frequent complication in CHIK patients included in the study. Future research on strain-specific clinical long-term manifestations and on their impact on daily life of patients, in the form of a comparative study between patients and controls, is recommended.


Subject(s)
Arthralgia/etiology , Chikungunya Fever/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthralgia/epidemiology , Chikungunya Fever/virology , Chikungunya virus/genetics , Chikungunya virus/isolation & purification , Chikungunya virus/physiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Sint Maarten , Young Adult
11.
Mar Pollut Bull ; 133: 442-447, 2018 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30041335

ABSTRACT

Here we investigate microplastics contamination on beaches of four islands of the Lesser Antilles (Anguilla, St. Barthélemy, St. Eustatius and St. Martin/Maarten). These islands are close to the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, which contains high levels of microplastics. On average 261 ±â€¯6 microplastics/kg of dry sand were found, with a maximum of 620 ±â€¯96 microplastics on Grandes Cayes, Saint Martin. The vast majority of these microplastics (>95%) were fibers. Levels of microplastics differed among islands, with significantly lower levels found in St. Eustatius compared to the other Islands. No difference in microplastic levels was found between windward and leeward beaches. Our research provides a detailed study on microplastics on beaches in the Lesser Antilles. These results are important in developing a deeper understanding of the extent of the microplastic challenge within the Caribbean region, a hotspot of biodiversity.


Subject(s)
Plastics/analysis , Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis , Bathing Beaches , Caribbean Region , Environmental Monitoring/methods , Environmental Pollution , Sint Maarten
12.
Geneva; World Health Organization; 2018. (WHO/CCU/18.02/Sint Maarten).
in English | WHO IRIS | ID: who-272619
13.
Article in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-34491

ABSTRACT

En la sexta edición de "Salud hoy", boletín digital de la Representación de la OPS/OMS para Venezuela, Aruba, Curazao, Sint Maarten y los Territorios Insulares del Reino de Holanda encontrará contenido sobre Malaria, Brote de sarampión y difteria en Venezuela, medicamentos para la lucha antimalárica en Venezuela Estrategias en para reducir morbilidad grave, mortalidad materna y perinatal desde un enfoque de curso de vida.


Subject(s)
Malaria , Diphtheria , Measles , Morbidity , Maternal Mortality , Perinatal Mortality
14.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 41: e58, 2017 Aug 21.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28902271

ABSTRACT

On 6 December 2013, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) reported confirmation of the first two cases of indigenous transmission of chikungunya fever (CHIK) in the Region of the Americas on the island of Sint Maarten (Netherlands Antilles). For the period 2013-2014, a total of 25 627 confirmed autochthonous cases were distributed in 43 countries, with Mexico reporting 155 cases in five states. Information on cases of CHIK in Mexico was obtained from the database of the General Directorate of Epidemiology (Ministry of Health of Mexico). The distribution of confirmed autochthonous cases of CHIK for 2015, by sex, was 64% female (5 583) and 36% male (3 085). The most frequent symptoms were fever in 98% of cases (8 564), followed by headache in 91.6% (7 941), myalgia in 89.9% (7 792), mild arthralgias in 73.5% (6 367), severe polyarthralgia in 72.6% (6 295), and exanthema in 58% (5 032). The clinical presentation of autochthonous cases of CHIK in Mexico has shown several clinical manifestations different from those seen in outbreaks in African and Asian countries and other regions in the Americas; for example, a greater percentage of cases with headache and myalgia and a smaller percentage of cases with arthralgia.


Subject(s)
Chikungunya Fever/diagnosis , Chikungunya Fever/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
15.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 41: e61, 2017 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28902274

ABSTRACT

This report describes the outbreak of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in Sint Maarten, a constituent country of Kingdom of the Netherlands comprising the southern part of the Caribbean island of Saint Martin, from 22 December 2013 (first reported case) through 5 December 2014. The outbreak was first reported by the French overseas collectivity of Saint-Martin in the northern part of the island-the first site in the Americas to report autochthonous transmission of CHIKV. By 5 December 2014, Sint Maarten had reported a total of 658 cases-an overall attack rate of 1.76%. Actual prevalence may have been higher, as some cases may have been misdiagnosed as dengue. Fever and arthralgia affected 71% and 69% of reported cases respectively. Of the 390 laboratory-confirmed cases, 61% were female and the majority were 20-59 years old (mean: 42; range: 4-92). The spread of CHIKV to Sint Maarten was inevitable given the ease of movement of people, and the vector, island-wide. Continuing their history of collaboration, the French and Dutch parts of the island coordinated efforts for prevention and control of the disease. These included a formal agreement to exchange epidemiological information on a regular basis and provide alerts in a timely manner; collaboration among personnel through joint island-wide planning of mosquito control activities, especially along borders; notification of all island visitors, upon their arrival at airports and seaports, of preventative measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes; dissemination of educational materials to the public; and island-wide public awareness campaigns, particularly in densely populated areas, for both residents and visitors. The information provided in this report could help increase understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of CHIKV and guide other countries dealing with vector-borne epidemics.


Subject(s)
Chikungunya Fever/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Sint Maarten/epidemiology , Time Factors , Young Adult
16.
Article in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-34310

ABSTRACT

En la quinta edición de "Salud hoy", boletín digital de la Representación de la OPS/OMS para Venezuela, Aruba, Curazao, Sint Maarten y los Territorios Insulares del Reino de Holanda1 encontrará información sobre Malaria, Emergencias en Desastres, Vacunación, Obesidad y Campus Virtual


Subject(s)
Malaria , Disaster Emergencies , Humanizing Delivery , Vaccination , Obesity , Education, Distance
17.
Article in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-34300

ABSTRACT

En la cuarta edición de "Salud hoy", boletín digital de la Representación de la OPS/OMS para Venezuela, Aruba, Curazao, Sint Maarten y los Territorios Insulares del Reino de Holanda encontrará el fortalecimiento de las capacidades ante situaciones de emergencias y desastres, Valoración de Condiciones Esenciales en Venezuela, Capacitación en investigación de brotes y evaluación de infecciones asociadas a la atención en salud y Enfermedades Transmisibles.


Subject(s)
Disaster Emergencies , Disease Outbreaks , Universal Health Insurance , Communicable Disease Control , Vaccination Coverage
18.
Article in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-34104

ABSTRACT

El 6 de diciembre de 2013, la Organización Panamericana de la Salud (OPS) y la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS) notificaron la confirmación de los dos primeros casos de transmisión autóctona en la Región de las Américas de fiebre chikungunya (CHIK) en la isla de Saint Martin (Antillas Neerlandesas). Para el período 2013-2014, el total de casos confirmados fue de 25 627 distribuidos en 43 países, donde México reportó 155 casos en cinco estados. La información de los casos de CHIK en México se obtuvo de la base de datos de la Dirección General de Epidemiología, dependiente de la Secretaría de Salud de México. La distribución por sexo de los casos autóctonos confirmados de CHIK para el año 2015 indica 64% para el sexo femenino (5 583) y 36% para el sexo masculino (3 085). Los síntomas más frecuentes fueron: fiebre en 98% de los casos (8 564), seguido por cefalea con 91,6% (7 941), mialgias en 89,9% (7 792), artralgias leves en 73,5% (6 367), poliartralgias graves en 72,6% (6 295) y exantema en 58% (5 032). La presentación clínica de los casos autóctonos de CHIK en México ha mostrado algunas características clínicas diferentes de las que se han observado en los brotes de los países africanos, asiáticos y otras regiones de América, como por ejemplo un mayor porcentaje de casos con cefalea y mialgias y un menor porcentaje de casos con artralgias.


On 6 December 2013, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) reported confirmation of the first two cases of indigenous transmission of chikungunya fever (CHIK) in the Region of the Americas on the island of Sint Maarten (Netherlands Antilles). For the period 2013-2014, a total of 25 627 confirmed autochthonous cases were distributed in 43 countries, with Mexico reporting 155 cases in five states. Information on cases of CHIK in Mexico was obtained from the database of the General Directorate of Epidemiology (Ministry of Health of Mexico). The distribution of confirmed autochthonous cases of CHIK for 2015, by sex, was 64% female (5 583) and 36% male (3 085). The most frequent symptoms were fever in 98% of cases (8 564), followed by headache in 91.6% (7 941), myalgia in 89.9% (7 792), mild arthralgias in 73.5% (6 367), severe polyarthralgia in 72.6% (6 295), and exanthema in 58% (5 032). The clinical presentation of autochthonous cases of CHIK in Mexico has shown several clinical manifestations different from those seen in outbreaks in African and Asian countries and other regions in the Americas; for example, a greater percentage of cases with headache and myalgia and a smaller percentage of cases with arthralgia.


Subject(s)
Chikungunya virus , Epidemiology , Mexico , Epidemiology
19.
Article in English | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-34101

ABSTRACT

This report describes the outbreak of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in Sint Maarten, a constituent country of Kingdom of the Netherlands comprising the southern part of the Caribbean island of Saint Martin, from 22 December 2013 (first reported case) through 5 December 2014. The outbreak was first reported by the French overseas collectivity of Saint-Martin in the northern part of the island—the first site in the Americas to report autochthonous transmission of CHIKV. By 5 December 2014, Sint Maarten had reported a total of 658 cases—an overall attack rate of 1.76%. Actual prevalence may have been higher, as some cases may have been misdiagnosed as dengue. Fever and arthralgia affected 71% and 69% of reported cases respectively. Of the 390 laboratory-confirmed cases, 61% were female and the majority were 20–59 years old (mean: 42; range: 4–92). The spread of CHIKV to Sint Maarten was inevitable given the ease of movement of people, and the vector, island-wide. Continuing their history of collaboration, the French and Dutch parts of the island coordinated efforts for prevention and control of the disease. These included a formal agreement to exchange epidemiological information on a regular basis and provide alerts in a timely manner; collaboration among personnel through joint island-wide planning of mosquito control activities, especially along borders; notification of all island visitors, upon their arrival at airports and seaports, of preventative measures to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes; dissemination of educational materials to the public; and island-wide public awareness campaigns, particularly in densely populated areas, for both residents and visitors. The information provided in this report could help increase understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of CHIKV and guide other countries dealing with vector- borne epidemics.


En el presente artículo se describe el brote del virus del chikungunya (CHIKV) que tuvo lugar entre el 22 de diciembre del 2013 (primer caso notificado) y el 5 de diciembre del 2014 en Sint Maarten, uno de los países integrantes del Reino de los Países Bajos, que comprende la parte sur de la isla caribeña de San Martín. El brote fue notificado primero por la colectividad de ultramar francesa de Saint-Martin, que ocupa la parte norte de la isla, convirtiéndose en la primera zona de las Américas en describir la transmisión autóctona del CHIKV. El 5 de diciembre del 2014, Sint Maarten había notificado 658 casos, equivalentes a una tasa de ataque del 1,76%, si bien la prevalencia real quizá haya sido mayor, puesto que algunos casos pueden haberse confundido por dengue. El 71% y el 69% de los casos notificados cursaron con fiebre y artralgias, respectivamente. De los 390 casos confirmados por laboratorio, el 61% eran mujeres y la mayoría tenían entre 20 y 59 años de edad (media: 42; intervalo: 4-92). Era inevitable que el CHIKV pasara a Sint Maarten, dadas la facilidad de movimiento de las personas y la extensión del vector por toda la isla. Siguiendo la tradición de cooperación mutua, las partes francesa y holandesa de la isla coordinaron las actuaciones de prevención y control, que consistieron en: la formalización de un convenio para intercambiar datos epidemiológicos de forma regular y emitir alertas puntualmente; la colaboración del personal de uno y otro lado para planificar, en todo el territorio insular, las actividades de control de mosquitos, sobre todo a lo largo de las fronteras; la notificación a todos los viajeros en arribo, a su llegada a los puertos y aeropuertos, de las medidas preventivas para evitar la picadura de los mosquitos; la difusión de materiales didácticos; y la realización de campañas públicas de concientización por toda la isla, en particular en las áreas de mayor densidad demográfica, dirigidas tanto a residentes como a turistas. La información expuesta en este informe puede ayudar a conocer mejor las características epidemiológicas del CHIKV y servir de orientación para otros países que hagan frente a epidemias transmitidas por vectores.


Subject(s)
Chikungunya virus , Chikungunya Fever , Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Caribbean Region , Americas , Chikungunya virus , Chikungunya Fever , Communicable Diseases, Emerging
20.
Article in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr2-34299

ABSTRACT

En la tercera edición de "Salud hoy", boletín digital de la Representación de la OPS/OMS para Venezuela, Aruba, Curazao, Sint Maarten y los Territorios Insulares del Reino de Holanda encontrará actividades de la cooperación técnica tales en el sistema nacional de salud, Fondo Rotatorio de Vacunas, Campus Virtual, Servicios de Salud mental y Día Mundial de la Depresión.


Subject(s)
Technical Cooperation , Public Health , Malaria , Mental Health Services , Vaccines , Depression
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