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1.
Washington, D.C.; OPS; 2022-01-11. (OPS/NMH/MH/COVID-19/22-0001).
Non-conventional in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-55563

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 HEalth caRe wOrkErs Study (HEROES) es un estudio multicéntrico de cohorte prospectivo que evalúa el impacto de la pandemia de COVID-19 en la salud mental de los trabajadores de los servicios de salud en 26 países de cuatro continentes y en cómo esta se ve afectada por una serie de factores a distintos niveles que pudieran estar interrelacionados: individual, familiar, laboral y social. El presente informe breve recoge la evidencia generada a partir de la encuesta basal del estudio para once países de la Región de las Américas que participan en el estudio. A partir del uso de escalas validadas, los resultados muestran que en varios países de la Región existen elevadas tasas de síntomas depresivos, ideación suicida y malestar psicológico. El espíritu del proyecto no es solo generar evidencia científica de calidad respecto de la salud mental del personal de salud, sino, sobre la base de lo anterior, contribuir a generar intervenciones (tanto a nivel individual como institucional) y políticas que permitan enfrentar las consecuencias negativas que en ella ha tenido la pandemia de COVID-19. The COVID-19 HEalth caRe wOrkErs Study (HEROES) es un estudio multicéntrico de cohorte prospectivo que evalúa el impacto de la pandemia de COVID-19 en la salud mental de los trabajadores de los servicios de salud en 26 países de cuatro continentes y en cómo esta se ve afectada por una serie de factores a distintos niveles que pudieran estar interrelacionados: individual, familiar, laboral y social. El presente informe breve recoge la evidencia generada a partir de la encuesta basal del estudio para once países de la Región de las Américas que participan en el estudio. A partir del uso de escalas validadas, los resultados muestran que en varios países de la Región existen elevadas tasas de síntomas depresivos, ideación suicida y malestar psicológico. El espíritu del proyecto no es solo generar evidencia científica de calidad respecto de la salud mental del personal de salud, sino, sobre la base de lo anterior, contribuir a generar intervenciones (tanto a nivel individual como institucional) y políticas que permitan enfrentar las consecuencias negativas que en ella ha tenido la pandemia de COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus , Mental Health , Risk Factors , Noncommunicable Diseases , Workforce , Surveillance of Working Environment , Americas
2.
Lima; Perú. Ministerio de Salud. Dirección General de Intervenciones Estratégicas en Salud Pública. Dirección de Salud Mental; 1 ed; Ene. 2022. 26 p.
Monography in Spanish | LILACS, LIPECS, MINSAPERÚ | ID: biblio-1353063

ABSTRACT

La pandemia del coronavirus ha provocado un gran impacto en la salud mental, especialmente entre niños y jóvenes. Este periodo de pandemia ha involucrado distanciamiento o pérdida de los seres queridos, dificultades económicas, cambios drásticos en las rutinas, en las formas de relacionarse con los demás y un clima de incertidumbre y preocupación. Esta situación puede aumentar el riesgo suicida. Por lo que brindamos las pautas para identificar y prevenir las conductas suicidas


Subject(s)
Suicide , Mental Health , Coronavirus , Comprehensive Health Care , Impacts on Health , Community Participation , Pandemics
3.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22268803

ABSTRACT

BackgroundDue to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the planet is going through a historical time of exceptional concern and uncertainty, which impacts peoples mental health. Here, we explored the levels of depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and their relation with the degree of physical activity and social interaction during the pandemic. MethodsWe performed a structured survey containing the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 tests to evaluate depressive symptoms and GAD levels. We also asked about weekly physical activity and the level of social interaction. We surveyed two groups of University students in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area: an internal group from the Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires (ITBA), and an external group of students from multiple universities. The survey was conducted in late October/early-November 2020, after a peak of contagions. Some of the participants were surveyed again in January 2021, during academic holidays and after a valley of contagion, for longitudinal analysis ResultsOur data show that men and women of both groups exhibited a significant positive linear correlation between depression and GAD levels. Moreover, low levels of depression and anxiety were associated with performing physical activity for more than two days a week and to longer periods of social interaction. Finally, the second survey revealed a decrease of the symptoms. ConclusionsOur results suggest that performing regular physical activity and avoiding long periods of social isolation gave benefits to mental health. We suggest that public policies could consider protecting these behaviors under health and safety standards.

4.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22268809

ABSTRACT

The measures used to contain the COVID-19 pandemic caused severe disruption to the lives of children and adolescents, compromising their mental health and wellbeing. In this study we assessed the incidence rates of psychiatric diagnoses and drugs in Israeli adolescents before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Analysis of health records data of over 200,000 12-17 years old adolescents identified a significant increase in all mental health diagnoses and most psychiatric drugs dispensation during the COVID-19 period compared to a corresponding pre-COVID period. A gender sub-analysis revealed that most of this increase was associated with adolescent girls. Girls exhibited increases of 68% in depression, 67% in eating disorders, 42% in anxiety and 29% in stress-related diagnoses during the COVID-19 period, which are significantly higher rates than those seen in boys and in the pre-COVID period. Sector sub-analysis showed that the increase was mainly in the general Jewish sector with almost no significant increases in the Arab and ultra-orthodox sectors. Our study highlights the mental health burden of Israeli adolescents during the pandemic and suggests that careful consideration should be given to it while deciding on measures to mitigate the pandemic.

5.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-21268596

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveTo examine the prevalence of psychological distress and its association with social isolation among University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) students. MethodsA cross-sectional survey was emailed to all students in June 2020. Students reported self-isolating none, some, most, or all of the time and were screened for clinically significant symptoms of depression (CSSD). Data were weighted to the UNC-CH population. Results7,012 students completed surveys-64% reported self-isolating most or all of the time and 64% reported CSSD. Compared to those self-isolating none of the time, students self-isolating some of the time were 1.78 (95% CI 1.37-2.30) times as likely to report CSSD, and students self-isolating most and all of the time were 2.12 (95% CI 1.64-2.74) and 2.27 (95% CI 1.75-2.94) times as likely to report CSSD, respectively. ConclusionsUniversities should prioritize student mental health and prepare support services to mitigate mental health consequences of the pandemic.

6.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22269102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVESThis study aims to define changes in anxiety and depression among medical students while evaluating the association of sleep habits and other risk factors, including exercise habits and a diagnosis of chronic disease. The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic was also evaluated. DESIGNA cohort of first- and second-year medical students was evaluated longitudinally using survey methods to quantify changes from pre-medical school and summer break to each semester in medical school throughout years one and two. METHODSData was analyzed using Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMMs) on the numeric responses of General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. Additional assessments evaluated exercise habits, chronic disease, and impact of COVID-19 Pandemic. RESULTSDepression, anxiety, and sleep habits displayed a cyclical change that was associated with the academic cycle. The COVID-19 pandemic was never significant. Medical students who had a chronic disease diagnosis had increased severity. Exercise did not play a role. CONCLUSIONThe main driver for depression, anxiety, and poor sleep quality was the academic cycle, while the COVID-19 pandemic did not have an impact on mental health.

7.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22269053

ABSTRACT

BackgroundCancer patients may be particularly vulnerable to psychological consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic and successive lockdowns. We studied the prevalence and evolution of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in cancer patients during the pandemic waves, and investigated factors associated with high symptoms. MethodsCOVIPACT is a one-year longitudinal prospective study of French patients with solid/hematologic malignancy receiving treatment during the first nationwide lockdown. PTSD symptoms were measured every 3 months from April 2020 using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Patients also completed validated questionnaires on quality of life (QoL), cognitive complaints and insomnia, and a survey on their COVID-19 lockdown experience. ResultsLongitudinal analyses involved 386 patients with at least one PTSD assessment after baseline (median age 63, 76% female). Among them, 21.5% had moderate/severe PTSD symptoms during the first lockdown. The rate of patients reporting PTSD symptoms decreased at lockdown release (13.6%), increased again at second lockdown (23.2%), and slightly declined from the second release period (22.7%) to the third lockdown (17.5%). Patients were grouped into three trajectories of evolution. Most patients had stable low symptoms throughout the period, 6% had high baseline symptoms slowly decreasing over time, and 17.6% had moderate symptoms worsening during second lockdown. Female sex, feeling socially isolated, worrying about COVID-19 infection, and using psychotropic drugs were associated with PTSD symptoms. PTSD symptoms were associated with impaired QoL, sleep and cognition. ConclusionsAround a quarter of cancer patients presented high and persistent PTSD symptoms over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and may benefit from psychological support.

8.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22269134

ABSTRACT

BackgroundWith the implementation of mass vaccination campaigns against COVID-19, the safety of vaccine needs to be evaluated. ObjectiveWe aimed to assess the incidence and risk factors for immediate hypersensitivity reactions (IHSR) and immunisation stress-related responses (ISRR) with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. MethodsThis nested case-control study included recipients who received the Moderna vaccine at a mass vaccination centre, Japan. Recipients with IHSR and ISRR were designated as cases 1 and 2, respectively. Controls 1 and 2 were selected from recipients without IHSR or ISRR and matched (1:4) with cases 1 and cases 2, respectively. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with IHSR and ISRR. ResultsOf the 614,151 vaccine recipients who received 1,201,688 vaccine doses, 306 recipients (cases 1) and 2,478 recipients (cases 2) showed 318 events of IHSR and 2,558 events of ISRR, respectively. The incidence rates per million doses were estimated as - IHSR: 266 cases, ISRR: 2,129 cases, anaphylaxis: 2 cases, and vasovagal syncope: 72 cases. Risk factors associated with IHSR included female, asthma, atopic dermatitis, thyroid diseases, and history of allergy; for ISRR, they were younger age, female, asthma, thyroid diseases, mental disorders, and a history of allergy and vasovagal reflex. ConclusionIn the mass vaccination settings, the Moderna vaccine can be used safely owing to the low incidence rates of IHSR and anaphylaxis. However, providers should beware of the occurrence of ISRR. Risk factor identification may contribute to the stratification of high-risk recipients for IHSR and ISRR.

9.
Preprint in English | medRxiv | ID: ppmedrxiv-22269151

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic generated a surge of critically ill patients greater than the NHS capacity. Additionally, there have been multiple well-documented impacts associated with the national COVID-19 pandemic surge on ICU workers, including an increased prevalence of mental health disorders on a scale potentially sufficient to impair high-quality care delivery. AimTo identify prevalence of probable mental health disorders and functional impairment. As well as establish demographic and professional predictors of probable mental health disorders and functional impairment in ICU staff between November 2020 to April 2021. MethodsEnglish ICU staff were surveyed before, during and after the winter 2020/2021 surge using a survey which comprised of validated measures of mental health. Results6080 surveys were completed, by nurses (57.5%), doctors (27.9%), and other healthcare staff (14.5%). Reporting probable mental health disorders increased from 51% (prior to), to 64% (during) and then dropped to 46% (after). Younger, less experienced and nursing staff were most likely to report probable mental health disorders. Additionally, during and after the winter, over 50% of participants met threshold criteria for functional impairment. Staff who reported probable post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression were more likely to meet threshold criteria for functional impairment. ConclusionsThe winter of 2020/2021 was associated with an increase in poor mental health outcomes and functional impairment during a period of peak caseload. These effects are likely to impact on patient care outcomes and the longer-term resilience of the healthcare workforce.

10.
Mindfulness (N Y) ; : 1-18, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35003380

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic is having an unprecedented detrimental impact on mental health in people around the world. It is important therefore to explore factors that may buffer or accentuate the risk of mental health problems in this context. Given that compassion has numerous benefits for mental health, emotion regulation, and social relationships, this study examines the buffering effects of different flows of compassion (for self, for others, from others) against the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety, and stress, and social safeness. Methods: The study was conducted in a sample of 4057 adult participants from the general community population, collected across 21 countries from Europe, Middle East, North America, South America, Asia, and Oceania. Participants completed self-report measures of perceived threat of COVID-19, compassion (for self, for others, from others), depression, anxiety, stress, and social safeness. Results: Perceived threat of COVID-19 was associated with higher scores in depression, anxiety, and stress, and lower scores in social safeness. Self-compassion and compassion from others were associated with lower psychological distress and higher social safeness. Compassion for others was associated with lower depressive symptoms. Self-compassion moderated the relationship between perceived threat of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety, and stress, whereas compassion from others moderated the effects of fears of contracting COVID-19 on social safeness. These effects were consistent across all countries. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the universal protective role of compassion, in particular self-compassion and compassion from others, in promoting resilience by buffering against the harmful effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health and social safeness. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12671-021-01822-2.

11.
Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 73: 103223, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35003731

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID19 pandemic has caused a variety of psychological problems including panic disorder, anxiety and depression. It is also associated with adverse psychological outcomes in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to compare the severity of postpartum depression in pregnant women with and without COVID-19 during the coronavirus epidemic. Methods: This case-control study was performed on 102 pregnant women referred to the hospitals of (XXX). Using questionnaire, consisting of demographic and maternal data (age, number of pregnancies, type of delivery, history of any disease, history of drug use, breastfeeding experience, separation of mother from infant due to coronavirus) and score from Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) score data from all the participants obtained and analyzed statistically using SPSSv23. Results: The results showed that the mean EPDS score in COVID-positive mothers was 26.64 and in COVID-negative mothers was 24.76, which was statistically significant, p < 0.001. The score did not vary among the two group with respect to age group and type of delivery method. The score was significantly higher among the women with 3-4 pregnancies. Conclusion: COVID-positive status is associated with increased postnatal depression among women. Perinatal and postnatal psychological consultancy is required in such patients along with monitoring of maternal and neonate physical and mental health.

12.
SSM Popul Health ; 17: 100993, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35005183

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact of personalized gender-based communication to encourage the screening of depression and seeking out mental health care consultation. An internet search engine advertisement was deployed on Bing, Microsoft during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (PACA) region in France during the month of May 2020, the height of the France lockdowns. A two-armed study was conducted with Arm A containing a non-personalized (control) advertisement and Arm B containing a personalized gender-based advertisement. 53,185 advertisements were shown between the two arms. Results show that receiving a personalized gender-based message increases the probability of clicking on the advertisement. However, upon clicking the advertisement, there was no significant difference in the completion of the depression questionnaire between the two groups. These results suggest that although personalized gender messaging is effective at drawing in a greater click rate, it did not increase, nor decreased, the conversion rate to monitor depression by self-assessment.

13.
Infant Ment Health J ; 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35007378

ABSTRACT

Parents of infants and young children who experience harsh circumstances are among those most vulnerable to the added stressors associated with COVID-19. Home visiting models have been shown to enhance outcomes for parents and infants when delivered in person, but in many parts of the world, the pandemic rendered in-person home visits difficult or impossible. In this special section, we examine adaptations made by home visiting programs to allow continued service delivery through telehealth, and strategies for assessing whether interventions maintain reach and fidelity when implemented remotely. In the first paper, Bullinger et al. (program implementers of SafeCare) provide evidence of the increased risk of maltreatment during COVID-19 for many families, and thus the need for home visiting services. Rybinska et al., developers and implementers of Family Connects, present evidence regarding their success in reaching families through telehealth. Roben and colleagues, in the third paper, report that clinicians implementing Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up through telehealth maintained fidelity at similar rates seen through in-person implementation. Finally, Tabachnick et al. describe procedures for collecting physiological data from infants and parents while conducting assessments remotely.

14.
Int J Rehabil Res ; 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35013065

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the effect of stress during the COVID-19 pandemic and the potential moderating effects of socioenvironmental factors on the physical conditions of Korean people with disabilities. Data from 405 participants on depression, instrumental activities of daily living and socioenvironmental factors were analyzed using frequency analysis, descriptive statistics, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlations and hierarchical regression analysis. Stress caused by COVID-19 was significantly correlated with depression, instrumental activities of daily living and social participation. Using socioenvironmental factors as moderators of the relationship between stress and depression, we found that increased depression was alleviated by social attitudes (ß = 2.064; P < 0.01), family attitudes (ß = 2.028; P < 0.05) and healthcare services and policies (ß = -4.579; P < 0.001). Moreover, instrumental activities of daily living increased with decreased stress as moderated by social attitudes (ß = 0.140; P < 0.05) and healthcare services and policies (ß = -0.306; P < 0.001). Further, increased social participation alleviated stress as moderated by social attitudes (ß = 0.106; P < 0.01), mobility and convenience facilities (ß = 0.158; P < 0.01) and healthcare services and policies (ß = -0.342; P < 0.001). The results indicate that even in public healthcare crises, it is important for people with disabilities to manage their health and participate in social activities. Their self-management and social participation can be promoted by strengthening community-centered rehabilitation and providing consumer-oriented social services.

15.
J Ment Health ; : 1-12, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35014927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current moment is characterised by deep-rooted uncertainties, such as climate change and COVID-19. Uncertainty has been reported to be associated with negative mental health outcomes, such as stress and anxiety. However, no comprehensive review on the association between uncertainty and mental health exists. AIM: The aim of the current scoping review was to systematically explore and describe the literature on the link between uncertainty and mental health. METHODS: A scoping review was undertaken following guidelines by Arksey and O'Malley (2005). RESULTS: One hundred and one papers addressing the association between uncertainty and mental health were identified. Most were cross-sectional studies (67%) conducted in the fields of medicine or nursing (59%), in high-income countries, among adult populations (74%), and in medical settings. Substantial heterogeneity was identified in the measurements of uncertainty and mental health. Most studies (79%) reported a positive association between uncertainty and mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS: Research is needed in more diverse contexts and populations. More robust designs are required to provide insight into the directionality and strength of the association between uncertainty and mental health. Few studies reported how individuals coped with uncertainty. Future studies should address the identified gaps and investigate interventions to address uncertainty and its determinants.

16.
JMIR Form Res ; 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34995203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, threats to mental health, psychological safety, and well-being are evident, particularly among the first responders and the healthcare staff. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the prevalence and the potential predictors of the likely stress, generalized anxiety disorder, and major depressive disorder among healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was used through a survey link sent to gather demographic information and responses on several self-report scales, including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) among HCWs subscribed to the Text4Hope program. RESULTS: The result from this study suggests that during the COVID-19 pandemic, HCWs reported high likelihood of moderate/high stress (n=840, 81.2%), moderate/severe anxiety (n=369, 38.6%), and depression (n=317, 32.7%) symptoms. Nurses and other HCWs were significantly more likely to report depressive symptoms, compared to physicians, (F (2, 159.47) =15.89, 95% CI= (-5.05) -(-2.04). Younger age groups of HCWs (≤30 y) were more prone to report likely stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, compared to HCWs 41-50y and >50y (Odd's ratio range: 1.82- 3.03). Similarly, females and those who reported a lack of social support (separated/divorced and single) among HCWs, had a higher likelihood to report likely stress and depressive symptoms, respectively (OR=1.8 and 1.6). CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional study explored a high level of mental health burdens during the COVID-19 pandemic among HCWs in Alberta. Levels of psychological symptoms were more noticeable in the female gender and the nursing profession. CLINICALTRIAL: The University of Alberta Health Research Ethics Board provided ethics approval for this research (Pro00086163).

17.
Infant Ment Health J ; 2022 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34997613

ABSTRACT

Multiple changes and stressors at the family, hospital, and societal levels have resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic that impact the early social environment of infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) settings. This manuscript reviews these pandemic-related adversities, including hospital-wide visitor restrictions, mask requirements that interfere with caregiver facial expressions, parental anxiety about virus transmission, and reduced support services. We will further describe adaptations to mental health service delivery and approaches to care in the NICU to mitigate increased risk associated with pandemic-related adversities. Adaptations include integration of technology, staff education and support, and delivery of activity kits to encourage parent-infant bonding. Data was collected as part of routine program evaluation of infant mental health services from one 50-bed NICU setting and describes family concerns, barriers to visitation, and utilization of mental health services during the pandemic. Concerns related to COVID-19 rarely emerged as the primary presenting issue by the families referred for infant mental health services from April through December of 2020. However, a number of families indicated that infection concerns and visitation restrictions posed significant challenges to their parenting and/or coping. There were significant discrepancies noted between the visitation patterns of families with public and private insurance. Several adaptations were developed in response to the multiple challenges and threats to infant mental health present during the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 3, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34986872

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the change in trend of antenatal mental health and associated factors among a cohort of pregnant women during the second wave of COVID-19 using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Previous study using the same scale, during the first wave reported a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression. RESULTS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at the two large maternity hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka: Castle Street Hospital for Women (CSHW) and De Soysa Hospital for Women (DSHW). Consecutively recruited 311 women were studied. Out of which, 272 (87.5%) were having uncomplicated pregnancies at the time of the survey and 106 (34.1%) were either anxious, depressed, or both. Prevalence of anxiety was 17.0% and depression 27.0%. Overall, continuing COVID-19 pandemic increased antenatal anxiety and depression. The trend was to aggravate depression more intensively compared to anxiety in this cohort of women studied. Special support is needed for pregnant mothers during infectious epidemics taking more attention to antenatal depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnant Women , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
19.
Virol J ; 19(1): 3, 2022 01 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a communicable disease caused by a virus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Pandemics are associated with the high level of mental stress. In many countries, general people reported the high level of depression, anxiety, psychological distress, post-traumatic stress disorder during recent a pandemic. This study aims to investigate the mental health status of people who survived through this alarming situation of COVID-19. METHODS: In this study, seventy individuals (either gender) between the age of 18-60 years, who contracted COVID-19 previously and then recovered as indicated by negative PCR results, were included. Data was collected by using three tools: impact of event scale (IES-R), patient health questionnaire-9(PHQ-9) and corona anxiety scale (CAS). People with other systemic/mental disorders, ongoing malignancies, upper/lower motor disorders and inability to give consent were excluded from the study. RESULTS: Mean age of participants was 26.29 + 11.79. All the 70 responders suffered from COVID-19. Among these 23 (32.9%) were asymptomatic and 47(67.1%) had common symptoms related to COVID-19 53 (75.7%) responders also had symptoms post-recovery. Most of the people who suffered COVID-19 had mild depression. Twenty-nine participants (41.4%) reported the highest impact of this traumatic event on their mental health. After suffering from COVID-19, 74.3% reported no anxiety as measured through corona anxiety scale (CAS). CONCLUSION: High level of post-traumatic stress was seen among participants who recovered from COVID-19, especially those patients who were symptomatic. Mild depression and anxiety were also noted among them.

20.
Support Care Cancer ; 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34993652

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Cancer patients are at increased risk for psychological difficulties and COVID-19. We sought to analyze anxiety and depression levels during the COVID-19 pandemic and the association between sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: A prospective, multicenter cohort of 401 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, advanced cancer completed the Brief Symptom Inventory, Michel Uncertainty in Illness Scale, Herth Hope Index, and Cancer Worry Scale between February 2020 and May 2021. Linear regression analyses explored the effects of uncertainty, hopelessness, and cancer worry on anxiety and depression, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. RESULTS: The incidence of anxiety and depression was 36% and 35%, respectively. Emotional distress was greater among women, patients < 65 years of age, and those with an estimated survival of > 18 months. Linear regression analysis revealed that being female, preoccupation about cancer, and hopelessness were associated with increased levels of anxiety (p < 0.001) and depression (p < 0.001) and younger age was associated with a higher risk of anxiety. No differences in anxiety or depression levels were found in relation to marital status, children, educational level, cancer type, histology, stage, or type of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with advanced cancer who initiated treatment during the pandemic experienced high levels of depression and anxiety. Early diagnosis and the development of intervention strategies are necessary, especially for specific patient subgroups, such as young women with long survival times.

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