Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 9.434
Filter
1.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e059660, 2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35918109

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The psychological outcomes for many parents who experience perinatal loss depend on nursing staff's ability to provide effective bereavement support. However, most nurses and midwives lack the ability to provide bereavement care and suffer from heavy emotional burden. The study aims to investigate the effectiveness of the perinatal bereavement care training programme on nurses and midwives to increase their perinatal bereavement care confidence (PBCC) and to reduce secondary traumatic stress and emotional exhaustion. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will follow a mixed methodology consisting of two stages. The first stage will adopt a pre/post repeated quasi-experimental design without a control group. The second stage will use a qualitative interview study. This study will be conducted in a tertiary maternity hospital in China in 2022-2023. Ethical approval was obtained from the institutional review board in January of 2020. Outcome measures will be assessed using the Chinese version of the PBCC, STS and the EE subscale of Chinese Burn-out Inventory at baseline, postintervention and at the 3-month follow-up. Participants will be interviewed to understand their perceptions of the training programme. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This research protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Women's Hospital School of Medicine, Zhejiang University (IRB no. 20210091). The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and academic conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR2100049730.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , Hospice Care , Midwifery , Female , Grief , Hospice Care/psychology , Humans , Pregnancy , Research Design
2.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35920956

ABSTRACT

Using a person-centred approach, this study inspected multi-trajectories of conduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention and peer problems, and associated risk factors for group membership. The sample included 3,578 children (50.8% males) from a population birth cohort in Scotland (Growing Up in Scotland). The parental version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was used when children were 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10 years old. Antecedent factors at the perinatal, child, and family levels were collected using parental reports, observation, and standardised assessments at 10, 24, and 36 months. A group-based multi-trajectory analysis was employed. Findings showed that a six-group model best fit the data. Identified groups included non-engagers, normative, decreasing externalising/low peer problems, low externalising/moderate peer problems, moderate externalising/increasing peer problems and multimorbid moderate-high chronic. Findings suggest multimorbidity between externalising behaviours and peer problems in the more elevated groups. Two common protective factors emerged across all groups: caregiver mental health and parent-infant attachment. Identified risk factors were specific to group membership. Risk factors for the most elevated group included single-parent status, social deprivation, previous neonatal intensive care unit admission, child sex, whilst children's expressive language was a protective factor. Taken together, findings contribute to the emerging literature modelling trajectories of externalising behaviours and peer problems simultaneously and have important practical implications for prevention of problems in childhood, by identifying targets at the perinatal, child, and family levels.

3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-10, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35929356

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study explores the depressive symptoms in postpartum women during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis in Japan. METHODS: An online survey conducted from May 31 to June 6, 2020 resulted in 3073 responses obtained from mothers with infants < 12 mo. RESULTS: The point prevalence of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 9 was 28.66% for primipara and 25.83% for multipara. Logistic regression analysis indicated a negative association between the COVID-19 crisis and EPDS ≥ 9; specifically, decreased social support and financial concern were identified as risk factors. The COVID-19-related experiences significantly increased the score of each factor of EPDS, ie, anxiety, anhedonia, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 crisis, the number of mothers who faced depreciation in social support and income had increased. Moreover, spending their perinatal period during the crisis increased the propensity of facing unexpected changes, such as changes of hospitals for delivery, or cancellation of parenting classes. These multiple factors were associated with an elevated risk of depression in postpartum women. In a prolonged crisis, postpartum mental health should be treated carefully with the prevention of infection.

4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(8): e2226203, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35930280

ABSTRACT

Importance: Intergenerational welfare contact is a policy issue because of the personal and social costs of entrenched disadvantage; yet, few studies have quantified the burden associated with intergenerational welfare contact for health. Objective: To examine the proportion of individuals who experienced intergenerational welfare contact and other welfare contact types and to estimate their cause-specific hospital burden. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used a whole-of-population linked administrative dataset of individuals followed from birth to age 20 years using deidentified data from the Better Evidence Better Outcomes Linked Data platform (Australian Government Centrelink [welfare payments], birth registration, perinatal birth records, and inpatient hospitalizations). Participants included individuals born in South Australia from 1991 to 1995 and their parents. Analysis was undertaken from January 2020 to June 2022. Exposures: Using Australian Government Centrelink data, welfare contact was defined as 1 or more parents receiving a means-tested welfare payment (low-income, unemployment, disability, or caring) when children were aged 11 to 15 years, or youth receiving payment at ages 16 to 20 years. Intergenerational welfare contact was defined as welfare contact occurring in both parent and offspring generations. Offspring were classified as: no welfare contact, parent-only welfare contact, offspring-only welfare contact, or intergenerational welfare contact. Main Outcomes and Measures: Hospitalization rates and cumulative incidence were estimated by age, hospitalization cause, and welfare contact group. Results: A total of 94 358 offspring (48 589 [51.5%] male) and 143 814 parents were included in analyses. The study population included 32 969 offspring (34.9%) who experienced intergenerational welfare contact. These individuals were more socioeconomically disadvantaged at birth and had the highest hospitalization rate (133.5 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years) compared with individuals with no welfare contact (46.1 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years), individuals with parent-only welfare contact (75.0 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years), and individuals with offspring-only welfare contact (87.6 hospitalizations per 1000 person-years). Hospitalizations were frequently related to injury, mental health, and pregnancy. For example, the proportion of individuals with intergenerational welfare contact who had experienced at least 1 hospitalization at ages 16 to 20 years was highest for injury (9.0% [95% CI, 8.7%-9.3%]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this population-based cohort study, individuals who experienced intergenerational welfare contact represented one-third of the population aged 11 to 20 years. Compared with individuals with parent-only welfare contact, individuals with intergenerational welfare contact were more disadvantaged at birth and had 78% higher hospitalization rates from age 11 to 20 years, accounting for more than half of all hospitalizations. Frequent hospitalization causes were injuries, mental health, and pregnancy. This study provides the policy-relevant estimate for what it could mean to break cycles of disadvantage for reducing hospital burden.

5.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 521, 2022 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35918689

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Poor sleep quality and maternal mood disturbances are common during pregnancy and may play pivotal roles in the development of postpartum depression. We aim to examine the trajectories of sleep quality and mental health in women from early pregnancy to delivery and explore the mediating effects of sleep quality and mental status on the link between antepartum depressive symptoms and postpartum depressive symptoms. METHODS: In an ongoing prospective birth cohort, 1301 women completed questionnaires in the first, second and third trimesters and at 6 weeks postpartum. In each trimester, sleep quality was measured utilizing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and mental health was assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Postpartum depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). The bootstrap method was used to test the mediation effect. RESULTS: The PSQI, CES-D, and SAS scores presented U-shaped curves across the antenatal period while the PSS score followed a descending trend. Antenatal sleep quality, depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms and perceived stress all predicted depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum. The influence of antepartum depressive symptoms on postpartum depressive symptoms was mediated by antepartum sleep quality and anxiety symptoms, which accounted for 32.14%, 39.25% and 31.25% in the first, second and third trimesters (P = 0.002, P = 0.001, P = 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep quality and anxiety symptoms in pregnancy mediated the relationship between antepartum depressive symptoms and postpartum depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at detecting and managing sleep quality and elevated anxiety among depressed women in pregnancy warrant further investigation as preventative strategies for postpartum depression.


Subject(s)
Depression, Postpartum , Pregnancy Complications , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Depression/complications , Depression/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/complications , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Mediation Analysis , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Prospective Studies , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Sleep Quality
6.
Behav Brain Res ; : 114047, 2022 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35933046

ABSTRACT

Despite decades of research, the precise etiology of schizophrenia is not fully understood. Ample evidence indicates that the disorder derives from a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors during vulnerable stages of brain maturation. Among the plethora of risk factors investigated, stress, pre- and perinatal insults, and cannabis use have been repeatedly highlighted as crucial environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. Compelling findings from population-based longitudinal studies suggest low income as an additional risk factor for future schizophrenia diagnosis, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this narrative review, we 1) summarize the literature in support of a relationship between low (parental) income and schizophrenia risk, and 2) explore the mediating role of chronic stress, pre- and perinatal factors, and cannabis use as established risk factors for schizophrenia. Our review describes how low income facilitates the occurrence and severity of these established risk factors and thus contributes to schizophrenia liability. The broadest influence of low income was identified for stress, as low income was found to be associated with exposure to a multitude of severe psychological and physiological stressors. This narrative review adds to the growing literature reporting a close relationship between income and mental health.

7.
J Affect Disord ; 2022 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35803394

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Perinatal Depression (PND) is one of the most common complications (10-20 %) during the perinatal period and its clinical course and phenotypes are still an area of research. It is becoming increasingly clear that pregnant women and mothers with depression are not a homogeneous clinical group. METHODS: A systematic literature search in 4 databases revealed 359 studies, 33 relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. We only included studies with at least three assessment points in total. RESULTS: Two to six trajectory classes were identified. A three trajectories solution was most observed. All the included studies reported a low symptom trajectory but ranged from 6.5 % to 92 %. The high-symptom group was in most of the studies the smallest subgroup (1.1 % - 14.6 %). Most of the studies described episodic trajectories of depressive symptoms during the peripartum. The most common risk factor associated with a high-symptom trajectory of depressive symptoms in our study was a history of depression. Important socio-demographic predictors were: young age, ethnicity, low maternal education, low income, single relationship status or relationship problems, unplanned or unintended pregnancy and experiencing high stress levels. LIMITATIONS: The methodology and the observed PND trajectories of the included studies differed, which makes generalizability difficult in this review. CONCLUSIONS: PND is a frequent but heterogeneous disorder. Globally, four major groups could be distinguished: low, medium, high and episodic trajectories. There is a need for consensus regarding which assessment instruments to use, validated cutoff scores and similar time points of assessment.

8.
Australas Psychiatry ; : 10398562221112851, 2022 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35785995

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Service demand at Australian psychiatric mother-baby units is high. This project aimed to test a model of care providing step up/step down support to women with moderate-severe perinatal mental health disorders awaiting hospital admission. METHOD: A multi-disciplinary team was convened to provide pre-admission assessment and support to women waiting for admission, as well as post-discharge support as needed. RESULTS: 108 referrals were managed between April - November 2021. With appropriate assessment and/or support in place, half of the women referred (n = 54/108) were removed from the waitlist and avoided hospital admission. Service capacity indicators suggest a positive impact on referral numbers managed each week, as well as admissions per month. CONCLUSION: The tested model of care appears to have successfully improved service capacity; however longer term data is recommended to determine the sustainability of the trend towards increased capacity, and the acceptability of the model of care from a consumer perspective.

9.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 83(5)2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35830616

ABSTRACT

Objective: To estimate overall prevalence of bipolar disorder (BD) and the prevalence and timing of bipolar-spectrum mood episodes in perinatal women.Data Sources: Databases (PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane, ClincalTrials.gov) were searched from inception to March 2020.Study Selection: Included studies were original research in English that had (1) populations of perinatal participants (pregnant or within 12 months postpartum), aged ≥ 18 years, and (2) a screening/diagnostic tool for BD. Search terms described the population (eg, perinatal), illness (eg, bipolar disorder), and detection (eg, screen, identify).Data Extraction: Study design data, rates, and timing of positive screens/diagnoses and mood episodes were extracted by 3 independent reviewers. Pooled prevalences were estimated using random-effects meta-analyses.Results: Twenty-two articles were included in qualitative review and 12 in the meta-analysis. In women with no known psychiatric illness preceding the perinatal period, pooled prevalence of BD was 2.6% (95% CI, 1.2%-4.5%) and prevalence of bipolar-spectrum mood episodes (including depressed, hypomanic/manic, mixed) during pregnancy and the postpartum period was 20.1% (95% CI, 16.0%-24.5%). In women with a prior BD diagnosis, 54.9% (95% CI, 39.2%-70.2%) were found to have at least one bipolar-spectrum mood episode occurrence in the perinatal period.Conclusions: Our review suggests that the perinatal period is associated with high rates of bipolar-spectrum mood episodes and that pregnant and postpartum women represent a special risk population. This review may help to inform clinical care recommendations, thus helping to identify those who may have.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , Affect , Bipolar Disorder/diagnosis , Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , Bipolar Disorder/psychology , Female , Humans , Postpartum Period/psychology , Pregnancy , Prevalence , Risk Factors
10.
J Atten Disord ; : 10870547221105064, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35815439

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: ADHD symptoms can adversely impact functioning in a range of domains relevant for maternal well-being and fetal development; however, there has been almost no research examining their impact during pregnancy. We aimed to address this gap. METHOD: We used data (n = 1,204) from a longitudinal birth cohort study spanning eight countries to address this gap. RESULTS: ADHD symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy were associated with lower social support from family (b = -0.16, p = .031), friends (b = -0.16, p = .024), and significant others (b = -0.09, p = .001); higher stress (b = 0.34, p < .001) and depressive symptoms (b = 0.31, p < .001), and increased likelihood of an unwanted pregnancy (b = 0.30, p = .009). Significant associations with tobacco use (b = 0.36, p = .023) and premature birth (b = 0.35, p = .007) did not survive correction for multiple comparisons and there were no significant associations with alcohol use, low birth weight, or unplanned pregnancy. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that women with ADHD symptoms could benefit from earlier, more regular screening for mental health difficulties and greater mental health support during pregnancy.

11.
J Perinat Med ; 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35822707

ABSTRACT

The perinatal period, from the beginning of pregnancy to one year after birth, is a time of considerable physiological and emotional change, where women face a significant risk of development or relapse of mental health disorders. Mental health disorders are one of the most common conditions faced in the perinatal period, but often go unrecognised. There are several barriers to accessing and delivering care, such as instances of structural bias, cultural diversity, stigma, lack of resources and the additional challenge brought by the coronavirus pandemic. Perinatal psychiatry is a dynamic and evolving field, which spans gender, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic background and many other characteristics, to care for people at a vulnerable time in their lives. This article explores the role of perinatal psychiatrists in today's society, as well as the challenges faced in the field.

12.
Med J Aust ; 217(1): 36-42, 2022 Jul 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35780458

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: About 44% of Indigenous Australian women smoke during pregnancy, compared with 12% of pregnant non-Indigenous women. Health care providers can assist smoking cessation, but they are not typically trained in culturally appropriate methods. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a health care worker training intervention increases smoking cessation rates among Indigenous pregnant smokers compared with usual care. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Supporting Indigenous Smokers to Assist Quitting (SISTAQUIT) study is a multicentre, hybrid type 1, pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial that compares the effects of an intervention for improving smoking cessation by pregnant Indigenous women (16 years or older, 32 weeks' gestation or less) with usual care. Twenty-one health services caring for Indigenous people in five Australian jurisdictions were randomised to the intervention (ten sites) or control groups (eleven sites). Health care providers at intervention sites received smoking cessation care training based on the ABCD (ask/assess; brief advice; cessation; discuss psychosocial context) approach to smoking cessation for Indigenous women, an educational resource package, free oral nicotine replacement therapy for participating women, implementation support, and trial implementation training. Health care providers in control group services provided usual care. PRIMARY OUTCOME: abstinence from smoking (self-reported abstinence via survey, validated by carbon monoxide breath testing when possible) four weeks after enrolment in the study. SECONDARY OUTCOMES: health service process evaluations; knowledge, attitudes, and practices of health care providers; and longer term abstinence, perinatal outcomes, and respiratory outcomes for babies (to six months). Ethics approval: The human research ethics committees of the University of Newcastle (H-2015-0438) and the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council of NSW (1140/15) provided the primary ethics approval. Dissemination of results: Findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications, at local and overseas conferences, and via public and social media, and to participating health services in art-based formats and reports. Policy briefs will be communicated to relevant government organisations. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12618000972224 (prospective).


Subject(s)
Health Services, Indigenous , Smoking Cessation , Australia , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Indigenous Peoples , Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Smoking/psychology , Smoking Cessation/methods , Tobacco Use Cessation Devices
13.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 536, 2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35780118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tailoring an intervention to the needs and wishes of pregnant women in vulnerable situations (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantages) can reduce the risk of adverse outcomes and empower these women. A relatively high percentage of pregnant women in the North of the Netherlands are considered vulnerable to adverse pregnancy outcomes because of their low socioeconomic status and the intergenerational transmission of poverty. In order to improve perinatal and maternal health, next to standard prenatal care, various interventions for pregnant women in vulnerable situations have been developed. We do not know to what extent these additional interventions suit the needs of (pregnant) women. Therefore, the aim of this study is to gain insight into the experiences and needs of women in vulnerable situations who receive additional maternity care interventions in the Northern Netherlands. METHODS: Qualitative research was performed. We used a phenomenological framework, which is geared towards understanding people's experiences in the context of their everyday lives. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 pregnant women in vulnerable situations living in the Northern Netherlands. A thematic analysis was carried out. RESULTS: We found three themes that reflect the experiences and needs of pregnant women in vulnerable situations in relation to the intervention they receive. These themes relate to the care provided by health professionals, to the impact of being offered an intervention, and to practical issues related to receiving an additional intervention. We found that the needs of pregnant women in vulnerable situations who received an additional maternity care intervention varied. This variation in needs was mainly related to practical issues. Women also expressed common needs, namely the desire to have control over their situation, the wish to receive tailor-made information about the intervention, and the wish for the intervention to be specifically tailored to their circumstances. CONCLUSIONS: Living in vulnerable situations and being offered additional care evoked diverse reactions and emotions from pregnant women. We recommend that health professionals ensure open and clear communication with women, that they ensure continuity of care and relationship-centered care, and that they become aware of the process of stigmatization of women in vulnerable situations.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Obstetrics , Female , Humans , Parturition/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , Qualitative Research
14.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 882429, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35782453

ABSTRACT

Trauma-related symptoms and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common during pregnancy and have adverse effects on pregnancy and birth outcomes, post-partum maternal mental health, and child development. The arousal symptoms associated with PTSD, including heightened or dysregulated physiology, may contribute to these adverse outcomes. Low-income minoritized women may be at highest risk given more lifetime exposure to trauma and limited access to mental health care. While evidence-based psychotherapies for PTSD exist, none are targeted to non-treatment seeking individuals nor specifically integrated with prenatal care. Thus, we developed and tested the efficacy of a short-term (four sessions) brief (30-45 min) psychotherapeutic intervention designed to address PTSD symptoms in pregnant women receiving prenatal care at two urban medical centers. Participants were 32 pregnant women with an average gestational age of 18.5 weeks at the time of enrollment. The sample was overwhelmingly non-Caucasian, single, and reported very low income. Participants completed measures of trauma-related symptoms (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, PCL), and depression (Edinburgh post-natal Depression Scale, EPDS) at baseline, twice during treatment, post-treatment, and at 10-14 weeks post-partum. The intervention was successful at significantly decreasing symptoms of PTSD (PCL score = -20.27, 95% CI: -25.62, -14.92, P < 0.001, W = -7.43) and depression (EPDS score = -4.81, 95% CI: -7.55, -2.06, P = 0.001, W = -3.23) by the final session. These benefits were sustained at post-treatment and post-partum follow ups. Future research should further explore the effectiveness of this treatment in a randomized controlled trial.

15.
Women Birth ; 2022 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35798661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Risk factors for poor maternal perinatal mental health include a previous mental health diagnosis, reduced access to perinatal services, economic concerns and decreased levels of social support. Adverse maternal perinatal mental health can negatively influence the psychological wellbeing of infants. The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic presented an additional stressor. While literature on the impact of COVID-19 on perinatal mental health exists, no systematic review has focused specifically on maternal perinatal mental health during periods of COVID-19 lockdown. AIMS: This systematic review explores how periods of COVID-19 lockdown impacted women's perinatal mental health. METHODS: Searches of CINAHL, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were conducted for literature from 1st January 2020-25th May 2021. Quantitative, peer-reviewed, cross-sectional studies published in English with perinatal women as participants, and data collected during a period of lockdown, were included. Data was assessed for quality and narratively synthesized. FINDINGS: Sixteen articles from nine countries met the inclusion criteria. COVID-19 lockdowns negatively impacted perinatal mental health. Risk factors for negative perinatal mental health noted in previous literature were confirmed. In addition, resilience, educational attainment, trimester, and ethnicity were identified as other variables which may influence mental health during perinatal periods experienced during lockdown. Understanding nuance in experience and harnessing intra and interpersonal support could advance options for intervention. CONCLUSION: Developing resources for perinatal women that integrate informal sources of support may aid them when normal routine is challenged, and may mediate potential long-term impacts of poor perinatal maternal health on infants.

16.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 935760, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35832593

ABSTRACT

Background: Fear of childbirth (FOC) is one of the most common psychological symptoms among pregnant women and significantly relates to cesarean section, anxiety, and depression. However, it is not clear the prevalence and risk factors of FOC among Chinese pregnant women since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Aims: The objective of this study was to examine the associations between coping styles, intolerance of uncertainty, and FOC. Method: From December 2021 to April 2022, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in two hospitals in China through convenient sampling. The cross-sectional survey was conducted among 969 pregnant women, which included the Childbirth Attitude Questionnaire (CAQ), Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale-12 (IUS-12), and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). Results: The total prevalence of FOC was 67.8%. The percentages of women with mild (a score of 28-39), moderate (40-51), and severe FOC (52-64) were 43.6, 20.2, and 4.0%, respectively. The regression results indicated that primiparas, unplanned pregnancy, few spousal support, intolerance of uncertainty, and negative coping styles were significant risk factors of FOC. Women who adopt positive coping strategies experienced a lower level of childbirth fear. Conclusion: These findings suggest that cultivating positive coping styles and obtaining sufficient childbirth information may be helpful for mothers' mental health. Regular screening assessment of perinatal psychological symptoms, such as the high level of intolerance of uncertainty and negative coping styles, should be adopted to reduce the risk of fear of childbirth.

17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35849215

ABSTRACT

Perinatal depression (PND) screening recommendations are made by national, state-based and professional organisations; however, there is disagreement regarding screening timing, provider responsible, screening setting, screening tool as well as the follow-up and referral pathways required post-screening. This systematic review aimed to identify, describe and compare PND screening recommendations from member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Publications were identified through systematically searching PubMed, Google and the Guidelines International Network (GIN). Recommendations regarding PND screening endorsement, timing, frequency, responsible provider, tools/assessments and follow-up and referral were extracted. Twenty-one publications, including guidelines, from five countries were included. Most made recommendations in support of PND screening using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Details differed regarding terminology used, as well as frequency of screening, follow-up mechanisms and referral pathways. A broad range of health providers were considered to be responsible for screening. This is the first review to identify and compare PND screening recommendations from OECD member countries; however, only online publications published in English, from five countries were included. Heterogeneity of publication types and inconsistency in definitions rendered quality assessment inappropriate. While most publications generally endorsed PND screening, there are exceptions and the associated details pertaining to the actual conduct of screening vary between and within countries. Developing clear, standardised recommendations based on current evidence is necessary to ensure clarity amongst healthcare providers and a comprehensive approach for the early detection of PND.

18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35849216

ABSTRACT

Preterm birth (PTB) and postpartum depression (PPD) are important public health issues, and although literature mainly supports the association between them, some reviews have highlighted methodological limitations in the studies in this field, restricting the interpretation of such finding. This study aimed at assessing the association between PTB and PPD, by comparing groups of preterm and full-term mothers in two Brazilian cities with contrasting sociodemographic indicators. This prospective convenience cohort study assessed 1421 women during pregnancy, at childbirth, and in the postpartum period. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was administrated to assess PPD within 6 months after delivery and women were considered probably depressed if scores were EDPS ≥ 12. PTB was defined as the delivery before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. A multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate relative risk for PPD in mothers of preterm infants, and the final analysis models were adjusted for psychosocial variables, selected according to the directed acyclic graph (DAG) approach. Frequencies of PPD were not significantly different in mothers of preterm and full-term infants, in neither city. In the final adjusted model, PTB was not associated with PPD. The association between PTB and PPD was not confirmed in two large samples from two Brazilian cities with contrasting socioeconomic profile. However, maternal health during pregnancy plays an important role in predicting PPD. Prenatal care should promote maternal mental health as an effort towards decreasing unfavored outcomes for mothers, infants, and families.

19.
Front Glob Womens Health ; 3: 846611, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35814836

ABSTRACT

Despite the availability of evidence-based postpartum depression (PPD) prevention and treatment interventions, perinatal persons continue to suffer. eHealth and mHealth tools to address mental health issues have grown exponentially, especially given the ubiquity of technology and the increased demand for telemental health resources. The Mothers and Babies Online Course (eMB), an 8-lesson prevention of PPD intervention, was digitally adapted to expand the reach of evidence-based interventions to perinatal persons with limited access to maternal mental health resources. This report describes the characteristics, behaviors, and feedback provided by users of the updated eMB website. Two hundred eight predominantly English-speaking U.S. residents enrolled in the eMB. Thirty-seven percent were either pregnant (n = 38) or postpartum (n = 39) women interested in learning skills to manage changes in their mood during and after pregnancy; 63% were health providers (n = 131) interested in learning how to support their patient communities. Seventy-six percent (n = 159) viewed at least one of the eight eMB lessons, with 50.9% exclusively viewing Lesson 1. Few (4.4%) viewed all eight lessons. The lessons were rated favorably on usefulness and understanding. Perinatal women engaged with interactive content at higher rates than health providers. Examining user behaviors and feedback is an essential developmental step before empirically testing the efficacy of digital tools. Future iterations of the eMB will incorporate these preliminary findings to provide perinatal persons with accessible web-based interventions that will hopefully reduce the incidence and negative consequences of postpartum depression.

20.
Front Glob Womens Health ; 3: 823632, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35814837

ABSTRACT

Background: Migrant women with young children, including asylum seekers and refugees, have multiple vulnerability factors that put them at increased risk of social isolation and loneliness, which are associated with negative health outcomes. This study explored the experiences of social isolation and loneliness among migrant mothers with children aged 0-5 years as well as their perceptions on possible health impacts. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted at La Maison Bleue, a non-profit organization providing perinatal health and social services to vulnerable women in Montreal, Canada. Recruitment and data collection occurred concurrently during the COVID-19 pandemic, between November and December 2020. Eleven women participated in individual semi-structured interviews and provided socio-demographic information. Interview data were thematically analyzed. Results: Migrant women in this study described social isolation as the loss of family support and of their familiar social/cultural networks, and loneliness as the feelings of aloneness that stemmed from being a mother in a new country with limited support. Multiple factors contributed to women's and children's social isolation and loneliness, including migration status, socioeconomic circumstances, language barriers, and being a single mother. Women expressed that the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated pre-existing experiences of social isolation and loneliness. Mothers' experiences affected their emotional and mental health, while for children, it reduced their social opportunities outside the home, especially if not attending childcare. However, the extent to which mothers' experiences of social isolation and loneliness influenced the health and development of their children, was less clear. Conclusion: Migrant mothers' experiences of social isolation and loneliness are intricately linked to their status as migrants and mothers. Going forward, it is critical to better document pandemic and post-pandemic consequences of social isolation and loneliness on young children of migrant families. Supportive interventions for migrant mothers and their young children should not only target social isolation but should also consider mothers' feelings of loneliness and foster social connectedness and belongingness. To address social isolation and loneliness, interventions at the individual, community and policy levels are needed.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...