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1.
Appetite ; 170: 105907, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979175

ABSTRACT

Breastfeeding has been associated with improved growth, development, and health outcomes for infants and children. However, the exclusive breastfeeding rate in Indonesia is suboptimal (37%). There is limited contextualised understanding of mothers' perceptions of breastfeeding and the factors behind exclusive breastfeeding practices. The aim of this qualitative study was to compare breastfeeding perceptions and exclusive breastfeeding practices between rural and urban mothers. We conducted a qualitative comparative study through in-depth interviews with 46 caregivers of children aged 6-23 months, two health professionals, and ten kader (frontline female health workers at the village level) in Central Java, Indonesia. We analysed the data using thematic analysis. Urban mothers had better knowledge and perceptions of breastfeeding and more access to breastfeeding information sources. However, exclusive breastfeeding practice was more frequent among rural mothers. Family and healthcare workers acted as both facilitators and barriers to exclusive breastfeeding practice in both settings. Perceptions of insufficient breast milk supply, infant illness, and breast problems prevented rural and urban mothers to breastfeed exclusively. Mother-infant separation after birth, breast rejection, latching difficulty, and maternal employment were among the factors that caused urban mothers to discontinue breastfeeding exclusively. Breastfeeding promotion strategies should focus on enhancing maternal breastfeeding knowledge and problem-solving skills by considering the individual and social context, particularly in urban areas where exclusive breastfeeding obstacles are more nuanced.

2.
Arch Osteoporos ; 17(1): 11, 2022 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34981246

ABSTRACT

Decisions on whether to use pharmacologic osteoporosis therapy in skilled nursing facility residents are complex and require shared decision-making. Residents, proxies, and staff desire individualized fracture risk estimates that consider advanced age, dementia, and mobility. They want options for reducing administration burden, monitoring instructions, and periodic reassessment of risk vs. benefit. PURPOSE: Decisions about pharmacologic osteoporosis treatment in nursing home (NH) residents with advanced age and multimorbidity are complex and should occur using shared decision-making. Our objective was to identify processes and tools to improve shared decision-making about pharmacologic osteoporosis treatment in NHs. METHODS: Qualitative analysis of data collected in three NHs from residents at high fracture risk, their proxies, nursing assistants, nurses, and one nurse practitioner (n = 28). Interviews explored participants' stories, attitudes, and experiences with oral osteoporosis medication management. Framework analysis was used to identify barriers to shared decision-making regarding osteoporosis treatment in this setting. RESULTS: Participants wanted individualized fracture risk estimates that consider immobility, advanced age, and comorbid dementia. Residents and proxies expected nursing staff to be involved in the decision-making; nursing staff wished to be informed on the relative risks vs. benefits of medications and given monitoring instructions. Two important competing demands to address during the shared decision-making process were burdensome administration requirements and polypharmacy. Participants wanted to reassess pharmacologic treatment appropriateness over time as clinical status or goals of care change. CONCLUSIONS: Shared decision-making using strategies and tools identified in this analysis may move osteoporosis pharmacologic treatment in NHs and for other older adults with multimorbidity from inappropriate inertia to appropriate prescribing or appropriate inaction.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Osteoporosis , Aged , Dementia/drug therapy , Dementia/epidemiology , Humans , Nursing Homes , Osteoporosis/drug therapy , Osteoporosis/epidemiology
3.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 6, 2022 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34974830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-moderated alcohol use is more prevalent among hospitalized patients compared to the general population. However, many hospitals fail to find and intervene with people with alcohol problems. We aimed to conduct an exploration of impeding and facilitating factors experienced by healthcare professionals in implementation of alcohol interventions in Dutch general hospitals. In addition, we explored the alcohol interventions used in the selected hospitals and involved stakeholders. METHODS: Through a qualitative study, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with twenty healthcare professionals working in or in collaboration with six different general hospitals. RESULTS: Healthcare professionals indicated impeding and facilitating factors in the areas of motivation, knowledge and skills, patient characteristics, protocol, internal and external collaboration/support, resources, role suitability and societal support. Five different categories of approaches to identify and intervene with non-moderated alcohol use and 18 involved stakeholders from both inside and outside the hospital were found. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of alcohol interventions for patients in Dutch general hospitals still seems to be in its infancy. Respondents emphasized the importance of one clear protocol on how to tackle alcohol problems within their hospital, repeated training on alcohol-related knowledge and skills, (clinical) "champions" that support healthcare professionals and developing and maintaining collaborations with stakeholders within and outside the hospital.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Hospitals , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Motivation , Qualitative Research
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 14, 2022 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34974838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with young onset dementia (YOD) have unique needs and experiences, requiring care and support that is timely, appropriate and accessible. This relies on health professionals possessing sufficient knowledge about YOD. This study aims to establish a consensus among YOD experts about the information that is essential for health professionals to know about YOD. METHODS: An international Delphi study was conducted using an online survey platform with a panel of experts (n = 19) on YOD. In round 1 the panel individually responded to open-ended questions about key facts that are essential for health professionals to understand about YOD. In rounds 2 and 3, the panel individually rated the collated responses in terms of their importance in addition to selected items from the Dementia Knowledge Assessment Scale. The consensus level reached for each statement was calculated using the median, interquartile range and percentage of panel members who rated the statement at the highest level of importance. RESULTS: The panel of experts were mostly current or retired clinicians (57%, n = 16). Their roles included neurologist, psychiatrist and neuropsychiatrist, psychologist, neuropsychologist and geropsychologist, physician, social worker and nurse practitioner. The remaining respondents had backgrounds in academia, advocacy, or other areas such as law, administration, homecare or were unemployed. The panel reached a high to very high consensus on 42 (72%) statements that they considered to be important for health professionals to know when providing care and services to people with YOD and their support persons. Importantly the panel agreed that health professionals should be aware that people with YOD require age-appropriate care programs and accommodation options that take a whole-family approach. In terms of identifying YOD, the panel agreed that it was important for health professionals to know that YOD is aetiologically diverse, distinct from a mental illness, and has a combination of genetic and non-genetic contributing factors. The panel highlighted the importance of health professionals understanding the need for specialised, multidisciplinary services both in terms of diagnosing YOD and in providing ongoing support. The panel also agreed that health professionals be aware of the importance of psychosocial support and non-pharmacological interventions to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The expert panel identified information that they deem essential for health professionals to know about YOD. There was agreement across all thematic categories, indicating the importance of broad professional knowledge related to YOD identification, diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing care. The findings of this study are not only applicable to the delivery of support and care services for people with YOD and their support persons, but also to inform the design of educational resources for health professionals who are not experts in YOD.


Subject(s)
Dementia , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/therapy , Health Personnel , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Heliyon ; 8(1): e08686, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34977397

ABSTRACT

Implementing health protocols and preventive measures are the only effective ways to suppress COVID-19 transmission before vaccines and antiviral drugs are developed. The implementation of health protocols and preventive measures are influenced by one's knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) toward this pandemic. Medical students as candidates for healthcare workers and role models for the community should have a good KAP. This study intends 1) to explore the KAP of medical students in Indonesia toward COVID-19 and 2) to assess which demographic factors have a significant effect on their KAP scores. An online questionnaire consisting of 18 items of knowledge, six items of attitudes, and 12 items of practices were used as instruments in this study. After being distributed for two weeks in June 2020, 525 respondents whose data were worth analyzing were obtained. The respondents consisted of male and female students, from diploma to bachelor degree, and came from all four types of higher education institutions in Indonesia. The results, 48% of respondents had good knowledge, 81% had good attitudes, and 43.5% had good practices toward COVID-19. The location of students' residence has no significant effect on their KAP score. Gender has a significant effect on knowledge and practice scores. Age, institution type, and institution status have a significant effect on their three KAP domains. The KAP survey results can be used as a reflection of the importance of the curriculum that prepares medical students for the pandemic. Medical students are also expected to be able to actively participate in educating people around them on how to minimize the transmission of COVID-19 during the pandemic.

6.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34978585

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) patients are at an increased risk for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The aim of this seroepidemiological study was to evaluate the risk of infection for employees at a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Serological tests for antibodies against SARS-CoV­2 were carried out in a prospective cohort of employees directly involved in the care of COVID­19 patients every 2 weeks from March to July 2020 (1st wave). Antibody status was examined again between December 2020 and February 2021 (2nd wave). RESULTS: The seroprevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV­2 was 5.1% at the end of the study in February 2021. The cumulative incidence was 3.9% after a median observation period of 261 days. CONCLUSION: We observed a low risk of SARS-CoV­2 infection comparable to that of the general population in the examined cohort of healthcare workers involved in the acute care of COVID­19 patients under the applied hygiene and protective measures.

7.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34978706

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of the study was to compare the challenges in implementing various COVID-19-related public health strategies and activities between the selected high health index and low health index states. The secondary objective was to identify the differently managed mechanisms adopted by the health-care delivery system across the states to maintain their functioning during the COVID-19 pandemic. SETTING: Eight states were divided into two groups; based on their health index and vulnerability index ranking-Kerala, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Karnataka in top four (Group 1) and Delhi, Tripura, Rajasthan, and Orissa in bottom four states (Group 2). RESULTS: There was lack of private sector involvement in both the groups of the states, more so in Group 2. Although transport-related issues were similar in both groups, lack of provision of vehicles for transport for carrying out various COVID and non-COVID activities seemed to be more prominent in Group 2. More obstacles related to infrastructure were observed in Group 1 states. In terms of innovations, commonalities lay in convergence of multiple departments for monitoring, contact tracing, essential supplies, and transportation. Both groups managed routine health services and fund allocation with nearly equal vigour. Major challenges faced were related to human resource, policy management, transportation, routine health services, data management, and infrastructure. HR-related challenges in top four states included confusion due to frequent change in guidelines, unclear micro-containment, and testing guidelines. Discharge guidelines and SOPs related to home isolation of slum dwellers, inter-departmental cooperation and coordination issues faced in greater proportion in top four states; issues with fund allocation for local needs were faced by the Group 2 states. Innovations implemented to meet hurdles faced during the pandemic could be categorized under heads of 'human resource', 'community actions', 'policy management', 'inter-departmental coordination', 'use of technology and media', and 'fund allocations'. There was private-public partnership; use of other human resource for health-care delivery; use of technology for health-care delivery was seen in all states but more so in Group 1 states. CONCLUSION: States with higher health index and lower vulnerability index, i.e., Group 1 states faced fewer challenges than those in Group 2. Innovative measures taken at local level to tackle problems posed by the pandemic were unique to the situations presented to them and helped control the disease as effectively as they could.

9.
J Headache Pain ; 23(1): 2, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurological symptoms are frequent among patients with COVID-19. Little is known regarding the repercussions of neurological symptoms for patients and how these symptoms are related to one another. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is an association between the neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19, and to characterize the headache. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. All hospital inpatients and health workers at the Hospital Universitario Oswaldo Cruz with a PCR-confirmed COVID-19 infection between March and June 2020 were considered for the study and were interviewed by telephone at least 2-months after the acute phase of the disease. These patients were identified by the hospital epidemiological surveillance department. A semi-structured questionnaire was used containing sociodemographic and clinical data and the ID-Migraine. RESULTS: A total of 288 patients was interviewed; 53.1% were male; with a median age of 49.9 (41.5-60.5) years; 91.7% presented some neurological symptom; 22.2% reported some neurological symptom as the symptom that troubled them most during COVID-19. Neurological symptoms were: ageusia (69.8%), headache (69.1%), anosmia (67%), myalgia (44.4%), drowsiness (37.2%), agitation (20.8%); mental confusion (14.9%), syncope (4.9%) and epileptic seizures (2.8%). Females, those who presented with fever, sore throat, anosmia/ageusia and myalgia also presented significantly more with headache (logistic regression). The most frequent headache phenotype was a non-migraine phenotype, was of severe intensity and differed from previous headaches. This persisted for more than 30 days in 18% and for more than 90 days in 10% of patients. Thirteen percent of those with anosmia and 11% with ageusia continued with these complaints after more than 90 days of the acute phase of the disease. Aged over 50 years, agitation and epileptic seizures were significantly associated with mental confusion (logistic regression). CONCLUSION: Headache is frequent in COVID-19, is associated with other symptoms such as fever, sore throat, anosmia, ageusia, and myalgia, and may persist beyond the acute phase of the disease.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Aged , Anosmia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Headache/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMC Geriatr ; 22(1): 7, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multidimensional frailty, including physical, psychological, and social components, is associated to disability, lower quality of life, increased healthcare utilization, and mortality. In order to prevent or delay frailty, more knowledge of its determinants is necessary; one of these determinants is lifestyle. The aim of this study is to determine the association between lifestyle factors smoking, alcohol use, nutrition, physical activity, and multidimensional frailty. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in two samples comprising in total 45,336 Dutch community-dwelling individuals aged 65 years or older. These samples completed a questionnaire including questions about smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, sociodemographic factors (both samples), and nutrition (one sample). Multidimensional frailty was assessed with the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI). RESULTS: Higher alcohol consumption, physical activity, healthy nutrition, and less smoking were associated with less total, physical, psychological and social frailty after controlling for effects of other lifestyle factors and sociodemographic characteristics of the participants (age, gender, marital status, education, income). Effects of physical activity on total and physical frailty were up to considerable, whereas the effects of other lifestyle factors on frailty were small. CONCLUSIONS: The four lifestyle factors were not only associated with physical frailty but also with psychological and social frailty. The different associations of frailty domains with lifestyle factors emphasize the importance of assessing frailty broadly and thus to pay attention to the multidimensional nature of this concept. The findings offer healthcare professionals starting points for interventions with the purpose to prevent or delay the onset of frailty, so community-dwelling older people have the possibility to aging in place accompanied by a good quality of life.

11.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 4, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34979992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Having good Quality of Life (QoL) is essential, particularly for women after childbirth. However, little is known about the factors associated with maternal QoL after giving birth. We aimed to investigate the relationship between characteristics of the mother (socio-demographic variables), selected symptoms (depression and joy/anger), health perception (perception of birth) and possible characteristics of the environment (infant temperament, colic, sleep, parental relationship), with mothers' overall quality of life when the child is 6 months of age. METHODS: This study is based on the Norwegian Mother, Father and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), conducted at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health from June 1999 to December 2008, which included a total of 86,724 children. Maternal QoL was assessed by the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Joy and anger were measured using the Differential Emotional Scale, mothers' mental health was assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and satisfaction with relationship was measured using the Relationship Satisfaction Scale. Child temperament was measured using the Infant Characteristics Questionnaire and colic, sleep duration and feelings related to childbirth were assessed by mothers' reports. The associations between life satisfaction and selected variables were analysed using stepwise multiple linear regression models, and the results are presented as effect sizes (ES). RESULTS: Maternal feelings of joy of having a baby (ES = 0.35), high relationship satisfaction (ES = 0.32), as well as having a baby with normal sleep (ES = 0.31), are factors associated with higher maternal overall QoL. Postnatal depression was negatively associated with mothers' QoL, and infant colic or child's temperament (fussiness) showed no such association with mothers' QoL. CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals and clinicians should focus on infants sleep but also on supporting joy of motherhood and strengthening relationships of the new parents when they develop health interventions or provide counselling to new mothers and their families.

12.
BMC Pediatr ; 22(1): 7, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980010

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) is an American Academy of Pediatrics neonatal resuscitation program designed to reduce neonatal mortality in low resource settings. The 2017 neonatal mortality rate in Haiti was 28 per 1000 live births and an estimated 85 % of Haitian women deliver at home. Given this, the Community Health Initiative implemented an adapted HBB (aHBB) in Haiti to evaluate neonatal mortality. METHODS: Community Health Workers taught an aHBB program to laypeople, which didn't include bag-valve-mask ventilation. Follow-up after delivery assessed for maternal and neonatal mortality and health. RESULTS: Analysis included 536 births of which 84.3 % (n=452) were attended by someone trained in aHBB. The odds of neonatal mortality was not significantly different among the two groups (aOR=0.48 [0.16-1.44]). Composite outcome of neonatal health as reported by the mother (subjective morbidity and mortality) was significantly lower in aHBB attended births (aOR=0.31 [0.14-0.70]). CONCLUSION: This analysis of the aHBB program indicates that community training to laypersons in low resource settings may reduce neonatal ill-health but not neonatal mortality. This study is likely underpowered to find a difference in neonatal mortality. Further work is needed to evaluate which components of the aHBB program are instrumental in improving neonatal health.

13.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 13, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980083

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although most systematic reviews of interprofessional education (IPE) evaluated the impact of IPE on the students' acquisition of knowledge in relation to other professions, the development of teamwork skills, and the changes in collaborative behaviour, the processes involved in IPE (i.e., approaches to teaching and learning) are under-researched. The purpose of the study was to conduct a systematic review to establish how IPE has been implemented in university-based undergraduate curricula, focusing on the teaching and learning approaches. METHODS: The systematic review was performed in 2020 with three databases: PubMed, Science Direct, and the Cochrane Library. Titles and abstracts were included based on pre-identified eligibility criteria. We used the article entitled 'Systematic reviews in medical education: a practical approach: AMEE guide 94' as the basis to establish the aim and methods of the current systematic review from 2010 to 2019. RESULTS: We found 16 articles that met the inclusion criteria and reported the implementation process of IPE in universities from Western, Asian, and African countries. A combination of at least two teaching and learning approaches was used to deliver IPE. The findings indicated that of all the teaching and learning approaches, simulation-based education, e-learning, and problem-based learning were the most prevalent approaches used to deliver IPE. This systematic review also revealed a lack of IPE programmes in the Middle East region. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence synthesised in the current systematic review could support IPE curriculum planners and educators when planning an IPE programme. More global IPE initiatives are required to meet the global health workforce needs. Further studies are required to identify the effectiveness of the different teaching and learning approaches in the development of IPE competencies.


Subject(s)
Interprofessional Education , Interprofessional Relations , Curriculum , Health Occupations , Humans , Problem-Based Learning
14.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 3, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980085

ABSTRACT

Denmark is considered one of the World's most secular societies, and spiritual matters are rarely verbalized in public. Patients report that their spiritual needs are not cared for sufficiently. For studying spiritual care and communication, twelve patients admitted to two Danish hospices were interviewed. Verbal and non-verbal communication between patients and healthcare professionals were identified and analysed. Methodically, the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used, and the findings were discussed through the lenses of existential psychology as well as philosophy and theory of caring sciences. Three themes were identified: 1. When death becomes present, 2. Direction of the initiative, and 3. Bodily presence and non-verbal communication. The encounter between patient and healthcare professional is greatly influenced by sensing, decoding, and interpretation. A perceived connection between the patient and the healthcare professional is of great importance as to how the patient experiences the relationship with the healthcare professional.The patient's perception and the patient's bodily experience of the healthcare professional are crucial to whether the patient opens up to the healthcare professional about thoughts and needs of a spiritual nature and initiates a conversation hereabout. In this way we found three dynamically connected movements toward spiritual care: 1. From secular to spiritual aspects of care 2. From bodily, sensory to verbal aspects of spiritual care and 3. From biomedical to spiritual communication and care. Thus, the non-verbal dimension becomes a prerequisite for the verbal dimension of spiritual communication to develop and unfold. The behaviour of the healthcare professionals, characterised by the way they move physically and the way they touch the patient, was found to be just as important as verbal conversation when it comes to spiritual care. The healthcare professional can create a connection to the patient through bodily and relational presence. Furthermore, the healthcare professionals should let their sensing and impressions guide them when meeting the patient in dialog about matters of a spiritual nature. Their perception of the patient and non-verbal communication are a prerequisite for being able to meet patient's spiritual needs with care and verbal communication.


Subject(s)
Hospice Care , Hospices , Denmark , Humans , Nonverbal Communication , Palliative Care , Qualitative Research , Spirituality
15.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 4, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An integrated care network between emergency, specialized and primary care services can prevent repeated hospitalizations and the institutionalized death of terminally ill patients in palliative care (PC). To identify the perception of health professionals regarding the concept of PC and their care experiences with this type of patient in a pre-hospital care (PHC) service in Brazil. METHODS: Study with a qualitative approach, of interpretative nature, based on the perspective of Ricoeur's Dialectical Hermeneutics. RESULTS: Three central themes emerged out of the professionals' speeches: (1) unpreparedness of the team, (2) decision making, and (3) dysthanasia. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to invest in professional training associated with PC in the home context and its principles, such as: affirming life and considering death as a normal process not rushing or postponing death; integrating the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient and family care, including grief counseling and improved quality of life, adopting a specific policy for PC that involves all levels of care, including PHC, and adopt a unified information system, as well as more effective procedures that favor the respect for the patients' will, without generating dissatisfaction to the team and the family.


Subject(s)
Palliative Care , Quality of Life , Brazil , Hospitals , Humans , Qualitative Research
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 12, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980098

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, there is little experiential learning in general practice (GP) during UK undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy education and training. AIM: To apply educational theories to explore pharmacy stakeholders' perceptions of placements in general practice and contribute to the development of a model of experiential learning for pharmacy. METHODS: Qualitative, semi-structured interviews, conducted as part of two studies exploring experiential learning in general practice, with learners and their GP based supervisors. Interviews explored experiences of learning and practice, and what aided or hindered this. An abductive approach to analysis combined inductive coding with deductive, theory-driven interpretation using Lave and Wenger's concept of "Communities of Practice". RESULTS: Forty-four interviews were conducted, with learners and placement supervisors. Participants valued placements for providing authentic patient-facing learning experiences in the workplace, facilitated through legitimate peripheral participation by supervisors and supported by the use of pre- and de-briefing. Learners benefitted from support from their supervisor(s) and other staff during their day-to-day learning (informal learning), whilst also having protected time with their supervisors to discuss learning needs or go through workplace-based assessments (formal learning). Lack of clarity regarding which and how competencies should be assessed / demonstrated in general practice challenged monitoring progress from peripheral to full participation. Findings suggest that GP placements provide opportunities for learning about the patient journey between care settings; to work effectively with multidisciplinary teams; and consolidation and application of consultation / communication skills learning. CONCLUSIONS: The learning culture of GP supports learners' development, providing time and opportunities for meaningful and authentic workplace learning, with healthcare professionals acting as supervisors and mentors. These findings can usefully inform implementation of meaningful learning opportunities in primary and secondary care for those involved in pharmacy education and training.


Subject(s)
General Practice , Pharmacies , Pharmacy , Family Practice , General Practice/education , Humans , Problem-Based Learning , Qualitative Research
17.
BMC Palliat Care ; 21(1): 1, 2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980105

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Needs assessment tools can facilitate healthcare professionals in timely recognition of palliative care needs. Despite the increased attention for implementation of such tools, most studies provide little or no attention to the context of implementation. The aim of this study was to explore factors that contribute positively and negatively to timely screening of palliative care needs in advanced chronic heart failure. METHODS: Qualitative study using individual interviews and focus groups with healthcare professionals. The data were analysed using a deductive approach. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used to conceptualise the contextual factors. RESULTS: Twenty nine healthcare professionals with different backgrounds and working in heart failure care in the Southern and Eastern parts of the Netherlands participated. Several factors were perceived to play a role, such as perception and knowledge about palliative care, awareness of palliative care needs in advanced chronic heart failure, perceived difficulty when and how to start palliative care, limited acceptance to treatment boundaries in cardiology, limited communication and collaboration between healthcare professionals, and need for education and increased attention for palliative care in advanced chronic heart failure guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: This study clarified critical factors targeting patients, healthcare professionals, organisations to implement a needs assessment tool for timely recognition of palliative care needs in the context of advanced chronic heart failure. A multifaceted implementation strategy is needed which has attention for education, patient empowerment, interdisciplinary collaboration, identification of local champions, chronic heart failure specific guidelines and culture.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Needs Assessment , Palliative Care , Qualitative Research
18.
Confl Health ; 16(1): 1, 2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34980205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Syrian conflict has endured for a decade, causing one of the most significant humanitarian crises since World War II. The conflict has inflicted massive damage to civil infrastructure, and not even the health care sector has been spared. On the contrary, health care has been targeted, and as a result, many health professionals have left the country. Despite the life-threatening condition, many health professionals continued to work inside Syria even in the middle of the acute crisis. This qualitative study aims to determine the factors that have motivated Syrian health professionals to work in a conflict-affected country. METHODS: The research is based on 20 semi-structured interviews of Syrian health care workers. Interviews were conducted in 2016-2017 in Gaziantep, Turkey. A thematic inductive content analysis examined the motivational factors Syrian health care workers expressed for their work in the conflict area. RESULTS: Motivating factors for health care workers were intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic reasons included humanitarian principles and medical ethics. Also, different ideological reasons, patriotic, political and religious, were mentioned. Economic and professional reasons were named as extrinsic reasons for continuing work in the war-torn country. CONCLUSIONS: The study adds information on the effects of the Syrian crisis on health care-from healthcare workers' perspective. It provides a unique insight on motivations why health care workers are continuing their work in Syria. This research underlines that the health care system would collapse totally without local professionals and leave the population without adequate health care.

19.
Heliyon ; 8(1): e08685, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34981035

ABSTRACT

Since March 2020, it is known that Indonesia has experienced the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (Covid-19) Pandemic, and making health workers at the forefront of potential exposure to the Covid-19 virus because they have to deal with Covid-19 patients every day during the pandemic. The purpose of this study is to focus on developing an empirical model to increase job performance in the hospital to create the right quality of work and still make the organization grow well sustainably. This study will use assistance of quality of work life, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and psychological empowerment in creating an increase in job performance needed by nurses at the Type B Hospital in Jakarta. This study uses a quantitative approach through a questionnaire survey method conducted on nurses at 36 Type B Hospital in Jakarta, totalling 400 respondents. The sample used in this study was obtained through a purposive sampling technique with the criteria of a service period of more than 2 years. Then the data were analysed using the Structural Equation Model (SEM). Though quality of work life is found to significantly affect organizational commitment, job satisfaction and psychological empowerment, its effect on job performance found to be insignificant. Further findings will be discussed further.

20.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 37(1_suppl): 24S-26S, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34974773
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