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1.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 37(1): 65-71, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31345045

RESUMEN

Effective team communication is necessary for the provision of high-quality health care. Yet, recent graduates from diverse health-care disciplines report inadequate training in communication skills and end-of-life care. This study explored the impact of a withdrawal of life-sustaining measures interprofessional simulation on team communication skills of students representing medicine, nursing, and social work. The 3-phase simulation required teams to communicate with the patient, family, and one another in the care of a seriously ill patient at the end of life. Team communication in the filmed simulations was analyzed via the Gap-Kalamazoo Communication Checklist. Results revealed fair to good communication across the 9 communication domains. Overall team communication was strongest in "shares information" and lowest in "understands the patient's and family's perspective" domains. Field notes revealed 5 primary themes-Team Dynamics, Awkwardness, Empathy is Everything, Build a Relationship, and Communicating Knowledge When You Have It-in the course of the data analysis. Logistical challenges encountered in simulation development and implementation are presented, along with proposed solutions that were effective for this study. This simulation provided an opportunity for interprofessional health-care provider students to learn team communication skills within an end-of-life care context.

2.
Rheum Dis Clin North Am ; 46(1): 135-153, 2020 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31757281

RESUMEN

This article reviews several national programs in musculoskeletal education initiated by the Department of Veterans Affairs over the past decade. These programs have become sustained interprofessional opportunities for learners across disciplines and along the continuum of health professions education (HPE) and training pathways. This article also describes opportunities for leaders in rheumatology and other HPE programs to join these efforts and to collaborate in the scholarship that will be necessary in constructing educational programs fit for the purpose of ensuring a well-trained, competent workforce of health care providers.

3.
Patient Educ Couns ; 103(1): 33-43, 2020 Jan.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31431309

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To identify the ways in which physicians, patients and interpreters express emotions, react to emotional expressions and/or coordinate the emotional interaction in interpreter-mediated consultations (IMCs). METHODS: We systematically searched four databases and screened 10 307 articles. The following inclusion criteria were applied: 1) participants are patients with limited proficiency in the host language, physicians and professional interpreters, 2) analysis of patient-physician-interpreter interaction, 3) focus on emotions, 4) in vivo spoken language interpretation, and 5) authentic primary data. RESULTS: The results of 7 included studies suggest that physicians, patients and interpreters work together and verbally and paraverbally contribute to the co-construction of emotional communication (EC) in IMCs. However, a decrease in EC might still compromise the patient's quality of care in IMCs. CONCLUSION: There is a dearth of scientific evidence of EC as an interactional process between participants in IMCs. More research on under investigated modes of communication and emotions is needed to advance our understanding. For now, EC seems to be subject to the successful interaction between participants in IMCs. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Evidence-based curricula of interprofessional education between physicians and interpreters on EC in IMCs could be beneficial to the effective co-construction of EC in IMCS.

4.
J Nurs Educ ; 58(12): 723-727, 2019 Dec 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31794040

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommends that health care educators create a collaborative and practice-ready workforce. Focused interprofessional education (IPE) promotes collaborative practice, yet few examples of how to develop sustained IPE and clinical partnerships exist. Mental health care professionals competent in their specialty and prepared for interprofessional collaboration are needed to treat complex mental health needs of patients. METHOD: Doctor of Nursing Practice Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) faculty partnered with College of Pharmacy faculty to create didactic, clinical, and simulation coursework and IPE competencies within PMHNP courses. Students developed skills about providing interprofessional mental health care. RESULTS: Recommendations for faculties include: embrace the value of interprofessional faculty partnerships; plan for time, money, motivation, and recognition needed for sustainable IPE; and design courses that become part of the fabric of the curricula. CONCLUSION: Embedding IPE into PMHNP curricula creates increased faculty satisfaction and positive feedback from students and clinical sites. [J Nurs Educ. 2019;58(12):723-727.].

5.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(11): 1138-1143, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783960

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Faculty and preceptor development have been noted to be areas of need within the expansion of interprofessional education (IPE). The primary objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of a preceptor development program on pharmacy preceptors' self-reported competence toward interprofessional collaboration. METHODS: Pharmacy preceptors were invited to participate in a two-hour preceptor development program followed by a brief survey. Preceptor development program objectives were to: define IPE and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP); describe the benefits of IPCP for patients/clients, healthcare providers, and health systems; discuss the four Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) Core Competencies; and describe IPE student experiences aimed at increasing collaborative practice. The Interprofessional Collaborative Competencies Attainment Survey (ICCAS) was administered after the preceptor development program. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the data and paired t-tests were used to analyze pre-/post-program scores. RESULTS: Thirty (35%) preceptors completed the survey. Mean scores for all twenty items in the ICCAS instrument increased from pre- to post-(p < 0.05). The mean total ICCAS score pre- was 5.28 ±â€¯1.12 and post- was 6.17 ±â€¯1.11 (p < 0.01) out of a possible total score of seven. CONCLUSIONS: A preceptor development program targeting IPE and IPCP increased pharmacy preceptors' self-reported competence toward interprofessional collaboration.

6.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(11): 1144-1151, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783961

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: This qualitative focus group study sought to describe how colleges of pharmacy use simulation-based learning (SBL) to teach cardiovascular topics and to identify challenges and benefits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Participants were recruited from a screening survey disseminated via e-mail to select American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research networks. Subjects were selected based on diversity in institution and simulation types. Two 1-hour focus group sessions were conducted by the primary investigator following a script designed by the research team. Each recorded session was independently reviewed by all investigators and coded into final themes. Results are reported in a qualitative fashion. RESULTS: Five individuals provided consent and participated. Themes identified include topics, formats, interprofessional education, challenges, strategies for success, and benefits. Frequent topics included advanced cardiac life support, heart failure, hypertension, and transitions of care. Multiple formats were used including standardized patients or providers, task trainers, and high-fidelity mannequins. Multiple institutions reported simulating interprofessional teams by involving students from other health professions. Scheduling, pharmacy program size, faculty availability, and logistics around planning and/or conducting an event were identified challenges. Institutions reported success when clear expectations were provided to students and skill development progressed from low-stakes to high-stakes events. Benefits reported included real world applicability with participants noting that students do not realize the importance of SBL until they have reached rotations. CONCLUSIONS: Various topics and simulation methods were employed to teach cardiovascular topics. While challenges exist, institutions have identified strategies for success and report students recognized the benefits to their learning.

7.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(11): 1178-1183, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783966

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Interprofessional education can be used to prepare healthcare graduates for teamwork. Simulations, when used with interprofessional education, create realistic clinical situations that promote teamwork. Faculty assessed changes in pharmacy and nursing students' competence in treating adult cardiac arrest and perceived readiness for interprofessional learning and teamwork. EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY AND SETTING: Eighty-three pharmacy students and 57 nursing students participated in a high fidelity simulation focused on adult cardiac arrest as an expectation of their respective courses. This study took place at a single campus College of Health Professions located at a public land grant institution. FINDINGS: The Readiness for Health Care Students for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) and Team Skills Scale (TSS) were used to develop a survey administered prepost simulation. A paired t-test indicated statistically significant increases of mean values prepost (p < 0.001) for: teamwork and collaboration, professional identity, team skills, and competence. An independent sample t-test found no differences by gender or degree. DISCUSSION: This research supports using simulation in interprofessional education to increase competence and promote changes in attitudes toward interprofessional learning and teamwork. SUMMARY: An interprofessional simulation increased student's perceived competence and positively increased perceptions of learning and working with other health profession students.

8.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(11): 1190-1195, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783968

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: As collaborative team-based healthcare expands, there is a need for effective interprofessional education (IPE). Although the desired outcomes of IPE are defined by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC), resources often limit IPE implementation. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a novel interprofessional activity in improving health professions students' interprofessional competencies using team-based learning (TBL). INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY: Teams of second year pharmacy and medical students participated in a novel IPE session targeting roles and responsibilities. This activity was designed and implemented by a small number of faculty and used TBL to educate a large number of students using limited resources. Class averages for individual and team readiness assurance test (iRAT/tRAT) scores were collected, and students were invited to complete the Interprofessional Collaborative Competencies Attainment Survey (ICCAS) to evaluate the effectiveness of the activity. DISCUSSION: On average, tRAT scores were 20% higher than iRAT scores. While there was significant improvement for all items on the ICCAS, questions within the roles and responsibilities domain of the ICCAS were most affected. IMPLICATIONS: This novel IPE activity was successful in teaching a large group of professional students in the targeted domain of roles and responsibilities in a single session. This activity was a rich experience in which students learned together using limited resources which can be easily replicated at other institutions to help professional students gain proficiency in interprofessional competencies.

9.
J Allied Health ; 48(4): 257-262, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800655

RESUMEN

Medications and their associated side effects impact systems treated by speech-language pathologists and audiologists, such as speech, language, voice, swallowing, hearing, tinnitus, and balance. However, students in these disciplines receive limited training in pharmacology, while nursing students receive training in pharmacology but limited training in communication disorders. In this interprofessional simulation experience to increase understanding of the impact of medications on communication, swallowing, and balance, audiology, nursing, and speech-language pathology students worked together to interview standardized patients (SPs) about their medications and symptoms in a simulated clinical setting. Goals were for students to understand professional roles, identify high-risk medications with potential communication implications, provide patient education, and evaluate interdisciplinary collaboration. The SPs demonstrated symptoms patients may have as they take high-risk medications. Students (n = 101) completed a knowledge pretest, online training, simulation, debriefing facilitated by faculty experts, and posttest and impressions survey. Results indicated high satisfaction with teamwork and interprofessional interactions. Student knowledge of high-risk medications was improved as a result of this exercise, with nursing and speech-language pathology students demonstrating statistically significant improvements in posttest results. While knowledge deficits of some high-risk medications were evident across student groups, the overall effects demonstrated benefits of the simulation-enhanced interprofessional education experience.

10.
J Allied Health ; 48(4): e117-e122, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800666

RESUMEN

Physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) professional associations assert the importance that entry-level therapists learn and apply the knowledge and skills necessary for interprofessional collaborative practice; however, the majority of PT and OT programs do not have the other discipline at their university. A challenge exists for the creation of a transparent active learning opportunity promoting interprofessional student engagement when the two professions do not reside in the same university. This case study provides a model for how to feasibly create an interprofessional experience for students in universities that do not include a complementary or collaborative allied health professional program, using various technologies. While creating this collaborative project, we provided opportunities to meet the Interprofessional Education Collaborative's (IPEC) competencies: a) value/ethics for interprofessional practice, b) roles and responsibilities, c) interprofessional communication, and d) teams and teamwork through participation in a breast cancer survivorship research study. Within this demonstration project, the faculty were able to make "micro level" changes to foster interprofessional collaboration among universities with other allied health profession programs, which may lead to improved health outcomes for our clients.

11.
J Allied Health ; 48(4): e123-e130, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31800667

RESUMEN

AIMS: As interprofessional education (IPE) grows, more health professions programs have begun promoting it in their accreditation standards. A frequent challenge of large universities is how to include the large set of diverse students in their foundational offerings. A potential way would be to implement an online IPE asynchronous experience with an optional synchronous discussion. The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe implementation of that approach at a large multi-campus university; 2) explore the associations between IPE activities and students' reported level of usefulness; and 3) provide recommendations for online IPE experiences. METHODS: An IPE Module was developed that had 4 sequential online learning activities. After finishing the module, participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions about demographics, retrospective pre and post assessment of key IPE concepts, and rating of the usefulness of the learning based on the module activities. RESULTS: 1,017 participants, representing 8 different health professional programs, completed the survey. The numbers of students were evenly distributed, with dentistry representing the highest number (21%), and most participants were first-year students (71.9%). The learning activities "reading posts/messages of colleagues from other professions" and "watching the video" were reported useful or very useful by 77.4% and 71.4% of participants, respectively. The self-reflection writing activity (67.1%) and the "6-word message" (59.4%) were rated as useful or very useful by over half of participants. DISCUSSION: Most participants reported that the learning activities in the online asynchronous IPE module were useful or very useful in achieving the learning objectives. Thus, an introductory experience based on an online program combining both asynchronous and decentralized optional synchronous instruction might be a viable method of delivering foundational IPE information.

12.
Violence Against Women ; : 1077801219890420, 2019 Dec 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31802693

RESUMEN

This study examined health profession students' comfort levels, perceived knowledge, attitudes, and preferences for domestic and sexual violence education at an academic medical center. Students indicated their perceived knowledge of community resources was poor, whereas comfort, attitudes, and perceived knowledge of the topic remained fair. A majority of students (83.2%) reported receiving less than 3 hr of training in their coursework, which remained consistent for students with more years of education. Students preferred content be incorporated into existing curricula or presented in lunch seminars. Study results reveal opportunities for improvement in domestic and sexual violence education.

13.
J Med Internet Res ; 21(11): e14020, 2019 Nov 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31719026

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Connected health (CH) technologies have resulted in a paradigm shift, moving health care steadily toward a more patient-centered delivery approach. CH requires a broad range of disciplinary expertise from across the spectrum to work in a cohesive and productive way. Building this interdisciplinary relationship at an earlier stage of career development may nurture and accelerate the CH developments and innovations required for future health care. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the perceptions of interdisciplinary CH researchers regarding the design and delivery of an interdisciplinary education (IDE) module for disciplines currently engaged in CH research (engineers, computer scientists, health care practitioners, and policy makers). This study also investigated whether this module should be delivered as a taught component of an undergraduate, master's, or doctoral program to facilitate the development of interdisciplinary learning. METHODS: A qualitative, cross-institutional, multistage research approach was adopted, which involved a background study of fundamental concepts, individual interviews with CH researchers in Greece (n=9), and two structured group feedback sessions with CH researchers in Ireland (n=10/16). Thematic analysis was used to identify the themes emerging from the interviews and structured group feedback sessions. RESULTS: A total of two sets of findings emerged from the data. In the first instance, challenges to interdisciplinary work were identified, including communication challenges, divergent awareness of state-of-the-art CH technologies across disciplines, and cultural resistance to interdisciplinarity. The second set of findings were related to the design for interdisciplinarity. In this regard, the need to link research and education with real-world practice emerged as a key design concern. Positioning within the program context was also considered to be important with a need to balance early intervention to embed integration with later repeat interventions that maximize opportunities to share skills and experiences. CONCLUSIONS: The authors raise and address challenges to interdisciplinary program design for CH based on an abductive approach combining interdisciplinary and interprofessional education literature and the collection of qualitative data. This recipe approach for interdisciplinary design offers guidelines for policy makers, educators, and innovators in the CH space. Gaining insight from CH researchers regarding the development of an IDE module has offered the designers a novel insight regarding the curriculum, timing, delivery, and potential challenges that may be encountered.

14.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 65(10): 1241-1248, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31721955

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate how many Brazilian medical and physical therapy schools have initiatives and courses related to IPE in their curricula, assessing the barriers and factors associated with their implementation and comparing the differences between both programs. METHODS: This nationwide survey was carried out in 2017 and included representatives of all physical therapy and medical schools in Brasil. Offers of interprofessional activities and related opinions and barriers were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 76 (33.9%) of the medical and 159 (41.4%) of the physical therapy schools answered the questionnaires. At least 68.4% of the medical schools and 79.2% of the physical therapy schools have IPE initiatives, although the number of mandatory courses and clerkships is still low. Despite recognizing IPE's importance in health education, school representatives see the lack of integration of programs, conflicting schedules, and the lack of institutional support as barriers. In physical therapy, there is a smaller perception of barriers and greater incorporation of mandatory programs in the curriculum. CONCLUSION: These results will help in the development of future interventions that can enhance IPE in curricula in developing countries.

15.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(11): e1915943, 2019 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31747038

RESUMEN

Importance: Studies have shown that interprofessional education (IPE) improves learner proficiencies, but few have measured the association of IPE with patient outcomes, such as clinical quality. Objective: To estimate the association of a multisite IPE initiative with quality of care. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study used difference-in-differences analysis of US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic health record data from July 1, 2008, to June 30, 2015. Patients cared for by resident clinicians in 5 VA academic primary care clinics that participated in the Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE), an initiative designed to promote IPE among physician, nurse practitioner, pharmacist, and psychologist trainees, were compared with patients cared for by resident clinicians in 5 regionally matched non-CoEPCE clinics using data for the 3 academic years (ie, July 1 to June 30) before and 4 academic years after the CoEPCE launch. Analysis was conducted from January 18, 2018, to January 17, 2019. Main Outcomes and Measures: Among patients with diabetes, outcomes included annual hemoglobin A1c, poor hemoglobin A1c control (ie, <9% or unmeasured), and annual renal test; among patients 65 years and older, outcomes included prescription of high-risk medications; among patients with hypertension, outcomes included hypertension control (ie, blood pressure, <140/90 mm Hg); and among all patients, outcomes included timely mental health referrals, primary care mental health integrated visits, and hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. Results: A total of 44 527 patients contributed 107 686 patient-years; 49 279 (45.8%) were CoEPCE resident patient-years (mean [SD] patient age, 59.3 [15.2] years; 26 206 [53.2%] white; 8073 [16.4%] women; mean [SD] patient Elixhauser comorbidity score, 12.9 [15.1]), and 58 407 (54.2%) were non-CoEPCE resident patient-years (mean [SD] patient age, 61.8 [15.3] years; 43 912 [75.2%] white; 4915 [8.4%] women; mean [SD] patient Elixhauser comorbidity score, 13.8 [15.7]). Compared with resident clinicians who did not participate in the CoEPCE initiative, CoEPCE training was associated with improvements in the proportion of patients with diabetes with poor hemoglobin A1c control (-4.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -7.5 to -1.8 percentage points; P < .001), annual renal testing among patients with diabetes (3.2 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.6 to 5.7 percentage points; P = .02), prescription of high-risk medications among patients 65 years and older (-2.3 percentage points; 95% CI, -4.0 to -0.6 percentage points; P = .01), and timely mental health referrals (1.6 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.6 to 2.6 percentage points; P = .002). Fewer patients cared for by CoEPCE resident clinicians had a hospitalization for an ambulatory care-sensitive condition compared with patients cared for by non-CoEPCE resident clinicians in non-CoEPCE clinics (-0.4 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.9 to 0.0 percentage points; P = .01). Sensitivity analyses with alternative comparison groups yielded similar results. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, the CoEPCE initiative was associated with modest improvements in quality of care. Implementation of IPE was associated with improvements in patient outcomes and may potentiate delivery system reform efforts.

16.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 2019 Nov 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31677206

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of dentists and dental hygienists regarding their own and each other's roles in interprofessional collaboration following a clinical interprofessional educational programme (CIEP) as part of their graduate programme at Radboud university medical center (Radboudumc) and HAN University of Applied Sciences (HAN UAS), Nijmegen, the Netherlands, respectively. Perceptions were obtained at the end of their study (2014) and two years after their graduation (2016). METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted using a questionnaire with open-ended questions. Sixty-two dentists and thirty-eight dental hygienists were invited. Theory-based analyses were applied in combination with principles of Grounded Theory to analyse and synthesise the collected data from the open-ended questions. RESULTS: At baseline, 100% responded. At follow-up, thirty-two dentists (51.6%) and twenty-six dental hygienists (68.4%) responded; twenty-seven dentists (43.5%) and eighteen dental hygienists (47.4%) were included. Many similarities were found between baseline and follow-up regarding perceptions of each other's expertise and responsibility, learning from and with each other, and the behaviour of students and the "novice" professionals in interprofessional collaboration. Both dentists and dental hygienists experienced the CIEP as useful for interprofessional collaboration. The "novice" dentists and dental hygienists indicated that in dental practices interprofessional collaboration was less common. CONCLUSION: The CIEP resulted in more understanding amongst dentists and dental hygienists with regard to interprofessional roles, but in practice the "novice" dentists and dental hygienists face difficulties in applying the interprofessional roles.

17.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31710802

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: Interprofessional education (IPE) is a concept that allows students from different health professions to learn with and from each other as they gain knowledge about their chosen professions and the professions of their colleagues. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of IPE in the academic preparation of students of the health professions. METHODS: A search was conducted of the PubMed and CINAHL databases using the following eligibility criteria: IPE including students from 3 or more healthcare professions, IPE exposure within academic coursework, measurement of attitudes and/or perceptions as outcomes, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted. RESULTS: The search yielded 870 total articles. After screening, 7 articles remained for review. All studies reported a positive impact of IPE on the education of students of the health professions. CONCLUSION: Evidence showed that IPE activities were an effective tool for improving attitudes toward interdisciplinary teamwork, communication, shared problem-solving, and knowledge and skills in preparation for collaboration within interdisciplinary teams.

19.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-12, 2019 Nov 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31709881

RESUMEN

Interprofessional undergraduate/pre-registration simulations (UIPSims) are growing in popularity but remain under researched and without pedagogic instruction. We report on an evaluation of final year healthcare student UIPSims, focussed on safe practice using a mixed methods study. The evaluation combines traditional methods with direct observations of students. Students completed a pre and post-course questionnaire with scored and free text questions and in addition an ethnographer observed the UIPSims supported with video recordings. Final year students participated (medical, nursing, operating department practitioner, pharmacy; n = 230). The scored questions were significant (p < .01) with student comments confirming the value of the learning. The observations identified strengths and weaknesses. The students were professional and patient-centered, but were unable to function as a team, communicate effectively for shared decision making or recognize and highlight patient safety concerns. The facilitators mainly guided rather than facilitated proceedings. Despite having completed a theme of interprofessional education (IPE) designed to develop team working abilities, final year healthcare students were unable to function as a student team in order to apply theory to practice. The findings highlight how an interprofessional simulation at the end of an undergraduate curriculum offers a litmus test on student readiness for teamworking. The findings support an IPE curriculum with a set of theoretical principles aligned to a set of team working skills in readiness for participating in an UIPSims. In addition, facilitators should be trained on the principles for IPE as well as on best practice for simulations. Briefing is vital, enabling students to come together to form a team and find their collective voice. Observational research offers a powerful evaluation tool illuminating what is happening in these teaching situations. More research on the constituent components of UIPSims is required.

20.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-3, 2019 Nov 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31696755

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education is recognized widely as an essential component to improving patient outcomes but little progress has been made toward understanding the impact of specific educational interventions on interprofessional competencies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a case study exercise aimed at improving students' teamwork competencies. A pre and posttest design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of two approaches to an educational intervention. The treatment group combined nursing, physical therapy, and pharmacy students; the control group involved only nursing students. The Team Skills Scale (TSS) was used to measure interprofessional teamwork competencies and open-ended questions were used to elicit students' views. Mean pretest scores were similar for both the treatment and control groups. Following the intervention, posttest TSS scores were significantly higher for both the treatment group and control groups. However, posttest scores for the treatment group were significantly higher than the control group (mean score change 19.2 for treatment group versus 10.0 for control group), indicating that the face-to-face interaction between students of different professions had a greater impact. Themes that emerged from the open-ended questions support the quantitative findings, indicating that the intervention was useful for improving teamwork competencies.

21.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-7, 2019 Nov 07.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31696759

RESUMEN

Interprofessional clinical education programs have the potential to impact participants' professional expectations and practices related to team-based care. In this qualitative study, research team members interviewed 38 graduates and 19 faculty members from such an interprofessional training program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCE). Semi-structured interviews with participants enquired about skills gained, impact on career expectations, and barriers to implementing interprofessional skills in the post-training workplace. Data were coded and analyzed using a hybrid inductive/deductive approach. Participants perceived that the program was successful in creating new norms of flattened team hierarchies, broadening graduates' understanding of role interaction, and teaching interactional skills involving teamwork. Participants reported organizational and systemic barriers to changing existing primary care practice. Interprofessional clinical education programs may help new professionals recognize and act on opportunities for improvement in existing practice. Healthcare employers must recognize changed expectations and provide opportunities for interprofessional collaboration to attract graduates from such programs.

23.
MedEdPORTAL ; 15: 10836, 2019 Sep 27.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31773063

RESUMEN

Introduction: Medical school education on orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) is limited, and O&P students receive limited education on performing comprehensive histories and physicals (H&Ps). This interprofessional workshop brings medical and O&P students together in a mock clinical setting. Students from one profession appraise the relationship of their scope/role to those of students of the other profession. Methods: Third-year medical students, second-year O&P students, and O&P patients participated in a 3-hour workshop. Students partnered into groups and rotated among stations performing patient history, physical exam, and O&P assessment. As a medical or O&P student completed the H&P, she or he explained the process to the student of the other profession. Each group assessed two patients and then presented one to a physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) attending physician. The workshop concluded with a feedback session. Results: Immediate feedback was positive. Medical students, O&P students, PM&R physicians, and patients all commented favorably. In the workshop's first year, there were 19 responding students (10 medical, nine O&P); 68.4% said that the clinical session was better than expected, 73.7% were satisfied with the overall event, and 73.7% felt they were likely to use what they had learned in clinical practice. Feedback from learners included requesting more time for students to interact with each other after the mock clinic, sending preparation materials before the session, and focusing the medical student H&P on the musculoskeletal exam. Discussion: This workshop was well received by participants. Their feedback will help to continue and expand this collaboration.

24.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31773803

RESUMEN

Many initiatives integrating health and social care have been implemented in order to provide adequate care and support to older people living at home. Further development of existing initiatives requires iterative processes of developing, implementing and evaluating improvements to current practice. This case study provides insight into the process of improving an existing integrated care initiative in the Netherlands. Using a participatory approach, researchers and local stakeholders collaborated to develop and implement activities to further improve collaboration between health and social care professionals. Improvement activities included interprofessional meetings focussing on reflection and mutual learning and workplace visits. Researchers evaluated the improvement process, using data triangulation of multiple qualitative and quantitative data sources. According to participating professionals, the improvement activities improved their communication and collaboration by establishing mutual understanding and trust. Enabling factors included the safe and informal setting in which the meetings took place and the personal relationships they developed during the project. Different organisational cultures and interests and a lack of ownership and accountability among managers hindered the improvement process, whereas issues such as staff shortages, time constraints and privacy regulations made it difficult to implement improvements on a larger scale. Still, the participatory approach encouraged the development of partnerships and shared goals on the level of both managers and professionals. This case study highlights that improving communication between professionals is an important first step in improving integrated care. In addition, it shows that a participatory approach, in which improvements are co-created and tailored to local priorities and needs, can help in the development of shared goals and trust between stakeholders with different perspectives. However, stakeholders' willingness and ability to participate in such an improvement process is challenged by many factors.

25.
Perspect Med Educ ; 2019 Nov 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31705482

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional education is promoted as a means of enhancing future collaborative practice in healthcare. We developed a learning activity in which undergraduate medical, nursing and allied healthcare students practice interprofessional collaboration during a student-led interprofessional team meeting. DESIGN AND DELIVERY: During their clinical rotation at a family physician's practice, each medical student visits a frail elderly patient and prepares a care plan for the patient. At a student-led interprofessional team meeting, medical, nursing and allied healthcare students jointly review these care plans. Subsequently, participating students reflect on their interprofessional collaboration during the team meeting, both collectively and individually. Every 4 weeks, six interprofessional team meetings take place. Each team comprises 9-10 students from various healthcare professions, and meets once. To date an average of 360 medical and 360 nursing and allied healthcare students have participated in this course annually. EVALUATION: Students mostly reported positive experiences, including the opportunity to learn with, from and about other healthcare professions in the course of jointly reviewing care plans, and feeling collectively responsible for the care of the patients involved. Additionally, students reported a better understanding of the contextual factors at hand. The variety of patient cases, diversity of participating health professions, and the course material need improvement. CONCLUSION: Students from participating institutions confirmed that attending a student-led interprofessional team meeting had enabled them to learn with, from and about other health professions in an active role. The use of real-life cases and the educational design contributed to the positive outcome of this interprofessional learning activity.

26.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-8, 2019 Nov 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31750747

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education (IPE) programs for pre-registration health science students are largely offered within one institution including different schools or faculties. Sometimes in small or regional institutions where there are limited student numbers or few professional training programs, or where larger institutions do not offer particular professional programs, it may be necessary to partner with other institutions to offer IPE. This study sought to explore teacher perspectives of forming inter-institutional partnerships to deliver IPE, in particular, to identify the elements that influence the formation of partnerships. An interpretive descriptive approach was used to thematically analyze data from three focus groups with teachers (n = 21) working in three different partnerships to deliver IPE to students in Wellington, New Zealand. Two main themes were identified which enabled the development of a model of partnership, with a continuum of complexity depending on whether institutions were on the same page and whether the partnership formed to join an existing IPE program or to create a new IPE program. Forming inter-institution partnerships is a pragmatic solution to providing IPE with benefits to all taking part. Our work showed that time, effort, working with complexity, and ability to stay on the same page are necessary elements for building successful partnerships and all need to be taken into account when planning inter-institution partnerships.

27.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 429, 2019 Nov 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31752844

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: There is growing recognition of the importance of educating health professional students to enhance their competence in collaborating with individuals from other health professions in the area of global health. This study aimed to identify the performance levels in interprofessional global health competencies (IGHC) of health professional students, their educational needs, and the strategies for successfully developing IGHC. METHODS: This study used a mixed methods design involving an online survey followed by focus group interviews. A sample of 325 fourth-year undergraduate students from 14 health-related majors completed a self-report online survey (38.8% response rate). The performance of IGHC was measured on a five-point Likert scale using the IGHC items developed by the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. Additionally, 12 senior students and five professors in global health-related majors participated in focus group interviews. The students' educational needs and priorities were analysed using the Borich needs assessment and the Locus for Focus model. RESULTS: The participants' IGHC mean score was 3.11 (SD = 0.55) and differed by previous global health activity experiences (t = - 2.10, p = .037). Nine competencies in six domains using the Locus for Focus model were identified as a priority for global health education. Suggested strategies to enhance IGHC included establishing IGHC education in formal curricula, developing value-based content and outcomes, and engaging students in learning activities. CONCLUSIONS: It is necessary to design an interprofessional pre-departure course to achieve the priority IGHC and to organise learning activities where there is cooperation in problem solving while applying the expertise of each major within resource-limited settings. This study supports future health professional education that should foster enhanced roles and scopes of practice as changing agents to assure the achievement of sustainable development goals.

28.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 41: 102651, 2019 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31704477

RESUMEN

The journey from pregnancy to caring for a new infant is a significant experience for many women and crucial period for obesity prevention. During this time, a large portion of care is allocated to midwives and maternal and child health nurses (MCHN). These professions have the potential to play a crucial role in supporting women with weight management across pregnancy and postpartum; however, both midwives and MCHNs report barriers to doing this. Upskilling achieved through midwifery and MCHN education that equips midwives and MCHNs with the skills and knowledge to provide evidence-based advice for weight management could assist in addressing some of these barriers. Interprofessional collaboration should be fostered so healthy lifestyle messages and support are reinforced consistently by midwives and MCHNs throughout pregnancy and postpartum.

29.
Am J Infect Control ; 2019 Nov 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31759766

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The comfort level of health care workers to respond to an infectious disease outbreak or epidemic is likely directly related to the amount of education, training, and experience they have in responding to these events. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study evaluated health care workers' state anxiety, self-efficacy, and interprofessional teamwork when working with patients simulated to have a potentially high consequence infectious disease. RESULTS: Pretest-posttest 1 scores revealed a significant decrease in state anxiety (P < .0001) and an increase in self-efficacy (P < .0001). Overall state anxiety preintervention (pretest) to postintervention (posttest 3) significantly decreased (P = .0265). Overall TeamSTEPPS knowledge significantly increased (P < .0001) from baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Simulation exercises are an effective strategy to increase self-efficacy and decrease state anxiety for health care workers. Positive teamwork scores indicate that the subjects value interprofessional teamwork.

30.
Aust Crit Care ; 2019 Oct 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31679985

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: End-of-life (EOL) decision-making in the intensive care unit (ICU) can be emotionally challenging for both doctors and nurses, who are sometimes placed in difficult positions where they are required to make decisions on behalf of patients. With an ageing population and advances in medical technology, there is an increase in such decisions being made in ICUs. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives of doctors and nurses involved in the EOL decision-making process in an ICU. METHODS: This study used a qualitative methodology based on naturalistic inquiry. Intensive care nurses and doctors from a large Sydney metropolitan public hospital were purposively selected, and data saturation was reached after a total of eight nurses and four doctors were interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured interviews, either face-to-face or over the telephone. Interviews were then transcribed verbatim, and themes were identified and coded through a line-by-line analysis of each transcript (manual thematic analysis). FINDINGS: The findings revealed two main themes: 'Doctors' and nurses' roles in decision-making' and 'Managing family expectations'. These themes highlighted key differences in decision-making processes, in that doctors tended to aim to meet the family's needs, while the nurses tended to advocate on behalf of the patient and what they interpreted as the patient's best interests. Furthermore, nurses tended to feel undervalued in decision-making during family conferences, when in reality, the doctors were making decisions based on all information obtained, primarily from nursing staff. CONCLUSIONS: EOL decision-making is complex and affects doctors and nurses involved in different ways. More emphasis on interprofessional education and collaboration between the two disciplines may enhance future decision-making processes.

31.
J Correct Health Care ; : 1078345819880901, 2019 Nov 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31684797

RESUMEN

Jail-based student-run clinics, though uncommon, have the potential to impact the future health workforce. We evaluated, via a survey of student attitudes and a collection of lessons learned, a student-faculty collaborative clinic that was implemented in a jail in 2015. Clinic participation led to significantly greater student volunteer ratings of the importance of collaborating with oral health providers and of comfort in providing care to incarcerated populations. We report lessons learned regarding logistical considerations, volunteer behavior, and common issues arising in clinic visits. The clinic proved feasible and sustainable over several years, offering a new model for the involvement of trainees in correctional health care.

32.
Rev. Assoc. Med. Bras. (1992) ; 65(10): 1241-1248, Oct. 2019. tab, graf
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1041032

RESUMEN

SUMMARY OBJECTIVES To investigate how many Brazilian medical and physical therapy schools have initiatives and courses related to IPE in their curricula, assessing the barriers and factors associated with their implementation and comparing the differences between both programs. METHODS This nationwide survey was carried out in 2017 and included representatives of all physical therapy and medical schools in Brasil. Offers of interprofessional activities and related opinions and barriers were evaluated. RESULTS A total of 76 (33.9%) of the medical and 159 (41.4%) of the physical therapy schools answered the questionnaires. At least 68.4% of the medical schools and 79.2% of the physical therapy schools have IPE initiatives, although the number of mandatory courses and clerkships is still low. Despite recognizing IPE's importance in health education, school representatives see the lack of integration of programs, conflicting schedules, and the lack of institutional support as barriers. In physical therapy, there is a smaller perception of barriers and greater incorporation of mandatory programs in the curriculum. CONCLUSION These results will help in the development of future interventions that can enhance IPE in curricula in developing countries.


RESUMO OBJETIVOS Investigar quantas escolas médicas e de fisioterapia brasileiras possuem iniciativas e cursos relacionados à EIP nos currículos, avaliando as barreiras e fatores associados com essa implementação e comparando as diferenças entre esses dois cursos. MÉTODOS Essa pesquisa nacional foi conduzida em 2017 e incluiu representantes das escolas médicas e de fisioterapia no Brasil. As ofertas de atividades interprofissionais, assim como as opiniões e barreiras para implementação, foram avaliadas. RESULTADOS Um total de 76 (33,9%) escolas médicas e 159 (41.4%) escolas de fisioterapia respondeu aos questionários. Pelo menos 68,4% das escolas médicas e 79,2% das escolas de fisioterapia possuem iniciativas de EIP, embora o número de cursos obrigatórios e estágios ainda seja baixo. Apesar de reconhecer a importância da EIP na educação em saúde, os representantes das escolas percebem como barreiras a falta de integração entre os cursos, associada a cronogramas incompatíveis e uma falta de suporte institucional. Na fisioterapia, existe menor percepção de barreiras e uma grande incorporação de cursos obrigatórios no currículo. CONCLUSÃO Esses resultados auxiliarão no desenvolvimento de futuras intervenções que promovam a EIP no currículo dos países em desenvolvimento.

33.
Med Teach ; : 1-7, 2019 Oct 11.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31603016

RESUMEN

Background: Interprofessional education (IPE) is an instructional approach for equipping health professions students with essential competencies needed to provide collaborative patient-centred care. The implementation and sustainability of IPE are challenging for many institutions. This qualitative study identified barriers and facilitators in the processes of IPE implementation. Methods: We conducted mixed focus groups (FGs) with faculty members from medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nutrition and dietetics, nursing, chiropractic, Chinese medicine, and other health sciences programmes; who were involved in the planning of IPE at institutional or programme level, or who participated in IPE activity. Transcripts were analysed using grounded theory. Results: We identified 25 barriers and facilitators, clustered under five major categories of commitment, faculty engagement, IPE design, support, and delivery. Conclusions: Successful implementation of IPE may hinge on actions in 5 stages; commitment, faculty engagement, IPE design, support, and delivery. The processes will require consistent leadership to break down professional silos and enhance collaborative effort in IPE implementation.

34.
Healthc Manage Forum ; : 840470419879456, 2019 Oct 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31597493

RESUMEN

Interprofessional Education (IPE) has been recognized on an international and national level as an effective method of preparing health professionals for practice while also improving health system outcomes. In particular, recent research highlights that geriatric IPE initiatives can be mutually beneficial both to learners and older adults in rural communities. Despite this trend, IPE initiatives continue to produce mixed results. Although some scholars have acknowledged that IPE initiatives need to consider the complexity of healthcare contexts, there is a dearth of research that considers the diversity of rural communities or rural older adult health. This paper proposes that leveraging contextually sensitive rural gerontological health research marks a next step in IPE development.

35.
Med Teach ; : 1-10, 2019 Oct 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31595791

RESUMEN

Introduction: We examined the interrelationships between context, mechanism, and outcome using a realist approach following the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) to clinical practice for medical students in the community. Methods: Through participant observation and interviews, a working hypothesis was developed. To evaluate IPE in clinical practice, medical students' reports were thematically analyzed, and configuration on contexts, mechanisms, and outcomes were identified using a realist approach. Results: Influential contexts were medical students' experience of clinical practice and learning characteristics, the capacity of other professionals, interprofessional relationships, and characteristics of the community hospital. One key mechanism was observational learning. Others were self-regulated learning, legitimate peripheral participation, experiential learning, contact hypotheses, awareness of social structure, and cognitive empathy. As faculties supported these key mechanisms, medical students became aware of the legitimacy of community-oriented primary care, noting the roles of physicians who support patients' and/or their family's life in collaboration with other professionals, and reflecting the necessity of shifting from physician-centered perspectives. As a result, medical students deepened their empathic understanding for other professionals. Conclusion: Faculties should develop IPE programs in clinical practice based on the 'mechanism', 'context', 'outcome' pattern and 'context-mechanism-outcome' configuration in primary care settings.

36.
Patient Educ Couns ; 2019 Oct 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31623946

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To investigate how empathic communication is expressed in interpreter-mediated consultations (IMCs) and the interpreter's effect on it. METHODS: We coded 20 authentic video-recorded IMCs by using the Empathic Communication Coding System (ECCS). We compared patient-initiated empathic opportunities (EOs) and doctors' responses as expressed by patients and doctors and as rendered by interpreters. RESULTS: We identified 44 EOs. In 2 of the 44 EOs there was a close match in the way the EOs were expressed by the patient in the first place and in the way they were rendered by the interpreter. Twenty-four of the 44 EOs that were passed on by the interpreter to the doctor and presented the doctor with an opportunity to respond, came with a shift in meaning and/or intensity. Twenty of the 44 EOs were not passed on by the interpreter to the doctor. CONCLUSION: In IMCs, EOs are subject to the interpreter's renditions and the doctor's actions during interaction. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Doctors and interpreters require skills to detect patient cues, assess them correctly, render them completely and in an appropriate manner (interpreters) and display communicative behaviours that take into account the intricacies of interpreter-mediated clinical communication and facilitate each other's communicative goals.

37.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1401, 2019 Oct 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31664973

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Health literacy is a multidimensional concept that is considered a primary public health concern. This concept is often neglected in research, and the evidence regarding health literacy in college students is limited. The aim of this study was two-fold: to determine the needs and limitations of health literacy among college students and to explore the relationships among the nine dimensions of health literacy and sociodemographic factors, including age, gender, nationality, year of study, field of study, smoking status, history of chronic diseases, use of on-campus gym, and the intention to exercise on-campus. METHODS: This study was conducted using a cross-sectional approach. A total of 520 college students participated in this study. The average age was 21.03 years (SD = 2.29), with 47.5% males and 52.5% females. Data were collected using a demographics questionnaire and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ). In addition to descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and follow-up analyses were performed to explore any statistically significant mean differences among levels of health literacy and sociodemographic factors. RESULTS: The levels of health literacy on the nine HLQ scales were lower than the levels reported in the literature. Multivariate analysis showed a significant effect of age, gender, smoking status, year of study, and field of study on the level of health literacy. Follow-up analyses revealed that female students, students from the health-related faculties, and those who do not smoke have higher levels of health literacy compared to their counterparts. A detailed comparison between the levels of the HLQ scales was made based on students' demographic characteristics. The field of study had the most prominent effect on the level of college students' health literacy; mean differences were statistically significant (p < .001), and effect sizes were large (ranging from .66 to 1.35 for the nine scales of the HLQ). CONCLUSION: College students' health literacy is influenced by demographic characteristics. Such variations could amplify some of the existing health disparities. The implications of the findings on health, health promotion, and interprofessional education are discussed.

38.
s.l; InterprofessionalResearch.Global; oct. 2019. 48 p. ilus, tab.
No convencional en Español | LILACS, Repositorio RHS | ID: biblio-1024733

RESUMEN

Este documento de trabajo fue elaborado por varios expertos en EIPC de renombre mundial durante el último año para estimular una mayor discusión sobre la investigación global en EIPC. La publicación ofrece perspectivas para informar las discusiones en torno a la agenda de investigación global en EIPC mediante la identificación de prioridades de investigación y proporcionando orientación sobre marcos teóricos, metodologías y composición de equipos de investigación. Un léxico propuesto para el campo interprofesional también se proporciona como un apéndice. El léxico sirve como documento de debate para desarrollar el consenso sobre la terminología relacionada con la educación, el aprendizaje, la práctica y la atención interprofesionales.


This Discussion Paper aims to provide guidance on IPECP research. We provide a perspective of the current situation and the needs in IPECP research around the globe, make recommendations for research teams to advance IPECP theory-informed research by 2022, and invite collaborators to join us in this initiative. The appendix provides a proposed lexicon for the interprofessional field based on the current interprofessional literature. This lexicon serves as a starting point in developing a global consensus on a set of definitions and descriptions related to interprofessional education, learning, practice, and care. In doing so, and in response to the Article 4 of the Sydney Interprofessional Declaration (All Together Better Health V, 2010), IPR.Global and Interprofessional. Global plan to conduct a web-based global Delphi panel in early 2020.


Este Documento de trabalho visa orientar pesquisas na área da EIPC. Nele fornecemos uma perspectiva sobre a situação atual e as necessidades mundiais em termos de pesquisa nessa área, fazemos recomendações para equipes de esquisas, informadas por teorias, para que alcancem avanços na EIPC até 2022, e convidamos colaboradores a participarem conosco nesta iniciativa. O Apêndice propõe um léxico para o campo interprofissional com base na literatura interprofissional atual. Esse léxico serve como ponto de partida para o desenvolvimento de um consenso global sobre uma série de definições e descritores relacionados à educação, ao aprendizado, à prática e à atenção interprofissional. Após propô-lo, e em resposta ao Artigo 4º da Declaração Interprofissional de Sydney (All Together Better Health V, 2010), o IPR.Global e o plano da Interprofessional.Global têm por objetivo conduzir um encontro com especialistas de todo o mundo, via Internet, no início de 2020.


Asunto(s)
Humanos , /organización & administración , Fuerza Laboral en Salud/organización & administración , Investigación Biomédica , Compromiso Laboral
39.
MedEdPORTAL ; 15: 10830, 2019 07 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31583273

RESUMEN

Introduction: Interprofessional education, which gives medical students the opportunity to learn from, with, and about other health professionals, is an essential component of the undergraduate medical education curriculum. Nonetheless, deliberate and sustained integration of interprofessional education into the undergraduate medical learning experience can be challenging, especially within the clinical setting. Methods: We implemented a 75-minute, interactive, collaborative, case-based conference focusing on an interprofessional clinical challenge in a pediatric setting. Medical students on their pediatrics core rotation and trainees within social work, nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition explored the concept of a team, reflected on roles, and considered how interprofessional collaboration could influence patient outcomes. Results: One hundred ninety-two health professions students participated in 15 sessions at three sites over a 10-month period (September 2017-July 2018). After each session, participants completed a session evaluation. They gave high ratings to the effectiveness and relevance of the experience and the case vignette. Responses to open-ended questions revealed that students had learned the importance of leveraging the expertise of team members and had resolved to speak up when faced with an interprofessional challenge in the future. Discussion: This case-based session is a logistically feasible and positively received opportunity for health professions students to discuss interprofessional collaboration. It could be adapted for a variety of learner populations and academic environments and could be incorporated into existing curricula.

40.
Acad Med ; 2019 Oct 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31577587

RESUMEN

Centers and institutes are created to support interdisciplinary collaboration. However, all centers and institutes face the challenge of how best to evaluate their impact since traditional counts of productivity may not fully capture the interdisciplinary nature of this work. The authors applied techniques from social network analysis (SNA) to evaluate the impact of a center for interprofessional education (IPE), a growing area for centers because of the global emphasis on IPE.The authors created networks based on the connections between faculty involved in programs supported by an IPE center at Virginia Commonwealth University from 2014 to 2017. They used mathematical techniques to describe these networks and the change in the networks over time. The results of these analyses demonstrated that, while the number of programs and involved faculty grew, the faculty maintained a similar amount of connection between members. Additional faculty clusters emerged, and certain key faculty were important connectors between clusters. The analysis also confirmed the interprofessional nature of faculty collaboration within the network.SNA added important evaluation data beyond typical metrics such as counts of learners or faculty. This approach demonstrated how a center was evolving and what strategies might be needed to support further growth. With further development of benchmarks, SNA could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of centers and institutes relative to each other. SNA should guide strategic decisions about the future of centers and institutes as they strive to meet their overarching goal of tackling a social challenge through interdisciplinary collaboration.

41.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 11(9): 920-927, 2019 Sep.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31570130

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Polypharmacy is a dilemma in modern medical practice and presents an opportunity for interprofessional collaboration. Our pilot project evaluated whether implementing an interprofessional education (IPE) session would influence awareness of interprofessional values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork. INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY: A dual-institution, multi-part IPE session on medication management was implemented with medicine and pharmacy students. Part 1 consisted of a pillbox exercise whereby students simulated the patient experience of taking medications. Part 2 was an interprofessional medication reconciliation exercise with a standardized patient. After completing the session, students were asked to reflect on their experience in response to a prompt. Reflections were analyzed qualitatively for overarching themes. DISCUSSION: This pilot uniquely captured the interaction between medical and pharmacy students from neighboring institutions. After completing the IPE session, both groups of students felt they were better equipped to take a medication history, perform medication reconciliation, and understand the value of a community pharmacist. Major themes elicited from reflections included: (1) increased awareness of barriers to medication adherence, (2) increased empathy towards adults with polypharmacy, (3) appreciation for the interprofessional team, and (4) realization of the importance of medication reconciliation and patient understanding of their medications. IMPLICATIONS: The collaboration between institutions, located at a distance from one another, demonstrates a novel approach that can be used by others to facilitate IPE. All students gained experience interacting in an interprofessional setting simulating their future practice(s). Future studies are needed to evaluate the extent of those interactions and potential outcomes.

42.
J Nurs Educ ; 58(10): 577-582, 2019 Oct 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31573646

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Increasing rates of medical errors necessitate incorporation of patient safety education for health professions students. Institutions must address the needs of both campus- and distance-based learners to meet interprofessional education (IPE) accreditation requirements. The purpose of this project was to evaluate a synchronous interprofessional patient safety simulation to train students on interprofessional teamwork and communication through recognition of patient safety and medical hazards. METHOD: Students from health care professions participated in a Haunted Hospital/Heartbreak Hospital patient hazard/medical error simulation. A total of 201 students in 41 teams, both campus and distance, participated over three semesters. RESULTS: Mean Student Perceptions of Interprofessional Clinical Education-Revised (SPICE-R) scores significantly improved from 44.81 ± 3.59 to 47.08 ± 3.31 (p < .0001). Qualitative responses indicated that students appreciated working with other health care students through collaborative practice and recognized the importance of discipline-specific expertise. CONCLUSION: This simulation provided campus and distance learners with a collaboration opportunity that improved their perceptions of IPE. [J Nurs Educ. 2019;58(10):577-582.].

43.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ ; : 1-14, 2019 Sep 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31564226

RESUMEN

Preparing a healthcare workforce able to respond to the growing complexity of health issues facing older adults is a critical issue for interprofessional educators. Students are in need of experiences promoting confidence and skill in communicating with older adults with cognitive issues. Student emotional and cognitive responses to an interprofessional Music and Memory® project in long term care facilities were evaluated. Forty-eight students met with assigned adults weekly to develop personalized music playlists and complete a journal entry. Student participants demonstrated improved interpersonal connections, enhanced professional skills, and increased empathy toward clients. Results are explored within the context of Kolb's Learning Theory and application of the evaluation outcomes for interprofessional education.

45.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 27: e3203, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués, Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31664411

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effect of interprofessional education on the climate of Primary Health Care teams and on the acquisition of knowledge about management of chronic non-communicable diseases. METHOD: Quasi-experimental study of interprofessional education intervention. Seventeen Primary Health Care teams (95 professionals) participated in the study, of which nine teams (50 professionals) composed the intervention group and eight teams (45 participants) composed the control group. The team climate inventory scale and a questionnaire on knowledge about management of chronic conditions in Primary Health Care were applied before and after intervention. Type I error was fixed as statistically significant (p<0.05). RESULTS: In the analysis of knowledge about management of chronic conditions, the teams that participated in the interprofessional education intervention presented higher mean post-intervention increase than the teams of the control group (p < 0.001). However, in the analysis of both groups, there was no significant variation in the teamwork climate scores (0.061). CONCLUSION: The short interprofessional education intervention carried out during team meetings resulted in improved apprehension of specific knowledge on chronic conditions. However, the short intervention presented no significant impacts on teamwork climate.


Asunto(s)
Enfermedad Crónica/terapia , Personal de Salud/educación , Prácticas Interdisciplinarias/organización & administración , Atención Primaria de Salud/organización & administración , Empleo , Femenino , Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Humanos , Masculino , Factores de Tiempo
46.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31650525

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Medical and nursing students may feel under-prepared to perform basic surgical and gynaecology procedural skills. There also remains scope within undergraduate programs to integrate interprofessional education, and better prepare students for interprofessional collaboration to improve patient care. AIMS: A simulation-based gynaecology surgical skills workshop program was introduced for undergraduate medical and nursing students. The aim of this study was to explore students' perceptions of a simulation-based interprofessional gynaecological skills program, using students' pre- and post-workshop confidence in taught skills reported in a post-workshop questionnaire as an outcome measure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty undergraduate medical (n = 133) and nursing (n = 27) students attended the workshop program at a tertiary university in Melbourne, Australia. A survey was completed by all students immediately after the workshop, addressing students' perceptions of surgical education, the four skill-stations (gowning/gloving, suturing, intrauterine device insertion, and urethral catheterisation), and interprofessional education. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare students' pre- and post-workshop confidence scores. RESULTS: Most medical and nursing students (86%) agreed their course should provide more structured surgical education. There was a statistically significant increase in post-workshop self-reported confidence scores for medical and nursing students in all four taught skills. Confidence in interprofessional behaviours also improved in both cohorts, but the improvement in nursing students did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Simulation-based, interprofessional, gynaecological surgery skills workshops are practical and valuable additions to undergraduate medical and nursing curricula. Further research should explore long-term retention of procedural skills and changes in interprofessional attitudes in clinical practice.

48.
Am J Occup Ther ; 73(5): 7305185050p1-7305185050p10, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31484024

RESUMEN

IMPORTANCE: Geriatric, interprofessional primary care training for occupational therapy students is needed. OBJECTIVE: To measure occupational therapy student-reported knowledge, attitudes, and skills after participation in interprofessional geriatric educational programs. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study with pre- and posttests for the three programs. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-nine entry-level and postprofessional occupational therapy master's students. OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Self-reported familiarity with other professionals' roles, perceptions of interprofessional training, capabilities to conduct assessments, and attitudes of older adults. RESULTS: Students of the three programs (Interprofessional Geriatrics Curriculum [IPGC], Student Senior Partnership Program [SSPP], and Geriatric Assessment Program [GAP]) reported different improvements in familiarity of roles, capabilities of assessment, and Geriatric Attitudes Scale (GAS) scores. For example, IPGC and SSPP students had changes in total GAS score (3.91-4.08, p = .002, and 3.84-3.99, p = .003, respectively), but no change was found for GAP students (3.85-3.91, p = .523). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: More structured interprofessional education with older adults appeared to help prepare occupational therapy students to work on geriatric interprofessional teams in primary care. WHAT THIS ARTICLE ADDS: This article expands on growing evidence to support occupational therapy's role in primary care by addressing the need to train future generations to work on interprofessional geriatric primary care teams.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Ocupacional , Anciano , Femenino , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Atención Primaria de Salud/organización & administración , Estudios Prospectivos , Estudiantes
49.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-9, 2019 Sep 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31532268

RESUMEN

Many higher education institutions struggle to provide interprofessional practice opportunities for their pre-licensure students due to demanding workloads, difficulties with timetabling, and problems with sourcing suitable placements that provide appropriate practice opportunities. A series of complex unfolding video-based simulation scenarios involving a patient who had experienced a stroke was utilized as a case study for a three-hour interprofessional practice workshop. 69 occupational therapy (OT), speech pathology (SP) and dietetics (DT) students participated in a mixed-methods study comparing interprofessional attitudes before and after the workshop. Attitudes toward interprofessional practice improved pre- vs. post-workshop and overall. Students were highly satisfied with the workshops contribution toward learning, although OT and SP students were more satisfied than DT students. Focus groups confirmed students liked the format and structure of the workshop, suggested that students better understood the role of other professions and improved role clarification, increased their confidence to practice in interprofessional practice settings, but noted the experience could have been improved with the incorporation of nursing and smaller groups to better facilitate participation. There is widespread support for implementing interprofessional education (IPE) in the health sciences, yet widespread implementation is not yet a reality. This research suggests that a simulation-based, three-hour IPE workshop can have an immediate benefit on confidence and attitudes toward interprofessional practice for allied health students.

50.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(6): 6848, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31507282

RESUMEN

Objective. To assess pharmacy students' opinions of an interprofessional learning (IPL) course in their final year of the Bachelor of Pharmacy program at The University of Auckland. Methods. Pharmacy students participated in the second day of a two-day simulation-based course, WardSim, alongside medical and nursing students in an acute care, hospital ward setting. After finishing the course, all students were asked to complete a questionnaire. The responses of pharmacy, nursing, and medical students on the scaled questions were compared. An in-depth thematic analysis of the pharmacy students' responses to the open-ended questions was completed using an iterative process. Results. Significant differences were found among the students' responses regarding the prioritization of care, systematic assessment of patients, and communication strategies. Pharmacy students had less favourable responses regarding the IPL experience than medical and nursing students. However, overall responses were positive. Some of the themes that emerged among the pharmacy students' responses included: learning communication tools, being assertive in communicating with other health care professionals, and understanding their own and others' roles in the health care team. Furthermore, some pharmacy students reported feeling underprepared for and underutilized during patient care scenarios. Conclusion. An IPL experience in an acute patient care setting demonstrated clear and beneficial learning outcomes for pharmacy students, especially in regards to communicating and understanding their roles and those of others on their team. Tailoring the pre-work or scenarios for the IPL experience to be more pharmacy orientated and having pharmacy students participate on both days may improve the preparedness for IPL.

51.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 83(6): 7034, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31507294

RESUMEN

Objective. To evaluate the impact of a large-scale interprofessional forum on pharmacy students' attitudes toward interprofessional collaborative practice. Methods. Pharmacy students were asked to complete the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale (IPAS) prior to and after completing a three-hour interprofessional forum. Scores for the total IPAS and each of the subscales were computed using the mean of students' responses to the items for each. Results. Of the 133 pharmacy students who participated in the forum, there were valid pre- and post-intervention matched IPAS data for 124 (93.2%). In general, prior to the forum, students reported positive attitudes toward interprofessional collaborative practice as demonstrated by mean scores greater than 4.0 (agree) on the total IPAS scale and on all of the IPAS subscales except the Interprofessional Biases subscale). There was a significant increase from pre- to post-intervention scores on all the subscales except Patient-Centeredness. Based on the Cohen d measure of effect size, the greatest changes were in the Teamwork, Roles and Responsibilities and Community-Centeredness subscales, followed by the Interprofessional Biases subscale and Diversity and Ethics subscale. Conclusion. Prior to participating in an interprofessional student forum, pharmacy students generally had positive attitudes toward interprofessional collaborative practice. After participating in the forum, these attitudes become even more positive. Interprofessional education interventions, such as the forum, play an important role in shaping student's attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration.

52.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Sep 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31516048

RESUMEN

This paper describes the initiation and proceedings of a national consultation organized to appraise issues in the local built environment affecting public health, using an interprofessional and intersectoral approach. The consultation was hosted as a part of the onsite session of an international fellowship program in interprofessional education and practice, organized by the Manipal FAIMER Institute for Leadership in Interprofessional Education, India. One hundred and eight delegates from across academic disciplines including the health professions, management, public health, architecture, and engineering, participated in this event. Plenary lectures and case studies highlighted the theoretical basics of built environment. Participants were also introduced to fundamental parameters for evaluating health-related aspects of the built environment. Delegates were then grouped into 18 teams and assigned to visit predetermined locations which they appraised and provided recommendations for. These were then thematically coded and synthesized for communication to relevant local municipal authorities. The consultation scope was limited by involving only academics in the appraisal process, and next steps include the engagement of local citizens and policy-makers to ensure the implementation of recommendations. This event illustrates how engaging interprofessional stakeholders can facilitate knowledge-driven development for promoting health equity, through action on the social determinants of health.

53.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-10, 2019 Sep 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31516056

RESUMEN

Health professions students will invariably confront professionalism dilemmas. These early encounters significantly influence future professional attitudes and behaviours. Heretofore, studies concerning professionalism dilemmas experienced by health professions students across disciplines have been limited. To address this issue, we recruited 56 students with clinical experience from the National Taiwan University College of Medicine in the nursing, dentistry, pharmacy, medical technology, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy programs to participate in this research to compare health professions students' understandings of professionalism and their experiences of professionalism dilemmas. We used group interviews to uncover students' experiences of professionalism dilemmas. We identified the six most commonly reported professionalism dilemmas and found that interprofessional dilemmas were the dominant workplace professionalism dilemma for health professions students. We also identified significant disciplinary differences regarding dilemma types and frequencies. We employed the framework of dual identity development to better understand the role of professional and interprofessional identities in interprofessional dilemmas. The professionalism dilemmas that individual students encountered were shaped by disciplinary differences. Our findings suggest that the development of a sense of belonging to both their own profession and a broader interprofessional care team in health professions students can increase the effectiveness of interprofessional healthcare teams.

54.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Sep 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31516058

RESUMEN

In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) published the WHO's Framework for Action on Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice recognizing the significance of improved quality of patient care, lower healthcare costs and decrease medical errors through the use of interprofessional teams. This concept was embraced by the Midwest Interprofessional Practice Education and Research Center (MIPERC) and its Service-Learning workgroup, through the development of multiple interprofessional service-learning experiential opportunities for area health and medical students. Throughout MIPERC's journey of developing and providing interprofessional service-learning opportunities, we have unsuccessfully sought to find a definition of interprofessional service-learning to assist us in better framing our work. We have found definitions of service-learning and interprofessional learning as well as case examples of service-learning, interprofessional learning, and interprofessional service-learning but, no definition of interprofessional service-learning. Following a review of the relevant literature, we have developed a definition of interprofessional service-learning that we believe is comprehensive and will be of use to other interprofessional service-learning organizations in framing and developing interprofessional service-learning opportunities for their health and medical students.

55.
J Prof Nurs ; 35(5): 393-397, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31519343

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The role of interdisciplinary faculty in schools and colleges of nursing has evolved over time. Historically, integration of interdisciplinary faculty into nursing education was as experts in non-nursing content and to fill a gap created by the lack of doctorally prepared nurses. In the 1980s, Lenz and Morton surveyed Departments, Schools and Colleges of Nursing to explore the role of interdisciplinary faculty in nursing education. PURPOSE: Our study adapted Lenz and Morton's work to examine new trends in faculty composition, while also considering the evolution in nursing education, including the integration of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) prepared faculty. RESULTS: Differences in enrollments, programs offered, and number of faculty and faculty composition were observed between 1988 and 2017. In 1988 the most common disciplines represented were nutrition, education and psychology, while in 2017 the most common disciplines were pharmacology, statistics and biological sciences. The current study shows a decrease of 15% in interdisciplinary faculty educating nursing students, although this finding may be related to differences in sampling techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Integration of interdisciplinary faculty has the potential to enrich nursing education by bringing in a depth of specialized knowledge from other disciplines. Further faculty role-modeling successful interdisciplinary collaboration is another way to prepare nurses for team-based patient care which is an imperative skill in today's health care arena.

56.
J Prof Nurs ; 35(5): 412-416, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31519346

RESUMEN

In a first of its kind authentic clinical interprofessional education (IPE) experience, University of Kentucky (UK) health profession students joined dental students to implement a pilot program to promote oral health and wellness with children living in underserved Appalachian communities. Known as hCATS (Health Colleges Advancing Team Skills) to Appalachia, a total of 113 students participated in interprofessional teams of 48 health profession students paired with 65 dentistry students to provide health services. Although the UK College of Dentistry has provided sealant services (tooth decay prevention) to elementary school children for several decades in eastern Kentucky counties, funding through the UK Women and Philanthropy Network allowed services to expand to include general health screening and age-appropriate education on oral health, nutrition, exercise, and prevention of substance abuse. The UK Center for Interprofessional Health Education (CIHE) coordinated the efforts for students from the colleges of Communication and Information Sciences, Health Sciences, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, and Social Work. In addition to the clinical experience in the elementary schools, nursing and other health profession students explored the health resources of the communities visited and reflected on their experience in collaborative practice that the program was designed to encourage. The authors noted positive outcomes with interprofessional education competencies, although more structure for collaboration is required to ensure students who work with other professions in an authentic clinical setting can gain early relevant practice in, and experience the benefits of, collaborative patient care.

57.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Sep 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31537139

RESUMEN

Interprofessional practice between nurses and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in healthcare is essential, and it is a priority for both professions. Interprofessional education (IPE) is warranted to move forward professional partnership, and would be best served through incorporation into academic training for both disciplines. A combined synchronous and asynchronous e-platform collaborative approach that minimizes encroachment on already overcrowded clinical curricula is described. Implementation is outlined for use within a graduate-level dysphagia course for SLP students and a medical/surgical undergraduate course for nursing students. This model is flexible and lends itself for use in other courses within clinical disciplines.

58.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-9, 2019 Sep 20.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31538507

RESUMEN

Interprofessional care is the standard for quality in healthcare. Interprofessional education (IPE) is an accreditation requirement in many health-care fields. This qualitative study evaluated the benefits of an interprofessional education program for Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) and Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students in the context of a pro bono physical therapy setting focused on reducing fall risk among older adults. For each pro bono participant, PharmD and DPT students worked together to analyze fall risk of the participating older adults. PharmD students completed a medication review while the DPT students completed balance assessments. Each profession recommended adjustments to care and presented their findings to peers, faculty, and participants. Following completion of the IPE program, students completed a voluntary evaluation with seven questions requiring semi-structured written reflection regarding their IPE experience. Student reflective responses from 2014-2016 were coded by IPE faculty using a coding guide collaboratively developed by the study team. Descriptive analysis included a summary of code frequency by year, discipline and Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competency: Values and Ethics, Communication, Teams and Teamwork, and Roles and Responsibilities. Values and Ethics were the most frequently coded core competency. Students consistently noted the importance of valuing the other profession, understanding each other's roles, having good interprofessional communication, and working within a health-care team. Additional codes emerged during the analysis process. Written reflective findings suggest that hands-on collaboration, focused on a real-world problem (fall risk) relevant to both PharmD and DPT students, enabled interprofessional care that benefited students through real-world practice of skills learned during coursework, and benefited clinical participants through increased awareness of physical function and medication factors that could affect fall risk. Findings indicate that a pro bono physical therapy setting can provide hands-on learning that meets IPE accreditation requirements and student learning needs while addressing a public health concern.

59.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ ; : 1-14, 2019 Sep 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31498034

RESUMEN

We implemented "My Life, My Story" as an educational activity for enhancing patient-centered care (PCC) competencies across health professions trainees. Four hundred and eighty-two stories were completed for patients (M age = 72.5, SD = 12.7) primarily in inpatient medical settings, by trainees from seven disciplines. Trainees spent approximately 2 hours on the assignment; 84% felt this was a good use of their time. A mixed method survey evaluated the effectiveness of the activity on enhancing PCC competencies using open ended questions and ratings on the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure adapted for this project. The assignment most influenced trainees' ability to understand the patient as a "whole person" along with other PCC competencies such as showing empathy, really listening, building knowledge of values and goals, and building relationships. In addition, trainees perceived the activity enhanced patient care and was a positive contrast to usual care.

60.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-8, 2019 Sep 16.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31525128

RESUMEN

Nurturing student's development of interprofessional collaboration is fundamental. Assessment-For-Learning can use reflection as one technique to support students' growth. Thus, we investigated using reflective-writing within an interprofessional education (IPE) course using an exploratory mixed-methods design. In 2015, student-nurses, student-pharmacists, and student-physicians participated in an IPE course and completed self-assessments of student learning objectives (SLOs). In 2016, new cohorts of student-nurses, student-pharmacists, and student-physicians participated in the course and completed their self-assessments of SLOs; however, student-nurses and student-pharmacists also reflectively-wrote. Quantitatively comparing SLOs from 2015 cohorts with 2016 cohorts, we found that the effect-sizes (magnitude of difference) for those who reflectively-wrote (student-nurses and student-pharmacists) grew more than historical controls, whereas the effect-sizes remained unchanged for a control group (student-physicians) who did not reflectively-write. Qualitatively, initial and final reflective-writings were explored using content analysis. Initial reflective-writings helped students create a baseline for their final reflective-writings. In final reflective-writings, most students discussed their growth in understanding roles/responsibilities and communication, though limited growth was discussed for teams/teamwork and values/ethics. Thus, initial and final reflective-writings appeared useful within this IPE course. Initial reflective-writing further enhanced students' self-assessed IPE improvement and recorded students' baseline perceptions for later review, while final reflective-writings documented students' self-actualized IPE development.

61.
J Allied Health ; 48(3): 159-166, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31487353

RESUMEN

Academic healthcare programs are incorporating interprofessional education (IPE) into students' learning experiences in order to prepare students for optimal clinical practice. This paper describes a simulation-based learning experience (SBLE) designed to encourage students (n = 130) from six healthcare professions to learn more about interprofessional communication, roles and responsibilities of the healthcare team, and knowledge of interprofessional collaborative practice. Data analysis showed statistically significant differences in participants' perceptions of roles/responsibilities for collaborative practice (p = 0.001) and the patient outcomes from collaborative practice (p = 0.002). Additionally, participants identified the importance of holistic, patient-centered care, a greater understanding of the roles and responsibilities of healthcare team members, and a greater desire to participate in IPE activities. Utilizing SBLE with students in athletic training, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, social work, and psychology led to positive perceptions of IPE and collaborative practice.

62.
J Allied Health ; 48(3): 167-171, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31487354

RESUMEN

AIMS: Faculty in the healthcare professions are engaging their students in a variety of interprofessional education (IPE) experiences. One such experience is a one-time IPE event, performed over 2 consecutive years by 2 different cohorts, involving 342 students in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology, and therapeutic recreation. The aim was to provide students with the opportunity to learn about the impact of a stroke, the rehabilitation process, the rehabilitation team and their own profession, as well as incorporating the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice. METHODS: The event had 3 separate components: a small group discussion on a pre-assigned case of a patient who had a stroke, a patient panel, and a clinician panel. RESULTS: All answers to the survey questions taken by students who attended the IPE event improved significantly at posttest (p<0.001). The IPE event was well received by the students (89.0% reported that the overall experience was good-excellent). CONCLUSION: This one-time event involving four health professions was successful in exposing the students to IPE.

63.
J Allied Health ; 48(3): e95-e100, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31487368

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education (IPE) research has grown dramatically, but it has primarily occurred at single institutions/contexts with unique assessment tools. Comparing pedagogical approaches and assessment tools across contexts and learner levels is necessary to advance the educational preparation of "collaborative-ready" health professionals. One common thread through IPE initiatives is a learning experience that introduces students to the basic tenets of professional roles, communication and collaboration. Commonly accepted objectives focus on competencies such as those defined by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC). The IPE Research Collaborative (IPE-RC) brings together researchers from four universities that deliver introductory interprofessional learning experiences seeking to leverage this relationship to improve IPE research in support of collaborative person-centered quality healthcare. Donabedian's quality improvement (QI) model provides a framework of structure, process and outcomes for assessing and improving the quality of healthcare. The IPE-RC operationalized the IPEC competencies in their collaboration using Donabedian's QI model. They demonstrate, using a systematic approach that mirrors interprofessional practice, how researchers from multiple institutions can study learning experiences across different contexts and learner levels to inform best practice for an introductory interprofessional learning experience.

64.
Gerontol Geriatr Educ ; : 1-22, 2019 Sep 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31488030

RESUMEN

With increasing rates of polypharmacy among older adults, preparedness of current and future health care professionals to identify and deprescribe potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) is critical. Medicine (n = 28), pharmacy (n = 35) and nursing (n = 11) trainees enrolled in an interprofessional course completed a survey assessing preparedness, confidence and attitudes toward deprescribing, and perception of interprofessional roles in the process. Pharmacy (p = .001) and nursing (p = .007) felt that their curriculum prepared them better to identify and deprescribe PIMs compared to medicine trainees. Pharmacy trainees perceived significantly more barriers to deprescribing compared to medicine (p = .003), but not nursing trainees. Physicians and pharmacists were perceived as the main drivers of the deprescribing process. Current curricular content should be modified to address lack of preparedness to deprescribe in clinical practice. Addressing such gaps as part of an interprofessional team may increase interprofessional role recognition and translate into changes in clinical practice as trainees move into the workforce.

65.
Nurs Sci Q ; 32(4): 288-290, 2019 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31514620

RESUMEN

Interprofessional collaborative education and practice is essential in the current complex healthcare climate. Barriers to interprofessional education include difficulty scheduling joint activities amid the silos of discipline-specific curricula and the lack of urgency by faculty to find innovative ways to commit to interprofessional training. Barriers in practice include poor understanding of the roles of different professionals and lack of awareness of the concept because the people in the workforce were mostly educated before interprofessional practice and education were prioritized by national bodies representing academic professions. The author of this paper describes opportunities for interprofessional education and practice and describes a way to create an educational-practice partnership to drive quality in healthcare settings.

66.
J Dent Educ ; 83(12): 1411-1419, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31501256

RESUMEN

Changes in U.S. health care delivery systems and Commission on Dental Accreditation standards provide impetus for interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice, but roadmaps for engaging dental and dental hygiene faculty to incorporate IPE in a systematic manner are limited. The purpose of this report is to describe the process for creating a strategy and gathering a variety of baseline data to use for determining objectives and metrics and the subsequent development of an IPE strategic plan at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill Adams School of Dentistry (SOD). SOD IPE committee members included representation from the UNC Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Business. A three-phase framework was developed. Phase 1 (IPE assessment) was an internal environmental scan including a 2017 faculty survey, departmental mapping of IPE activities, comparison of UNC with national results on the IPE component of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) survey of dental school seniors (2016 graduating class), identification of faculty joint/adjunct appointments at other UNC schools, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats (SWOT) analysis. Phase 2 (visioning) consisted of development of IPE mission, vision, and priorities. In Phase 3 (implementation), priorities were developed. Data-gathering led to a strategic plan with three objectives: 1) increase faculty engagement and recognition, 2) develop predoctoral dentistry and dental hygiene IPE curricula, and 3) develop an infrastructure that supports IPE. Specific initiatives and activities, supporting metrics, and estimated costs were developed for each objective. The framework guided a systematic, transparent, and organized process for collecting and monitoring the evidence and directing activities. A three-year strategic plan for IPE was developed in 2017, and implementation is ongoing.


Asunto(s)
Relaciones Interprofesionales , Facultades de Odontología , Curriculum , Educación en Odontología , Docentes de Odontología , Humanos
67.
J Gen Intern Med ; 34(12): 2912-2917, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31515736

RESUMEN

AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a team training program to support shared mental model (SMM) development in interprofessional rounds. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A three-arm randomized controlled trial study was conducted for interprofessional teams of 207 health profession learners who were randomized into three groups. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: The full team training program included a didactic training part on cognitive tools and a virtual simulation to support clinical teamwork in interprofessional round. Group 1 was assigned to the full program, group 2 to the didactic part, and group 3 (control group) with no intervention. The main outcome measure was team performance in full scale simulation. Secondary outcome was interprofessional attitudes. PROGRAM EVALUATION: Teamwork performance and interprofessional attitude scores of the full intervention group were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group. The two intervention groups had significantly higher (P < 0.05) attitude scores on interprofessional teamwork compared with the control group. DISCUSSION: Our study indicates the need of both cognitive tools and experiential learning modalities to foster SMM development for the delivery of optimal clinical teamwork performances. Given its scalability and practicality, we anticipate a greater role for virtual simulations to support interprofessional team training.

68.
J Dent Educ ; 83(12): 1361-1369, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31548305

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education (IPE) is based on collaborative practices that increase the occasions for communication among those in various health professions. However, there is a paucity of literature about the effectiveness of IPE programs in health professions education. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to objectively assess the literature on the effectiveness of IPE in improving health professions students' attitudes after training. The major scholarly databases were searched for relevant IPE studies involving predoctoral health professions students. Two independent researchers selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the quality of the studies. Meta-analyses of the outcomes were performed using random effects models. Sixteen articles were ultimately selected for detailed review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed that IPE training had a significant influence on students' understanding of collaboration and resulted in better attitudes about interprofessional teamwork. Subscale analysis showed that one subscale score (roles and responsibilities) did not statistically significantly improve after IPE training (p=0.06), whereas the other four subscale items showed statistically significant improvements (p<0.01). The test for overall effects showed that IPE training had a significantly positive influence on students' attitudes about IPE (Z=6.85, p<0.01). Subgroup results showed that medical students had more positive attitudes about IPE than did dental students. Regardless of profession, women students responded with significantly more positive feedback than did men students (p=0.02). These results suggest that intervention through IPE training has had positive effects in health professions education. Gender was an important factor impacting the outcomes of IPE. However, further clinical practice interventions may be helpful to enhance the IPE competence of health professions students.


Asunto(s)
Estudiantes del Área de la Salud , Estudiantes de Medicina , Actitud del Personal de Salud , Femenino , Empleos en Salud , Humanos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Masculino
69.
Nurse Educ Today ; 83: 104194, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31493620

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The need to provide care for the dying patient and his/her family may occur in every medical setting. Newly graduated nurses and physicians should therefore be prepared to deliver it at a high-quality level. OBJECTIVES: To explore (a) the primary difficulties participants anticipate they will encounter whilst working with dying patients, (b) their interest in developing competencies in caring for dying patients, and (c) their interest in working in palliative/hospice settings or with dying patients in the future. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: A medical university in Poland. PARTICIPANTS: Convenience sample of nursing (=112) and medical students (=101) at the end of their undergraduate education. METHODS: Questionnaire distributed online and in hard-copy format. RESULTS: Half of the participants anticipated experiencing various emotional and professional difficulties in caring for dying individuals, especially medical students. These difficulties pertained mostly the reaction of family members to the patient's death, addressing the psychological needs of the dying person, and coping with his/her own emotions when dealing with the patient's death. Students reported that working with dying patients could cause occupational stress - more so among medical students. The majority of them showed an interest in improving knowledge regarding palliative care and also in this case this was mostly true of medical rather than nursing students. However, more than half of the participants preferred avoiding work in palliative/hospice settings, with no differences between the two groups. Participants attributed this attitude to two factors: (a) the desire to avoid negative emotions and stress that could be triggered by dealing with death and dying; and (b) because they felt they lacked the required skills and personal abilities to handle such situations. CONCLUSIONS: Undergraduate curricula that include strategies for coping with negative emotions associated with facing the process of death and dying should be developed. Interprofessional education should be encouraged, especially regarding the psychosocial aspects of end-of-life care.

70.
Br J Nurs ; 28(17): 1144-1147, 2019 Sep 26.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31556744

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education is a key requirement identified in various professional and regulatory body education standards in the UK. However, recent high-profile investigatory reports into adverse incidents in NHS organisations have demonstrated failures of translating interprofessional education into practice. This paper explores how a university in the south of England uses service improvement projects to address this. Working with key senior clinicians, small groups of students from a variety of professional backgrounds collaborate to address an identified problem in practice to bring about better, safer practice to benefit patients. This style of learning enables students to acquire essential attributes in preparation for employment, such as critical thinking, teamworking, ethical practice and leadership.

71.
J Palliat Care ; : 825859719869614, 2019 Sep 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31496358

RESUMEN

Palliative care services offered in the United States have grown substantially since the year 2000. These types of services have been shown to improve a patient's quality of life when presented with a serious or life-threatening disease or illness. An important characteristic of a quality palliative care service is the presence of an interdisciplinary team to utilize different areas of expertise to address multiple aspects of patient care. An important member of this team is the pharmacist. The services presented in this interprofessional education and practice guide describe pharmacist-delivered palliative care services offered in an institutional ambulatory palliative care setting from 2012 to 2018.

72.
Rural Remote Health ; 19(3): 5238, 2019 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31500435

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Youth from rural communities face significant challenges in the pursuit of healthcare training. Healthcare trainees with a rural background are more likely than those without to practice rurally as healthcare professionals. The Healthcare Travelling Roadshow (HCTRS) is an initiative in Canada that provides rural youth with exposure to healthcare careers, while providing healthcare students with exposure to rural opportunities, and an interprofessional education experience. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an initiative for rural university-high school healthcare career outreach that involves near-peer teaching, highly interactive sessions, and an interprofessional focus. METHODS: Ten HCTRSs took place throughout northern rural and remote British Columbia between 2010 and 2017. Questionnaires were delivered to youth in a pilot research project in 2010. Healthcare students and community members completed questionnaires for ongoing program evaluation from 2010 to 2017. Quantitative elements were graded on a five-point Likert scale. Qualitative elements were analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Participants indicated that the program was very successful (4.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.63-4.79), would likely encourage healthcare students to consider rural practice (4.12, 95%CI 3.98-4.26), and that it inspired local youth to consider careers in health care much or very much (4.45, 95%CI 4.35-4.55). Qualitative analysis led to description of four themes: (1) sincerity and interactivity sparking enthusiasm, (2) learning through rural exposure and community engagement, (3) healthcare student personal growth and (4) interprofessional collaboration and development. Open-ended feedback identified successes outside of the primary goals and illustrated how this program could act in a multi-faceted way to promote healthcare recruitment and retention. Constructive comments emphasized the importance of taking a balanced approach to planning the HCTRS, ensuring the goals of the HCTRS are best met, while meeting the needs of the host communities as much as possible. CONCLUSIONS: The HCTRS is an interdisciplinary experience that successfully engages rural youth, healthcare students, and community stakeholders. Participants consistently indicated that it encouraged rural youth towards healthcare careers and healthcare students towards rural practice. Success of the program requires meaningful engagement with multiple academic and community stakeholders.

73.
Otolaryngol Clin North Am ; 52(6): 995-1003, 2019 Dec.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526536

RESUMEN

Simulation-based education (SBE) has become pervasive in health care training and medical education, and is even more important in subspecialty training whereby providers such as otolaryngologists and anesthesiologists share overlapping patient concerns because of the proximity of the surgical airway. Both these subspecialties work in a fast-paced environment involving high-stakes situations and life-changing events that necessitate critical thinking and timely action, and have an exceedingly small bandwidth for error. Team training in the form of interprofessional education and learning involving surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nursing is critical for patient safety in the operating room in general, but more so in otolaryngology surgery.

74.
Saúde debate ; 43(spe1): 64-76, agosto 2019. tab
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1043394

RESUMEN

RESUMO Os marcos teórico-conceituais e metodológicos da Educação Interprofissional (EIP) em saúde vêm sendo amplamente reconhecidos em todo o mundo como úteis para o desenvolvimento de competências colaborativas para o efetivo trabalho em equipe. O artigo teve como objetivo explorar as percepções de estudantes de enfermagem e medicina sobre os fatores institucionais que interferem na adoção de iniciativas de EIP em seus contextos de formação. Trata-se de um estudo de caso, que adotou a abordagem qualitativa e a perspectiva exploratória. Os participantes da pesquisa foram estudantes de enfermagem e medicina de duas universidades públicas de um estado do Nordeste - uma estadual e outra federal. O grupo focal foi escolhido para coleta de dados, e foi utilizada a técnica de análise de conteúdo categorial, observando as fases de pré-análise, exploração do material e tratamento dos resultados. Três categorias temáticas foram construídas a posteriori: a importância do trabalho em equipe, contextos institucionais para adoção da EIP e desafios para a adoção da EIP. Embora as realidades pesquisadas apresentem avanços nas mudanças curriculares, como a aproximação do ensino com a realidade dos serviços, a adoção de métodos mais ativos para a formação de sujeitos críticos e reflexivos, ainda são notórias as lacunas no desenvolvimento de competências colaborativas.


ABSTRACT The theoretical-conceptual and methodological frameworks of Interprofessional Education in Health (IPE) have been widely recognized throughout the world as useful for the development of collaborative competences for effective teamwork. This article aims to explore the perceptions of nursing and medical students regarding the institutional factors that interfere in the adoption of IPE initiatives in their training contexts. It is a case study, which adopted the qualitative approach and the exploratory perspective. The research participants were nursing and medical students from two public universities from a Brazilian Northeastern state - one state and one federal. The focus group was chosen for data collection, and the categorical content analysis technique was used, observing the phases of pre-analysis, material exploration and treatment of results. Three thematic categories were built a posteriori: the importance of teamwork, the institutional contexts for the adoption of the IPE and challenges for the adoption of the IPE. Although the realities researched present advances in curricular changes, such as the approximation of teaching with the reality of services, the adoption of more active methods for the formation of critical and reflexive subjects, the gaps in the development of collaborative competences are still notorious.

75.
Saúde debate ; 43(spe1): 50-63, agosto 2019. tab
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1043397

RESUMEN

RESUMO Este artigo objetivou identificar se as ações formativas do eixo do provimento emergencial do Programa Mais Médicos se apoiam em elementos teórico-metodológicos da educação interprofissional, na perspectiva dos participantes do programa. Trata-se de estudo exploratório, desenvolvido em 2016, em Minas Gerais. Os dados foram coletados mediante entrevistas individuais (n=30) e nove grupos focais (n=52) com participantes do programa, e tratados por análise de conteúdo, que produziu três categorias: Os pressupostos da educação interprofissional enunciados nos ciclos formativos do Programa Mais Médicos; As mudanças no processo de trabalho em equipe, na perspectiva dos elementos da educação interprofissional, desencadeadas pelos ciclos formativos; e Dificuldades para a abordagem da educação interprofissional nos ciclos formativos. Entre os elementos enunciados nos processos formativos, estão o aprendizado sobre o papel de cada profissão, o compartilhamento de experiências e a centralidade do cuidado no paciente. Por outra via, o preceito fundamental da educação interprofissional de aprendizado entre duas ou mais profissões não é aplicado sistematicamente. O Mais Médicos se constitui política propícia para o fortalecimento da interprofissionalidade, especialmente porque sua proposta se assenta na lógica da educação permanente, que demanda o estabelecimento de uma relação de mútua influência entre a educação e o trabalho em saúde.


ABSTRACT This article aimed to identify if the formative actions of the axis the emergency provision of the More Doctors Program are based on theoretical and methodological elements of interprofessional education from the perspective of the participants of the program. It is an exploratory study, developed in 2016, in Brazil. Data were collected through individual interviews (n=30) and nine focus groups (n=52), and treated by content analysis, which produced three categories: Assumptions of interprofessional education set forth in the formative cycles of the More Doctors; Changes in the process of teamwork, from the perspective of the elements of interprofessional education, triggered by the formative cycles; Difficulties for the approach of interprofessional education in the formative cycles. Among the elements enunciated in the formative processes are the learning about the role of each profession, the sharing of experiences, and the centrality of care in the patient. However, the fundamental precept of interprofessional education of learning between two or more professions is not applied. The More Doctors constitutes a propitious policy for the strengthening of interprofessionality, because its proposal is based on the logic of permanent education, which demands the establishment of a relationship of mutual influence between education and work in health.

76.
Saúde debate ; 43(spe1): 97-105, agosto 2019.
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1043398

RESUMEN

RESUMO Este ensaio teve como objetivo refletir sobre as contribuições da edição mais recente do Programa de Educação pelo Trabalho para a Saúde - PET-Saúde/Interprofissionalidade para a implementação da Política Nacional de Educação Permanente em Saúde (PNEPS) no âmbito do Sistema Único de Saúde. Nesse contexto, resgata-se a contemporaneidade da formação em saúde, a Educação Interprofissional e o processo formativo, e a execução do PET-Saúde/Interprofissionalidade como potencializador da prática colaborativa na atenção primária. Ressalta-se que, diante dos inúmeros desafios vivenciados pelos serviços de saúde para responder às demandas populacionais variadas e influenciadas pela transição demográfica e epidemiológica, entende-se como necessário ensaiar reflexões sobre a interprofissionalidade e suas contribuições para a implementação da PNEPS. Acredita-se que este material possa subsidiar a discussão e atuação profissional na elaboração e realização de intervenções interprofissionais apropriadas para as diferentes demandas em saúde.


ABSTRACT This essay aims to reflect on the contributions of the most recent edition of the Education through Work for Health Program - PET-Health/Interprofessionality for the implementation of the National Policy of Permanent Education in Health (PNEPS) within the scope of the Unified Health System (SUS). In this context, the contemporaneity of health education, the Interprofessional Education and the formative process, and the implementation of PET-Health/Interprofessionality as a potentiator for the collaborative practice in primary care are rescued. It should be stressed that, given the innumerable challenges experienced by the health services to respond to the demands of a varied population and influenced by the demographic and epidemiological transition, we believe it is necessary to rehearse reflections on interprofessionality and its contributions to the strengthening of the PNEPS. It is believed that this material can subsidize the discussion and professional performance in the elaboration and accomplishment of interprofessional interventions that are appropriate for the different health demands.

77.
Saúde debate ; 43(spe1): 24-39, agosto 2019. tab
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1043404

RESUMEN

RESUMO Este manuscrito apresenta os resultados de um survey on-line conduzido com os coordenadores de projetos e de grupos da última edição do Programa de Educação pelo Trabalho para a Saúde (PET-Saúde/GraduaSUS), que buscou identificar os resultados alcançados e apontar os limites e as contribuições dessa edição na produção de mudanças. O survey foi realizado em março e abril de 2018, com 445 coordenadores, cujos dados quantitativos foram tratados estatisticamente; e os qualitativos, por análise de conteúdo, dando origem a quatro categorias: As repercussões positivas do PET-Saúde/GraduaSUS; Os aspectos negativos do PET-Saúde/GraduaSUS; A coordenação dos projetos pelo serviço de saúde: ponto controverso; e Sugestões de mudanças. Constatou-se que o PET-Saúde/GraduaSUS contribuiu para o desenvolvimento profissional, ampliação e diversificação dos cenários de aprendizagem, fortalecimento da atenção primária e da educação interprofissional nos currículos e beneficiou a comunidade local. Os principais aspectos positivos da edição foram a coordenação de projeto pelo serviço de saúde e os relatos de experiências na Comunidade de Práticas; já a composição numérica e uniprofissional dos grupos foi apontada como aspecto negativo.


ABSTRACT This manuscript presents the results of an online survey conducted with the project and group coordinators of the last edition of the Education through Work for Health Program (PET-Health/GraduaSUS), which sought to identify the results achieved and to point out the limits and contributions of such edition for the production of changes. The survey was carried out in March and April 2018, with 445 coordinators, whose quantitative data were treated statistically; and qualitative data by content analysis, giving rise to four categories: The positive repercussions of PET-Health/GraduaSUS; The negative aspects of PET-Health/GraduaSUS; The coordination of the projects by the health service: controversial point; and Suggestions for changes. It was found that the PET-Health/GraduaSUS contributed to the professional development, expansion and diversification of the learning scenarios, strengthening primary care and interprofessional education in the curricula and benefited the local community. The main positive aspects of the edition were the coordination of the project by the health service and the reports of experiences in the Community of Practices; the numerical and uniprofessional composition of the groups, however, was pointed as a negative aspect.

78.
Saúde debate ; 43(spe1): 86-96, agosto 2019. graf
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | ID: biblio-1043406

RESUMEN

RESUMO O processo de formação dos profissionais de saúde encontra-se no momento histórico de reformas orientado para o fortalecimento dos sistemas de saúde, com grandes desafios para esse novo século. Iniciativas para a superação dos problemas relacionados com a colaboração entre diferentes profissionais de saúde são assumidas como uma das prioridades. É partindo da necessidade de formar profissionais de saúde mais aptos à colaboração para o trabalho em equipe que a Educação Interprofissional (EIP) começa a ser valorizada em todo o mundo. O objetivo deste ensaio foi apresentar a trajetória histórica da incorporação dessa abordagem nas políticas de formação profissional em saúde do Brasil, bem como destacar os recentes avanços nessa direção. Recentemente, o Brasil passou a incorporar a EIP de forma mais clara nas políticas de reorientação da formação em saúde, processo intensificado nos últimos dois anos, o que pode ser atribuído ao reconhecimento dos formuladores de políticas para a importância da abordagem no processo de formação profissional em saúde no País, assim como à atuação de organismos internacionais de saúde que intensificaram o chamado para a sua relevância no processo de mudança do modelo de atenção à saúde.


ABSTRACT The process of training of health professionals is set in the historical moment of reforms oriented towards the strengthening of health systems, with great challenges for this new century. Initiatives to overcome problems related to collaboration among different health professionals are taken as one of the priorities. Starting from the need to train health professionals better able to collaborate in teamwork, Interprofessional Education (IPE) begins to be valued throughout the world. The objective of this essay is to present the historical trajectory of the incorporation of such approach in the policies of professional training in health in Brazil, as well as to highlight the recent advances in this direction. Brazil has recently begun to incorporate IPE more clearly into policies for reorienting health education, a process intensified in the last two years, which can be attributed to the recognition of policymakers for the importance of the approach in the training process in health care in the country, as well as the work of international health organizations that have intensified the call for their relevance in the process of change of the health care model.

79.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-9, 2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31379225

RESUMEN

Pain is complex and best managed using an interprofessional approach. A complicating factor is the high prevalence of co-existing opioid use disorder (OUD). Interprofessional education (IPE) may be an important strategy for transforming pain and OUD care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of an interactive, case-based IPE session related to acute pain management in persons with OUD on pre-licensure health science students' perceived achievement of core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice. Students completed a self-assessment of competency before and after the IPE session, using the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Scale. Paired samples t-tests determined differences between pre- and post-session assessments and Cohen's d effect sizes evaluated the magnitude of change. Learners (n = 160) included students from pharmacy (30.9%), social work (21.9%), dentistry (16.3%), nursing (14.4%), medicine (9.4%), and other professional schools (7.4%). Learners showed significant improvement in perceived competency for all items (all p ≤ 0.002). Using a Collaborative Patient-Centered Approach and Team Functioning demonstrated the greatest overall improvement (Cohen's d > 0. 80). Findings suggest that an interactive IPE session is associated with perceived achievement of core interprofessional competencies for acute pain management in persons with OUD.

80.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31392511

RESUMEN

Interprofessional teamwork between healthcare professionals is integral to the delivery of safe high-quality patient care in all settings. Recent reforms of medical education curricula incorporate specific educational opportunities that aim to foster successful interprofessional collaboration and teamwork. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of curriculum reform on medical students' perceptions of their interactions and team-working with nurses. We gathered data from 12 semi-structured individual narrative interviews with a purposive sample of male (n = 6) and female (n = 6) medical students from fourth year (n = 6 following an integrated curriculum) and fifth year (n = 6 following a traditional curriculum). Data were subject to narrative analysis which was undertaken using NVivo software. Overall, there was no notable difference in the responses of the participants on the traditional and integrated curricula about their interactions and team work with nurses. However, the introduction of an integrated medical curriculum was viewed positively but a lack of interprofessional education with nursing students, removal of a nursing placement and shorter clinical placements were perceived as lost opportunities for the development of educationally beneficial relationships. The participants reported that nurses play a number of roles in clinical practice which underpin patient safety including being medical educators who provide a valuable source of support for medical students. The participants highlighted different factors that could hinder or foster effective working relationships such as a lack of understanding of nurses' different professional roles and mutual respect. Medical education needs to provide students with more structured opportunities to work with and learn from nurses in clinical practice. Further research could explore how to foster positive relationships between medical students and nurses.

81.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Aug 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31397198

RESUMEN

Studying experiences of interprofessional learning (IPL) in international contexts can contribute to better understand its nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' IPL in the context of a two-week study-abroad program. There were 28 health-care students from Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan, who participated in a two-week interprofessional education program provided by Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, from 2013 to 2016. The program consisted of classroom-based activities, a literature study (since 2015) and study-visits to health-care facilities. The data were two pre-course questionnaires with open-ended questions that inquired about students' motivation, expectations and goals, and one post-course questionnaire that inquired about their learning. A qualitative KJ-method analysis of students' completed questionnaires revealed two understandings about the nature of IPL. Namely, the 'unfamiliar', presented by both interprofessional and international contexts, provided students' with unique learning, with the international context reinforcing interprofessional learning. Secondly, developing one's individual collaborative skills and one's professional expertise was important aspects of their learning. International context can add value to students' IPL by affording learning opportunities considered unique to the different socio-cultural context. IPL may also pertain to 'learning about oneself', in addition to 'learning with, about and from each other'.

82.
Int J Pharm Pract ; 2019 Aug 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31373100

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of an interprofessional education (IPE) course at a German university was complicated by the lack of validated German versions of IPE assessment instruments. The objectives of this study were to (1) translate version 2 of the Student Perceptions of Physician-Pharmacist Interprofessional Clinical Education (SPICE-2) and (2) test its validity and reliability. METHODS: After translation, the SPICE-2D instrument was administered electronically to medical and pharmacy students at four universities in Germany using a convenience sampling design. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to assess validity of the translated instrument. Goodness-of-fit assessment was conducted by evaluating the standardized root mean square residuals (SRMR), the comparative fit index (CFI) and the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Overall and factor-specific reliabilities of SPICE-2D were assessed using Cronbach's alpha. KEY FINDINGS: Four German universities participated. Response rate was 19.8% (n = 312/1576), mean age of respondents was 25.1 years (SD 3.3), and the majority were female (69%, n = 215). The SRMR of the overall model showed a good fit (0.061). The measured CFI of 0.95 and RMSEA of 0.072 (95% CI 0.053-0.091) can be considered acceptable. Cronbach's alpha indicated overall instrument reliability and composite reliabilities; only the reliability of factor 2 (Roles/responsibilities for Collaborative Practice) was mediocre (α = 0.41). Medical students scored consistently higher across all factors than pharmacy students. CONCLUSIONS: The SPICE-2D instrument demonstrated acceptable reliability, with the exception of the roles/responsibilities factor. A robust evaluation of SPICE-2D's validity and reliability in the context of a more representative sample of German medical and pharmacy students is warranted.

83.
J Nurs Educ ; 58(8): 474-480, 2019 Aug 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31373669

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Correctly leveling simulation scenarios for health professional students has posed a challenge for simulation educators teaching teamwork and communication skills. In addition, licensed health professionals may come to simulation-based scenarios with a predisposed hierarchy, preventing them from effectively learning the importance of teamwork and communication. METHOD: Using a simulation center environment for an escape room scenario allows educators to teach about teamwork and communication concepts via "edutain ment" (i.e., educational entertainment). RESULTS: Employing escape room-type learning activities is an effective method to expose learners to teamwork and communication concepts without requiring them to use clinical knowledge and can teach teamwork and communication concepts in a unique and exciting way. CONCLUSION: Escape room scenarios are a novel way to teach interprofessional health students about teamwork and communication. This article describes how a simulation center planned, implemented, and evaluated an escape room scenario with a group of learners. [J Nurs Educ. 2019;58(8):474-480.].

84.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-8, 2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31381472

RESUMEN

Poor communication between nurses and physicians results in patient injury and increased healthcare costs. While multiple attempts have been made to improve communication between the two professions, evidence confirms little progress has been made. Previous research focused on standardizing communication processes and protocols between nurses and physicians rather than examining the relational component of these human interactions. The purpose of this study was to explore physician valuing of nursing communication in the context of patient care. Interviews were conducted with 15 internal medicine resident physicians. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to develop the substantive theory of Getting Work Done. Getting Work Done incorporated three major categories: discerning the team, shifting communication, and accessing nurse knowledge and abilities. Hierarchical behaviors and language, and nurse collusion in both, characterized nurse-physician communication and situated the nurse outside the decision-making team. Complex work environments further devalued nurse-physician communication. Interprofessional education and practice must advance the unique and essential role of all health care professionals such that mutual valuing replaces hierarchical actions with collaborative systems for determining the most effective approaches to patient care.

85.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Aug 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31386587

RESUMEN

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore the influence of an interprofessional simulation experience on student perceptions of interprofessional collaboration, as well as to explore the influence of the participant and observer roles on these beliefs. A two-session simulation experience was developed to engage professional students in the collaborative care of a patient admitted to a home health agency. To provide the simulation experience in a time efficient manner within the curriculum, students participated in two interprofessional teams of nursing and physical therapy students. Each team actively participated in the collaborative care of the patient in one session. In the alternate session, the interprofessional team observed the care of the patient, documented behaviors ideal for interprofessional teamwork, and provided feedback regarding the interprofessional collaboration and communication observed during debriefing. Observers in this study consistently improved their self-perceived comfort in working with others irrespective of the order in which they participated in the simulation scenario. The use of observers in simulation may provide opportunities for programs to integrate large scale simulation experiences in a time efficient manner to further engage students in active learning as a component of interprofessional education.

86.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Aug 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31386602

RESUMEN

Interprofessional care is essential in healthcare, but prior work has shown that physicians and nurses tend to have different perceptions about working interprofessionally (interprofessional attitudes). Although training has been shown to improve interprofessional attitudes, providing traditional face to face training is logistically challenging in the healthcare setting. The current study examined whether a virtual interprofessional training program could improve interprofessional attitudes for nurses and physicians. Among a sample of 35 physicians and nurses, results suggested that engagement in a virtual interprofessional training program was associated with improvements in interprofessional attitudes (i.e., perceived ability to work with, value in working with, and comfort in working with other professions) (p = .002), with attitudes improving an average of 0.25 points on a six-point scale (Cohen's d = 0.52). As a secondary aim, results showed that the magnitude of change in interprofessional attitudes did not differ significantly between physicians and nurses. Altogether, results suggest that virtual interprofessional training appears to be a suitable way to begin to improve interprofessional attitudes for both physicians and nurses.

87.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-7, 2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31381458

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education needs a stronger theoretical basis informed by the challenges facing collaboration across professions. This study explores the impact of power distance (perception of role hierarchy), on team effectiveness as mediated by team cohesion and psychological safety (believe one can speak up without the fear of negative consequences). Furthermore, it tests for differences between medical and nursing students in these concepts. Final-year medical and nursing students completed a paper survey on study constructs at the end of a three-session, 6-h interprofessional critical care simulation activity. Two hundred and forty-three (76% response rate) retrospective surveys found the relationship between power distance and perceived team effectiveness was mediated by perceptions of team cohesion and psychological safety, suggesting these concepts influence desired interprofessional collaboration. There were no differences between medical and nursing students on study variables. While interprofessional training typically focuses on general attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and on the acquisition and demonstration of knowledge and skills, these findings suggest important team concepts underlying effective collaboration may include perceptions of psychological safety and power distance. These concepts can be key drivers of cohesion and effectiveness during interprofessional simulation exercises and may be targets for future interventions.

88.
J Palliat Med ; 2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31381469

RESUMEN

Background: Communication training is a hallmark of palliative care education. The purpose of this article is to report on the development, exploratory outcomes, and lessons learned from a pilot project, "TeamTalk," which adapted VitalTalk methodology for interprofessional learners. Materials and Methods: TeamTalk included a series of interactive workshops led by an interprofessional faculty team at a health sciences university. Teaching methods were small group discussion, reflection, and high-fidelity simulated patient/family encounters, using a "Skills and Capacities" handout. The course was offered between January and May of 2015 and 2016 to medical fellows, advanced practice nursing students, and chaplain interns. Pre- and post-test design and qualitative data analysis were used to assess the learners' response to the TeamTalk curriculum. Validated instruments assessed attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and self-confidence for interprofessional communication. Results: Sixty-one learners participated in TeamTalk over two academic years. Attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration improved from pre- to post-test (126.1 ± 6.9-130.0 ± 7.1; p < 0.01) with no difference among the professional groups. Self-confidence for interprofessional communication improved in "eliciting the contributions of colleagues, including those from other disciplines" (p < 0.001) for all learners during year two; chaplains improved in the greatest number of areas (15/19), followed by nurses (7/19) and physicians (4/19). Learners expressed appreciation for the opportunity to explore their professional roles together with other professions. Conclusion: Preliminary findings indicate that TeamTalk improved attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and self-confidence for participating on an interprofessional team. The lessons derived from creating and implementing this course may be applicable to interprofessional education in serious illness management.

89.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-7, 2019 Jul 31.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31366252

RESUMEN

Whilst we have seen a growth in the use of information and communication technologies to deliver interprofessional education (IPE) in the last decade, little has been written about facilitating IPE in the online environment. For the last 10 years, the Faculty of Health at Deakin University has offered a fully online IPE course that has consistently employed facilitators to guide interprofessional teams in both asynchronous and synchronous (real-time) online interprofessional learning experiences. This Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide draws on the Deakin University leadership experience in supporting teams of online IPE facilitators over the last decade, underpinned by prior research and key literature. The key lessons provided in this guide aim to assist others in developing, supporting and sustaining a team of online IPE facilitators to guide asynchronous and synchronous online interprofessional learning experiences.

90.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 39: 67-72, 2019 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31419734

RESUMEN

Health care providers need to be able to function and react appropriately and efficiently during a community-wide disaster situation. Traditional health care education is not adequately structured to provide realistic experiences with respect to high-risk or infrequently encountered events such as a disaster. As a result, many healthcare providers graduate into practice with inadequate exposure or skills to intervene in a disastrous event. Previous studies validate that active participation by students during a simulation can translate into positive, meaningful learning applicable to practice. This paper describes how a disaster response simulation can be utilized as an innovative experiential learning technique. Additionally, interprofessional collaboration and positive learning experiences were fostered between military trainees and health care students in nursing and paramedic sciences. The constructivist framework utilized enabled educators to incorporate interprofessional collaboration, clinical reasoning, and technical skills in the safe learning environment of a simulation.

91.
Presse Med ; 48(7-8 Pt 1): 780-787, 2019.
Artículo en Francés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31383383

RESUMEN

Interprofessional simulation-based education is effective for learning non-technical critical care skills and strengthening interprofessional team collaboration to optimize quality of care and patient outcome. Implementation of interprofessional simulation sessions in initial and continuing education is facilitated by a team of "champions" from each discipline/profession to ensure educational quality and logistics. Interprofessional simulation training must be integrated into a broader interprofessional curriculum supported by managers, administrators and clinical colleagues from different professional programs. When conducting interprofessional simulation training, it is essential to account for sociological factors (hierarchy, power, authority, interprofessional conflicts, gender, access to information, professional identity) both in scenario design and debriefing. Teamwork assessment tools in interprofessional simulation training may be used to guide debriefing. The interprofessional simulation setting (in-situ or simulation centre) will be chosen according to the learning objectives and the logistics.


Asunto(s)
Cuidados Críticos/métodos , Educación Médica/métodos , Relaciones Interprofesionales , Grupo de Atención al Paciente , Entrenamiento Simulado , Competencia Clínica , Cuidados Críticos/normas , Curriculum/normas , Educación Médica/normas , Evaluación Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Ciencia de la Implementación , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/organización & administración , Grupo de Atención al Paciente/normas , Entrenamiento Simulado/métodos , Entrenamiento Simulado/organización & administración , Entrenamiento Simulado/normas
92.
J Am Osteopath Assoc ; 119(9): 612-619, 2019 Sep 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31449307

RESUMEN

Interprofessional education (IPE) is necessary to ensure that future health care professionals are prepared to provide holistic, patient-centered prevention programs, assessments, diagnoses, treatment plans, and chronic illness management in a collaborative manner. Accrediting bodies such as the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation and the American Psychological Association newly require programs to implement instruction and evaluate IPE core competency development in each year of their programs. The IPE core team at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine has designed, implemented, and tested an IPE core course over the past 2 years that includes students in osteopathic medicine, clinical psychology, mental health counseling, and physician assistant programs. Throughout this process, the IPE core team has identified strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and challenges. Cultural considerations, institutional resources, pedagogy for large interdisciplinary groups at different stages of training, and technology and assessment tools for student and course evaluation are all critical considerations.

93.
BMJ Open ; 9(7): e027590, 2019 Jul 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31362963

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Almost all healthcare today is team-based in collaboration over professional borders, and numerous students have work-based learning in such contexts. However, interprofessional learning (IPL) in clinical settings has mostly been systematically explored in specially designed contexts dedicated to interprofessional education (IPE). This study aimed to explore the possibilities for IPL activities, and if or how they occur, in an acute ward context not dedicated to IPE. DESIGN AND SETTING: Between 2011 and 2013 ethnographic observations were performed of medical and nursing students' interactions and IPL during early clerkship at an acute internal medicine ward in Sweden. Field notes were taken and analysed based on the framework of IPE: learning with, from and about. PARTICIPANTS: 21 medical, 4 nursing students and 30 supervisors participated. RESULTS: Learning with-there were no organised IPE activities. Instead, medical and nursing students learnt in parallel. However, students interacted with staff members from other professions. Learning from-interprofessional supervision was frequent. Interprofessional supervision of nursing students by doctors focused on theoretical questions and answers, while interprofessional supervision of medical students by nurses focused on the performance of technical skills. Learning about-students were observed to actively observe interactions between staff and learnt how staff conducted different tasks. CONCLUSION: This study shows that there were plenty of possibilities for IPL activities, but the potential was not fully utilised or facilitated. Serendipitous IPL activities differed between observed medical and nursing students. Although interprofessional supervision was fairly frequent, students were not learning with, from or about each other over professional borders.

94.
Clin Exp Dent Res ; 5(4): 406-412, 2019 08.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31452951

RESUMEN

Abstract: Interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional practice (IPP) are essential for the comprehensive care of patients. A goal of this paper is to articulate learning outcomes likely to improve patient outcomes. Yet learning outcomes in IPE are "systematically lacking" in consistency. Objective: An approach offered here and the main purpose of this paper is to develop and implement an IPE learning outcome by applying emulation concepts from the education literature. In dental situations, emulation has been used to derive the thought process of the expert succinctly enough for the novice to apply to the next patient. Methods: The expert's thought process thus becomes the learning outcome, the learning guide, and the assessment instrument. In IPE/IPP, several experts make up the team. The resulting learning outcome is the collection of key questions from respective health care team members. Team members are primary care, pharmacy, nursing, social work, nutrition, and dentistry. The resulting list of questions has not been reported and was applied to patient planning in a geriatric/special needs clinic. Results: Students were more likely to apply questions from disciplines that were preceded by didactic instruction-primary care, pharmacy, nutrition, and dentistry-and less likely to apply questions from nursing and social work. Conclusions: Although still in the early stages, the model is viable to guide learning and assess performance to a level of grasping the concept. The exercise is student led. For the practitioner, the learning outcome becomes the performance outcome. Further model development is ongoing with limited models for comparison.

95.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-8, 2019 Aug 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405312

RESUMEN

Medical educators have not identified effective approaches for interprofessional ethics education of clinicians who work in intensive care units (ICUs), in spite of the fact that ICUs have a high incidence of ethical conflicts. As a first step in designing an interprofessional ethics education initiative tailored to the needs of ICU team members, we interviewed 12 professionals from the medical and surgical ICUs of a tertiary care academic medical center to understand what they know about medical ethics. Respondents were interviewed between November 2016 and February 2017. We used the 'think aloud' approach and realist thematic analysis of the sessions to evaluate the extent and content of interprofessional team members' knowledge of medical ethics. We found wide variation in their knowledge of and facility in applying the principles and concepts of biomedical ethics and ways of resolving ethical conflicts. Ethics education tailored to these areas will help equip critical care professionals with the necessary knowledge and skills to discuss and address ethical conflicts encountered in the ICU. Preventive ethics rounds are one approach for providing real-time, embedded interprofessional ethics education in the clinical setting.

96.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-4, 2019 Aug 23.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31438738

RESUMEN

The aim of this study was to gain insight into how online gaming can teach medical students about interprofessional collaborative practice and promote their development of interprofessional competencies prior to clerkship. This prospective cohort study involved third year medical students from the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry in London, Ontario, Canada who participated in the 'Circles of Care'© online board game. A total of 97 student reflections were obtained and subjected to conventional qualitative descriptive content analysis. The transcribed data were analyzed question by question and line by line. Themes evolved from four questions: (1) What surprised you the most about teamwork from this learning activity, (2) What did you learn about collaborative teamwork, (3) What will you take away from this learning event to use in your practice, and (4) Please comment on the value of using a game such as this one to develop your collaborative team practice. A total of seven themes emerged including: "Gaining insights", "What worked and what did not", "Openness to learning", "Comfort in sharing with others", "Commitment and skepticism", "Being a seeker", and "Continuum of value to learning and practice". Analysis of the student reflections illustrated the potential of using an online-based game to effectively introduce and teach interprofessional competencies to medical students.

97.
J Interprof Care ; : 1-11, 2019 Aug 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31431115

RESUMEN

The objective of this mixed methods study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of using a virtual world educational environment for interprofessional health professions students learning about palliative care. Graduate students (n = 35) from five different health professions programs (medicine, nursing, nutrition, physical therapy, and social work) across two educational institutions participated in a small-group immersive educational experience focused on palliative care in the virtual world of Second Life. Collected data included pre and post surveys of interprofessional attitudes using previously-published questionnaires as well as student reflective writing and photographs about their experience. We found it was feasible to create and deliver an interprofessional educational experience in palliative care in a virtual world environment. The educational experience was acceptable to participants, with an improvement in attitudes toward interprofessional education and interprofessional teamwork after a single virtual world educational session, based on both quantitative and qualitative results. Students found the virtual world environment acceptable for interprofessional education focused on palliative care, based on qualitative results. As health professions schools develop interprofessional education curricula, the use of virtual world technology may be an important modality to consider, to effectively and conveniently bring interprofessional learners together.

98.
Psychol Serv ; 2019 Aug 05.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31380679

RESUMEN

This article describes the curriculum of an interprofessional training program tasked with teaching policy and advocacy knowledge and skills specific to the underserved population of individuals with developmental disabilities. The program, guided by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Leadership Competencies, emphasizes integrating professionals in health disciplines, including psychology, together with individuals with disabilities and their family members for shared learning experiences. The article discusses the importance of incorporating advocacy training into preparation programs for future psychologists. Strategies are described in the context of Gagné's Nine Events of Instruction and include goal development and mentorship, experiential opportunities, and didactic teaching. Lessons learned and next steps, specifically related to establishing efficient evaluation procedures, are discussed. Psychology graduate education programs and other training programs, especially those that have an interprofessional focus, may benefit from incorporating similar strategies to strengthen their advocacy curriculum and foster students and trainees to become skilled advocates. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

99.
Soc Work Public Health ; 34(7): 628-636, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31365321

RESUMEN

Suicide prevention training for health professions students is lacking, often occurring in disciplinary silos. The present study reports outcomes from an interprofessional education (IPE)-based suicide prevention course for health professions students across a variety of disciplines (e.g., social work, counseling, public health). Using a quasi-experimental design, students either took part in a fully online or blended version of the course. Primary outcomes included: (1) significant moderate-to-large positive gains in suicide prevention knowledge, perceived clinical care skills, and perceived ability to help self-harming patients; (2) moderate positive shifts in sensitivity to risk factors of those who died by suicide; (3) non-significant impacts on IPE-related outcomes; (4) overall high course satisfaction; and (5) students in the blended course preferred several interactive methods more than students in the online course version (large effects). Recommendations are provided for course revision and future implementation in educational and community-based settings.

100.
J Interprof Care ; 33(4): 343-346, 2019.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31385731

RESUMEN

Providing quality health care is the core purpose for health systems, and it is only possible with adequate capacity among the workforce to provide the required services. Addressing the requirements for, and supply of, the health workforce (workforce planning) is essential for strengthening health systems. There is a global recognition that interprofessional education (IPE) is critical to achieving universal health care. In this introductory paper we discuss how IPE is a key factor within needs-based health systems strengthening and Human Resources for Health (HRH) planning. This perspective is illustrated through six case studies from countries around the globe which provide discourse on how the integration of IPE/IPC with needs-based workforce planning can contribute to strengthening the health systems. Three key learnings arise from the case studies - 1) IPE is important to meet health care needs of populations efficiently and effectively; 2) integrated needs-based planning provides a framework within which IPE has an integral role, and 3) stakeholders from both health and education are critical to the process of seamless integration of IPE across the continuum of health systems.

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