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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35409901

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Some (minority) groups (MGs) are more vulnerable to sexual violence (SV) exposure than others. Othering-based stress (OBS) may mediate the relationship between minority identification and SV. This study aims to assess the prevalence of SV in different MGs to explore the relationship between minority identification and SV, to investigate whether belonging to multiple MGs moderates this relationship, and to explore OBS SV moderation for different MGs. METHOD: Through an online survey administered to a nationally representative sample in Belgium, data was collected from 4632 persons, of whom 21.01% self-identified as belonging to a MG (SI-Minority). SV prevalence was measured using behaviorally specific questions based on the WHO definition of SV. SI-Minority participants received an additional scale on OBS. RESULTS: SI-Minority participants reported more SV victimization compared to the non-minorities. However, this increased risk was not moderated by minority identification but linked to the socio-demographic SV risk markers common to minority individuals. Multiple-minority participants were found more at risk of SV compared to single-minority respondents. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, pan-/omnisexual, asexual, and other non-heterosexual (LGB+) participants were found more at risk than heterosexual participants. OBS was found to be significantly correlated to SV in sexual and gender minorities and in cultural minorities. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributes to our understanding of the relationship between minority identification, OBS, and SV. Studying both specific and common SV vulnerabilities and outcomes within specific societal subgroups and the general population may inform policy makers when allocating resources to those interventions with the largest societal impact.


Assuntos
Delitos Sexuais , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Heterossexualidade , Humanos , Comportamento Sexual
2.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 46(4): 641-656, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35318685

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sexual minority women (SMW) report higher rates of heavy episodic drinking (HED) and adverse alcohol-related outcomes, including poor mental health, than heterosexual women. These disparities indicate a greater need for behavioral and mental health treatment for SMW. This study examined associations among alcohol outcomes, behavioral and mental health help-seeking, and treatment satisfaction among SMW by age, sexual identity, race/ethnicity, and income. METHODS: Participants included a community sample of 695 SMW (Mage  = 40.0, SD = 14.1; 74.1% lesbian, 25.9% bisexual; 37.6% White, 35.8% Black, 23.2% Latinx; 26.3% annual income $14,999 or less). We used bivariate analyses to characterize the sample's demographic characteristics and multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine associations among variables. RESULTS: SMW subgroups based on age, race/ethnicity, and annual income differed in alcohol outcomes (i.e., HED, DSM-IV alcohol dependence, alcohol-related problem consequences, alcohol problem recognition, and motivation to reduce drinking); help-seeking; and treatment satisfaction. SMW who engaged in help-seeking for alcohol-related concerns were more likely than those who did not to meet criteria for DSM-IV alcohol dependence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 7.13; 95% CI = 2.77; 18.36), endorse alcohol-related problem consequences (aOR = 11.44; 95% CI = 3.88; 33.71), recognize problematic drinking (aOR = 14.56; 95% CI = 3.37; 62.97), and report motivation to reduce drinking (aOR = 5.26; 95% CI = 1.74; 15.88). SMW's alcohol outcomes did not differ based on their satisfaction with treatment or with providers. CONCLUSIONS: This study's findings confirm SMW's elevated risk for HED and other alcohol-related outcomes and underscore the importance of identity-affirmative and accessible behavioral and mental health treatment for young, Black, and low-income SMW. Clinicians and intervention scientists should develop or enhance existing brief behavioral and mental health treatments for SMW engaging in HED who may not recognize that their drinking is problematic or who are not motivated to reduce drinking.


Assuntos
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool , Alcoolismo , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/diagnóstico , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/epidemiologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/terapia , Alcoolismo/diagnóstico , Alcoolismo/epidemiologia , Alcoolismo/terapia , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Feminino , Heterossexualidade , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Satisfação Pessoal
3.
Int J Drug Policy ; 103: 103642, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35247865

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Injecting drug use is purportedly more common among gay and bisexual men (GBM) than the general Australian population. Approaches designed to support the wellbeing of people who inject drugs may not be effective for GBM who inject, due to divergent settings, substances, and/or symbolism. We sought to identify the critical elements shaping injecting among GBM as a social practice and the implications for health and psychosocial wellbeing. METHODS: We conducted 19 in-depth interviews with GBM in Australia with lifetime experience of injecting drug use, adopting the Frameworks Method for data analysis. Framed by social practice theory, transcripts were coded to delineate the constituent material, competency, and meaning elements of GBM's injecting practices. We developed themes encompassing the dynamic interrelationship between practice elements and wellbeing aspects. RESULTS: Of 19 participants interviewed (aged 24-60 years), 17 identified as gay, two as bisexual. Injecting histories ranged from 2-32 years; most injected methamphetamine (n = 18). Injecting involved the integration of sexual function with substances and injecting skills in dyadic/communal settings. Beyond traditional harm reduction aspects, 'safe injecting' concerned trustworthiness of fellow practitioners, preventing addiction, and maintaining a solid self-concept. Injecting occurred as a dyadic/communal practice, in which an uneven distribution of materials (substances, sexual capital) and competencies (self-injecting) influenced risk and power dynamics. Pleasurable meanings of belonging, desirability and self-actualisation - gained from communities of practice - conflicted with injecting-related stigma, social dependencies, and fear of harms to body, mind, and sense of self. CONCLUSION: Injecting is a heterogenous practice, including among GBM. Shifting configurations of its composite elements influence GBM's perceptions and experiences of pleasure, risk, and harms. Efforts to support their wellbeing should take a dyadic/communal approach and seek to rectify the uneven distribution of material and competency elements in these settings.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Austrália/epidemiologia , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia
4.
JAMA Pediatr ; 176(5): 493-501, 2022 May 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35254391

RESUMO

IMPORTANCE: Sexual orientation and gender identity change efforts (SOGICE), also called conversion therapy, is a discredited practice attempting to convert lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ) individuals to be heterosexual and/or cisgender. OBJECTIVES: To identify and synthesize evidence on the humanistic and economic consequences of SOGICE among LGBTQ youths in the US. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This study, conducted from December 1, 2020, to February 15, 2021, included a systematic literature review and economic evaluation. The literature review analyzed published evidence on SOGICE among LGBTQ individuals of any age. The economic model evaluated the use of SOGICE vs no intervention, affirmative therapy vs no intervention, and affirmative therapy vs SOGICE to estimate the costs and adverse outcomes for each scenario and to assess the overall US economic burden of SOGICE. Published literature and public sources were used to estimate the number of LGBTQ youths exposed to SOGICE, the types of therapy received, and the associated adverse events (anxiety, severe psychological distress, depression, alcohol or substance abuse, suicide attempts, and fatalities). EXPOSURES: SOGICE (licensed or religion-based practitioners) or affirmative therapy (licensed practitioners). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Total incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) vs no intervention and total economic burden of SOGICE. RESULTS: Among 28 published studies, which included 190 695 LGBTQ individuals, 12% (range, 7%-23%) of youths experienced SOGICE, initiated at a mean age of 25 years (range, 5-58 years), with a mean (SD) duration of 26 (29) months. At least 2 types of SOGICE were administered to 43% of recipients. Relative to LGBTQ individuals who did not undergo SOGICE, recipients experienced serious psychological distress (47% vs 34%), depression (65% vs 27%), substance abuse (67% vs 50%), and attempted suicide (58% vs 39%). In the economic analysis, over a lifetime horizon with a 3% annual discount rate, the base-case model estimated additional $97 985 lifetime costs per individual, with SOGICE associated with 1.61 QALYs lost vs no intervention; affirmative therapy yielded cost savings of $40 329 with 0.93 QALYs gained vs no intervention. With an estimated 508 892 youths at risk for SOGICE in 2021, the total annual cost of SOGICE is estimated at $650.16 million (2021 US dollars), with associated harms totaling an economic burden of $9.23 billion. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This economic evaluation study suggests that there is a high economic burden and high societal costs associated with SOGICE and identifies additional research questions regarding the roles of private and public funding in supporting this harmful practice.


Assuntos
Identidade de Gênero , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Adulto , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Estresse Financeiro , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Estados Unidos
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35329146

RESUMO

Crystal methamphetamine (CM) disproportionately impacts gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM). However, not all gbMSM are interested in changing their substance use. The present study aimed to examine whether participant-preferred service characteristics were associated with their readiness to change. We surveyed gbMSM who used CM in the past six months, aged 18 plus years, on dating platforms. Participants rated service-design characteristics from "very unimportant" to "very important". Multivariable regression tested service preference ratings across levels of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES-8D). Among 291 participants, 38.7% reported their CM use was not problematic, 19.5% were not ready to take any action to reduce or stop using CM, and 41.7% were ready to take action. On average, participants rated inclusive, culturally-appropriate, out-patient counselling-based interventions as most important. Participants with greater readiness-to-change scores rated characteristics higher than gbMSM with lesser readiness. Contingency management and non-abstinence programming were identified as characteristics that might engage those with lesser readiness. Services should account for differences in readiness-to-change. Programs that provide incentives and employ harm reduction principles are needed for individuals who may not be seeking to reduce or change their CM use.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Metanfetamina , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade , Estudos Transversais , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino
6.
LGBT Health ; 9(3): 169-176, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35255225

RESUMO

Purpose: Obesity is linked to personal behaviors and external stressors. Despite emerging evidence that sexual minority stress (SMS) and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with the risk of obesity, little is known about their independent and interactive effects on sexual minority men. This study investigated these relationships using panel data. Methods: Self-identified gay and bisexual adult men in Taiwan were recruited through Facebook advertisements to complete an online questionnaire. This study reports only on data from the gay subsample (n = 731, mean age = 28.05 years, standard deviation = 5.75 years) as the bisexual subsample (n = 132) was insufficient for comparative statistical analysis. Over two time points, respondents reported their body weight and height, experiences with SMS, and ACEs on an online survey platform. Data analysis was conducted using multiple logistic regression to determine the individual and interactive effects of the ACE score, ACE components, and SMS on the odds for obesity. Results: Almost 16% of the respondents met the criterion for obesity (body-mass index ≥27). In the adjusted models, neither SMS nor ACEs had significant associations with the likelihood of obesity. Only the interaction term of SMS and childhood sexual abuse was significant, indicating that victims of sexual abuse have an increased likelihood of obesity that SMS may intensify. Conclusions: This study shows that gay men who experience childhood sexual abuse and SMS accumulatively faced an increased risk of obesity. Healthy weight promotion for these men should address these stressors.


Assuntos
Experiências Adversas da Infância , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Bissexualidade , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Taiwan/epidemiologia
7.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 471, 2022 03 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35264132

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stigmatization may prompt gay, bisexual, queer and other men who have sex with men (GBQMSM) to avoid or delay HIV testing. There has been little attention to GBQMSMs' perspectives about how stigma may influence their decisions about whether, where, and how often to get tested for HIV. METHODS: We conducted nine focus groups with 64 adult GBQMSM in Metropolitan Detroit, including HIV-negative men and people living with HIV (PLWH). Data were thematically analyzed deductively and inductively in three rounds. RESULTS: Three themes emerged regarding whether to get tested: (1) Perceived promiscuity, risk perceptions and HIV testing; (2) Fearing sexual rejection; and (3) Fearing friend and family member distancing and rejection. Themes concerning where to get tested included: (4) Conflating HIV testing and diagnosis; and (5) Seeking privacy and safety at specialized services. As for how often to get tested, themes included: (6) Reducing contact with healthcare providers due to intersectional stigma; (7) Responsibility and regular testing; and (8) HIV stigma and testing as routine care. Black participants articulated themes (3), (4), and (6) with greater frequency than other participants. Framing HIV testing as a personal responsibility may have created a "new stigma," with unintended consequences not observed with "routine healthcare" messaging. CONCLUSIONS: GBQMSMs' perspectives indicate the potential for new foci for HIV testing promotion interventions based on stigma-related issues that they deem important. There is a need for interventions to challenge the "promiscuity" stereotype, and to reduce the sexual stigmatization of GBQMSM living with HIV/AIDS-especially online. Provider stigma requires both intervention and continued availability of specialized services. Future stigma-reduction interventions for Black GBQMSM could focus on building family support/acceptance, awareness of multiple testing options, and integrating LGBTQ-related issues into initiatives for racial justice in health care.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Bissexualidade , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Teste de HIV , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Estigma Social
9.
Int J Drug Policy ; 103: 103630, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35231668

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the use of HIV antiretroviral medications to reduce the risk of HIV acquisition. PrEP is highly effective when used during periods of potential HIV exposure. Gay and bisexual men (GBM) who engage in unprotected chemsex (without condoms or PrEP) are at high-risk of acquiring HIV. Substance use has been shown to detrimentally impact on the effective use of HIV treatment among GBM living with HIV. This study aims to qualitatively explore PrEP uptake and adherence among GBM who engage in chemsex in the United Kingdom. METHODS: Nineteen semi-structured in-depth telephone interviews were conducted with self-identifying HIV-negative GBM who reported recently engaging in chemsex and currently using or had recently used PrEP. We explored the ways in which chemsex influenced GBM's motivation to use, access to and effective use of PrEP. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Most of the men identified as gay, were of white ethnicity and had a median age of 41. Eighteen men were still using PrEP at the time of the interview and most used daily dosing. The perception of being at high risk of HIV acquisition was a key factor influencing PrEP initiation and after initiation, continued to influence high levels of adherence which was reported by the majority of participants. The few individuals who reported sub-optimal adherence, explained that psychosocial stressors or periods of impaired mental health led to more frequent or intense chemsex sessions, which in turn contributed to occasional non-adherence. Most participants used a variety of strategies to help them adhere, which included restricting the amount or intensity of chemsex they engaged in, strategic placement of PrEP and external triggers to remind them to take PrEP. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the majority of GBM who engaged in chemsex, initiated PrEP in recognition of their potential risk of HIV acquisition and reported high levels of PrEP adherence. They used multiple strategies to support effective PrEP access and adherence. These findings support a growing body of evidence that PrEP is a viable prevention tool for GBM who engage in chemsex, and that chemsex does not negatively impact PrEP adherence.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia
10.
Prev Med ; 157: 107007, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35247440

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify latent class profiles of sexual minority adolescents (Men Sexually attracted to Men, Women Sexually attracted to Women, and Bisexual) with elevated suicidal ideation. METHODS: Data were collected from 18 secondary schools in China. Sub-group classifications were identified using variables associated with suicidal ideation in sexual minority adolescents, including parental relationship quality, electronic equipment time, school bullying, and sleep quality using the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to measure sleep. Anxiety was measured using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7), depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), hypomania using the Hypomanic Checklist-32 (HCL-32), positive coping style was identified using the Trait Coping Style Questionnaire, and self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale. RESULTS: Four distinctive profiles were derived from the data. Compared to "low-risk" group (Class 3), the "adolescent with mood problems" group (Class 2) had a 9.81 times higher risk of suicidal ideation; the those who classified as "severe bullied adolescent" (Class 4) had a 9.26 times higher risk of suicidal ideation. and the "adolescents with low self-efficacy" group (Class 1) had a 4.48 times higher risk of suicidal ideation. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual minority adolescents with mood problems have the highest risk of suicidal ideation, followed by adolescents frequently being bullied at school. Interventions aimed at reducing suicide risk among sexual minority adolescents may benefit from attending to such profile factors identified in this study to develop targeted clinical care.


Assuntos
Bullying , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Suicídio , Adolescente , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Ideação Suicida
11.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604489, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35321048

RESUMO

Objective: On May 24, 2019, same-sex marriage (SSM) was legalized in Taiwan. Increasing research in western countries has yielded longitudinal evidence about the psychosocial benefits of SSM for sexual minority individuals, but they have rarely included sexual minority-specific measures or considered participants' relationship status. This study aimed to examine the short-term effects associated with the legalization of SSM for gay and bisexual men in Taiwan. Methods: A panel sample of 731 gay and 132 bisexual men participated in baseline (May 2019) and follow-up (October 2020) online surveys to report their depressive symptoms, distal sexual minority stress, internalized homophobia, and outness status. Results: The results demonstrated significant reductions in depressive symptoms and distal sexual minority stress along with increased rates of coming out to friends, family, and parents. These changes were similar for partnered and un-partnered individuals. Fixed-effect regression analysis indicated that the decline in distal sexual minority stress and internalized homophobia contributed to the decline in depressive symptoms. Conclusion: This study preliminarily supports the positive effects of SSM in promoting sexual minority men's mental health and disclosure in Taiwan.


Assuntos
Casamento , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Taiwan
12.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 209, 2022 Mar 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35241025

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Asian-born gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) newly arrived in Australia are more than four times as likely than their Australian-born counterparts to be diagnosed with incident HIV. Our aim was to explore experiences of Asian-born gbMSM newly arrived in Australia and attending a sexual health centre with regards to their knowledge of and preference for HIV prevention strategies. RESULTS: Twenty-four gbMSM aged 20-30 years attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre who were born in Asia and arrived in Australia in the preceding four years, participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews from 8th May 2019 and 23rd December 2019. Men were excluded if they were living with HIV. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Men reported little knowledge of HIV prevention strategies outside of condom use prior to coming to Australia. Although participants reported basic knowledge of HIV transmission and treatment, exposure to sexual identity and HIV-related stigma in their countries of birth meant they imagined a HIV diagnosis would be devastating. Most relied on condoms to stay HIV negative however their consistency of use varied. Seven men were on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); all but one started PrEP after coming to Australia. Many indicated interest in PrEP but described it as too expensive given they do not have access to government-subsidized healthcare. Sexual health counselling and connections with LGBTQI community groups appeared to facilitate PrEP and consistent condom use. CONCLUSIONS: Asian-born gbMSM newly-arrived to Australia may have limited knowledge of HIV prevention strategies aside from condom use. Increased connections with sexual health services and LGBTQI communities may facilitate more effective HIV prevention strategies.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Austrália , Bissexualidade , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Adulto Jovem
13.
AIDS Educ Prev ; 34(1): 53-68, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35192393

RESUMO

The emotional burden of an HIV diagnosis can impact HIV outcomes and overall well-being. We piloted a four-session individual-level emotional well-being intervention, offered during HIV care visits, for gay and bisexual men living with HIV in Guatemala City who were recently diagnosed or reengaged in care. To assess intervention impact in a contextualized manner, we conducted longitudinal qualitative interviews (n = 3) with study participants (n = 10) over 12 months. Data analysis included thematic coding using NVivo and longitudinal narrative summaries and matrices to identify narratives of change and assess intervention impact. Participants experienced changes in their view of self and diagnosis perceptions, improved physical and mental health, increased interest in sex and relationships, and a clarification of their life goals. The intervention helped participants reach diagnosis acceptance, improve self-esteem, and gain self-efficacy for managing life with HIV. Findings support the importance of integrating emotional well-being into HIV care.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual
14.
BMJ Open ; 12(2): e055884, 2022 Feb 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35177460

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Health systems must rapidly move knowledge into practice to address disparities impacting sexual and gender minority (SGM) patients. This qualitative study explores barriers and facilitators that arose during an initiative to improve care for SGM patients in federally qualified health centres (FQHCs) from the perspectives of FQHC staff. DESIGN: Cross-sectional qualitative content analysis, using a general inductive approach, of secondary data from transcripts of intervention events offered to FQHC staff and semistructured interviews with staff and FQHC leadership during the intervention. SETTING: 10 FQHCs from nine states in the USA. PARTICIPANTS: FQHC quality improvement (QI) and clinical care staff, and leaders at each FQHC. INTERVENTIONS: The transforming care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people QI initiative combined two evidence-based programmes, Learning Collaborative (LC) and Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO), to assist primary care health centres in developing capacity to identify SGM patients, monitor their health and care, and improve disparities. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was identification of barriers and facilitators to implementing initiatives to improve care for SGM patients. The secondary outcome was clarification of how intervention participants used Project ECHO sessions versus LC meetings to obtain information that influenced implementation of the initiative at their FQHC. RESULTS: Barriers and facilitators mapped to two major themes: 'Clinical' (patients' health, wellness, and available treatment) and Health Systems and Institutional Culture (FQHC operations, and customs and social institutions within the FQHCs and in the external environment). Common 'Clinical' inquiries were for assistance with behavioural health, pre-exposure prophylaxis and transgender hormone therapy. Prevalent facilitators included workflow change and staff training, while adapting electronic health records for data collection, decision support and data extraction was the most prevalent barrier. CONCLUSIONS: Project ECHO and LC provided complimentary forums to explore clinical and operational changes needed to improve care for SGM at FQHCs.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Pessoas Transgênero , Bissexualidade , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde
15.
Curr Pharm Teach Learn ; 14(1): 106-109, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35125188

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Teaching can be likened to a performance. Instructors can portray themselves as they wish, concealing their personal identities and vulnerabilities to whatever extent they choose. For certain topics, such as cultural safety, there may be a role for intersecting personal and professional identities and sharing one's own personal experiences in order to better connect with students. DESCRIPTION: Tasked to develop and implement Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Asexual, Queer/Questioning, Intersexual, and others (LGBTAQI+) health content for the first time, I stepped outside my comfort zone by exposing my vulnerabilities and sharing personal experiences with students as an LGBTAQI+ community member. I partnered with a Maori colleague who helped to relate cultural safety concepts back to previous teaching on Indigenous health. ANALYSIS/INTERPRETATION: This experience taught me that simply providing facts, statistics, and textbook descriptions would have been suboptimal for instilling knowledge and shifting the mindset of students when considering LGBTAQI+ health. Incorporation of personal experiences into teaching was effective at stimulating reflective thought and will hopefully result in better resonation of concepts in practice. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional textbook-based teaching methods may not be optimal for all topics. The role of personalizing content through sharing and connection should be further explored as a strategy to promote cultural safety in pharmacy education. IMPLICATIONS: Educators and institutions should promote reflective practice for curricula designed to facilitate cultural safety. Sharing oneself with students may not always be a favored strategy but there could be other strategies identified through further reflection and research.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Pessoas Transgênero , Bissexualidade , Currículo , Feminino , Identidade de Gênero , Humanos
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35206614

RESUMO

Internalized sexual stigma (ISS) is one of the major issues that can compromise the health of sexual minority populations. This quantitative study aimed to examine: (1) the relationships of individual factors (gender, age, education level, sexual orientation, and age of identification of sexual orientation) and perceived family support with ISS; and (2) the associations of ISS with mood problems and the moderating effects of gender on the associations among Taiwanese young adult lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. In total, 500 male and 500 female young adult LGB individuals aged between 20 and 30 years participated in this study. The experience of ISS, individual (e.g., gender, age, education level, sexual orientation, and age of identification of sexual orientation) and environmental factors (perceived family), mood problems (e.g., anxiety and depression) were collected. The individual and environmental factors related to ISS and the associations of ISS with mood problems were examined using multivariate linear regression analysis. The results indicated that gender, sexual orientation, age of identification of sexual orientation, and perceived family support were significantly associated with all or some dimensions of ISS in LGB individuals. Various dimensions of ISS had different relationships with anxiety and depression. Gender had moderating effects on the association between the identity dimension of ISS and sexual orientation as well as between the social discomfort dimension of ISS and anxiety. Various dimensions of ISS among LGB individuals should be routinely assessed by mental health service units. Intervention programs should be provided for LGB individuals, especially those with factors related to ISS.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adulto , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Taiwan/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35162690

RESUMO

Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) experience many sexual orientation-related stressors that negatively influence physical and mental health, making it imperative to understand their experiences of resilience-promoting resources such as social support. We utilized qualitative and participatory methodologies to examine sources of social support and types of social support received by GBMSM in Western Kenya through in-depth interviews with 60 GBMSM, including both peer educators and community members. GBMSM received emotional, informational, and instrumental support from six different relationship types: friends and peer groups, family of origin, sexual and romantic partners, healthcare providers, peer educators, and other people including work colleagues and police officers. A key finding from this study is the centrality of sexuality-specific support across all sources and types of support. Implications for clinics and LGBTQ organizations, policy, and future research are discussed.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Homossexualidade Masculina/psicologia , Humanos , Quênia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Comportamento Sexual , Apoio Social
18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35162722

RESUMO

Little is known about how permanent, inclusive, affordable, and supportive long-term housing may affect the health of low-income lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual and/or another identity (LGBTQIA+) older adults. Focus group interviews were conducted with 21 older adults to explore the lived experiences and potential health benefits of living in a new LGBTQIA+-welcoming senior housing. Participants reported that moving into the housing was associated with benefits for health and well-being, especially for psychological health. Community, social support, and in-house services were particularly important. However, the combined nature of LGBTQIA+-welcoming and older adult only housing evoked mixed feelings. Appropriate and accessible housing solutions are essential for LGBTQIA+ older adults and may help address health disparities for these populations.


Assuntos
Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Pessoas Transgênero , Idoso , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Identidade de Gênero , Habitação , Humanos
19.
J Youth Adolesc ; 51(4): 746-765, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35150376

RESUMO

Prior scholarship has documented health-relevant consequences of sexual minority youth (SMY) sexual identity disclosure (i.e., "outness"), yet most of the extant work focuses on one social context at a time and/or measures outness as dichotomous: out or not out. However, SMY are out in some contexts (e.g., family, friends) and not in others, and to varying degrees (e.g., to some friends, but not to all). Using a national sample of 8884 SMY ages 13-17 (45% cisgender female, 67% White, 38% gay/lesbian and 34% bisexual, and 36% from the U.S. South), this study used latent class analysis to identify complex patterns of outness among SMY, as well differences in class membership by demographics, depression, family rejection, and bullying. The results indicated six distinct classes: out to all but teachers (n = 1033), out to siblings and peers (n = 1808), out to siblings and LGBTQ peers (n = 1707), out to LGBTQ peers (n = 1376), mostly not out (n = 1653), and very much not out (n = 1307). The findings reveal significant differences in class membership by age, sexual identity, gender identity, race and ethnicity, geography, and well-being outcomes. Moreover, these findings underscore the complex role of outness across social contexts in shaping health and well-being.


Assuntos
Homossexualidade Feminina , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Adolescente , Bissexualidade , Feminino , Identidade de Gênero , Humanos , Análise de Classes Latentes , Masculino
20.
Acta Psychiatr Scand ; 145(4): 357-372, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35090051

RESUMO

AIMS: To conduct a meta-analysis of population-based studies to quantify the association between sexual minority status (lesbian women, gay men, and bisexual people) and the risk of common mental disorders (depressive disorders, alcohol use disorders (AUD), anxiety disorders, and suicidality). METHOD: PubMed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library Database, the Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, and ProQuest were searched for relevant studies published between 2000 and May 2020. The PRISMA guidelines were followed for selection processes. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria which included a total of 519,414 heterosexuals, 10,178 lesbian/gay people and 14,410 bisexual people. RESULTS: Lesbian/gay people (ORs between 1.97, 95% [CI = 1.76, 2.19] and 2.89, 95% [CI = 2.41,3.38]) and bisexual people (ORs between 2.70; 95% [CI = 2.21,3.18], and 4.81; 95% [CI = 3.63, 5.99]) had a higher risk for mental disorders than heterosexuals for all investigated diagnostic categories. The risk for depression (OR = 2.70; 95% [CI = 2.21, 3.18]) and suicidality (OR = 4.81; 95% [CI = 3.63, 5.99]) was higher in bisexual compared with lesbian/gay people. Exploratory meta-regressions revealed no evidence for a decrease in mental health differences between people with minority sexual orientations and heterosexuals in more recent years of data assessment, except for AUD. CONCLUSIONS: These findings clearly suggest disparities in mental health between people with minority sexual orientations and heterosexual people. There is a lack of data regarding a wider spectrum of sexual orientations and mental disorders and studies in non-Western countries.


Assuntos
Alcoolismo , Homossexualidade Feminina , Bissexualidade/psicologia , Feminino , Homossexualidade Feminina/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia
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