Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 3.203
Filtrar
2.
PLoS Biol ; 20(3): e3001565, 2022 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35239647

RESUMO

A change of mind in response to social influence could be driven by informational conformity to increase accuracy, or by normative conformity to comply with social norms such as reciprocity. Disentangling the behavioural, cognitive, and neurobiological underpinnings of informational and normative conformity have proven elusive. Here, participants underwent fMRI while performing a perceptual task that involved both advice-taking and advice-giving to human and computer partners. The concurrent inclusion of 2 different social roles and 2 different social partners revealed distinct behavioural and neural markers for informational and normative conformity. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) BOLD response tracked informational conformity towards both human and computer but tracked normative conformity only when interacting with humans. A network of brain areas (dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and temporoparietal junction (TPJ)) that tracked normative conformity increased their functional coupling with the dACC when interacting with humans. These findings enable differentiating the neural mechanisms by which different types of conformity shape social changes of mind.


Assuntos
Giro do Cíngulo/fisiologia , Lobo Parietal/fisiologia , Córtex Pré-Frontal/fisiologia , Desempenho Psicomotor/fisiologia , Lobo Temporal/fisiologia , Adulto , Algoritmos , Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Modelos Neurológicos , Rede Nervosa/diagnóstico por imagem , Rede Nervosa/fisiologia , Estimulação Luminosa/métodos , Conformidade Social , Adulto Jovem
3.
Psychol Rev ; 129(1): 18-48, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35266789

RESUMO

A cognitive model of social influence (Social Sampling Theory [SST]) is developed and applied to several social network phenomena including polarization and contagion effects. Social norms and individuals' private attitudes are represented as distributions rather than the single points used in most models. SST is explored using agent-based modeling to link individual-level and network-level effects. People are assumed to observe the behavior of their social network neighbors and thereby infer the social distribution of particular attitudes and behaviors. It is assumed that (a) people dislike behaving in ways that are extreme within their neighborhood social norm (social extremeness aversion assumption), and hence tend to conform and (b) people prefer to behave consistently with their own underlying attitudes (authenticity preference assumption) hence minimizing dissonance. Expressed attitudes and behavior reflect a utility-maximizing compromise between these opposing principles. SST is applied to a number of social phenomena including (a) homophily and the development of segregated neighborhoods, (b) polarization, (c) effects of norm homogeneity on social conformity, (d) pluralistic ignorance and false consensus effects, (e) backfire effects, (f) interactions between world view and social norm effects, and (g) the opposing effects on subjective well-being of authentic behavior and high levels of social comparison. More generally, it is argued that explanations of social comparison require the variance, not just the central tendency, of both attitudes and beliefs about social norms to be accommodated. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Conformidade Social , Normas Sociais , Afeto , Atitude , Humanos , Comportamento Social
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35206142

RESUMO

Social conformity, a psychological phenomenon commonly shared by most individuals, has long been ignored by studies focusing on influencing preferences for shared electric vehicles (SEVs). To fill this gap, this paper divides social conformity into informational conformity and normative conformity, and analyzes their effects on individuals' choice of SEVs. Respondents were selected randomly in Jiangsu Province, and the data were collected by the choice experiment method. The data were further analyzed by logit models. Results show that social conformity has a significant positive impact on individuals' choice of SEVs, and informational conformity has a much more profound impact than normative conformity. The driving cost and the convenience of picking up and returning a vehicle also influence consumers' preferences. In addition, social conformity cannot totally dispel the negative impact of poor experience. Finally, some targeted policy recommendations are proposed.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Consumidor , Conformidade Social , China , Comportamento de Escolha , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Comportamento Social
5.
Psych J ; 11(2): 247-258, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35080146

RESUMO

We often align our behaviors, attitudes, and opinions in line with a majority of others, a phenomenon known as "social conformity." A seminal framework has proposed that conformity behaviors are mainly driven by three fundamental motives: a desire to gain more information to be accurate, to obtain social approval from others, and to maintain a favorable self-concept. However, previous studies usually have interpreted conformity behaviors as driven by one motive or another, largely ignoring the fact that human behaviors could be concurrently induced by multiple and even conflicting motivations. Adopting a typical conformity paradigm widely used in previous studies, we explored distinct and concurrent motives underlying the same conformity behavior, combining personality and individual differences with more nuanced analyses of observed conformity behaviors. Our findings provide novel evidence to show that three motivations exist within a single conformity behavior, suggesting that multiple motivations drive the conformity concurrently. These findings provide a potential solution for the extensive debate about what drives human social conformity and help to better understand the conformity behavior in daily life.


Assuntos
Motivação , Conformidade Social , Humanos , Personalidade , Autoimagem , Comportamento Social
6.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 517, 2022 01 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35082277

RESUMO

Changing collective behaviour and supporting non-pharmaceutical interventions is an important component in mitigating virus transmission during a pandemic. In a large international collaboration (Study 1, N = 49,968 across 67 countries), we investigated self-reported factors associated with public health behaviours (e.g., spatial distancing and stricter hygiene) and endorsed public policy interventions (e.g., closing bars and restaurants) during the early stage of the COVID-19 pandemic (April-May 2020). Respondents who reported identifying more strongly with their nation consistently reported greater engagement in public health behaviours and support for public health policies. Results were similar for representative and non-representative national samples. Study 2 (N = 42 countries) conceptually replicated the central finding using aggregate indices of national identity (obtained using the World Values Survey) and a measure of actual behaviour change during the pandemic (obtained from Google mobility reports). Higher levels of national identification prior to the pandemic predicted lower mobility during the early stage of the pandemic (r = -0.40). We discuss the potential implications of links between national identity, leadership, and public health for managing COVID-19 and future pandemics.


Assuntos
Pandemias/legislação & jurisprudência , Saúde Pública/legislação & jurisprudência , Conformidade Social , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , COVID-19/psicologia , Comparação Transcultural , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Liderança , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pandemias/estatística & dados numéricos , SARS-CoV-2 , Autorrelato , Identificação Social
8.
Psychophysiology ; 59(4): e13985, 2022 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34931318

RESUMO

Our behavior is shaped by multiple factors, including direct feedback (seeing the outcomes of our past actions) and social observation (in part, via a drive to conform to other peoples' behaviors). However, it remains unclear how these two processes are linked in the context of behavioral change. This is important to investigate, as behavioral change is associated with distinct neural correlates that reflect specific aspects of processing, such as information integration and rule updating. To clarify whether these processes characterize both direct learning and conformity, we elicited the two within the same task, using a role-swapping version of the Ultimatum Game-a fairness paradigm where subjects decide how to share a pot of money with other players-while electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded. Behavioral results showed that subjects decided how to divide the pot based on both direct feedback (seeing whether their past proposals were accepted or rejected) and social observation (copying the splits that others just proposed). Converging EEG evidence revealed that increased centroparietal positivity (P2, P3b, and late positivity) indexed behavioral changes motivated by direct feedback and those motivated by drives to conform. However, exploratory analyses also suggest that these two motivating factors may also be dissociable, and that frontal midline theta oscillations may predict behavioral changes linked to direct feedback but not conformity. Overall, this study provides novel electrophysiological evidence regarding the different forms of behavioral change. These findings are also relevant for understanding the mechanisms of social information processing that underlie successful cooperation.


Assuntos
Eletroencefalografia , Conformidade Social , Fenômenos Eletrofisiológicos , Potenciais Evocados , Retroalimentação , Humanos , Comportamento Social
9.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res ; 45(11): 2370-2382, 2021 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34846760

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Norm-correcting interventions are an effective alcohol harm-reduction approach, but innovation is needed to increase modest effect sizes. Recent social psychology research shows that individuals may be influenced by social norms that are increasing in prevalence. Contrary to static norms that reflect the current state of normative behavior, dynamic norms reflect behavioral norms that are shifting over time. This proof-of-concept study tested the utility of dynamic norms messages within norm-correcting interventions. METHOD: Undergraduate student drinkers (N = 461; Mage  = 19.97; 64.43% female) were randomly assigned to receive (a) dynamic norms messages highlighting a steady decrease over the past six years in heavy drinking among college students; (b) static norms messaging stating only the current norms; or (c) a control condition without normative information. Proximal outcomes assessed immediately following the experimental paradigm included intentions for total weekly drinks and heavy episodic drinking. Self-reported information on alcohol use behavior was collected at 1-month follow-up. RESULTS: Following the experimental paradigm, participants in the dynamic norms condition estimated that future drinking norms would decrease, while those in the static norms and control groups estimated that future drinking norms would increase. Participants in the dynamic norms condition reported lower intentions for weekly drinks and heavy episodic drinking than those in the static norms and control conditions. No significant differences between conditions were found on alcohol use indices reported at the 1-month follow-up. However, dynamic norms messaging had a favorable indirect effect on heavy episodic drinking intentions mediated through lower perceived future drinking norms. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide proof-of-concept that dynamic norms messaging may be a prudent strategy for reducing alcohol use intentions, which can be integrated into or used alongside existing norm-correcting strategies.


Assuntos
Consumo de Álcool na Faculdade/psicologia , Conformidade Social , Controles Informais da Sociedade/métodos , Normas Sociais , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Retroalimentação Psicológica , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupo Associado , Distribuição Aleatória , Percepção Social , Adulto Jovem
10.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(6): 15579883211057391, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34836484

RESUMO

Conformity to masculine norms has been linked to poor mental and physical health outcomes. Its valid assessment among subgroups of the population is therefore a crucial step in the investigation of intercultural variability in the enactment of masculinity, as well as its causes, costs, and benefits. The present pilot study aimed to adapt and conduct a preliminary validation of a French version of the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory (CMNI-22), a self-report questionnaire designed to assess overall conformity to male gender standards. The French adaptation of the CMNI-22 (CanFr-CMNI-22) was developed using a forward-backward translation process. The data from a sample of 57 Canadian French men (23-81 years old), collected at two time points 2 weeks apart, were then analyzed to investigate the psychometric properties and factor structure of the CanFr-CMNI-22. Findings indicated adequate internal reliability of the global scores and highly satisfactory test-retest reliability. Correlations with the Male Role Norms Inventory-Short Form (MRNI-SF) at both time points also showed strong convergent validity. Overall, the CanFr-CMNI-22 appears to be a reliable and valid instrument to assess conformity to traditional masculine gender norms in French-speaking men from the general population. This study is a key step in a research process aiming to validate the Canadian French version of the CMNI and contributes to enhance inclusive research and clinical care to foster men's health.


Assuntos
Masculinidade , Conformidade Social , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Canadá , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Projetos Piloto , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
11.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(34)2021 08 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34417299

RESUMO

Humans and nonhuman animals display conformist as well as anticonformist biases in cultural transmission. Whereas many previous mathematical models have incorporated constant conformity coefficients, empirical research suggests that the extent of (anti)conformity in populations can change over time. We incorporate stochastic time-varying conformity coefficients into a widely used conformity model, which assumes a fixed number n of "role models" sampled by each individual. We also allow the number of role models to vary over time ([Formula: see text]). Under anticonformity, nonconvergence can occur in deterministic and stochastic models with different parameter values. Even if strong anticonformity may occur, if conformity or random copying (i.e., neither conformity nor anticonformity) is expected, there is convergence to one of the three equilibria seen in previous deterministic models of conformity. Moreover, this result is robust to stochastic variation in [Formula: see text] However, dynamic properties of these equilibria may be different from those in deterministic models. For example, with random conformity coefficients, all equilibria can be stochastically locally stable simultaneously. Finally, we study the effect of randomly changing weak selection. Allowing the level of conformity, the number of role models, and selection to vary stochastically may produce a more realistic representation of the wide range of group-level properties that can emerge under (anti)conformist biases. This promises to make interpretation of the effect of conformity on differences between populations, for example those connected by migration, rather difficult. Future research incorporating finite population sizes and migration would contribute added realism to these models.


Assuntos
Adaptação Fisiológica , Evolução Cultural , Modelos Teóricos , Comportamento Social , Conformidade Social , Animais , Diversidade Cultural , Humanos , Aprendizagem
12.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253577, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34270563

RESUMO

Memory conformity may develop when people are confronted with distinct memories reported by others in social situations and knowingly/unknowingly adhere to these exogenous memories. Earlier research on memory conformity suggests that (1) subjects were more likely to conform to confederate with high confidence; (2) subjects with low confidence on their memory accuracy were more likely to conform, and; (3) this subjective confidence could be adjusted by social manipulations. Nonetheless, it remains unclear how the confidence levels of ours and others may interact and produce a combined effect on our degree of conformity. More importantly, is memory conformity, defined by a complete adoption of the opposite side, the result of a gradual accumulation of subtler changes at the confidence level, i.e., a buildup of confidence conformity? Here, we followed participant's confidence transformation quantitatively over three confederate sessions in a memory test. After studying a set of human motion videos, participants had to answer simultaneously whether a target or lure video had appeared before by indicating their side (i.e., Yes/No) and their associated confidence rating. Participants were allowed to adjust their responses as they were being shown randomly-generated confederates' answers and confidence values. Results show that participants indeed demonstrated confidence conformity. Interestingly, they tended to become committed to their side early on and gain confidence gradually over subsequent sessions. This polarizing behaviour may be explained by two kinds of preferences: (1) Participant's confidence enhancement towards same-sided confederates was greater in magnitude compared to the decrement towards an opposite-sided confederate; and (2) Participants had the most effective confidence boost when the same-sided confederates shared similar, but not considerably different, confidence level to theirs. In other words, humans exhibit side- and similarity-biases during confidence conformity.


Assuntos
Comportamento Social , Adulto , Humanos , Memória , Conformidade Social , Adulto Jovem
13.
JAMA ; 326(2): 133-134, 2021 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34255004
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 15349, 2021 07 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34321512

RESUMO

Ecological factors, such as predation, have traditionally been used to explain sociability. However, it is increasingly recognised that individuals within a group do not associate randomly, and that these non-random associations can generate fitness advantages. The majority of the empirical evidence on differentiated associations in group-living mammals, however, comes from a limited number of taxa and we still know very little about their occurrence and characteristics in some highly social species, such as rats (Rattus spp.). Here, using network analysis, we quantified association patterns in four groups of male fancy rats. We found that the associations between rats were not randomly distributed and that most individuals had significantly more preferred/avoided associates than expected by random. We also found that these preferences can be stable over time, and that they were not influenced by individuals' rank position in the dominance hierarchy. Our findings are consistent with work in other mammals, but contrast with the limited evidence available for other rat strains. While further studies in groups with different demographic composition are warranted to confirm our findings, the occurrence of differentiated associations in all male groups of rats have important implications for the management and welfare of captive rat populations.


Assuntos
Agressão/psicologia , Comportamento Competitivo/fisiologia , Comportamento Cooperativo , Comportamento Predatório/fisiologia , Distância Psicológica , Conformidade Social , Animais , Masculino , Ratos , Predomínio Social
15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(25)2021 06 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34099578

RESUMO

What is an effective vaccination policy to end the COVID-19 pandemic? We address this question in a model of the dynamics of policy effectiveness drawing upon the results of a large panel survey implemented in Germany during the first and second waves of the pandemic. We observe increased opposition to vaccinations were they to be legally required. In contrast, for voluntary vaccinations, there was higher and undiminished support. We find that public distrust undermines vaccine acceptance, and is associated with a belief that the vaccine is ineffective and, if enforced, compromises individual freedom. We model how the willingness to be vaccinated may vary over time in response to the fraction of the population already vaccinated and whether vaccination has occurred voluntarily or not. A negative effect of enforcement on vaccine acceptance (of the magnitude observed in our panel or even considerably smaller) could result in a large increase in the numbers that would have to be vaccinated unwillingly in order to reach a herd-immunity target. Costly errors may be avoided if policy makers understand that citizens' preferences are not fixed but will be affected both by the crowding-out effect of enforcement and by conformism. Our findings have broad policy applicability beyond COVID-19 to cases in which voluntary citizen compliance is essential because state capacities are limited and because effectiveness may depend on the ways that the policies themselves alter citizens' beliefs and preferences.


Assuntos
Vacinas contra COVID-19/imunologia , COVID-19/imunologia , Aglomeração , Conformidade Social , Normas Sociais , Vacinação , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Modelos Imunológicos , Motivação
16.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull ; 47(7): 1205-1217, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34092146

RESUMO

Although people often disapprove of conformity, they also dislike when others deviate from group norms. What explains this ambivalence? We hypothesized that judgments of conformity would be affected by whether people view it as motivated by self-interested or benevolent motives. Four studies (N = 808), using both hypothetical and real-life instances of conformity, support this prediction. We find that people judge those who conform to gain social approval (self-interested conformity) as weak-willed, but those who conform out of concern for their group (benevolent conformity) as competent and possessing strong character. In addition, we predict and find that people view self-interested conformity as "fake" but benevolent conformity as revealing one's true self. Finally, we show that differences in perceived intentions explain how people sustain positive self-regard while succumbing to group pressures and why people judge their own conformity more favorably than others' conformity. We discuss implications for encouraging and discouraging conformity.


Assuntos
Julgamento , Conformidade Social , Humanos , Motivação , Comportamento Social
17.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 2718, 2021 05 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33976160

RESUMO

A key function of morality is to regulate social behavior. Research suggests moral values may be divided into two types: binding values, which govern behavior in groups, and individualizing values, which promote personal rights and freedoms. Because people tend to mentally activate concepts in situations in which they may prove useful, the importance they afford moral values may vary according to whom they are with in the moment. In particular, because binding values help regulate communal behavior, people may afford these values more importance when in the presence of close (versus distant) others. Five studies test and support this hypothesis. First, we use a custom smartphone application to repeatedly record participants' (n = 1166) current social context and the importance they afforded moral values. Results show people rate moral values as more important when in the presence of close others, and this effect is stronger for binding than individualizing values-an effect that replicates in a large preregistered online sample (n = 2016). A lab study (n = 390) and two preregistered online experiments (n = 580 and n = 752) provide convergent evidence that people afford binding, but not individualizing, values more importance when in the real or imagined presence of close others. Our results suggest people selectively activate different moral values according to the demands of the situation, and show how the mere presence of others can affect moral thinking.


Assuntos
Princípios Morais , Infuência dos Pares , Ajustamento Social , Conformidade Social , Adulto , Cultura , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupo Associado , Política , Inquéritos e Questionários
18.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0250105, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33939734

RESUMO

Previous research has shown that behavioural mimicry fosters affiliation, and can be used to infer whether people belong to the same social unit. However, we still know very little about the generalizability of these findings and the individual factors involved. The present study intends to disentangle two important variables and assess their importance for affiliation: the matching in time of the behaviours versus their matching in form. In order to address this issue, we presented participants with short videos in which two actors displayed a set of small movements (e.g. crossing their legs, folding their arms, tapping their fingers) arranged to be either contingent in time or in form. A dark filter was used to eliminate ostensive group marks, such us phenotype or clothing. Participants attributed the highest degree of affiliation to the actors when their subsequent movements matched in form, but were delayed by 4-5 seconds, and the lowest degree when the timing of their movements matched, but they differed in form. To assess the generalizability of our findings, we took our study outside the usual Western context and tested a matching sample of participants from a traditional small-scale society in Kenya. In all, our results suggest that movements are used to judge the degree of affiliation between two individuals in both large- and small-scale societies. While moving in different ways at the same time seems to increase the perceived distance between two individuals, movements which match in form seem to invoke closeness.


Assuntos
Movimento , Conformidade Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Vestuário/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Distância Psicológica
19.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251843, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34019557

RESUMO

Studies on physiotherapists are generally focused on clinical professionalism, with very few examining job performance from a management standpoint. To address this gap, this study sought to investigate the relationship between impression management and organizational citizenship behavior and job performance. This study targeted medical institutions offering rehabilitation and physiotherapy services and conducted a questionnaire survey based on scales developed by domestic and foreign scholars. A total of 600 questionnaires were distributed and 523 valid ones collected. The data was tested and verified using regression analysis and hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). In the survey, the Impression Management Scale, Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, and Job Performance Scale indicated that at the individual level, the impression management of physiotherapists is significantly related to their organizational citizenship behaviors and job performance. The organizational citizenship behaviors were also found to have a mediating effect between impression management and job performance. At the group level, impression management had a conditioning effect on organizational citizenship behaviors and job performance. In terms of statistical methods, group-level variables act as moderators, which affects the power of individual-level explanatory variables on outcome variables, i.e., the influence of the slope. The job behaviors of physiotherapists entail direct service and their performance is closely related to organizational development. Impression management gives people certain purposes and behaviors while organizational citizenship behaviors are a type of non-self-seeking, selfless dedication behaviors. Therefore, the motivation of physiotherapists who demonstrate organizational citizenship behaviors should be further explored.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Cultura Organizacional , Fisioterapeutas/psicologia , Desempenho Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Altruísmo , Feminino , Humanos , Satisfação no Emprego , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Motivação , Lealdade ao Trabalho , Conformidade Social , Inquéritos e Questionários , Taiwan , Desempenho Profissional/ética
20.
Int J Neuropsychopharmacol ; 24(8): 645-655, 2021 08 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33929492

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Our social activities are quite often erroneous and irrational, based on biased judgements and decision-making, known as social biases. However, the cognitive and affective processes that produce such biases remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated associations between social schemas, such as social judgment and conformity, entailing social biases and psychological measurements relevant to cognitive and affective functions. METHOD: This study recruited 42 healthy adult subjects. A psychological test and a questionnaire were administered to assess biased social judgements by superficial attributes and social conformity by adherence to social norms, respectively, along with additional questionnaires and psychological tests for cognitive and affective measurements, including negative affects, autistic traits, and Theory of Mind (ToM). Associations of social judgment and conformity with cognitive and affective functions were examined using a multiple regression analysis and structural equation modeling. RESULTS: Anxiety and the cognitive realm of ToM were mutually associated with both social judgments and conformity, although social judgements and conformity were still independent processes. Social judgements were also associated with autistic traits and the affective realm of ToM, whereas social conformity was associated with negative affects other than anxiety and an intuitive decision-making style. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that ToM and negative affects may play important roles in social judgements and conformity, and the social biases connoted in these social schemas.


Assuntos
Afeto/fisiologia , Julgamento/fisiologia , Conformidade Social , Percepção Social , Teoria da Mente/fisiologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...