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1.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 39: 142-155, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38876619

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: There is growing research evidence on bodily discourses and body image issues of women with disabilities. Within the art-based intervention repertoire for persons with disabilities, dance and movement-based therapies and interventions are gaining prominence. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dance sessions (delivered online) on body image, body satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and wellbeing of women with disabilities. METHOD: A quasi-experimental waitlist control design study was conducted with data collected at two time points: baseline or pre-test and five-months later or post-test. Outcomes were measured using the Body Image Scale and the WHO-5-Wellbeing Index. RESULTS: The dance sessions were effective (Hedges' g = -0.56 -0.88; p < 0.01) and post-test body dissatisfaction scores were lower and wellbeing scores were higher for participants with a college degree or postgraduate degree, self-employed or students, and whose intervention compliance was above threshold (>50% dance sessions attended and corresponding homework sessions completed). Tobit regression models indicated that it was possible to estimate post-test outcomes due to dance sessions alone, controlling for significant socio-demographics. DISCUSSION: The domain knowledge of non-pharmacological art-based interventions for persons with disabilities, particularly women, is supported. CONCLUSIONS: Findings commend dance sessions as effective psychotherapeutic mechanisms to mitigate body dissatisfaction, improve body image and wellbeing of women with disabilities. Future research may focus on large-scale cross-sectional trials, variations in the repertoire for women with different disability types and histories, and qualitative narratives.


Assuntos
Imagem Corporal , Dançaterapia , Pessoas com Deficiência , Humanos , Feminino , Imagem Corporal/psicologia , Adulto , Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação , Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Dançaterapia/métodos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem , Satisfação Pessoal , Dança/fisiologia , Dança/psicologia , Insatisfação Corporal/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Adolescente
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(24): e37393, 2024 Jun 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38875423

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To explore the effect of dance art on the treatment of hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia. METHODS: In a prospective randomized controlled study conducted from June 2019 to June 2020, 120 patients from Shanghai Pudong New Area Mental Health Center were divided into intervention (n = 60) and control (n = 60) groups using a random number table. Control patients received standard drug treatment and nursing care, while the intervention group underwent dance art therapy sessions for 90 minutes twice weekly, in addition to standard care. Treatment outcomes after 6 and 12 weeks were measured using the positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA), and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: This study involved 120 male patients with chronic schizophrenia, aged 30 to 60 years. After 6 and 12 weeks, the intervention group showed a greater reduction in PANSS scores (intervention group: from 49.02 ±â€…2.53 to 37.02 ±â€…1.83, control group: from 49.08 ±â€…2.59 to 44.91 ±â€…2.35, P < .05). In the WCST, the intervention group exhibited a higher increase in classification completion and correct answers, and a greater decrease in errors (P < .05). MoCA scores improved significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group (P < .05). BMI decreased in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in the intervention group (intervention group: from 26.47 ±â€…1.05 kg/m² to 22.87 ±â€…0.73 kg/m², control group: from 26.50 ±â€…1.03 kg/m² to 26.22 ±â€…0.80 kg/m², P < .05). CONCLUSION: Based on routine drug treatment and routine nursing care, dance art has a better clinical effect in treating hospitalized patients with chronic schizophrenia, which can improve cognitive function, alleviate clinical symptoms, and reduce BMI.


Assuntos
Dançaterapia , Esquizofrenia , Humanos , Esquizofrenia/terapia , Masculino , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Dançaterapia/métodos , Doença Crônica , Resultado do Tratamento , Hospitalização , China , Índice de Massa Corporal , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica
4.
Age Ageing ; 53(5)2024 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38776214

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Fall prevention is a global health priority. Strength and balance exercise programmes are effective at reducing falls. Emerging literature suggests dance is an enjoyable and sociable form of exercise. However, there is little evidence that dance reduces fall incidence. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis examining effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of dance for falls prevention in older adults. Five databases were searched with no restrictions on publication date or intervention settings. Risk of bias was assessed using variants of Cochrane Risk of bias tools, Mixed-Methods Appraisal and Drummond checklist as appropriate. Certainty of evidence was assessed using GRADE. RESULTS: Forty-one studies were included (19 RCTs, 13 quasi-experimental, two mixed-method, seven observational studies, 2,451 participants). Five types of dance interventions were identified: ballroom and Latin dance, dance exercise, cultural dance, dance therapy, and low-impact dance. Meta-analysis was only possible for functional outcome measures: Timed-Up-and-Go (dance versus usual care, mean difference (MD) = 1.36; 95% CI -3.57 to 0.85), Sit-to-Stand (dance versus exercise MD = -0.85; 95% CI -2.64 to 0.93: dance versus education MD = -1.64; 95% CI -4.12 to 0.85), Berg Balance Scale (dance versus usual care MD = 0.61; 95% CI -4.26 to 5.47). There was unexplained variance in effects and no significant differences between intervention and control groups. Overall, certainty of evidence was very low; we are uncertain about the effect of dance interventions in reducing falls. CONCLUSIONS: There is very low certainty evidence for dance as an alternative to strength and balance training if the aim is to prevent falls. No robust evidence on the cost-effectiveness of dance interventions for the prevention of falls was found. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42022382908.


Assuntos
Acidentes por Quedas , Análise Custo-Benefício , Dançaterapia , Dança , Humanos , Acidentes por Quedas/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Dançaterapia/métodos , Masculino , Feminino , Equilíbrio Postural , Resultado do Tratamento , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Etários , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
5.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(6): 388, 2024 May 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38802666

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dance/movement therapy (DMT) is increasingly used as a complementary treatment to address psychological and physical wellbeing. However, it is unknown how it can be leveraged in adult cancer care. This mixed methods program evaluation aimed to assess patient-reported benefits and satisfaction with the virtual DMT in an academic oncology setting. METHODS: We developed, implemented, and evaluated a 6-week virtual, synchronous DMT program aiming to improve physical health, address mental distress, and foster social connection for cancer patients. We used deidentified program evaluation data to assess impact of DMT on patient-reported outcomes and patients' satisfaction with the DMT program. Pre- and post-session data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a paired t-test. Qualitative data were captured through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Results from 39 participants (mean age 64.7 ± 9.8), majority female (89.7%) with a history of breast cancer (43.6%), showed high satisfaction (100%) and unanimous program recommendation (100%). Significant improvements were noted in anxiety (- 0.42 ± 0.76, p = .009), distress (- 0.35 ± 0.80, p = .036), and sense of joy (0.73 ± 1.18, p = .004), with a non-significant trend in increased physical activity (0.38 ± 0.98, p = .057). Thematic findings indicated that DMT participation (1) facilitated engagement in physical activity for improved physical health, (2) fostered creative expression, (3) improved mental state, and (4) helped build social connections and support. CONCLUSION: Our DMT program shows promise as a component of integrative cancer care. The mixed-method evaluation provides insightful information to generate hypotheses for future RCT studies aiming to evaluate the specific effects of DMT on patient experience and outcomes.


Assuntos
Dançaterapia , Neoplasias , Satisfação do Paciente , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Humanos , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Masculino , Dançaterapia/métodos , Neoplasias/terapia , Neoplasias/psicologia , Idoso , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Técnicas de Exercício e de Movimento/métodos , Adulto
6.
BMC Geriatr ; 24(1): 392, 2024 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38698317

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous studies show that in-person dance training is a beneficial form of physical activity that involves mental, social, and physical dimensions. This exploratory study investigated the benefits of a 12-week online dance training intervention on mental and physical health outcomes for older women. METHODS: A convergent parallel mixed-method design was used. Forty-five older adults (74.0 ± 5.3 yrs old, 44 women) were recruited through advertisements at activity and rehabilitation centers in the North Denmark region. The intervention consisted of two weekly 60-min classes of improvisation and salsa delivered online through video call applications. Changes in physical health outcomes (body mass and composition, resting blood pressure, Senior Fitness Test battery) and self-rated health and wellbeing (health-related quality of life (HRQOL), feelings of loneliness) were assessed prior to and after 12 weeks of dancing. Focus group interviews were conducted post-intervention to further explore the benefits as well as the participant's experience of the intervention. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted. RESULTS: Thirty-two participants (all women) completed the study. Significant improvements in fitness were found for the number of arm curls performed (baseline: 12.3 ± 3.0; post-intervention: 13.7 ± 3.0, P = 0.005), 2-min step test performance (baseline: 66.5 ± 20.0 reps.; post-intervention: 73.8 ± 22.6 reps., P = 0.016), and chair sit-and-reach (baseline: 0.4 ± 11.3 cm; post-intervention: 5.5 ± 10.1 cm, P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in body mass from baseline to post-intervention (P < 0.015). The themes from the focus groups included (1) Participation, (2) Challenges, (3) Progression, (4) Motivation, (5) Perceived health and wellbeing, and (6) Online dance instruction. No significant changes were reported in HRQOL and loneliness from the quantitative data, although the qualitative data did reveal improved feelings of physical health and wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention improved several aspects of fitness in older women and improved the participants' perceptions of their own physical abilities and wellbeing. While most participants found the online intervention enjoyable, several participants missed the feedback from the instructors that naturally occurs with in-person instruction.


Assuntos
Dança , Saúde Mental , Humanos , Feminino , Idoso , Dança/psicologia , Dança/fisiologia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Aptidão Física/fisiologia , Aptidão Física/psicologia , Internet , Dançaterapia/métodos , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia
7.
Eval Program Plann ; 104: 102430, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581972

RESUMO

Dance programs for people living with Parkinson's disease (PwPD) offer participants an opportunity to exercise, engage in artistic self-expression, and form new relationships. While it is understood that the social dimension of dance programs for PwPD contributes to dancer satisfaction and program sustainability, the social mechanisms instrumental to program success are under-examined. Engaging with theory from wider disciplines, or "theory knitting" can help program designers and evaluators examine the mechanisms and contextual factors that make classes socially meaningful with greater detail and specificity. This study identified and examined three theoretical frameworks that program planners and evaluators could use to conceptualize social engagement in dance for PwPD contexts and inform practice. Each theory was assessed for fit using the T-CaST theory comparison and selection tool developed by Birken et al. (2018). As an example, we used anthropologist Victor Turner's (1970; 1977) theory of liminality and communitas to identify five key areas for fostering a sense of social connection in dance for PwPD contexts: (1) selecting a meaningful dance space (2) creating a joyous atmosphere (3) marking entrance into the liminal time and space with rituals (4) embodying liminality and anti-structure and (5) inverting power relations and embracing fluid roles.


Assuntos
Dança , Doença de Parkinson , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Humanos , Doença de Parkinson/psicologia , Dança/psicologia , Dançaterapia/métodos , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Exercício Físico/psicologia
8.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1561668

RESUMO

O ser humano é um ser que se constrói, apresenta e reverbera, no mínimo, em dois universos, que não são opostos; são complementares, e se pronunciam em relações multidirecionais, plurais e imbricadas em rizomas físicos, mentais, emocionais e espirituais. Somos seres individuais e coletivos, onde tecemos uma complexa trama relacional tanto no campo da razão quanto das emoções. No entanto, essas últimas são territórios muito, e quase sempre, negligenciados por nós. Nesse artigo, propomos trazer reflexões sobre nossos estados de desajustes emocionais e levando o olhar para a dança como potencialidades de se conhecer de forma mais verdadeira e honesta no intuito de repensarmos nosso conceito de saúde (AU)


The human being is a being that is constructed, presented, and reverberates, at least, in two universes which are not opposites, are com-plementary and are pronounced in multidirectional, plural relationships and imbricated in physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual rhizomes. We are individual and collective beings where we weave a complex rela-tional web both in the Field of reason and emotions. However, the latter are territories that are very anl almost ways neglected by us. In this ar-ticle we propose to bring reflections on our states of emotional mal ad-justment and taking the look at dance as a potential to know each other more truthfully and honestly to rethink our concept of health (AU).


El ser humano es un ser que se construye, se presenta y re-percute, por lo menos, em dos universos que no son opuestos, son com-plementarios y se manifiestan em relaciones multidireccionales, plurales e imbricados en rizomas físicos, mentales, emocionales y espirituales. Somos seres individuales y colectivos donde tenemos una compleja red relacional tanto en El campo de la razón como em El de las emociones. Sin embargo, estos últimos son territorios muy y casi siempre descui-dados por nosotros. Em este artículo nos proponemos traer reflexiones sobre nuestros estados de desajuste emocional y la mirada a la danza como potencial para conocérnoslas veraz y honestamente para repen-sar nuestro concepto de salud (AU).


Assuntos
Humanos , Dançaterapia
9.
IEEE Trans Vis Comput Graph ; 30(5): 2119-2128, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38457325

RESUMO

Children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often exhibit motor disorders. Dance Movement Therapy (DMT) has shown great potential for improving the motor control ability of children with ASD. However, traditional DMT methods often lack vividness and are difficult to implement effectively. To address this issue, we propose a Mixed Reality DMT approach, utilizing interactive virtual agents. This approach offers immersive training content and multi-sensory feedback. To improve the training performance of children with ASD, we introduce a novel training paradigm featuring a self-guided mode. This paradigm enables the rapid creation of a virtual twin agent of the child with ASD using a single photo to embody oneself, which can then guide oneself during training. We conducted an experiment with the participation of 24 children diagnosed with ASD (or ASD propensity), recording their training performance under various experimental conditions. Through expert rating, behavior coding of training sessions, and statistical analysis, our findings revealed that the use of the twin agent for self-guidance resulted in noticeable improvements in the training performance of children with ASD. These improvements were particularly evident in terms of enhancing movement quality and refining overall target-related responses. Our study holds clinical potential in the field of medical treatment and rehabilitation for children with ASD.


Assuntos
Realidade Aumentada , Transtorno do Espectro Autista , Dançaterapia , Criança , Humanos , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/terapia , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/diagnóstico , Dançaterapia/métodos , Gráficos por Computador , Movimento
10.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 122: 105371, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38471410

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Functional decline, chronic illness, reduced quality of life and increased healthcare utilisation are common in older adults. Evidence suggests music and dance can support healthy ageing in older adults. This study explored the feasibility, potential for effect and cost effectiveness of the Music and Movement for Health (MMH) programme among community-dwelling older adults using a pragmatic cluster-randomised, controlled feasibility trial design. METHODS: Community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older were recruited to seven clusters in the Mid-West region of Ireland. Clusters were block randomised to either the MMH intervention or control. Primary feasibility outcomes included recruitment, retention, adherence, fidelity, and safety. Secondary outcomes measured physical activity, physical and cognitive performance, and psychosocial well-being, along with healthcare utilisation were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. RESULTS: The study successfully met feasibility targets, with recruitment (n = 100), retention (91 %), adherence (71 %), data completeness (92 %) and intervention fidelity (21 out of 24) all meeting predetermined criteria. Both groups exhibited an increase in self-reported physical activity and improved physical function. Participants in the intervention group scored consistently better in psychosocial measures compared to the control group at follow-up. The health economic analysis confirmed the feasibility of the methodology employed and points to the potential cost-effectiveness of the MMH relative to the control or no organised programme. DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS: The MMH intervention and study design were found to be feasible and acceptable with important findings to inform future evaluation of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a definitive randomised controlled trial.


Assuntos
Estudos de Viabilidade , Vida Independente , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise Custo-Benefício , Dançaterapia/métodos , Dança/psicologia , Exercício Físico , Envelhecimento Saudável/psicologia , Irlanda , Musicoterapia/métodos , Qualidade de Vida
11.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(4): 235, 2024 Mar 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38502260

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This review examined the effectiveness of using dance movement therapy (DMT) and dance movement interventions (DMIs) with cancer and palliative care patients. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Six databases were searched from inception to July 9, 2022, without limits on year or age. Searching was updated on July 10, 2023. The risk of bias was assessed by the Cochrane (RoB 2) and ROBINS-I tools. Meta-analyses were conducted to pool estimates of the effects of DMT and DMI on patients' health-related outcomes. A narrative synthesis of outcomes was performed where meta-analysis was not appropriate. RESULTS: Among a total of 16 studies included in this review, nine were randomized controlled trials and seven were non-randomized trials, with a total of 893 participants. Only six of these studies were fully or partially described as true DMTs (some with less clarity than others), whereas the majority (n = 10) were DMIs with unclear therapeutic alignment. Most studies focused on female patients with breast cancer. Cancer patients undergoing palliative care received little attention. The overall risk of bias from the evaluated studies was high. Meta-analysis of two trials revealed that DMTs had no effect on QOL in cancer patients (SMD - 0.09, 95% CI - 0.21-0.40, P = 0.54), while narrative analysis and non-randomized trials showed no overall effect of DMTs on anxiety, depression, body image, self-esteem, or sleep disturbance but significant positive effects on perceived stress, pain severity, and pain interference. DMIs had significant positive effects on cancer patients' depression (SMD - 0.53, 95% CI - 0.93 to - 0.14, P = 0.008) and fatigue (SMD - 0.42, 95% CI - 0.70 to - 0.14, P = 0.003). DMI trials synthesized narratively showed an effect on patients' body image, self-esteem, physical function, right and left handgrip strength, life satisfaction, and the mental component of QOL. CONCLUSION: Both DMT and DMIs had promising effects on several health outcomes, but results were inconsistent, and the evidence was weak. The reviewed studies' low evidence quality and small sample sizes affected the findings' robustness and reliability. Large-scale, high-quality randomized controlled trials with sufficient sample sizes, and clear and veracious DMT and DMI protocols and data are required to provide more credible research evidence and influence practice.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama , Dançaterapia , Dança , Feminino , Humanos , Dançaterapia/métodos , Depressão/terapia , Força da Mão , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Masculino
13.
Sports Med ; 54(5): 1179-1205, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38270792

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Physical activity is known to improve psychological and cognitive outcomes. Learning dance sequences may challenge cognition, partnered or group dance may benefit social interactions, and the artistic aspect may improve psychological wellbeing. Dance is an equally effective form of physical activity compared with other structured physical activities to improve physical health, but it is unclear how effective dance could be for psychological and cognitive outcome measures. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of structured dance interventions, compared with structured exercise programmes, on psychological and cognitive outcomes across the lifespan. METHODS: Eight databases were searched from earliest records to July 2022. Studies investigating a dance intervention lasting ≥ 4 weeks, including psychological and/or cognitive health outcomes, and having a structured exercise comparison group were included. Screening and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers at all stages. All reviewer disagreements were resolved by the primary author. Where appropriate, meta-analysis was performed, or an effect size estimate generated. RESULTS: Of 21,737 records identified, 27 studies met the inclusion criteria. Total sample size of included studies was 1392 (944 females, 418 males, 30 unreported). Dance was equally as effective as other physical activity interventions in improving quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease [mean difference 3.09; 95% confidence interval (CI) - 2.13 to 8.30; p = 0.25], reducing anxiety (standardised mean difference 2.26; 95% CI - 2.37 to 6.90; p = 0.34), and improving depressive symptoms (standardised mean difference 0.78; 95% CI - 0.92 to 2.48; p = 0.37). Preliminary evidence found dance to be superior to other physical activity interventions to improve motivation, aspects of memory, and social cognition and to reduce distress. Preliminary evidence found dance to be inferior to other physical activity interventions to improve stress, self-efficacy and language fluency. CONCLUSION: Undertaking structured dance of any genre is generally equally and occasionally more effective than other types of structured exercise for improving a range of psychological and cognitive outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO: CRD42018099637.


Assuntos
Cognição , Dança , Exercício Físico , Humanos , Dança/psicologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida , Doença de Parkinson/psicologia , Doença de Parkinson/terapia , Dançaterapia , Saúde Mental , Depressão/terapia , Depressão/prevenção & controle
14.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 120: 105326, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38237379

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Dance has emerged as a comprehensive intervention for enhancing well-being in this population. This meta-analysis aimed to assess the effectiveness of dance on mental health and quality of life among individuals with PD. METHODS: Three databases were searched in December 2022. Research papers comparing the effects of dance with a non-dance control on the quality of life or mental health of individuals with PD were included. Two authors independently screened the studies, extracted data, and assessed methodological quality of eligible studies. To address the interdependence of effect sizes within studies, the three-level meta-analysis approach was employed to analyze the data. RESULTS: Thirteen trials involving a total of 496 participants were included, with 11 being subjected to statistical analysis. The results indicated that dance had a positive impact on mental health (g = 0.43, 95 % CI = [0.11, 0.75]) and quality of life (g = 0.46, 95 % CI = [-0.04, 0.95]) when compared to passive control groups. Moderator analyses revealed that non-partnered dance and dance interventions with lower total dosages were particularly beneficial for mental health. CONCLUSION: Dance interventions are an effective lifestyle activity for enhancing mental health and quality of life in individuals with PD. A theoretical framework is proposed to explain the impact of dance on well-being from neurological, social, physical, and psychological perspectives.


Assuntos
Dançaterapia , Doenças Neurodegenerativas , Doença de Parkinson , Humanos , Doença de Parkinson/terapia , Qualidade de Vida , Saúde Mental , Estilo de Vida , Dançaterapia/métodos
15.
J Appl Gerontol ; 43(3): 319-327, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37991282

RESUMO

With the population aging, more people are living with neurodegenerative conditions, leading to an influx of informal family caregivers, who often experience negative health outcomes. Few caregiver interventions have successfully adopted a holistic, strengths-based approach to fostering resilience. This article examines existing literature on caregiver resilience factors, which include self-efficacy, flexibility, cultivating positive emotions, and drawing on spiritual and social supports. Despite how dance/movement therapy (DMT) has been shown to foster psychological and physiological benefits, it remains underexplored for caregivers. Therapeutic mechanisms of DMT are expounded for their innate correspondence to resilience factors, and a new comprehensive model of DMT for caregiver resilience is presented, with implications for future intervention design and measurement.


Assuntos
Dançaterapia , Resiliência Psicológica , Humanos , Adaptação Psicológica , Envelhecimento , Cuidadores/psicologia , Autoeficácia
16.
J Clin Psychol ; 80(4): 900-911, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38111153

RESUMO

Dance Movement Therapy is gradually becoming recognized as a treatment option in Mental Health Care. However, the working mechanisms can be difficult to comprehend without experiential knowledge of this therapy form. This article aims to offer insight into the clinical application of Dance Movement Therapy for Sanne, a woman with a history of interpersonal relationship difficulties, problems with self-regulation, low self-efficacy and diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and co-morbid Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This case illustration describes treatment interventions during two months of bi-monthly Dance Movement Therapy as an additional treatment alongside weekly group therapy and bi-monthly individual Psychotherapy. Post treatment, Sanne demonstrates improvements in self-regulatory behavior, interpersonal relationships and self-efficacy as well as an experience she describes as being whole. This article highlights the implications for practitioners of embodied forms of therapy as well as multidisciplinary teams who wish to better understand how the use of opposites within Dance Movement Therapy may be used as an additional intervention for people with Borderline Personality Disorder and co-morbid complex Post Traumatic stress Disorder.


Assuntos
Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline , Dançaterapia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos , Feminino , Humanos , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/terapia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/psicologia , Transtorno da Personalidade Borderline/psicologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Psicoterapia
17.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 695, 2023 10 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37880590

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Individuals with mild cognitive impairment are at high risk of developing dementia. Dance therapy has promising applications in delaying cognitive decline. However, the effectiveness of dance therapy for older adults with mild cognitive impairment is unclear. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of dance therapy on global cognitive function, specific cognitive subdomains, quality of life, and mental health in older adults with mild cognitive impairment to enrich health management strategies for dementia. METHODS: Electronic databases and grey literature were searched from inception up to September 23, 2023. The language was limited to English and Chinese. Relevant studies were screened and assessed for risk of bias. A meta-analysis and subgroup analyses stratified by measurement instrument, dance type, intervention duration, and frequency were conducted using the STATA 16.0 software. This review was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. RESULTS: Ten studies involving 984 participants aged 55 years and over who met the eligibility criteria were included. Dance therapy significantly improved global cognitive function, memory, executive function, attention, language, and mental health (i.e., depression and neuropsychiatric symptoms). However, the effects of dance therapy on processing speed, visuospatial ability, and quality of life in older adults with mild cognitive impairment remain inconclusive. Moreover, dance interventions of longer duration (> 3 months) improved global cognition more than shorter interventions. CONCLUSION: This review reported that dance therapy was effective in improving global cognitive function, memory, executive function, attention, language, and mental health (i.e., depression and neuropsychiatric symptoms). Hence, it may be an effective non-pharmacological complementary treatment for older adults with mild cognitive impairment.


Assuntos
Disfunção Cognitiva , Dançaterapia , Demência , Humanos , Idoso , Saúde Mental , Qualidade de Vida , Disfunção Cognitiva/terapia , Cognição
18.
Rev. psicol. deport ; 32(4): 51-59, Oct 15, 2023. ilus, tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-228851

RESUMO

This paper explores the innovative integration of dance culture application modeling within the context of basketball, with a dual emphasis on sports science and enterprise applications. The convergence of dance and basketball offers a unique opportunity to enhance player performance, promote physical conditioning, and facilitate dynamic teamwork. In sports science, the infusion of dance-inspired exercises and routines into basketball training regimens has proven instrumental in enhancing athletes' agility, coordination, and balance. These fundamental attributes are essential for basketball players to excel in dribbling, shooting, and defensive maneuvers. Furthermore, dance culture application modeling contributes to optimal physical conditioning, bolstering cardiovascular endurance and muscular strength, and basketball players maintain peak performance levels throughout the game. Beyond the court, the marriage of dance and basketball presents exciting prospects for enterprises within the sports industry. Team cohesion and motivation are vital for success, and dance culture modeling fosters teamwork, synchronization, and camaraderie among players. Such attributes translate into better on-court performance and contribute to a more marketable and engaging sports product. This approach can be a potent tool for branding, fan engagement, and marketing initiatives within the basketball ecosystem. Additionally, dance culture application modeling can play a pivotal role in injury prevention and rehabilitation, safeguarding players' physical well-being and prolonging their careers. It also offers a refreshing avenue for player wellness during off-seasons and recovery periods. This abstract showcases the promising intersection of dance culture application modeling with basketball, transcending conventional training methodologies. Through its amalgamation of sports science and enterprise applications, it not only elevates player performance but also enhances the appeal and viability of basketball as a dynamic and marketable sport.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Atletas/psicologia , Basquetebol/psicologia , Desempenho Atlético , Dançaterapia , Dança , Esportes , Psicologia do Esporte
19.
Trials ; 24(1): 557, 2023 Aug 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37626418

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Arts therapies are widely but inconsistently provided in community mental health. Whilst they are appealing to patients, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Trials to date have been limited to one art-form or diagnosis. Patients may hold strong preferences for or against an art-form whilst group therapies rely on heterogeneity to provide a range of learning experiences. This study will test whether manualised group arts therapies (art therapy, dance movement therapy and music therapy) are effective in reducing psychological distress for diagnostically heterogeneous patients in community mental health compared to active group counselling control. METHODS: A pragmatic multi-centre 2-arm randomised controlled superiority trial with health economic evaluation and nested process evaluation. Adults aged ≥ 18, living in the community with a primary diagnosis of psychosis, mood, or anxiety disorder will be invited to participate and provide written informed consent. Participants are eligible if they score ≥ 1.65 on the Global Severity Index of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Those eligible will view videos of arts therapies and be asked for their preference. Participants are randomised to either their preferred type of group arts therapy or counselling. Groups will run twice per week in a community venue for 20 weeks. Our primary outcome is symptom distress at the end of intervention. Secondary outcomes include observer-rated symptoms, social situation and quality of life. Data will be collected at baseline, post-intervention and 6 and 12 months post-intervention. Outcome assessors and trial statisticians will be blinded. Analysis will be intention-to-treat. Economic evaluation will assess the cost-effectiveness of group arts therapies. A nested process evaluation will consist of treatment fidelity analysis, exploratory analysis of group process measures and qualitative interviews with participants and therapists. DISCUSSION: This will be the first trial to account for patient preferences and diagnostic heterogeneity in group arts therapies. As with all group therapies, there are a number of logistical challenges to which we have had to further adapt due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, the study will provide evidence as to whether there is an additive benefit or not to the use of the arts in group therapy in community mental health care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN, ISRCTN88805048 . Registered on 12 September 2018.


Assuntos
Arteterapia , COVID-19 , Dançaterapia , Serviços de Saúde Mental , Musicoterapia , Adulto , Humanos , Aconselhamento , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Pandemias , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Adolescente , Ensaios Clínicos Pragmáticos como Assunto , Estudos de Equivalência como Asunto
20.
J Dance Med Sci ; 27(4): 253-267, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37537758

RESUMO

Introduction: Dancing is one way of maintaining an active lifestyle, and online dance interventions in group settings can be a solution when in-person classes are impossible. This study investigated the feasibility and potential clinical effects of an online dance program for older adults with and without Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Participants attended 2 weekly dance classes in the same videoconference room for 2 months. The dance activities were mainly performed while seated (around 75%). Researchers monitored feasibility (ie, adherence, attendance, and technological barriers) and safety. Pre- and post-intervention assessments investigated self-perceptions, effects on emotional domains, quality of life, activity-specific balance confidence, lower-limb functional mobility, and PD non-motor symptoms. Individuals also reported their self-perceptions regarding technology usability, enjoyment, and social interaction. Results: Most of the participants with PD (n = 12) had moderate PD (Hoehn & Yahr score) and presented a greater risk of falls when compared to participants without PD (n = 14). Overall, we found a high rate of adherence (100%), attendance (87.5%-91.7%), and safety (100%) for both groups. No falls or near-falls occurred during the sessions. Only the PD group ameliorated emotional domains (anxiety and depression) and improved lower-limb functional mobility. All participants reported feeling safe and perceived benefits, although over a third of older adults with PD reported moderate difficulties in using technology and in socializing with the group. Conclusion: This online dance protocol is feasible, safe, and a potential strategy to improve clinical parameters in older adults and people with moderate PD.


Assuntos
Dançaterapia , Dança , Doença de Parkinson , Humanos , Idoso , Doença de Parkinson/terapia , Doença de Parkinson/psicologia , Dançaterapia/métodos , Qualidade de Vida , Estilo de Vida
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