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1.
Mil Med ; 186(12 Suppl 2): 23-34, 2021 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34469531

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges for every segment of the U.S. population, including military personnel and their families. The TriService Nursing Research Program's Military Family Research Interest Group (FIG) formed a collaboration with Blue Star Families, a civilian non-profit organization, to identify potential issues faced by military families during the pandemic. DATA COLLECTION METHODS: The Pain Points Poll was introduced online by Blue Star Families, and findings were aggregated weekly between March 18 and May 26, 2020. Volunteer poll respondents were mainly recruited through social media outreach. FIG-informed questions were incorporated in week 4 of polling and focused on workplace environment, financial health, social support, physical and mental health, child behavior, utilization of family care plans, and general well-being. Data were collected to gain real-time insights into the major challenges posed by the pandemic. Findings from FIG-informed questions were collaboratively reviewed and analyzed by FIG and BSF teams. Data-driven recommendations were made to stakeholders to improve processes and reprioritize investments for services that aim to alleviate the impact of COVID-19 on military families. FINDINGS: A total of 2,895 military family units (i.e., service members and spouses) responded to the poll, a majority of which (88%) represented active duty family units. Although the majority of families (range: 59%-69%) noted no impact to their finances, approximately one in five families endorsed dipping into their savings during the pandemic. A majority of respondents (69.5%) reported taking active measures to support their mental health, endorsing various strategies. Among parents of special needs children, 45% of active duty families and 60% of single-parent service members reported the inability to maintain continued services for their children. A majority of parents with school-aged children (65%) reported child behavioral changes due to their child's inability to socialize with peers. Among military service members, 41% were concerned about obtaining fair performance evaluations during the crisis. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic produced significant challenges for military families. Collaboration between military and civilian partners can inform policies and appropriate strategies to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 for military families. The findings presented here provide insight into areas where military families can be supported for optimal outcomes during unprecedented times.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Família Militar , Militares , Criança , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Apoio Social
2.
Life Sci ; 282: 119777, 2021 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34197885

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the prevalence of medical and behavioral conditions is higher in children of deployed veterans (DVs) versus non-deployed veterans (NDVs) after the 1991 Gulf War. METHODS: We examined 1387 children of 737 veterans. Children ages 2-18 had physical exams and parental reports of physical history and behavior. RESULTS: Physical health was analyzed using GEE models. Behavioral health [total, internalizing, and externalizing behavior problems (TBP, IBP, EBP)] was analyzed with mixed-effects regression models. Analyses were conducted by age group (2-3, 4-11, 12-18), and gender (ages 4-11, 12-18). Children of DVs ages 2-3 had significantly worse dentition (13.9% vs. 4.8%, P = 0.03) and more EBP {least square means (lsmeans) 54.31 vs. 47.59, P = 0.02}. Children of DVs ages 4-11 had significantly more obesity (18.8% vs. 12.7%, P = 0.02). Among children 4-11, male children of DVs had significantly more TBP (lsmeans 70.68 vs. 57.34, P = 0.003), IBP (lsmeans 63.59 vs. 56.16, P = 0.002) and EBP (lsmeans 61.60 vs. 52.93, P = 0.03), but female children did not. For children ages 12-18, male children of DVs had more EBP (lsmeans 63.73 vs. 43.51, P = 0.008), while female children of DVs had fewer EBP (lsmeans 45.50 vs. 50.48, P = 0.02). Veteran military characteristics and mental health, and children's social status and health, including obesity, predicted children's TBP for one or more age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Children of DVs experienced worse dentition, greater obesity, and more behavioral problems compared to NDV children, suggesting adverse health effects associated with parental deployment in need of further exploration.


Assuntos
Saúde da Criança , Família Militar , Qualidade de Vida , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Emoções , Feminino , Guerra do Golfo , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Veteranos
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 662313, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34095067

RESUMO

Introduction: A new vision of resilience and well-being for Canadian military service members (SMs), Veterans and their families has been championed by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC). Operationalizing this vision, which aims to support those who serve/have served and their families as they navigate life during and post-service, requires the support of service providers (SPs). Training SPs to deliver complementary resilience-training programs Reaching In… Reaching Out (RIRO; for adults working with parents of young children) and Bounce Back and Thrive! (BBT; for parents of children aged 0-8 years of age) may support this vision. Objective: To assess the appropriateness of RIRO/BBT trainer training for SPs, and RIRO and BBT resilience-training for military populations and families. Methods: This qualitative descriptive study involved the delivery of RIRO/BBT trainer training to SPs (n = 20), followed by focus groups (n = 6) with SPs and organisational leaders (n = 4). Focus groups were recorded, and data were transcribed and thematically-analysed. Results: Several themes emerged: (1) RIRO/BBT trainer training enabled SPs to model resilience and deliver the resilience-training programs, (2) training was appropriate and adaptable for the CAF and SMs/CMFs, and (3) training could support the development of resilient communities. Discussion: RIRO/BBT trainer training and RIRO and BBT resilience-training programs use a holistic, integrated, experiential, and community approach to resilience-building and align with CAF and VAC initiatives. Once contextualised, such programs could support resilience-building in the military context.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Militares , Veteranos , Adulto , Canadá , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Grupos Focais , Humanos
5.
Pediatr Radiol ; 51(6): 883-890, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33999234

RESUMO

Child maltreatment is an unfortunate aspect of our society, afflicting civilian and military families alike. However, unlike their civilian counterparts, military families bear additional burdens inherent to military service that can exacerbate some of the root causes of child abuse. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Defense is committed to ensuring not only a highly disciplined and ready force, but also a healthy force - the foundation of which is healthy families. Therefore, understanding the military health care system, how it functions and how it collects data is a necessary first step in evaluating the efficacy of current programs and identifying opportunities for improvement. Moving beyond treatment and prevention, the military also boasts an independent judicial system designed to promote the dual interests of justice and good order as well as discipline in the armed forces, and this also contributes to a distinct culture. These two independent systems, often viewed as having diametrically opposed interests, can work together synergistically to promote the ultimate goal of fewer instances of child maltreatment in the military.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Infantis , Família Militar , Militares , Criança , Maus-Tratos Infantis/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Estados Unidos
6.
Mil Med ; 186(Suppl 1): 214-221, 2021 01 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33499525

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Military spouses play a critical role in supporting military service members, and thus, their experiences may have a significant impact on the well-being, readiness, and resilience of the U.S. Armed Forces. Research suggests that military spouses experience unique stressors as a result of military life, but few studies have assessed demographic factors associated with their experiences of military life and perceived support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using data from the Millennium Cohort Family Study, a nationwide survey of 9,872 married spouses of service members with 2 to 5 years of military service, this study examined differences in experiences of military life and perceived support across multiple understudied subgroups of military spouses. Key outcomes included military-related stressors (e.g., deployment-related experiences), perceived social support, and perceived military efforts to provide support. RESULTS: Military life stress and perceived support differed across military spouse, service member, and family characteristics. Results indicated that spouses who are older than age 35 or are married to enlisted service members in the Army, Navy, or Marines are more likely to experience heightened military stress or less perceived social support. Dual-military couples reported experiencing less stress associated with military life and perceiving more social support and support from the military, compared with spouses who have never served in the military. CONCLUSION: These findings may help guide effective channeling of resources and outreach to potentially vulnerable military families.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Militares , Adulto , Humanos , Apoio Social , Cônjuges , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia
7.
Mil Med ; 186(Suppl 1): 222-229, 2021 01 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33499532

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Civilian and military research has linked parental illness and injury with increased overall mental health care and psychiatric medication use in children. Care for specific mental health conditions and medications by child age have not been reported. OBJECTIVE: We sought to quantify the effect of parental illness and injury on child mental health care and psychiatric medication use in children overall and stratified by age. METHODS: A self-controlled case series analyzed the impact of parental illness/injury on mental health and psychiatric medication use of military dependent children. Children were aged 2-16 years (51% male) when their parents were injured and received care in the Military Health System for 2 years before and 2 years after their parent's illness/injury. We used International Classification of Diseases 9th edition codes to identify outpatient mental healthcare visits. Outpatient care for 14 specific mental health diagnoses was classified using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality clinical classification system. Outpatient pharmacy records identified psychiatric medication prescriptions by therapeutic class. Parental illness/injury was identified by inclusion in the Military Health System Ill, Injured, and Wounded Warrior database. Adjusted negative binomial regression analysis compared rates of outpatient visits and medication days in the 2 years following parental illness/injury to the 2 years before the parent's illness/injury overall. Secondary analyses were stratified by age groups of 2-5 years (n = 158,620), 6-12 years (n = 239,614), and 13-16 years n = 86,768) and adjusted for parental pre-injury/illness deployment and child sex. Additional secondary analysis compared post-parental injury/illness care of children whose parents had post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury to children of parents with physical/mental health injury/illness. RESULTS: There were 485,002 children of 272,211 parents injured during the study period. After adjustment for child sex, years of pre-injury/illness parental deployment, and child age, parental illness/injury was associated with increased mental visits across all categories of care except developmental diagnoses. Post-parental injury visits for suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, mood, and anxiety disorders were all doubled. For children aged 2-5 years at parental illness/injury, the largest increases in care were in psychotic, anxiety, attention deficit, and mood disorders. In children aged 6-12 years, the largest increases were in psychotic conditions, suicidal ideation, and personality disorders. In adolescents aged 13-16 years, the largest increases were for alcohol and substance abuse disorders, with visits increasing by 4-5 times. For children of all ages, parental injury was associated with increased use of all therapeutic classes of psychiatric medications; use of stimulant medications was increased in younger children and decreased in older children following parental injury (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Parental illness/injury is associated with increased mental health care and days of psychiatric medication use in dependent children. Practitioners who care for families impacted by parental illness/injury should be cognizant of children's mental health risk. Early identification and treatment of child-related mental health issues can improve family functioning and increase military family readiness.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Família Militar , Militares , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/tratamento farmacológico , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental , Pais , Psicotrópicos/uso terapêutico
8.
Health Promot Pract ; 22(5): 692-701, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31984799

RESUMO

Background. To create efficacious interventions for military family caregivers (MFCs), it is important to understand the characteristics and predictors of completers and dropouts of newly developed supportive interventions. Aim. The purpose of this study was to examine completion patterns in MFCs enrolled in an educational intervention feasibility study. Method. Baseline data are presented from MFC completers (n = 64) and dropouts (n = 60) of a national feasibility study for an innovative intervention. Measures include depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-2), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), somatic symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-15), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief), relationship satisfaction (Relationship Assessment Scale), and military care recipient number of injuries. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences between completers and dropouts and logistic regression was used to identify predictors of intervention completion. Results. Results indicated that MFCs with greater anxiety, χ2(3) = 10.33, p = .02; depression, χ2(1) = 8.18, p = .004; somatic symptoms, F(1, 106) = 6.26, p = .01; care recipient number of injuries, F(1, 118) = 16.31, p < .001; lower general satisfaction with treatment, F(1, 96) = 4.34, p = .04; and lower satisfaction with accessibility and convenience with treatment, F(1, 89) = 4.18, p = .04, were significantly more likely to complete the intervention. After multivariate analysis, the sole predictor of intervention completion was the number of care recipients' injuries, χ2(6) = 14.89, N = 77, p < .05. Conclusions. Overall, findings indicate that MFCs who were more "at risk" were more likely to complete the intervention. Findings present patterns of intervention completion and provide insight on areas in need of further investigation on intervention development supporting the needs of MFCs.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Militares , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Cuidadores , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida
9.
J Fam Psychol ; 35(1): 80-91, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32673030

RESUMO

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that clinicians screen patients for intimate partner violence (IPV). This article aims to develop and test the first screeners for clinically significant physical and psychological IPV (i.e., acts meeting criteria in the International Classification of Diseases (11th ed.; ICD-11; World Health Organization, 2019) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The goal was to derive screeners that (1) are maximally brief, while still achieving high sensitivity and specificity; (2) assess perpetration and victimization when either men or women are reporting; and (3) use ICD-11/DSM-5 criteria as the reference standard. Random samples of active duty service members at 82 installations worldwide were obtained via e-mail invitation (2006: N = 54,543; 2008: N = 48,909); their response rates were excellent for long general population surveys with no payment (2006: 44.7%, 2008: 49.0%). The population of spouses at the participating installation was invited by mailed postcard (2006: N = 19,722; 2008: N = 12,127; response rates-2006: 12.3%, 2008: 10.8%). Clinically significant physical intimate partner violence can be effectively screened with as few as four items, with sensitivities > 90% and specificities > 95%; clinically significant psychological intimate partner violence can be screened with two items. Men and women can be screened with equivalent accuracy, as can those committing the violence and those victimized by it. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Conjugais/diagnóstico , Adulto , Vítimas de Crime/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Violência por Parceiro Íntimo/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Cônjuges/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
10.
J Fam Psychol ; 35(1): 33-43, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32437203

RESUMO

The current study examined patterns of risk and protective factors among military families and associations with mental health diagnoses among U.S. Army spouses. Spouses (N = 3,036) completed a survey of family psychosocial fitness, which informed protective factors including coping, family cohesion, and social support. Survey results were linked with Department of Defense archival data, which provided information on military-specific risks, including relocation, deployments, and reunification, as well as mental health care diagnoses. The three-step method of latent profile analysis identified six profiles, suggesting significant heterogeneity in military families with respect to their access to resources and exposure to risk. The largest profile of families (40.48% of the sample) had limited risk exposure and considerable strengths. Variability in risk and protection across profiles was associated with statistically significant differences in the prevalence of mental health diagnoses among spouses (χ² = 108.968, df = 5, p < .001). The highest prevalence of mental health diagnoses among Army spouses (41.2%) was observed in the profile with the lowest levels of protective factors. Findings point to the importance of evaluating both concurrent risk and protective factors. Increasing access to resources may be a fruitful avenue for prevention among military families that are struggling. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Família Militar/psicologia , Resiliência Psicológica , Cônjuges/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Militares/psicologia , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
11.
J Prim Prev ; 41(6): 567-583, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33146803

RESUMO

This paper describes a multi-phase effort to develop a web-based training for adults serving as mentors in school-based programs for youth with a parent in the military. In Phase 1, we conducted focus groups with military parents to: gauge their receptivity to this type of supportive intervention, identify program features that would make the option of mentoring for their children more or less appealing, and identify specific training needs for adult volunteers preparing for the role of mentor to youth in this population. In Phase 2, we used an iterative process to develop the training protocol, including cycling through multiple drafts, creating a web-based platform, reviewing and incorporating feedback from various stakeholders, and then pilot testing the training with two groups of mentor volunteers as part of a school-based mentoring program for military-connected students. We report on what we learned from the military parent focus groups, including parent skepticism about the need for such a program, concerns about potential stigma, and the need for mentors to have some understanding of military culture. We describe how we used that information to develop a practical and accessible training module for volunteer mentors, especially those without a military background, who could be matched with military-connected youth.


Assuntos
Internet , Tutoria , Família Militar , Instituições Acadêmicas , Estudantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Cultura , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noroeste dos Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
12.
Curr Psychiatry Rep ; 22(12): 82, 2020 11 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33215305

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Military cultural competence has been recognized as an important factor to delivering effective care to service members, who are a distinct population with unique exposures, and thus with different clinical implications-though only recently has the military service been recognized as a cultural identity that can impact treatment (Meyer et al. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 18:26:1-8, 2016). Competencies within this field do not share a universal definition but have been recognized by the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) to include four key components: (1) military ethos, (2) organization and roles, (3) military stressors and resources, and (4) treatment, resources, and tools (Atuel & Castro Clin Soc Work J. 46:74-82, 2018). This article summarizes research literature published in the last 6 years addressing common features and health needs of military families with the goal of improving military cultural competence. This includes recognizing that (a) The military carries its own culture as evidenced by its particular traditions, beliefs, language, and set of guiding principles (Sanghera Optom Educ J Assoc Sch Coll Optom. 42:8-16, 2017) and (b) military families-defined in this paper as active duty service members, their spouses, their children, and civilian warfighters in the form of National Guard and Reservists (NG/R)-face unique stressors as they access health care either in military treatment facilities (MTFs) or in civilian settings. Given the broad and unshared definition of military cultural competence, the CDP's framework for understanding military culture helped shape the focus of our review into literature addressing military stressors and resources, with a particular interest on the impact of deployment, reintegration after deployment, interfamily relationships strained by military service, mental health concerns related to military families, and the vulnerabilities of civilian warfighters. RECENT FINDINGS: A 2018 demographics profile revealed there were 1.3 million active duty service members, with 605,677 spouses and 981,871 children (Department of Defense, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community Family Policy (ODASD (MC&FP)). 2018). Concerningly, military families exhibit above-average mental health issues-defined in this review to include increased susceptibility to mental health diagnoses and hospitalizations, worse academic achievement in their children, and higher rates of child maltreatment-and challenges related to military service such as frequent relocations and deployments, geographic isolation from social/support network, financial stressors, worries about infidelity, sexual trauma, and child maltreatment. The military has been described as the most engrossing and demanding institution in American society. Our review shows that military families exhibit above-average mental health issues, thought to be related, at least in part, to the challenges of frequent relocations and deployments. The implications for this are broad, given that 8% of the USA has served in the military, and a third is directly related to a service member (Meyer et al. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 18:26:1-8, 2016) This article describes unique challenges military families face and their impact on the service member, their spouse, and their children.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Militares , Criança , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Apoio Social , Estados Unidos
13.
Nurs Forum ; 55(4): 703-710, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33118620

RESUMO

Moving to a new country and culture has emotional, social, financial, health, and cultural consequences. Military spouses face a wide range of stressors when relocating or sojourning, placing them at risk for a variety of health challenges. The aim of this study was to describe the transition experiences of military spouses who sojourn abroad as part of a service member's assignment. Using qualitative narrative inquiry, semi-structured interviews of 13 US military spouses living in Italy were conducted. Narrative thematic and structural analysis was used to analyze the data. Six themes represent the transition experience: adding stress to an already stressful situation, managing a new set of worries and fears surrounded by the unknown, reestablishing an everyday life from chaos, battling social, personal, and physical isolation, reinventing myself to move beyond simply functioning to control, and pondering about life, returning, and repatriation. Internationally, the nursing profession has a responsibility to understand the transition experience of military spouses to overseas assignments so appropriate strategies aimed at strengthening resiliency, building cultural flexibility, and maintaining health and well-being can be provided, while minimizing negative consequences. Additionally, nurses and health care providers can play a role by continually developing culturally congruent and sensitive practice.


Assuntos
Família Militar/psicologia , Cônjuges/psicologia , Viagem/psicologia , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Itália , Instalações Militares/organização & administração , Instalações Militares/estatística & dados numéricos , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Narração , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Apoio Social , Cônjuges/estatística & dados numéricos , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Viagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/etnologia
14.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238508, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32898144

RESUMO

Strictly relying on publicly available data, this study depicts and quantifies the spatial pattern of England's military families with dependent children. England's Service Pupil Premium for the financial years between 2011 and 2019 is used as a proxy variable to estimate the density of service children at the parliamentary constituency level. Methodologically, the approach allows an assessment of spatial movements of a population or a cohort. The results inform policy makers by providing evidence-based findings about the location of England's military families and how the distribution has changed between 2011 and 2019. The results show empirical evidence supporting the hypothesis that, at a macro scale, beyond commuting distance, England's military families are becoming increasingly dispersed. We argue that the findings unveil spatial dynamics that have practical issues of housing, employment, and education regarding military families.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Criança , Demografia/estatística & dados numéricos , Inglaterra , Habitação , Humanos , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos
15.
Nurs Sci Q ; 33(4): 339-345, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940162

RESUMO

In this paper the authors explore the impact of loss of a parent to suicide on adolescents in military families using Marcia's identity status theory and the Roy adaptation model (RAM). After describing a brief case study of a 13-year-old boy in a military family who lost his father in this manner, these two theories are applied to better understand his struggle to develop and maintain a healthy identity and adapt to numerous relocations, deployments, and then loss. The military family stressors are seen as weakening the resilience of children in such families, making them more vulnerable to the impact of parent loss. Implications for nurses and other healthcare professionals are discussed.


Assuntos
Família Militar/psicologia , Pais , Suicídio/psicologia , Adaptação Psicológica , Adolescente , Humanos , Masculino , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem/psicologia , Identificação Social , Suicídio/prevenção & controle , Estados Unidos , Guerra
17.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 54: 34-41, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32526614

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify ways parents comfort their children to help them cope and adapt to the stresses of the deployment of a mother or father in military service, as well as the reintegration process of the parent returning home. DESIGN AND METHODS: This qualitative study used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to better understand the lived experiences of these families and strategies used to combat stressors of deployment and post-deployment. Using purposive and snowball sampling for recruitment, participants completed an online anonymous survey that consisted of demographic and open-ended questions. A study sample of 15 participants (n = 15) was selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Using an interpretive framework for data analysis, six themes emerged from the survey. RESULTS: Six themes emerged from the data including the value of family communication, the importance of maintaining a routine, the occurrence of behavioral issues and emotional distress in children, the use of creative coping strategies, the need for parental self-care, and the resilience of the military families. CONCLUSION: There are unique challenges for military families during and after deployment that can be mitigated with identified strategies. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Incorporation of the study's findings into nursing practice will enhance patient education and anticipatory guidance for military families with children experiencing or planning for a parental deployment.


Assuntos
Família Militar , Militares , Adaptação Psicológica , Criança , Pai , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pais
18.
MSMR ; 27(6): 3-7, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32589440

RESUMO

The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch conducts weekly surveillance of influenza activity among Department of Defense (DoD) populations each influenza season. This report provides a summary of the data from the 2018-2019 influenza season. Ambulatory data for influenza-like illnesses (ILIs), influenza hospitalization data, and lab data for influenza-confirmed cases were used for the surveillance. The 2018-2019 season differed from past seasons in that it was much longer, had a later peak, and the predominant strain of influenza changed from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 at the beginning of the season to influenza A(H3N2) in the middle of the season. Non-service member beneficiaries accounted for the majority of ILI-related encounters and hospitalizations. However, there were still 149 influenza-related hospitalizations among service members during the 2018- 2019 season. Continued weekly surveillance of influenza among DoD populations is crucial to track increases in activity each season and the potential emergence of new and/or severe influenza subtypes.


Assuntos
Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Militares/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Vigilância da População , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
19.
MSMR ; 27(3): 19-23, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32228003

RESUMO

The EpiData Center (EDC) has provided routine blood lead level (BLL) surveillance for Department of Defense (DoD) pediatric beneficiaries since 2011. Data for this study were collected and compiled from raw laboratory test records obtained from the Composite Health Care System Health Level 7 (HL7)-formatted chemistry data, allowing an overview of the number of tests performed and the number of elevated results. Between 2010 and 2017, there were 177,061 tests performed among 162,238 pediatric beneficiaries tested. Using only the highest test result per year for each individual, 169,917 tests were retained for analysis, of which 1,334 (0.79%) test results were considered elevated. The percentage of children with elevated BLLs generally decreased over the time period for children of every service affiliation. All tests throughout this time frame were evaluated using current standards and the protocol followed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of the Navy (DON). The adoption of a standardized BLL surveillance methodology across the DoD supports a cohesive approach to an evolving public health surveillance topic.


Assuntos
Intoxicação por Chumbo/epidemiologia , Chumbo/sangue , Família Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços de Saúde Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Vigilância da População , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
20.
Infant Ment Health J ; 41(5): 723-737, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32281133

RESUMO

Studies show that children with a military parent are at heightened risk of the development of behavior problems. However, there is limited work examining how other factors experienced by military families may also influence behavior problems. In the current study, we recruited three types of Canadian families with a preschooler: families with a deployed military member, families with a nondeployed military member, and nonmilitary families. We examined whether the nonmilitary parent's (in all cases the mother) parenting stress and attachment relationship with the child are associated with behavior problems, and whether deployment status further contributes to the prediction. Child-mother dyads participated in an observed attachment assessment, and mothers reported on their stress levels and their child's behavior. Results showed that both child attachment insecurity and parenting stress were associated with elevated levels of internalizing problems; however, only parenting stress was associated with conduct problems. Military deployment predicted higher levels of internalizing and conduct problems beyond the contributions of attachment and stress. Furthermore, having a father in the military (whether deployed or not) also contributed to internalizing problems. These findings shed light on how the military lifestyle impacts early childhood mental health through the complex interplay between various parts of their environment.


Assuntos
Comportamento Infantil/psicologia , Família Militar/psicologia , Relações Mãe-Filho/psicologia , Mães/psicologia , Apego ao Objeto , Poder Familiar/psicologia , Comportamento Problema/psicologia , Adulto , Canadá , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
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