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1.
Curr Opin Oncol ; 35(2): 125-131, 2023 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36633319

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is growing evidence that suggests a possible role for bacteria in the progression of cancer. Fusobacteria have been detected in different types of cancers, including colorectal and oral cancers. Fusobacteria are common opportunistic oral bacteria known to cause various infections. In this review, we focus on the association between Fusobacteria and cancer, specifically oral cancer, and provide insight into the role of Fusobacteria in carcinogenesis and immune evasion. RECENT FINDINGS: Recently, it has been suggested that Fusobacteria are among the bacteria that contribute to the progression of cancer and might affect disease prognosis and treatment outcome. Moreover, Fusobacteria might alter tumor microenvironment and have an impact on tumor immune response. Thus, understanding the effect of Fusobacteria on cancer cells and tumor microenvironment is crucial to improve treatment outcome. SUMMERY: Recent evidences suggest that Fusobacteria not only have an impact on tumor progression, but might also affect tumor immune response. Moreover, Fusobacteria presence in the tumor microenvironment might have an impact on treatment outcome and might be used as a prognostic factor.


Assuntos
Fusobacterium , Neoplasias Bucais , Humanos , Fusobactérias , Evasão da Resposta Imune , Carcinogênese , Microambiente Tumoral
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 21023, 2022 Dec 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36470924

RESUMO

Odontogenic rhinosinusitis is a subtype of rhinosinusitis associated with dental infection or dental procedures and has special bacteriologic features. Previous research on the bacteriologic features of odontogenic rhinosinusitis has mainly used culture-dependent methods. The variation of microbiota between odontogenic and nonodontogenic rhinosinusitis as well as the interplay between the involved bacteria have not been explored. Therefore, we enrolled eight odontogenic rhinosinusitis cases and twenty nonodontogenic rhinosinusitis cases to analyze bacterial microbiota through 16S rRNA sequencing. Significant differences were revealed by the Shannon diversity index (Wilcoxon test p = 0.0003) and PERMANOVA test based on weighted UniFrac distance (Wilcoxon test p = 0.001) between odontogenic and nonodontogenic samples. Anaerobic bacteria such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, and Prevotella were significantly dominant in the odontogenic rhinosinusitis group. Remarkably, a correlation between different bacteria was also revealed by Pearson's correlation. Staphylococcus was highly positively associated with Corynebacterium, whereas Fusobacterium was highly negatively correlated with Prophyromonas. According to our results, the microbiota in odontogenic rhinosinusitis, predominantly anaerobic bacteria, was significantly different from that in nonodontogenic rhinosinusitis, and the interplay between specific bacteria may a major cause of this subtype of rhinosinusitis.


Assuntos
Microbiota , Sinusite , Humanos , Disbiose/complicações , Disbiose/microbiologia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Bactérias Anaeróbias/genética , Sinusite/complicações , Sinusite/microbiologia , Bactérias/genética , Fusobacterium/genética
4.
Digestion ; 103(6): 451-461, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36349755

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Fusobacterium and several bacteria are reported to be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, their relationship and whether they cause CRC or are just adapted to the cancerous environment is not known. We approached this subject by investigating the correlation and distribution of the bacteria throughout the colon in patients with CRC and elucidated the relationship between microbiota and CRC. METHODS: Twenty-five patients with CRC who underwent colonoscopy for endoscopic submucosal dissection or surgery were prospectively enrolled. Fecal samples were taken before bowel preparation, and mucosal samples were collected from three sites (tumor surface, tumor-adjacent mucosa, and cecum) during colonoscopy using a cytology brush. The microbiota was identified and analyzed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of the V3-V4 region. We evaluated the correlation between the bacteria based on network analysis and the distribution of Fusobacterium in the colon. RESULTS: A network consisting of many bacteria was found in all sites; especially, oral origin bacteria including Fusobacterium formed a positively correlated network on tumor surface. Streptococcus showed a significantly higher relative abundance on tumor surface than in feces. The relative abundance of Fusobacterium had significant positive correlations between tumor surface and feces, tumor-adjacent mucosa, and cecum. CONCLUSION: In patients with CRC, many bacteria were correlated with each other, and Fusobacterium and oral origin bacteria formed a positively correlated network on tumor surface. Fusobacterium was equally distributed on tumor surface and throughout the lumen and mucus in the colon. In the colon where Fusobacterium is widely distributed, Fusobacterium would adhere to the tumor surface and be correlated with oral origin bacteria to make a microenvironment that is favorable for CRC.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Microbiota , Humanos , Fusobacterium/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais/cirurgia , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Fezes/microbiologia , Bactérias/genética , Membrana Mucosa/patologia , Microambiente Tumoral
5.
Yonsei Med J ; 63(12): 1138-1143, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36444550

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Fusobacterium species can cause infections, and associations with cancer are being increasingly reported. As their clinical significance differs, accurate identification of individual species is important. However, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry has not been found to be effective in identifying Fusobacterium species in previous studies. In this study, we aimed to improve the accuracy and efficacy of identifying Fusobacterium species in clinical laboratories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 229 Fusobacterium isolates were included in this study. All isolates were identified at the species level based on nucleotide sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and/or DNA-dependent RNA polymerase ß-subunit gene (rpoB). Where necessary, isolates were identified based on whole genome sequences. Among them, 47 isolates were used for updating the ASTA database, and 182 isolates were used for the validation of Fusobacterium spp. identification. RESULTS: Fusobacterium isolates used for validation (182/182) were correctly identified at the genus level, and most (180/182) were correctly identified at the species level using the ASTA MicroIDSys system. Most of the F. nucleatum isolates (74/75) were correctly identified at the subspecies level. CONCLUSION: The updated ASTA MicroIDSys system can identify nine species of Fusobacterium and four subspecies of F. nucleatum in good agreement. This tool can be routinely used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify Fusobacterium species and serve as a springboard for future research.


Assuntos
Fusobacterium , Laboratórios Clínicos , Humanos , Fusobacterium/genética , Espectrometria de Massas , Bases de Dados Factuais , Lasers
6.
BMC Microbiol ; 22(1): 286, 2022 11 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36447140

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease of the respiratory system. It is still one of the leading causes of death from a single infectious disease, but it has been stuck in the study of a single pathogen. Recent studies have shown that many diseases are associated with disruption of the native microbiota. In this study we investigated the occurrence of tuberculosis and the correlation between drug resistance and respiratory flora. High-throughput 16 S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the respiratory microbiota composition of 30 tuberculosis (TB) affected patients and compared with 30 healthy (H) controls. According to their Gene Xpert results, 30 pulmonary tuberculosis patients were divided into 12 persons in the drug-sensitive group (DS0) and 18 persons in the drug-resistant group (DR0). The microbial flora of the two were compared with the H group. RESULTS: The data generated by sequencing showed that Firmicutes, Proteus, Bacteroides, Actinomyces and Fusobacterium were the five main bacterial phyla detected, and they constituted more than 96% of the microbial community. The relative abundances of Fusobacterium, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, Neisseria, TM7, Spirochetes, SR1, and Tenericutes in the TB group was lower than that of the H group, and Granulicatella was higher than the H group. The PcoA diagrams of the two groups had obvious clustering differences. The Alpha diversity of the TB group was lower than that of the H group, and the Beta diversity was higher than that of the H group (P < 0.05). The relative abundance of Streptococcus in the DS0 group was significantly higher than that in the DR0 group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Pulmonary tuberculosis can cause disorders of the respiratory tract microbial flora, in which the relative abundance of Streptococcus was significantly different between rifampicin-sensitive and rifampicin-resistant patients.


Assuntos
Microbiota , Tuberculose Pulmonar , Humanos , Rifampina/farmacologia , Tuberculose Pulmonar/tratamento farmacológico , Sistema Respiratório , Fusobacterium
7.
Vet Res ; 53(1): 78, 2022 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36209119

RESUMO

Besides Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterium that may cause gastric disorders in humans, non-Helicobacter pylori helicobacters (NHPH) may also colonize the stomach of humans and animals. In pigs, H. suis can induce gastritis and may play a role in gastric ulcer disease, possibly in association with Fusobacterium gastrosuis. In the present study, gastric samples from 71 slaughtered pigs and 14 hunted free range wild boars were tested for the presence of DNA of F. gastrosuis and gastric Helicobacter species associated with pigs, dogs cats and humans, using species-specific PCR assays, followed by sequencing of the amplicon. These gastric samples were also histopathologically evaluated. Almost all the pigs presented gastritis (95.8%). Helicobacter spp. were detected in 78.9% and F. gastrosuis in 35.2% of the animals. H. suis was the most frequently identified Helicobacter species (57.7% of the animals), followed by a H. pylori-like species (50.7%) and less often H. salomonis and H. felis (each in 2.8% of the animals). H. suis was most often detected in the glandular (distal) part of the stomach (pars oesophagea 9.9%, oxyntic mucosa 35.2%, antral mucosa 40.8%), while the H. pylori-like species was mainly found in the non-glandular (proximal) part of the stomach (pars oesophagea 39.4%, oxyntic mucosa 14.1%, antral mucosa 4.2%). The great majority of wild boars were also affected with gastritis (71.4%) and Helicobacter spp. and F. gastrosuis were detected in 64.3% and 42.9% of the animals, respectively. H. bizzozeronii and H. salomonis were the most frequently detected Helicobacter species, while a H. pylori-like species and H. suis were only occasionally identified. These findings suggest that these microorganisms can colonize the stomach of both porcine species and may be associated with gastric pathology. This should, however, be confirmed through bacterial isolation. This is the first description of the presence of F. gastrosuis DNA in the stomach of wild boars and a H. pylori-like species in the pars oesophagea of the porcine stomach.


Assuntos
Doenças do Cão , Gastrite , Infecções por Helicobacter , Helicobacter pylori , Helicobacter , Doenças dos Suínos , Animais , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Cães , Fusobacterium , Mucosa Gástrica , Gastrite/microbiologia , Gastrite/veterinária , Helicobacter/genética , Infecções por Helicobacter/microbiologia , Infecções por Helicobacter/veterinária , Helicobacter pylori/genética , Humanos , Sus scrofa , Suínos , Doenças dos Suínos/microbiologia
8.
Cancer Res ; 82(20): 3671-3672, 2022 10 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36245243

RESUMO

The role of the microbiome in human cancer has become an area of intensive research and controversy. Many reports have highlighted the physical association of Fusobacterium with colorectal cancer. This association has provided diagnostic and therapeutic promise but has also given rise to several controversies regarding the influence of Fusobacterium species on human colorectal cancer. Here, we discuss two areas of controversy surrounding this emerging pathogen: the influence of Fusobacterium on colorectal cancer proliferation and the effect of Fusobacterium on the immune microenvironment of colorectal cancer.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Infecções por Fusobacterium , Microbiota , Fusobacterium , Infecções por Fusobacterium/complicações , Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia , Humanos , Microambiente Tumoral
9.
NPJ Biofilms Microbiomes ; 8(1): 87, 2022 10 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36307484

RESUMO

Perturbations in the gut microbiome have been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), with the colonic overabundance of Fusobacterium nucleatum shown as the most consistent marker. Despite its significance in the promotion of CRC, genomic studies of Fusobacterium is limited. We enrolled 43 Vietnamese CRC patients and 25 participants with non-cancerous colorectal polyps to study the colonic microbiomes and genomic diversity of Fusobacterium in this population, using a combination of 16S rRNA gene profiling, anaerobic microbiology, and whole genome analysis. Oral bacteria, including F. nucleatum and Leptotrichia, were significantly more abundant in the tumour microbiomes. We obtained 53 Fusobacterium genomes, representing 26 strains, from the saliva, tumour and non-tumour tissues of six CRC patients. Isolates from the gut belonged to diverse F. nucleatum subspecies (nucleatum, animalis, vincentii, polymorphum) and a potential new subspecies of Fusobacterium periodonticum. The Fusobacterium population within each individual was distinct and in some cases diverse, with minimal intra-clonal variation. Phylogenetic analyses showed that within four individuals, tumour-associated Fusobacterium were clonal to those isolated from non-tumour tissues. Genes encoding major virulence factors (Fap2 and RadD) showed evidence of horizontal gene transfer. Our work provides a framework to understand the genomic diversity of Fusobacterium within the CRC patients, which can be exploited for the development of CRC diagnostic and therapeutic options targeting this oncobacterium.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Microbiota , Humanos , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Filogenia , Fusobacterium/genética , Genômica , Neoplasias Colorretais/microbiologia
10.
Nat Rev Microbiol ; 20(10): 576, 2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35915254
11.
Anaerobe ; 76: 102611, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35820595

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Although anaerobic bacteria are important agents of a wide variety of serious infections, they are overlooked often in the etiology of infection due to difficulties in isolation and detection. The aim of this study was to develop a new multiplex PCR panel that could detect Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Veillonella, Clostridium, Peptostreptococcus, and Actinomyces bacteria, which are the most frequently isolated from anaerobic infections, at the genus level. METHOD: Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed on 46 clinical specimens, with suspicion of anaerobic infection and were sent to the laboratory. DNA isolation was performed with the same samples and anaerobic bacteria were detected by the multiplex PCR test developed in the study. RESULT: The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex PCR assay was found to be 1-103 CFU/ml, depending on the bacterial species. In this study, anaerobic growth was observed in eight (17.4%) of 46 clinical samples. The multiplex PCR test detected 35 anaerobic bacteria from 20 (43.5%) of 46 clinical samples. The most common anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens by the multiplex PCR assay were Prevotella spp. (37.1%) and Fusobacterium spp. (22.9%) while Clostridium spp. (14.3%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (11.4%), Bacteroides spp. (8.6%), and Veillonella spp. (5.7%) followed these genera. CONCLUSION: As a result, it was concluded that the multiplex PCR panel developed in this study eliminates problems in the detection of anaerobes based on culture, provides more accurate detection of anaerobic bacteria from clinical specimens, takes a shorter time, and allows more accurate infection treatment.


Assuntos
Bactérias Anaeróbias , Infecções Bacterianas , Bactérias/genética , Infecções Bacterianas/microbiologia , Clostridium , Fusobacterium/genética , Humanos , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Multiplex
12.
Microbiol Spectr ; 10(4): e0106822, 2022 08 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35862975

RESUMO

The tumor microbiome is believed to have a profound impact on tumor progression owing to its local colonization in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Using the Cancer Microbiome Atlas (TCMA), a database of curated, decontaminated microbial profiles for 3,689 oropharyngeal, esophageal, gastrointestinal, and colorectal tissue samples from 1,772 patients, we conducted a comprehensive multi-omics analysis to reveal microbial signatures among various cancers and the potential mechanisms involved in tumor progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSC). We found that compared with other cancer types, the tumor-resident microbiome of HNSC accounted for the highest bacterial abundance and strongest association with host TME signatures. Fusobacterium was found to be enriched in HNSC tissues, which was associated with an increased inflammatory effect and inferior prognosis. Moreover, we revealed that the microbiota-associated inflammatory TME was attributed to the competing endogenouse RNA (ceRNA) network and chromatin accessibility. IMPORTANCE Studies on revealing the composition and potential mechanisms of the tumor microbiome are still at an initial stage. We uncovered the potential contribution of the tumor-resident microbiota on the immunosuppressive microenvironment in HNSC, which will provide a new perspective for tumor microbiome research and yield valuable insights into the clinical management of HNSC.


Assuntos
Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Fusobacterium , Humanos , Prognóstico , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço , Microambiente Tumoral/genética
13.
Neoplasia ; 31: 100813, 2022 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35834946

RESUMO

Recently, increased number of studies have demonstrated a relationship between the oral microbiome and development of head and neck cancer, however, there are few studies to investigate the role of oral bacteria in the context of the tumor microenvironment in a single head and neck subsite. Here, paired tumor and adjacent normal tissues from thirty-seven oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole exome sequencing (WES), in addition to RNA sequencing for tumor samples. We observed that Fusobacterium was significantly enriched in oral tongue cancer and that Rothia and Streptococcus were enriched in adjacent normal tissues. A decrease in alpha diversity was found in tumor when compared to adjacent normal tissues. While increased Fusobacterium in tumor samples was not associated with changes in immune cell infiltration, it was associated with increased PD-L1 mRNA expression. Therefore, we examined the effects of Fusobacterium on PD-L1 expression in head and neck SCC cell lines. We demonstrated that infection with Fusobacterium species can increase both PD-L1 mRNA and surface PD-L1 protein expression on head and neck cancer cell lines. The correlation between Fusobacterium and PD-L1 expression in oral tongue SCC, in conjunction with the ability of the bacterium to induce PD-L1 expression in vitro suggests a potential role for Fusobacterium on modulation of the tumor immune microenvironment in head and neck cancer.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas , Neoplasias de Cabeça e Pescoço , Neoplasias Bucais , Neoplasias da Língua , Antígeno B7-H1/genética , Fusobacterium/genética , Fusobacterium/metabolismo , Humanos , Neoplasias Bucais/genética , RNA Mensageiro , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas de Cabeça e Pescoço/genética , Neoplasias da Língua/genética , Microambiente Tumoral/genética
14.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 12: 830684, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35663463

RESUMO

Background: There is no information on the commonality and specificity of oral and fecal microbiota in patients with gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: The high-throughput 16S rRNA gene V4 region sequencing was used to perform bioinformatics analysis of oral, fecal, and tissue microbiota in GC (76 subjects), CRC (53), and healthy controls (HC, 70). Furthermore, we determined the microbial characteristics of each part, constructed and verified three classifiers for GC and CRC, and evaluated curves of receiver operating characteristic and precision-recall with probability of disease. Results: Compared to HC, the microbial richness and diversity of GC and CRC decreased in oral cavity and increased in stool; additionally, these indexes in GC tissue were higher than those in CRC tissue. In GC and CRC patients, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Faecalibacterium, and Romboutsia were significantly reduced compared to the relative abundance value of oral or fecal bacterial genera in the HC group, while the Streptococcus, Gemella, Escherichia-Shigella, and Fusobacterium were significantly increased. The oral and tissue microbiota have similar and abundant shared bacterial networks. The single and combined microbial detection have good AUC values based on POD indices for predicting GC, CRC, and gastrointestinal (GI) cancers (GC and CRC). Conclusion: This study is the first to examine the characteristics of oral, fecal, and tumor microbiota in GC and CRC patients, and the similarities and differences in their microbial changes are reported. These oral or fecal bacteria (Haemophilus, Neisseria, Faecalibacterium, Romboutsia, Streptococcus, Gemella, Escherichia-Shigella, and Fusobacterium) may be involved in tumor evolution as potentially characteristic genera. In addition, both oral and fecal microbial detection may provide a solid theoretical foundation for the non-invasive prediction of these cancers.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Microbiota , Neoplasias Gástricas , Bactérias/genética , Biomarcadores , Neoplasias Colorretais/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Colorretais/microbiologia , Fezes/microbiologia , Fusobacterium/genética , Humanos , Microbiota/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico
15.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 3336, 2022 06 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35680952

RESUMO

The bacterial genus Fusobacterium promotes colorectal cancer (CRC) development, but an understanding of its precise composition at the species level in the human gut and the relevant association with CRC is lacking. Herein, we devise a Fusobacterium rpoB amplicon sequencing (FrpoB-seq) method that enables the differentiation of Fusobacterium species and certain subspecies in the microbiota. By applying this method to clinical tissue and faecal samples from CRC patients, we detect 62 Fusobacterium species, including 45 that were previously undescribed. We additionally reveal that Fusobacterium species may display different lineage-dependent functions in CRC. Specifically, a lineage (designated L1) including F. nucleatum, F. hwasookii, F. periodonticum and their relatives (rather than any particular species alone) is overabundant in tumour samples and faeces from CRC patients, whereas a non-enriched lineage (designated L5) represented by F. varium and F. ulcerans in tumours has a positive association with lymphovascular invasion.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais , Infecções por Fusobacterium , Neoplasias Colorretais/patologia , Fusobacterium/genética , Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia , Infecções por Fusobacterium/patologia , Fusobacterium nucleatum/genética , Humanos
16.
Stomatologiia (Mosk) ; 101(3): 18-21, 2022.
Artigo em Russo | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35640174

RESUMO

THE AIM OF THE STUDY: The study by the method of tissue polymerase chain reaction of the species composition of the microbiota of lesions of the oral mucosa in patients with bullous lesions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Biopsy specimens of the oral mucosa of 51 patients were studied by the polymerase chain reaction method, of which 14 patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 17 patients with pemphigoid bullosa, and 20 patients with the bullous form of ruber lichen planus. 4 types of microorganisms have been identified - Fusobacterium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Ureaplasma spp. and viruses - Human Papillomavirus 16, Epstein-Barr virus and Citomegalovirus. RESULTS: In the study of the microbiota of bullous lesions, associations of microorganisms and viruses were established in a significant number of cases. Associations of Str.pneumoniae and C. albicans were quite common in patients with pemphigus vulgaris in 26.3%, pemphigoid bullosa in 20.0%, and in patients with the bullous form of ruber lichen planus in 14.3% of cases. In patients with pemphigus vulgaris, the association of Str.pneumoniae, C. albicans and EBV was noted in 31.6% of cases. In patients with the bullous form of ruber lichen planus in a high percentage of cases (28.6%), the associations of Str. pneumoniae, EBV and CMV. CONCLUSION: Identification at earlier stages of management of patients with bullous lesions Str. pneumoniae, Candida albicans, and Fusobacterium associated with herpes viruses should be regarded as one of the triggering mechanisms of an autoimmune conflict, which subsequently causes a specific clinical picture of these diseases.


Assuntos
Microbiota , Mucosa Bucal/patologia , Vesícula/microbiologia , Vesícula/virologia , Candida albicans/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Vírus Epstein-Barr/complicações , Infecções por Vírus Epstein-Barr/patologia , Fusobacterium/isolamento & purificação , Herpesvirus Humano 4/isolamento & purificação , Humanos , Líquen Plano/complicações , Líquen Plano/patologia , Mucosa Bucal/microbiologia , Mucosa Bucal/virologia , Penfigoide Bolhoso/patologia , Pênfigo/complicações , Pênfigo/patologia , Streptococcus pneumoniae/isolamento & purificação
17.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(7): 517-523, 2022 07 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35363651

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The past decade has witnessed a rise in Fusobacterium infections. This study aimed to describe the epidemiology, clinical and demographic characteristics and outcomes associated with Fusobacterium infections in hospitalized children in central Israel. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of children <18 years old who had been admitted with a diagnosis of invasive Fusobacterium infection (IFI) between January 2010 and April 2020. Clinical, laboratory and microbiologic data were retrieved. IFI diagnosis was based upon microbiological identification in any specimen by culture or by 16S ribosomal RNA polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Fifty-one children (26 boys) with a median age of 3 years (range, 5-16 years) were included. Hospitalizations for IFI increased from 19 of 100,000 admissions between 2010 and 2015 to 50 of 100,000 between 2016 and 2020, representing a 2.5-fold increase. Most of the infections were from an otogenic source (n = 28, 55%) followed by an oropharyngeal/respiratory source (n = 21, 41%). The most common complications were subperiosteal and epidural abscesses (41% and 37%, respectively). Thrombosis was diagnosed in 11 children, 10 of whom had sinus vein thrombosis. All had an otogenic source. Children with otogenic compared with all other infection sources were significantly younger (median age of 1.9 vs. 3 years; P < 0.001). Forty-seven children (92%) underwent a surgical intervention. All patients survived, one with neurologic sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: The admissions for IFI in children increased 2.5-fold during the last decade. The most common source is otogenic, especially among younger children, and it is associated with high complication rates. Current management, including combinations of antibiotics and surgical interventions, leads to favorable outcome.


Assuntos
Abscesso Epidural , Infecções por Fusobacterium , Adolescente , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Abscesso Epidural/complicações , Fusobacterium , Infecções por Fusobacterium/diagnóstico , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
18.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266610, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35421136

RESUMO

Infections caused by Fusobacterium species are rare; however serious infections with complications or mortality may occur occasionally. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the clinical features of patients with Fusobacterium infections and the differences between infections caused by the species F. necrophorum, F. nucleatum, and F. varium. Additionally, we attempted to identify risk factors for Fusobacterium-associated mortality. This study included all patients at a large tertiary care teaching hospital in South Korea with Fusobacterium infections from January 2006 to April 2021. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome data were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for in-hospital mortality associated with F. nucleatum and F. varium infections. We identified 272 patients with Fusobacterium infections during the study period. The number of Fusobacterium cases has increased recently, with F. varium infections markedly increasing since 2016 and causing a significant proportion of infections. Patients with F. varium infections were older and had a higher proportion of nosocomial infections than the other groups. The F. nucleatum and F. varium groups showed higher in-hospital mortality than the F. necrophorum group. Through logistic regression analysis, APACHE II score and serum albumin level were considered risk factors for in-hospital mortality. APACHE II score was positively correlated with age, red cell distribution width, and serum blood urea nitrogen, and negatively correlated with serum albumin level. Infections caused by Fusobacterium species are increasing. F. varium causes a significant proportion of severe infections.


Assuntos
Infecções por Fusobacterium , Fusobacterium , Infecções por Fusobacterium/complicações , Infecções por Fusobacterium/microbiologia , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Albumina Sérica
19.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 5284, 2022 03 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35347182

RESUMO

Peri-implantitis has a polymicrobial etiology and is a major cause of dental implant loss. Various clinical protocols for its prevention and treatment have been proposed; however, some cases show a rapid progression with non-resolving clinical symptoms. To clear a means of differentiating between such cases, the implants with peri-implantitis in this study were categorized as the active group and the remission group and that two kinds of samples were obtained from the same subjects (n = 20). The microbiome was analyzed through pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. From LEfSe results, Porphyomonas, Fusobacterium, Treponema, Tannerella, and other periodontal pathogens were abundant in the active group, while lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillales and Bifidobacterium) were abundant in the remission group.


Assuntos
Microbiota , Peri-Implantite , Fusobacterium/genética , Humanos , Microbiota/genética , Peri-Implantite/etiologia , Peri-Implantite/terapia , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Treponema/genética
20.
BMC Microbiol ; 22(1): 63, 2022 02 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35216552

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The microbiome alterations are associated with cancer growth and may influence the immune system and response to therapy. Particularly, the gut microbiome has been recently shown to modulate response to melanoma immunotherapy. However, the role of the skin microbiome has not been well explored in the skin tumour microenvironment and the link between the gut microbiome and skin microbiome has not been investigated in melanoma progression. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine associations between dysbiosis in the skin and gut microbiome and the melanoma growth using MeLiM porcine model of melanoma progression and spontaneous regression. RESULTS: Parallel analysis of cutaneous microbiota and faecal microbiota of the same individuals was performed in 8 to 12 weeks old MeLiM piglets. The bacterial composition of samples was analysed by high throughput sequencing of the V4-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene. A significant difference in microbiome diversity and richness between melanoma tissue and healthy skin and between the faecal microbiome of MeLiM piglets and control piglets were observed. Both Principal Coordinate Analysis and Non-metric multidimensional scaling revealed dissimilarities between different bacterial communities. Linear discriminant analysis effect size at the genus level determined different potential biomarkers in multiple bacterial communities. Lactobacillus, Clostridium sensu stricto 1 and Corynebacterium 1 were the most discriminately higher genera in the healthy skin microbiome, while Fusobacterium, Trueperella, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Bacteroides were discriminately abundant in melanoma tissue microbiome. Bacteroides, Fusobacterium and Escherichia-Shigella were associated with the faecal microbiota of MeLiM piglets. Potential functional pathways analysis based on the KEGG database indicated significant differences in the predicted profile metabolisms between the healthy skin microbiome and melanoma tissue microbiome. The faecal microbiome of MeLiM piglets was enriched by genes related to membrane transports pathways allowing for the increase of intestinal permeability and alteration of the intestinal mucosal barrier. CONCLUSION: The associations between melanoma progression and dysbiosis in the skin microbiome as well as dysbiosis in the gut microbiome were identified. Results provide promising information for further studies on the local skin and gut microbiome involvement in melanoma progression and may support the development of new therapeutic approaches.


Assuntos
Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Melanoma , Microbiota , Animais , Bactérias/genética , Disbiose/microbiologia , Fezes/microbiologia , Fusobacterium , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Suínos , Microambiente Tumoral
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