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1.
Salud Colect ; 20: e4843, 2024 Jun 10.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38972073

RESUMO

A whole series of processes lead to the decrease in the use of traditional medicine by the indigenous peoples of Mexico, including the reduction in the number of traditional healers and the direct and indirect expansion of biomedicine. This essay addresses the central role these processes play in the relations of hegemony/subalternity that occur in different fields of reality, and especially in the health-illness-care-prevention processes, given that counter-hegemonic processes are not generated, or those that do arise have been ineffective in confronting social hegemony in general and biomedical hegemony in particular.


Toda una serie de procesos conducen a la disminución del uso de la medicina tradicional por los pueblos indígenas de México, incluyendo la reducción del número de curadores tradicionales y la expansión directa e indirecta de la biomedicina. En este ensayo se aborda el papel nuclear que tienen estos procesos en las relaciones de hegemonía/subaltenidad que se dan en los diferentes campos de la realidad y, especialmente, en los procesos de salud-enfermedad-atención-prevención, dado que no se generan procesos contrahegemónicos o, los que surgen, han sido ineficaces para enfrentar la hegemonía social en general y biomédica en particular.


Assuntos
Medicina Tradicional , México/etnologia , Humanos , Povos Indígenas , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração
2.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15090, 2024 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956124

RESUMO

Arid and semi-arid areas are among the most threatened ecosystems on the planet. The Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Biosphere Reserve (TCBR), in southeastern Mexico, is an arid and semi-arid area with high biological diversity and human settlements of eight ethnic groups. Two rivers drain the reserve, Río Grande (RG) and Río Salado (RS), which are not subject to water quality monitoring by government agencies; however, measures of water quality of these rivers are needed to focus conservation actions on this resource. This work aimed to test the effectiveness of participatory water quality monitoring with the participation of three actors: Reserve management leaders, local communities, and academics, to monitoring water quality in the rivers of the TCBR. Ninety-two residents were trained to carry out water quality biomonitoring using the Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP) index calibrated for the reserve. The BMWP uses macroinvertebrate families to display numerical and categorical water quality scores. Additionally, the Water Quality Index (WQI) was assessed and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of the riparian zones was estimated in each study site. The mean WQI scores were 69.24 for RS (no treatment necessary for most crops and necessary treatment for public water supply) and 75.16 for RG (minor purification for crops requiring high-quality water and necessary treatment for public water supply). The BMWP showed five water quality categories (Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair, and Poor), showing higher water quality scores in the upper portion of the basins and capable of discriminating study sites with lower scores close to human settlements. At one study site, data from participatory monitoring impelled actions taken to address a pollution source and influenced policy focus, reaching the maximum level of participatory-based monitoring. This led to avoid the discharge of wastewater into the river to conserve and protect the water resource. WQI is closely related to BMWP; however, the latter was far more sensitive to detecting areas affected by domestic water discharges. The NDVI presented low values for the TCBR, being lower in RS (the driest area). Although the NDVI showed a weak relationship with BMWP values, areas with higher NDVI values generally achieved higher BMWP values. The results of this study highlight the high sensitivity of the BMWP to detect several water quality conditions in the rivers running through the TCBR when compared to WQI. In addition, the usefulness of biomonitoring using the BMWP index was evident, as well as the importance of the participation of local inhabitants contributing to the knowledge of water quality in biosphere reserves and carrying out timely measures that allow the rivers in these reserves to be maintained in good condition.


Assuntos
Ciência do Cidadão , Povos Indígenas , Rios , Qualidade da Água , México , Humanos , Ecossistema , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/métodos , Monitoramento Ambiental/métodos , Abastecimento de Água/normas , Monitoramento Biológico/métodos , Clima Desértico
3.
Popul Health Metr ; 22(1): 15, 2024 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38992670

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The gaps in healthy life expectancy (HLE) between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians are significant. Detailed and accurate information is required to develop strategies that will close these health disparities. This paper aims to quantify and compare the causes and their relative contributions to the life expectancy (LE) gaps between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous population in the Northern Territory (NT), Australia. METHODS: The age-cause decomposition was used to analyse the differences in HLE and unhealthy life expectancy (ULE), where LE = HLE + ULE. The data was sourced from the burden of disease and injury study in the NT between 2014 and 2018. RESULTS: In 2014-2018, the HLE at birth in the NT Indigenous population was estimated at 43.3 years in males and 41.4 years in females, 26.5 and 33.5 years shorter than the non-Indigenous population. This gap approximately doubled the LE gap (14.0 years in males, 16.6 years in females) at birth. In contrast to LE and HLE, ULE at birth was longer in the Indigenous than non-Indigenous population. The leading causes of the ULE gap at birth were endocrine conditions (explaining 2.9-4.4 years, 23-26%), followed by mental conditions in males and musculoskeletal conditions in females (1.92 and 1.94 years, 15% and 12% respectively), markedly different from the causes of the LE gap (cardiovascular disease, cancers and unintentional injury). CONCLUSIONS: The ULE estimates offer valuable insights into the patterns of morbidity particularly useful in terms of primary and secondary prevention.


Assuntos
Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Expectativa de Vida , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto , Idoso , Adolescente , Adulto Jovem , Austrália , Criança , Lactente , Northern Territory/epidemiologia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Pré-Escolar , Recém-Nascido , Povos Indígenas
4.
BMC Womens Health ; 24(1): 388, 2024 Jul 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38965526

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chronic pelvic pain is a common disease that affects approximately 4% of women of reproductive age in developed countries. This number is estimated to be higher in developing countries, with a significant negative personal and socioeconomic impact on women. The lack of data on this condition in several countries, particularly those in development and in socially and biologically vulnerable populations such as the indigenous, makes it difficult to guide public policies. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of chronic pelvic pain (dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, non-cyclical pain) and identify which variables are independently associated with the presence of the condition in indigenous women from Otavalo-Ecuador. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was carried out including a sample of 2429 women of reproductive age between 14 and 49 years old, obtained from April 2022 to March 2023. A directed questionnaire was used, collected by bilingual interviewers (Kichwa and Spanish) belonging to the community itself; the number of patients was selected by random sampling proportional to the number of women estimated by sample calculation. Data are presented as case prevalence, odds ratio, and 95% confidence interval, with p < 0.05. RESULTS: The prevalence of primary dysmenorrhea, non-cyclic pelvic pain, and dyspareunia was, respectively, 26.6%, 8.9%, and 3.9%.all forms of chronic pain were independently associated with each other. Additionally, dysmenorrhoea was independently associated with hypertension, intestinal symptoms, miscegenation, long cycles, previous pregnancy, use of contraceptives and pear body shape. Pain in other sites, late menarche, exercise, and pear body shape were associated with non-cyclic pelvic pain. And, urinary symptoms, previous pregnancy loss, miscegenation, and pear body shape were associated with dyspareunia. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of primary dysmenorrhea and non-cyclical chronic pelvic pain was notably high, in contrast with the frequency of reported dyspareunia. Briefly, our results suggest an association between dysmenorrhoea and conditions related to inflammatory and/or systemic metabolic disorders, including a potential causal relationship with other manifestations of pelvic pain, and between non-cyclical pelvic pain and signs/symptoms suggesting central sensitization. The report of dyspareunia may be influenced by local cultural values and beliefs.


Assuntos
Dor Crônica , Dismenorreia , Dor Pélvica , Humanos , Feminino , Adulto , Dor Pélvica/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Prevalência , Adulto Jovem , Dor Crônica/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Equador/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Dismenorreia/epidemiologia , Dispareunia/epidemiologia , Povos Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
5.
Syst Rev ; 13(1): 181, 2024 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39010189

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Historically, Indigenous voices have been silent in health research, reflective of colonial academic institutions that privilege Western ways of knowing. However, Indigenous methodologies and methods with an emphasis on the active involvement of Indigenous peoples and centering Indigenous voices are gaining traction in health education and research. In this paper, we map each phase of our scoping review process and weave Indigenous research methodologies into Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) framework for conducting scoping reviews. METHODS: Guided by an advisory circle consisting of Indigenous Knowledge Keepers and allied scholars, we utilized both Indigenous and Western methods to conduct a scoping review. As such, a circle of Knowledge Keepers provided guidance and informed our work, while our methods of searching and scoping the literature remained consistent with PRISMA-ScR guidelines. In keeping with an Indigenous methodology, the scoping review protocol was not registered allowing for an organic development of the research process. RESULTS: We built upon Arksey and O'Malley's 5-stages and added an additional 3 steps for a combined 8-stage model to guide our research: (1) Exploration and Listening, (2) Doing the Groundwork, (3) Identifying and Refining the Research Question, (4) Identifying Relevant Studies, (5) Study Selection, (6) Mapping Data, (7) Collating, Summarizing and Synthesizing the Data, and lastly, (8) Sharing and Making Meaning. Engagement and listening, corresponding to Arksey and O'Malley (2005)'s optional "consultation stage," was embedded throughout, but with greater intensity in stages 1 and 8. CONCLUSION: An Indigenous approach to conducting a scoping review includes forming a team with a wide array of experience in both Indigenous and Western methodologies, meaningful Indigenous representation, and inclusion of Indigenous perspectives to shape the analysis and presentation of findings. Engaging Indigenous peoples throughout the entire research process, listening, and including Indigenous voices and perspectives is vital in reconciliation research, producing both credible and useable information for both Indigenous communities and academia. Our Indigenous methodology for conducting a scoping review can serve as a valuable framework for summarizing Indigenous health-related research.


Assuntos
Povos Indígenas , Humanos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Literatura de Revisão como Assunto , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
6.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 16291, 2024 Jul 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39009685

RESUMO

Hard-to-reach communities represent Peru's main challenge for malaria elimination, but information about transmission in these areas is scarce. Here, we assessed Plasmodium vivax (Pv) and P. falciparum (Pf) transmission dynamics, resistance markers, and Pf hrp2/3 deletions in Nueva Jerusalén (NJ), a remote, indigenous community in the Peruvian Amazon with high population mobility. We collected samples from November 2019 to May 2020 by active (ACD) and passive case detection (PCD) in NJ. Parasites were identified with microscopy and PCR. Then, we analyzed a representative set of positive-PCR samples (Pv = 68, Pf = 58) using highly-multiplexed deep sequencing assays (AmpliSeq) and compared NJ parasites with ones from other remote Peruvian areas using population genetics indexes. The ACD intervention did not reduce malaria cases in the short term, and persistent malaria transmission was observed (at least one Pv infection was detected in 96% of the study days). In Nueva Jerusalen, the Pv population had modest genetic diversity (He = 0.27). Pf population had lower diversity (He = 0.08) and presented temporal clustering, one of these clusters linked to an outbreak in February 2020. Moreover, Pv and Pf parasites from NJ exhibited variable levels of differentiation (Pv Fst = 0.07-0.52 and Pf Fst = 0.11-0.58) with parasites from other remote areas. No artemisin resistance mutations but chloroquine (57%) and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (35-67%) were detected in NJ's Pf parasites. Moreover, pfhrp2/3 gene deletions were common (32-50% of parasites with one or both genes deleted). The persistent Pv transmission and the detection of a Pf outbreak with parasites genetically distinct from the local ones highlight the need for tailored interventions focusing on mobility patterns and imported infections in remote areas to eliminate malaria in the Peruvian Amazon.


Assuntos
Malária Falciparum , Malária Vivax , Plasmodium falciparum , Plasmodium vivax , Proteínas de Protozoários , Peru/epidemiologia , Humanos , Plasmodium falciparum/genética , Plasmodium falciparum/isolamento & purificação , Plasmodium vivax/genética , Plasmodium vivax/isolamento & purificação , Malária Falciparum/epidemiologia , Malária Falciparum/parasitologia , Malária Falciparum/transmissão , Malária Vivax/epidemiologia , Malária Vivax/parasitologia , Malária Vivax/transmissão , Proteínas de Protozoários/genética , Feminino , Masculino , Criança , Adulto , Antimaláricos/uso terapêutico , Antimaláricos/farmacologia , Adolescente , Resistência a Medicamentos/genética , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Povos Indígenas/genética , Adulto Jovem , Pré-Escolar , Genômica/métodos , Variação Genética , Antígenos de Protozoários/genética
8.
Nutrients ; 16(13)2024 Jun 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38999754

RESUMO

Urban Indigenous populations encounter distinctive challenges in maintaining traditional dietary practices, compounded by the complexities of socio-economic and environmental factors and the modern urban lifestyle. This qualitative study explores the perceptions of healthy eating, along with the facilitators and barriers to such practices, among urban Indigenous peoples in Saskatoon, Regina, and Prince Albert. Through virtual interviews, we engage 14 participants from these cities. Utilizing NVivo for thematic coding, we apply inductive thematic analysis to reveal relevant themes. The study highlights a preference for nutrient-rich, natural, and minimally processed foods, with a significant emphasis on incorporating traditional Indigenous foods into diets. These preferences are deeply entwined with cultural identity and underscore the importance of traditional foods in maintaining cultural heritage and promoting well-being. Despite the intrinsic value of these traditional foods, participants face several barriers to healthy eating, including economic constraints, limited access to traditional foods, and the psychological impacts of historical trauma. Nevertheless, facilitators such as community and family support, engagement in traditional food practices, and a growing awareness of nutritional knowledge are identified as being crucial in supporting healthy dietary choices. This research underscores the complex interplay of cultural, economic, and environmental factors in shaping the dietary practices of urban Indigenous peoples.


Assuntos
Dieta Saudável , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , População Urbana , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Dieta Saudável/psicologia , Dieta Saudável/etnologia , Saskatchewan , Adulto , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Povos Indígenas/psicologia , Preferências Alimentares/etnologia , Preferências Alimentares/psicologia , Adulto Jovem , Comportamento Alimentar/etnologia , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia
10.
J Med Virol ; 96(7): e29795, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39007429

RESUMO

Despite increased risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections and higher rates of COVID-19-related complications, racialized and Indigenous communities in Canada have lower immunization uptake compared to White individuals. However, there is woeful lack of data on predictors of COVID-19 vaccine mistrust (VM) that accounts for diverse social and cultural contexts within specific racialized and Indigenous communities. Therefore, we sought to characterize COVID-19 VM among Arab, Asian, Black, and Indigenous communities in Canada. An online survey was administered to a nationally representative, ethnically diverse panel of participants in October 2023. Arabic, Asian, Indigenous, and Black respondents were enriched in the sampling panel. Data were collected on demographics, COVID-19 VM, experience of racial discrimination, health literacy, and conspiracy beliefs. We used descriptive and regression analyses to determine the extent and predictors of COVID-19 VM among racialized and Indigenous individuals. All racialized respondents had higher VM score compared to White participants. Among 4220 respondents, we observed highest VM among Black individuals (12.18; ±4.24), followed by Arabic (12.12; ±4.60), Indigenous (11.84; ±5.18), Asian (10.61; ±4.28), and White (9.58; ±5.00) participants. In the hierarchical linear regression analyses, Black participants, women, everyday racial discrimination, and major experience of discrimination were positively associated with COVID-19 VM. Effects of racial discrimination were mediated by addition of conspiracy beliefs to the model. Racialized and Indigenous communities experience varying levels of COVID-19 VM and carry specific predictors and mediators to development of VM. This underscores the intricate interaction between race, gender, discrimination, and VM that need to be considered in future vaccination campaigns.


Assuntos
Árabes , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , COVID-19 , Letramento em Saúde , Povos Indígenas , Racismo , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Adulto , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , COVID-19/etnologia , Canadá/epidemiologia , Vacinas contra COVID-19/administração & dosagem , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Povos Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Confiança , Adulto Jovem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Idoso , Povo Asiático , População Negra/estatística & dados numéricos , População Negra/psicologia , SARS-CoV-2/imunologia , Vacinação/psicologia , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Etnicidade
11.
Med J Aust ; 221(1): 61-67, 2024 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38946651

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To better understand what knowledge translation activities are effective and meaningful to Indigenous communities and what is required to advance knowledge translation in health research with, for, and by Indigenous communities. STUDY DESIGN: Workshop and collaborative yarning. SETTING: Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health Conference, Cairns, June 2023. PARTICIPANTS: About 70 conference delegates, predominantly Indigenous people involved in research and Indigenous health researchers who shared their knowledge, experiences, and recommendations for knowledge translation through yarning and knowledge sharing. RESULTS: Four key themes were developed using thematic analysis: knowledge translation is fundamental to research and upholding community rights; knowledge translation approaches must be relevant to local community needs and ways of mobilising knowledge; researchers and research institutions must be accountable for ensuring knowledge translation is embedded, respected and implemented in ways that address community priorities; and knowledge translation must be planned and evaluated in ways that reflect Indigenous community measures of success. CONCLUSION: Knowledge translation is fundamental to making research matter, and critical to ethical research. It must be embedded in all stages of research practice. Effective knowledge translation approaches are Indigenous-led and move beyond Euro-Western academic metrics. Institutions, funding bodies, and academics should embed structures required to uphold Indigenous knowledge translation. We join calls for reimaging health and medical research to embed Indigenous knowledge translation as a prerequisite for generative knowledge production that makes research matter.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Pesquisa Translacional Biomédica , Humanos , Austrália , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração , Povos Indígenas , Povos Aborígenes Australianos e Ilhéus do Estreito de Torres
13.
BMC Res Notes ; 17(1): 194, 2024 Jul 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38997757

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of diabetes in a clinical population of primarily Indigenous women in Guatemala. RESULTS: In a retrospective chart review of a clinical program serving 13,643 primarily Indigenous women in Guatemala, crude diabetes prevalence was 8.3% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 7.8 to 8.7) and age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was 7.9% (95% CI: 7.3 to 8.5). Among those with diabetes, 37.9% (95% CI: 35.1 to 40.8) of women were undiagnosed. Diabetes prevalence rose significantly with increasing age and was significantly higher among women with obesity (risk ratio: 1.4 [95% CI: 1.1 to 1.8]) and among women least likely to be in poverty (risk ratio: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.5 to 2.6]). Diabetes prevalence was significantly lower among Indigenous women (risk ratio: 0.7 [95% CI: 0.6 to 0.9]) and among women who spoke Mayan languages rather than Spanish (risk ratio: 0.7 [95% CI: 0.6 to 0.9]). There was no significant difference in diabetes prevalence between women who lived in rural settings and women who lived in urban settings.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Humanos , Feminino , Guatemala/epidemiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Prevalência , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/etnologia , Idoso , Povos Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Obesidade/etnologia , Fatores de Risco
14.
Multimedia | Recursos Multimídia | ID: multimedia-13192

RESUMO

Durante a Oficina do Projeto BVS Saúde Indígena (TA4/TC93), realizada pela BIREME/OPAS/OMS com SESAI/MS no Dia Nacional dos Povos Indígenas, Giovana Cruz Mandulão, Coordenadora-Geral de Gestão do Conhecimento, da Informação, da Avaliação e do Monitoramento da Secretaria de Saúde Indígena, realiza intervenção em homenagem e defesa dos povos indígenas do Brasil.


Assuntos
Brasil/etnologia , Direitos Humanos , Indígenas Sul-Americanos , Território Sociocultural , Povos Indígenas , Violência Étnica , Discurso , Saúde de Populações Indígenas
15.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1390210, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38932776

RESUMO

Introduction: Injecting methamphetamine poses significant health risks, but little is known about how methamphetamine injectors filter their injection preparations and experience related health concerns. Methods: A chain-referral sample of Indigenous people who inject methamphetamine (n = 30) was recruited and semistructured interviews were conducted to collect information on filtration practices and health concerns. Results: Filtration of the injection preparation was described by 53% of injectors. Elevated levels of concern for kidney disease, cancer and heart disease were observed among those who filtered their preparations (ranging from 50 to 56.3%). Concern about liver disease was the most frequent concern among those who filtered their preparations (62.5%) and was elevated in comparison to those who did not use filters (7.1%). Grouped logistic regression revealed a positive association between filtration of the injection preparation and overall health concerns expressed by injectors, after adjusting for gender and age. The marginal posterior distribution of the adjusted odds ratio for filtration of the injection preparation had a posterior median = 35.7, and 95% HPD interval = (5.1, 512.4). Discussion: Results illustrate a positive relationship between filtration of the injection preparation and health concerns among Indigenous people who inject methamphetamine. This likely reflects the use of filtration to reduce harms, and further research is needed to understand the full scope of prevention that may be associated with filtration of methamphetamine injection preparations.


Assuntos
Metanfetamina , Abuso de Substâncias por Via Intravenosa , Humanos , Metanfetamina/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Filtração , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Povos Indígenas , Adulto Jovem , Entrevistas como Assunto
16.
Health Hum Rights ; 26(1): 57-70, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38933227

RESUMO

Grounded in human rights approaches, truth and reconciliation commissions (TRCs) explore an event or process that did widespread and systematic intentional harm to a group of people. Health as a fundamental right is an important component addressed by TRCs. Yet despite TRCs often having recommendations for health care systems, it is unknown how well these recommendations are being translated within health care settings. Therefore, the overarching purpose of our scoping review was to identify academic articles that discussed health care system discourse or responses to TRCs in the context of Indigenous Peoples. Our thematic analysis of the included articles identified three main themes for health care system responses to TRCs: (1) the acknowledgment of multiple ways of knowing, being, and doing in health systems; (2) current interventions as responses within health systems; and (3) suggestions for change within health systems. Although a TRC may create a specific road map and mandate for health care systems, we found considerable variability in the uptake of these actions across institutions. Concerted efforts within and around health care systems and across sectors are therefore necessary to achieve large-scale, meaningful change for Indigenous Peoples post-TRCs and to maintain accountability as a foundational human rights principle.


Assuntos
Atenção à Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Direitos Humanos , Povos Indígenas , Humanos , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração
17.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 83(1): 2372123, 2024 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38917207

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic posed a grave threat not only to Indigenous people's health and well-being, but also to Indigenous communities and societies. This applies also to the Indigenous peoples of the Arctic, where unintentional effects of public health actions to mitigate the spread of virus may have long-lasting effects on vulnerable communities. This study aim was to identify and describe Sámi perspectives on how the Sámi society in Sweden was specifically affected by the pandemic and associated public health actions during 2020-2021. A mixed-method qualitative case study approach was employed, including a media scoping review and stakeholder interviews. The media scoping review included 93 articles, published online or in print, from January 2020 to 1 September 2021, in Swedish or Norwegian, regarding the pandemic-related impacts on Sámi society in Sweden. The review informed a purposeful selection of 15 stakeholder qualitative interviews. Thematic analysis of the articles and interview transcripts generated five subthemes and two main themes: "weathering the storm" and "stressing Sámi culture and society". These reflect social dynamics which highlight stressors towards, and resilience within, the Sámi society during the pandemic. The results may be useful when evaluating and developing public health crisis response plans concerning or affecting the Sámi society in Sweden.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Regiões Árticas/epidemiologia , Suécia/epidemiologia , SARS-CoV-2 , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Povos Indígenas/psicologia , Pandemias , Saúde Pública
18.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e083448, 2024 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38839385

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Indigenous people experience a unique set of health inequalities and social determinants that can negatively affect their physical health, mental health and wellness. This critical state of affairs is compounded by the limited availability of culturally appropriate care services and treatments for the different groups. In response, increasing numbers of studies are turning their focus to art-based interventions and how these might benefit Indigenous lives. The proposed scoping review aims to map this growing field of research. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review is based on the Arksey and O'Malley methodological framework and the subsequent enhancements proposed by Levac et al. Academic databases and grey literature sources will be searched to identify appropriate studies for inclusion. The search strategies of all databases were tested on 25 April 2024. This will be followed by a two-step screening process to be conducted by two researchers and consisting of (1) a title and abstract review and (2) a full-text review. Data from the selected studies will be extracted, collated and charted to summarise all relevant interventions, their outcomes and key findings. An Indigenous research partner will be hired as a consultant, and the research will be further informed by other stakeholders. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study is the first step in a research programme involving working with Indigenous artists to codesign a pilot art-based intervention aimed at improving mental health and wellness among Indigenous people. The scoping review will identify the specific components in documented art-based interventions that have proven beneficial to this group. Since it will draw exclusively on data from published and public sources, no ethics approval is required. The results will be disseminated through knowledge translation activities with Indigenous organisations and art therapy groups; a summary of the results will also be distributed through Indigenous networks.


Assuntos
Arteterapia , Povos Indígenas , Humanos , Arteterapia/métodos , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Projetos de Pesquisa , Literatura de Revisão como Assunto
19.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0302153, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38848414

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Cervical cancer, a malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus, disproportionally affects women from low resource settings. Persistence of human papillomavirus infection may mediate an association between tobacco use and cervical cancer. In limited resource settings, women from indigenous communities are often marginalized and do not benefit from evidence-based interventions to prevent tobacco use or cervical cancer due to the limited reach of mainstream healthcare services to these communities. This study determined the association between smoking and high-risk human papillomavirus infection among women from indigenous communities in western Botswana. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of women in indigenous communities was conducted between June and October 2022. Demographic, clinical and self-reported smoking data were collected. Cervical cytology and HPV DNA testing for high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes were performed. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression models were fit to evaluate the association between smoking and high-risk human papillomavirus infection while adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 171 participants with a median (interquartile range) age of 40 (31-50) years from three settlements and two villages were recruited for the study. Of these, 17% were current smokers, 32.8% were living with HIV and high-risk human papillomavirus DNA was detected in 32.8% of the cervical specimens. Women who were current smokers, were nearly twice as likely to have cervical high-risk human papillomavirus infection compared to non-smokers (Adjusted Odds Ratio (95% CI); 1.74(1.09, 2.79)) after controlling for confounders. CONCLUSION: These data underscore the need for effective tobacco control to help mitigate cervical cancer risk in this setting. These findings can help inform decisions about targeted cervical cancer prevention and tobacco cessation interventions for women from indigenous communities.


Assuntos
Infecções por Papillomavirus , Fumar , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero , Humanos , Feminino , Infecções por Papillomavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Papillomavirus/virologia , Botsuana/epidemiologia , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Transversais , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/virologia , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/epidemiologia , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/etiologia , Neoplasias do Colo do Útero/prevenção & controle , Povos Indígenas/estatística & dados numéricos , Papillomaviridae/isolamento & purificação , Papillomaviridae/genética , Fatores de Risco
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