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1.
Nat Commun ; 15(1): 5537, 2024 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38956413

RESUMO

Circadian gene expression is fundamental to the establishment and functions of the circadian clock, a cell-autonomous and evolutionary-conserved timing system. Yet, how it is affected by environmental-circadian disruption (ECD) such as shiftwork and jetlag are ill-defined. Here, we provided a comprehensive and comparative description of male liver circadian gene expression, encompassing transcriptomes, whole-cell proteomes and nuclear proteomes, under normal and after ECD conditions. Under both conditions, post-translation, rather than transcription, is the dominant contributor to circadian functional outputs. After ECD, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes are the major contributors to whole-cell or nuclear circadian proteome, respectively. Furthermore, ECD re-writes the rhythmicity of 64% transcriptome, 98% whole-cell proteome and 95% nuclear proteome. The re-writing, which is associated with changes of circadian regulatory cis-elements, RNA-processing and protein localization, diminishes circadian regulation of fat and carbohydrate metabolism and persists after one week of ECD-recovery.


Assuntos
Relógios Circadianos , Ritmo Circadiano , Fígado , Proteoma , Animais , Fígado/metabolismo , Proteoma/metabolismo , Masculino , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Ritmo Circadiano/genética , Relógios Circadianos/genética , Relógios Circadianos/fisiologia , Transcriptoma , Camundongos , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Síndrome do Jet Lag/metabolismo , Jornada de Trabalho em Turnos
2.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(7): e2422266, 2024 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39008296

RESUMO

Importance: Misaligned dietary rhythmicity has been associated with metabolic diseases; however, its association with mental health remains largely unexplored. Objective: To examine the association between dietary rhythms and the mental health condition of shift workers, specifically airline crew members. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study analyzed data collected from the Civil Aviation Health Cohort of China, an ongoing large-scale health survey of pilots, flight attendants, and air security officers employed by major airline companies in China. Participants aged 18 to 60 years were invited through text messages to complete a web-based survey. The data collection period was December 2022 to March 2023. Statistical analysis was performed from July 24, 2023, to April 12, 2024. Exposure: Data on timing of breakfast and dinner on workdays and rest days, daily time windows for food intake, and meal and eating jet lags were collected and calculated. Main Outcomes and Measures: Anxiety and depressive symptoms were measured using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Assessment and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regressions were performed to evaluate the associations of anxiety and depression with meal timing, eating window time, meal jet lag (ie, delayed meals), and eating jet lag (ie, delayed eating). All models were adjusted for individual socioeconomic, demographic, and lifestyle characteristics. Results: Of the 22 617 participants (median [IQR] age, 29.1 [26.3-33.7] years; 13 712 males [60.6%]), 1755 (7.8%) had anxiety and 2768 (12.2%) had depression. After controlling for confounding factors, having dinner after 8 pm on morning-shift days was associated with increased odds of anxiety (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.78; 95% CI, 1.53-2.05) and depression (AOR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.78-2.27), compared with consuming dinner before 8 pm. Similar results were observed on night-shift days and rest days. An eating window of less than 12 hours was associated with reduced odds of anxiety (AOR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75-0.93) and depression (AOR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.75-0.89) on morning-shift days; the results remained significant on rest days. Delayed dinner on morning-shift days was associated with increased odds of anxiety (AOR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.13-1.54) and depression (AOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.22-1.58). On night-shift days, delayed dinner was associated with higher odds of anxiety (AOR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.39) and depression (AOR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.36). On morning-shift days, delayed eating rhythms were associated with higher odds of depression (AOR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.13-1.61), whereas advanced eating rhythms were associated with lower odds of anxiety (AOR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.70-0.87). Conclusions and Relevance: This cross-sectional study found that meal timing, long eating window, and meal jet lags were associated with increased odds of depression and anxiety. These findings underscore the need for interventions and supportive policies that help mitigate the adverse implications of shift work and irregular working hours for the mental health of shift workers.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , Depressão , Humanos , Adulto , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Depressão/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , China/epidemiologia , Comportamento Alimentar/psicologia , Adulto Jovem , Adolescente , Dieta/estatística & dados numéricos , Síndrome do Jet Lag/epidemiologia , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Aviação , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/psicologia , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/fisiologia
3.
Trials ; 25(1): 474, 2024 Jul 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38997765

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Social jetlag is a chronic disruption of sleep timing that is characterized by different sleep timing during workdays and free days. Social jetlag has been associated with disturbed glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and increased risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we aim to investigate whether a combination of bright light therapy in the morning, bright light reduction in the evening and sleep advance instructions for 3 weeks reduces social jetlag and if this results in improvement of glycemic and metabolic control, sleep, mood and quality of life after 3 and 12 weeks in people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes and to assess possible mediators, compared to regular sleep habits. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes with > 1 h social jetlag will be recruited. The intervention consists of bright light therapy (5000 lx) emitted by Vitamine-L (Lumie, UK) for 30 min each morning, combined with the advice to follow sleep advance instructions and to wear bright light-dimming goggles every evening for a period of 3 weeks. The control group adheres to their regular sleep habits and conditions. The primary outcome is glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) after 12 weeks comparing the intervention and control in an intention-to-treat analysis. Secondary outcomes at 3 and 12 weeks are (1) social jetlag; (2) insulin sensitivity, fasting blood glucose, glucose-lowering medication use, and frequency of perceived hypoglycemia; (3) metabolic outcomes, including body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat percentage, and blood pressure; (4) mood, including depression, fatigue and anxiety (measured with questionnaires); and (5) quality of life measured using EQ5D questionnaire. To assess other factors that might play a role as possible mediators, we will measure (para)sympathetic nervous system activity assessed with ECGs and electrochemical skin conductance tests, sleep quality and sleep phase distribution assessed with a sleep measuring headband (ZMax), the Dim Light Melatonin Onset in saliva samples (in a subgroup) at 3 and 12 weeks, the feeling of satiety and satiation with a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), diet using a food frequency questionnaire, and physical activity using an accelerometer (ActiGraph). DISCUSSION: Social jetlag can contribute to poorer glycemic control and metabolic control in those with type 2 diabetes. With this intervention, we aim to reduce social jetlag and thereby improve glycemic and metabolic control. This could offer a way to improve overall population health and to reduce the disease burden of type 2 diabetes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN registry ISRCTN11967109 . Registered on 9 May 2024.


Assuntos
Glicemia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2 , Hemoglobinas Glicadas , Estado Pré-Diabético , Qualidade de Vida , Sono , Humanos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Estado Pré-Diabético/terapia , Glicemia/metabolismo , Hemoglobinas Glicadas/metabolismo , Fatores de Tempo , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Afeto , Resultado do Tratamento , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto , Ritmo Circadiano
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38928916

RESUMO

Lifestyle factors, including sleep characteristics, have been implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome, particularly among shift workers. This study aimed to explore the relationship between shift work, sleep duration, social jetlag, and the risk of metabolic syndrome among U.S. workers and the moderating effect of sleep duration and social jetlag on this relationship. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2017-2020 March were analyzed. Poisson regression models were employed to examine associations. Among 4136 U.S. workers, 53.3% had metabolic syndrome, with a higher proportion of shift workers (63.8% vs. 56.7%, p = 0.001) and those sleeping less than 6 h or more than 9 h per week (22.3% vs. 19.1%, p = 0.044) in the affected group. Shift workers were initially found to have an increased risk of metabolic syndrome (Coef. = 0.03, 95% CI: 0.02, 0.16); however, this association was mitigated when accounting for the interaction with social jetlag. Specifically, 1 to <2 h of social jetlag interacted significantly, increasing metabolic risk (Coef. = 0.15, 95% CI: 0.09, 0.22), whereas 1 to <2 h alone showed a protective effect (Coef. = -0.11, 95% CI: -0.17, -0.06). These findings suggest that optimizing sleep schedules and addressing social jetlag may be crucial in mitigating metabolic syndrome risks among shift workers.


Assuntos
Síndrome Metabólica , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Sono , Humanos , Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Síndrome Metabólica/etiologia , Masculino , Adulto , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Jornada de Trabalho em Turnos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem , Tolerância ao Trabalho Programado/fisiologia , Duração do Sono
5.
Chronobiol Int ; 41(6): 767-779, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38745423

RESUMO

Sleep timing is an important output of the circadian system. The COVID-19-mandated social restrictions significantly altered commuting time and sleep duration regionally in Japan. This study aimed to elucidate sleep patterns, especially chronotype and social jetlag (SJL), due to changes in social time pressure through the social restrictions between the Metropolitan and Regional areas in Japan. As part of the Global Chrono Corona Survey 2020 (GCCS), the data were collected during social restrictions (SR), but pre-COVID-19 behaviours were also queried retrospectively. We analyzed a cohort of 729 respondents representing both the Metropolitan and the Regional areas separately for workdays and work-free days. While the areas showed no difference in SJL before SR, the differential decrease was larger in the Metropolitan area during SR, resulting in a significant difference in SJL between the areas. The outdoor light exposure before SR was 30 min longer in the Metropolitan areas than in the Regional; during SR both areas showed similarly low (below 1 h) outdoor light exposures. The variables associated with decreased SJL were the Metropolitan areas, work-from-home, a no-usage alarm clock on workdays, and chronotypes (mid-sleep time on free days corrected for sleep deficit accumulated over the workweek, MSFsc) during SR. The results suggest that relaxed social schedules, as reflected in the increased frequency of work-from-home and reduced alarm clock use, and moving towards earlier MSFsc during SR were linked to decreased SJL and were more prominent in the Metropolitan areas. This study provides insights into sleep patterns and the social time pressure markers, by comparison between residential groups in Japan.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Ritmo Circadiano , Sono , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Japão/epidemiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , SARS-CoV-2 , Estudos Retrospectivos , Síndrome do Jet Lag/epidemiologia , Síndrome do Jet Lag/fisiopatologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
6.
Chronobiol Int ; 41(6): 829-839, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38771191

RESUMO

Academic performance plays a crucial role in long-term educational attainment and occupational function. Chronotype refers to an individual's daily tendencies for times for waking, activity, and sleep. Social jetlag reflects the mismatch between an individual's chronotype and their social schedule. Because school typically starts early in the morning, later chronotype is often associated with daytime sleepiness, insufficient sleep, and poor academic performance. However, the relationship between academic performance, chronotype, and social jetlag has not been extensively examined in large samples like the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. We hypothesized that greater social jetlag would predict poorer cognitive and academic performance. Year 2 (ages 11-14) cross-sectional data from the ABCD cohort (n = 6,890 adolescents) were used to evaluate academic performance (i.e. self-reported past year grades), NIH Toolbox cognitive performance measures, chronotype, and social jetlag from the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. We found that later chronotype and greater social jetlag predicted poorer cognitive and academic performance with small effect sizes. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual differences in chronotype and social jetlag when designing class schedules, as aligning school activities with student optimal sleep-wake times may contribute to improved academic performance.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Ritmo Circadiano , Cognição , Sono , Humanos , Adolescente , Masculino , Feminino , Cognição/fisiologia , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Encéfalo/fisiologia , Encéfalo/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Desenvolvimento do Adolescente/fisiologia , Comportamento Social , Síndrome do Jet Lag
7.
Sleep Med ; 119: 549-555, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38810480

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Social jetlag, the misalignment between biological and social rhythms, can lead to adverse health outcomes. This study explored the association between social jetlag and hazardous alcohol consumption, as well as the sex differences in this association. METHODS: This study included a nationally representative sample of Korean workers consisting of 11,462 individuals (5479 women). Social jetlag was calculated as the difference in the mid-point between sleep onset and offset on free days and workdays. Hazardous alcohol consumption was determined using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Consumption (range 0-12), with a cutoff of ≥6 for men, ≥5 for women, and ≥3 for those aged ≥65. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Among men, 599 out of 5983 individuals (10.0 %) had ≥120 min of social jetlag. Among women, 550 out of 5479 individuals (10.0 %) had ≥120 min of social jetlag. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use was 56.2 % for men and 27.3 % for women. In the regression analysis, there was a significant sex interaction, where social jetlag ≥120 min was associated with hazardous alcohol consumption in female workers (OR: 1.52, 95 % CI: 1.18-1.96), but not in male workers (OR: 1.04, 95 % CI: 0.84-1.29). CONCLUSION: High social jetlag was associated with an increased likelihood of hazardous alcohol consumption among women. Our findings underscore the importance of considering sex differences in future research and policy interventions regarding social jetlag and its associated behavior outcomes.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Sexuais , Prevalência , Síndrome do Jet Lag/epidemiologia
8.
J Appl Physiol (1985) ; 136(4): 996-1006, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38450426

RESUMO

Social jet lag (SJL) is a misalignment between sleep and wake times on workdays and free days. SJL leads to chronic circadian rhythm disruption and may affect nearly 70% of the general population, leading to increased risk for cardiometabolic diseases. This study investigated the effects of SJL on metabolic health, exercise performance, and exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptations in mice. Ten-week-old C57BL/6J mice (n = 40) were allocated to four groups: control sedentary (CON-SED), control exercise (CON-EX), social jet lag sedentary (SJL-SED), and social jet lag exercise (SJL-EX). CON mice were housed under a 12:12-h light-dark cycle. SJL was simulated by implementing a 4-h phase delay for 3 days to simulate "weekends," followed by a 4-h phase advance back to "weekdays," for 6 wk. EX mice had free access to a running wheel. Graded exercise tests (GXTs) and glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) were performed at baseline and after intervention to monitor the effects of exercise and social jet lag on cardiorespiratory and metabolic health, respectively. SJL led to alterations in activity and running patterns and clock gene expression in skeletal muscle and decreased average running distance (P < 0.05). SJL-SED mice gained significantly more weight compared with CON-SED and SJL-EX mice (P < 0.01). SJL impaired fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance compared with CON mice (P < 0.05), which was partially restored by exercise in SJL-EX mice. SJL also blunted improvements in exercise performance and mitochondrial content in the quadriceps. These data suggest that SJL blunted some cardiometabolic adaptations to exercise and that proper circadian hygiene is necessary for maintaining health and performance.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In mice, disrupting circadian rhythms with social jet lag for 6 wk caused significant weight gain, higher fasting blood glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance compared with control. Voluntary exercise in mice experiencing social jet lag prevented weight gain, though the mice still experienced increased fasting blood glucose and impaired exercise performance compared with trained mice not experiencing social jet lag. Social jet lag seems to be a potent circadian rhythm disruptor that impacts exercise-induced training adaptations.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Humanos , Camundongos , Animais , Síndrome do Jet Lag/genética , Glicemia , Camundongos Endogâmicos C57BL , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Aumento de Peso
9.
Chronobiol Int ; 41(4): 485-494, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38353208

RESUMO

This study evaluates how food addiction is related to chronotype, social jetlag, and psychological pain. Of the participants (n = 1,035 university students), 16.6% had a morning chronotype, 25.1% had an evening chronotype, and 25.1% were clinically addicted to eating. The mean sleep durations for participants were 7.41 ± 2.18 h and 8.95 ± 3.0 h on weekdays and weekends, respectively. The mean misalignment time for social jetlag was 1.45 ± 1.5 h. Food addiction, psychological pain, and social jetlag levels were high among participants with the evening chronotype. The risk factors for food addiction included being female, having an evening chronotype, and having high body mass index levels and psychological pain. The total indirect effect of psychological pain and social jetlag on the relationship between chronotype and food addiction was 20.6%. However, the social jetlag effect is relatively minor compared to psychological pain. The significant conclusions of this study are as follows. Clinical food addiction is prevalent among students, and a strong direct correlation between chronotype and food addiction was observed. The study emphasizes the importance of being aware of chronotype and mental status in establishing a healthy diet and lifestyle.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Dependência de Alimentos , Sono , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem , Sono/fisiologia , Dependência de Alimentos/psicologia , Adulto , Estudantes/psicologia , Adolescente , Índice de Massa Corporal , Comportamento Alimentar/fisiologia , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Inquéritos e Questionários , Dor/psicologia , Cronotipo
10.
Chronobiol Int ; 41(4): 473-484, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38353253

RESUMO

In humans, sleep is an essential physiological process for life and survival. The main objective of the current study is to determine the behavioural sleep patterns and social jetlag in elderly adults. The second objective is to define the relationship among subjective sleep quality, mid-sleep timings, social jetlag, and sunlight exposure. We recruited 945 female and 1047 male participants aged ≥ 60 years from 65 rural villages in the Sambalpur district of Odisha, India. The Munich Chrono Type Questionnaire (MCTQ) is a self-reported questionnaire that measures a person's behavioral sleep variables, including social jetlag and chronotype, whereas the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) measures the subjective sleep quality of an individual. We employed MCTQ and PSQI to obtain behavioral sleep variables and subjective sleep quality in the recruited subjects. The behavioral sleep variables were compared using a paired t-test on both work and work-free days. In addition, the behavioral sleep variables as a function of gender were compared using an independent Student's t-test. In the current study, most of the elderly individuals reported both midpoint of sleep on workdays (MSW) and midpoint of sleep on work-free days (MSF) between 00:01-03:00. The averages of mid-sleep timings between workdays and work-free days were not statistically significant. Data on MSFsc (midpoint of sleep on work-free days sleep corrected) indicated that most elderly adults (99.6%) are morning type; they go to bed early and wake up early. The elderly participants from the rural population of Sambalpur district in western Odisha had the least social jetlag and exhibited good subjective sleep quality. It would be worthwhile to find out the determinants of these positive features apropos social jetlag and behavioural sleep patterns.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Qualidade do Sono , Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Idoso , Sono/fisiologia , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Índia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Síndrome do Jet Lag/fisiopatologia , Fatores de Tempo , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , População Rural
11.
Neuroscience ; 543: 1-12, 2024 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38354900

RESUMO

There has been a long history that chronic circadian disruption such as jet lag or shift work negatively affects brain and body physiology. Studies have shown that circadian misalignment act as a risk factor for developing anxiety and mood-related depression-like behavior. Till date, most studies focused on simulating jet lag in model animals under laboratory conditions by repeated phase advances or phase delay only, while the real-life conditions may differ. In the present study, adult male mice were subjected to simulated chronic jet lag (CJL) by alternately advancing and delaying the ambient light-dark (LD) cycle by 9 h every 2 days, thereby covering a total of 24 days. The effect of CJL was then examined for a range of stress and depression-related behavioral and physiological responses. The results showed that mice exposed to CJL exhibited depression-like behavior, such as anhedonia. In the open field and elevated plus maze test, CJL-exposed mice showed increased anxiety behavior compared to LD control. In addition, CJL-exposed mice showed an increased level of serum corticosterone and proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-α in both serum and hippocampus. Moreover, CJL-exposed mice exhibited a reduction in structural complexity of hippocampal CA1 neurons along with decreased expression of neurotrophic growth factors, BDNF and NGF in the hippocampus compared to LD control. Taken together, our findings suggest that simulated chronic jet lag adversely affects structural and functional complexity in hippocampal neurons along with interrelated endocrine and inflammatory responses, ultimately leading to stress, anxiety, and depression-like behavior in mice.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Camundongos , Masculino , Animais , Síndrome do Jet Lag/metabolismo , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Fotoperíodo , Hipocampo/metabolismo , Neurônios/metabolismo
12.
Sleep Health ; 10(1): 122-128, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238123

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Sleep is a critical health-related behavior; research evidence has shown that sleep duration, poor sleep quality and insomnia are associated with aging and relevant age-related diseases. However, the associations between sleep duration, chronotype, sleep disturbance, and biological age have not been comprehensively assessed. This study aimed to examine sleep characteristics with biological age. METHODS: The study included 6534 participants aged 20 years and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2017 and March 2020. Sleep questionnaires were used to collect information on sleep duration and wake behavior on workdays and workfree days and sleep disturbance. Phenotypic age acceleration (PhenoAgeAccel) was estimated as a biological age measure using 9 blood chemistry biomarkers. RESULTS: Long sleep (>9 hours) and extremely short sleep (≤4 hours) on workdays were positively associated with PhenoAgeAccel, compared with optimal sleep duration (7-8 hours). Similar positive associations with PhenoAgeAccel were observed for sleep duration on workfree days and across the whole week. Both slightly evening and evening chronotypes were associated with faster PhenoAgeAccel compared to morning chronotype. Social jetlag and sleep disturbance were not associated with PhenoAgeAccel, while long corrected social jetlag was associated with faster PhenoAgeAccel. The associations of sleep duration, chronotype, and corrected social jetlag with PhenoAgeAccel appeared stronger among females than among males. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest a U-shape relationship between sleep duration and biological aging; slightly evening and evening chronotypes may be risk factors for aging. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília , Masculino , Feminino , Humanos , Cronotipo , Estudos Transversais , Duração do Sono , Inquéritos Nutricionais , Fatores de Tempo , Sono , Síndrome do Jet Lag
13.
Int J Sports Physiol Perform ; 19(2): 212-218, 2024 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38168013

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Transmeridian travel is common for elite athletes participating in competitions and training. However, this travel can lead to circadian misalignment wherein the internal biological clock becomes desynchronized with the light-dark cycle of the new environment, resulting in performance decrement and potential negative health consequences. Existing literature extensively discusses recommendations for managing jet lag, predominantly emphasizing light-based interventions to synchronize the internal clock with the anticipated time at the destination. Nevertheless, visually impaired (VI) athletes may lack photoreceptiveness, diminishing or nullifying the effectiveness of this therapy. Consequently, this invited commentary explores alternative strategies for addressing jet lag in VI athletes. CONCLUSIONS: VI athletes with light perception but reduced visual acuity or visual fields may still benefit from light interventions in managing jet lag. However, VI athletes lacking a conscious perception of light should rely on gradual shifts in behavioral factors, such as meal timing and exercise, to facilitate the entrainment of circadian rhythms to the destination time. Furthermore, interventions like melatonin supplementation may prove useful during and after travel. In addition, it is recommended that athlete guides adopt phase-forward or phase-back approaches to synchronize with the athlete, aiding in jet-lag management and optimizing performance.


Assuntos
Melatonina , Paratletas , Humanos , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Ritmo Circadiano , Atletas
14.
Minerva Med ; 115(2): 178-184, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38197571

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this registry study was to evaluate the efficacy of Pycnogenol® in controlling signs/symptoms and temporary impairment of cognitive function (COFU) associated with jet lag. Previous flight studies have shown a decrease in the level of jet lag symptoms with Pycnogenol®. The control of jet lag signs/symptoms appeared to be correlated with flight-related microangiopathy and peripheral edema. Pycnogenol® - a standardized extract from the bark of French maritime pine - has significant antiedema, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. METHODS: A group of subjects flying east in economy class for 10-12 hours used Pycnogenol® 150 mg/day and a similar group without supplementation served as controls. A subgroup of mild hypertensive subjects using a single ACE inhibitor was also included. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-seven subjects completed the study. Of the participants, 48 were aviation professionals like pilots, flight attendants or air company staff - 24 of them took Pycnogenol® and 24 served as controls. Forty-seven study participants were frequent flyers and non-staff professionals, 25 of which took Pycnogenol® and 22 served as controls. In addition, a group of 32 subjects with mild hypertension was included, 16 took Pycnogenol® and 16 served as controls. No side effects and a good tolerability were observed. The registry groups were comparable for baseline characteristics. Eastbound flights' duration was 11.22±0.4 hours in supplemented subjects and 11.14±0.32 in controls. Dropouts were due to logistical problems. Post flight Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in all Pycnogenol® groups, including hypertensives for all signs and symptoms of jet lag compared to controls, showing prevention and improvement of jet lag symptoms. The duration of any sign/symptom of jet lag with Pycnogenol® intake was significantly shorter (P<0.05) post-flight compared to controls (P<0.05). The number of nights of altered/disturbed sleep was also lower in the Pycnogenol® groups compared to controls. Leg edema was present in almost all subjects with different degrees especially in the hypertensive group. The increase in ankle circumference before and after flight was significantly lower with Pycnogenol® compared to controls (P<0.05). After the flight, average scores of the single COFU tasks were significantly higher in the Pycnogenol® groups compared to controls, showing preserved cognitive function. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, in this registry study Pycnogenol® was effective in preventing jet lag-related symptoms and preserving cognitive functions without tolerability problems. These observations should be tested in a larger group of subjects including complex individuals prone to edema (i.e. diabetics, hypertensive or older patients).


Assuntos
Flavonoides , Hipertensão , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Extratos Vegetais , Humanos , Extratos Vegetais/uso terapêutico , Flavonoides/uso terapêutico , Flavonoides/administração & dosagem , Hipertensão/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Síndrome do Jet Lag/tratamento farmacológico , Síndrome do Jet Lag/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto , Disfunção Cognitiva/prevenção & controle , Disfunção Cognitiva/etiologia , Sistema de Registros , Fitoterapia
15.
Int J Nurs Knowl ; 35(2): 195-202, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36625567

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Shift-working nurses must function against their natural circadian system and are, thus, bound to be detrimentally affected by social jetlag. Circadian rhythms play a crucial role in regulating homeostasis, and social jetlag may increase one's risk for obesity. Therefore, this study aimed to identify associations between social jetlag and obesity among shift-working nurses. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 183 nurses working rotating shifts in South Korea. Chronotype and social jetlag were measured using the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire for Shift-Workers, respectively. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of 25.0 or higher, which was calculated using self-reported height and weight data. The associations between chronotype, social jetlag, and obesity were investigated using multiple logistic regression analysis. FINDINGS: A total of 183 nurses were included in the analysis (81.4% women and 80.3% single, median age = 27.00 years). Majority of the participants' (95.1%) chronotypes were moderate evening or intermediate type. The mean overall social jetlag was 3 h and 31 min. The odds for obesity were 8.44 times higher among shift-working nurses whose social jetlag was over 3 h and 31 min (95% confidence interval: 1.66-42.99) while controlling for chronotype, exercise time, and eating habits. CONCLUSIONS: Social jetlag may increase the likelihood of obesity among rotating shift-working nurses. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: To achieve positive outcomes for promoting nurses' health, upper nursing management should consider individual nurses' social jetlag when scheduling shifts. In addition, nursing managers should have the responsibility to educate nurses involved in shift work about the adverse effects of social jetlag.


Assuntos
Síndrome do Jet Lag , Sono , Humanos , Feminino , Adulto , Masculino , Estudos Transversais , Sono/fisiologia , Índice de Massa Corporal , República da Coreia , Obesidade , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
Eur Addict Res ; 30(1): 23-31, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38081146

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Chronotype describes a person's preferential activity pattern during a 24-hour period, which may not be in line with their social lifestyle. A mismatch between biological and social time is known as "social jetlag," which has negative effects on wellbeing. Cocaine influences a person's activity levels, but very little is known about possible changes in chronotype of patients with cocaine use disorder (CUD). Here, we aimed to shed light on self-reported changes in chronotype in patients with CUD and the clinical implications. METHODS: A total of 90 men from the local community were recruited; about half of the sample met the criteria for CUD, while the other half were healthy without a personal history of substance use disorder. Participants completed the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire along with questionnaires about mental health, daily fatigue, and drug/alcohol use. RESULTS: Half of the CUD patients fell into the category of late chronotype - a significantly larger proportion than their healthy peers. Late "night owls" tended to have started using cocaine at an earlier age than other chronotypes; a finding that was not observed with tobacco, cannabis, or alcohol. Drug use severity in CUD patients did not differ across chronotypes. CUD patients (52%) did not have a preferred time of day to use cocaine. The mismatch between social and biological time was significantly greater in CUD patients and unrelated to drug use or mental health status. CONCLUSION: CUD appears to be associated with disruptions in chronotype which are, contrary to a widely held view, not reflected by using patterns or addiction severity.


Assuntos
Cocaína , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Masculino , Humanos , Ritmo Circadiano , Sono , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
Obes Rev ; 25(3): e13664, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38072635

RESUMO

Social jetlag, the weekly variation in sleep timing, is proposed to contribute to increased obesity risk, potentially because of the misalignment of behavioral cycles relative to the endogenous circadian timing system. This systematic review and meta-analysis aim to determine the association between social jetlag and adiposity-related measures using observational studies. We reviewed 477 references, of which 43 studies met inclusion criteria with a total sample size of 231,648. There was a positive association between social jetlag and body mass index (correlation coefficient [r]: 0.12; 95%CI, 0.07, 0.17; P < 0.001; I2  = 94.99%), fat mass (r: 0.10; 95%CI, 0.05, 0.15; P < 0.001; I2  = 0.00%), fat mass index (fat mass divided by height in meter squared, ß: 0.14 kg/m2 ; 95%CI, 0.05, 0.23; P < 0.001; I2  = 56.50%), percent of body fat (r: 0.37; 95%CI, 0.33, 0.41; P < 0.001; I2  = 96.17%), waist circumference (r: 0.15; 95%CI, 0.06, 0.24; P = 0.001; I2  = 90.83%), and the risk of having overweight/obesity (odds ratio: 1.20; 95%CI, 1.02, 1.140; P = 0.039; I2  = 98.25%). Social jetlag is positively and consistently associated with multiple obesity-related anthropometric measures. Further studies are needed to test causality, underlying mechanisms, and whether obesity interventions based on increasing regularity of the sleep/wake cycle can aid in the battle against the obesity pandemic.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Obesidade , Humanos , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Obesidade/complicações , Sono , Síndrome do Jet Lag/complicações , Índice de Massa Corporal , Estudos Observacionais como Assunto
18.
Chronobiol Int ; 41(1): 29-37, 2024 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38093635

RESUMO

The early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic has previously been associated with marked changes in sleep/wake timing arising from the imposition of society-wide infection mitigation measures. Such observations are considered of broader significance as they reveal the social pressures that sleep timing normally operates under. In order to assess how persistent such changes were as the COVID-19 pandemic developed, we assessed sleep timing and quality in a longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of Irish adults with data collected at two time-points (December 2021 and March 2021). Data on social jetlag and chronotype was derived from the micro Munich Chronotype Questionnaire from 830 and 843 participants who provided data in December 2020 and March 2021 respectively, of which 338 contributed data to both timepoints. Demographics and measures of insomnia symptoms, anxiety, depression and loneliness were also collected, and data was analysed both within-subjects and cross-sectionally within data waves. Social jetlag (the mismatch between sleep timing on "work" and "free" days) and other measures of sleep timing were stable across the two time-points, although insomnia symptoms improved slightly from December 2020 to March 2021. The mean social jetlag at both timepoints was ~ 30 minutes, considerably lesser than reported pre-pandemic levels in similar populations. Multiple regression analysis of cross-sectional data reveals that the timing of midsleep on "free" days was only a weak-to-moderate predictor of social jetlag, whilst hours worked per week was the strongest predictor of social jetlag. Requirement for "face-to-face" contact with the public at work and urban location of residence also emerged as predictors of social jetlag, although insomnia, anxiety and depression symptoms and loneliness rating did not. We conclude that sleep timing changes that occurred during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic persisted into the second year of the pandemic, and these results further illustrate the key roles working practices and other social factors have in shaping social jetlag.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Adulto , Humanos , Ritmo Circadiano , Pandemias , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Irlanda , Estudos Longitudinais , Comportamento Social , Sono , Síndrome do Jet Lag , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Sleep ; 47(1)2024 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37792965

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Although insufficient sleep is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS), the circadian timing of sleep (CTS) is also involved in cardiac and metabolic regulation. We examined whether delays and deviations in the sleep midpoint (SM), a measure of CTS, modify the association between visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and MetS in adolescents. METHODS: We evaluated 277 adolescents (median 16 years) who had at least 5 nights of at-home actigraphy (ACT), in-lab polysomnography (PSG), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, and MetS score data. Sleep midpoint (SM), sleep irregularity (SI), and social jetlag (SJL) were examined as effect modifiers of the association between VAT and MetS, including waist circumference, blood pressure, insulin resistance, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Linear regression models adjusted for demographics, ACT-sleep duration, ACT-sleep variability, and PSG-apnea-hypopnea index. RESULTS: The association between VAT and MetS was significantly stronger (p-values for interactions < 0.001) among adolescents with a schooldays SM later than 4:00 (2.66 [0.30] points increase in MetS score), a SI higher than 1 hour (2.49 [0.30]) or a SJL greater than 1.5 hours (2.15 [0.36]), than in those with an earlier SM (<3:00; 1.76 [0.28]), lower SI (<30 minutes; 0.98 [0.70]), or optimal SJL (<30 minutes; 1.08 [0.45]). CONCLUSIONS: A delayed sleep phase, an irregular sleep-wake cycle, and greater social jetlag on schooldays identified adolescents in whom VAT had a stronger association with MetS. Circadian misalignment is a risk factor that enhances the impact of visceral obesity on cardiometabolic morbidity and should be a target of preventative strategies in adolescents.


Assuntos
Resistência à Insulina , Síndrome Metabólica , Adolescente , Humanos , Síndrome Metabólica/complicações , Síndrome Metabólica/metabolismo , Obesidade Abdominal/complicações , Obesidade Abdominal/metabolismo , Adiposidade/fisiologia , Resistência à Insulina/fisiologia , Fatores de Risco , Sono/fisiologia , Síndrome do Jet Lag
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