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2.
Clin J Sport Med ; 30(5): e139-e142, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30358616

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore differences in baseline King-Devick Test (KD) completion time between 2 testing modalities: (1) spiral-bound paper cards (cards) and (2) iPad application (iPad). DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort analysis. SETTING: National Collegiate Athlete Association (NCAA) institutions. PARTICIPANTS: Student athletes from 13 women's and 11 men's collegiate sports who completed KD baseline testing as part of their first year in the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium from 2014 to 2016 (n = 2003, 52.2% male). INDEPENDENT VARIABLES: King-Devick Test modalities; cards or iPad. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Baseline KD completion time (seconds). RESULTS: Mean baseline KD completion time of the iPad modality group [42.8 seconds, 95% confidence interval (CI), 42.1-43.3] was 2.8 seconds (95% CI, 2.1-3.4) greater than the cards group (40.0 seconds, 95% CI, 39.7-40.3) (t(1, 1010.7) = -8.0, P < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: Baseline KD performance is slower when tested on an iPad than when tested on spiral-bound paper cards. The 2 KD modalities should not be used interchangeably in concussion assessments because differences in the modalities can lead to time differences similar in magnitude to those used to indicate concussion. From a research perspective, modality may influence interpretation and/or synthesis of findings across studies.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas/fisiopatologia , Concussão Encefálica/fisiopatologia , Testes Neuropsicológicos , Fatores de Tempo , Atletas , Intervalos de Confiança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Minicomputadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Testes Neuropsicológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação de Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Papel , Estudantes , Adulto Jovem
3.
J Telemed Telecare ; 25(9): 552-558, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31631759

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Telepractice systems should be acceptable to users and meet end-user needs. Whilst the system requirements to conduct adult dysphagia assessments via telepractice are established, key differences exist between adult and paediatric swallowing assessments. This study was conducted to develop the system architecture required to conduct paediatric feeding assessments in patient homes via telepractice. METHODS: The study used a four-phase iterative design, informed by human-centred design principles. In Phase 1, two telepractice researchers and two paediatric feeding clinicians identified assessment tasks and explored potential system design solutions. Initial system testing was completed using clinical simulations (Phase 2). Live trials with 10 typically developing children were then conducted (Phase 3). Phase 4 involved user-centred feedback from clinicians and parents. Feedback from the development team, clinicians and parents was used to continuously refine the model. RESULTS: A combination of synchronous and asynchronous methods enabled all assessment components to be successfully completed. Clinician and parent feedback established the optimal technology (e.g. phone, tablet) and key camera positions necessary to optimise visual/auditory information for the online clinician. End-user feedback identified greater time efficiencies could be achieved through collecting some data (e.g. intra-oral pictures) via asynchronous methods prior to the session. Information sheets were deemed necessary to enhance the user experience. Clinicians and parents responded positively to the final system design. DISCUSSION: Modifications to standard videoconferencing were necessary to develop a clinically viable process for conducting paediatric feeding assessments in the home via telepractice. End-user feedback was integral to the design of the final model.


Assuntos
Transtornos de Deglutição/diagnóstico , Métodos de Alimentação , Telemedicina/organização & administração , Adulto , Aleitamento Materno/métodos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Minicomputadores , Smartphone , Telemedicina/instrumentação , Interface Usuário-Computador , Comunicação por Videoconferência
4.
Soc Work Health Care ; 58(4): 382-391, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30739595

RESUMO

Health care delivery is being transformed by the use of computer technology, and integrated physical health with mental and behavioral health care are national priorities. This study examined the basic computer skills and computer preferences of inner-city hospitalized medical patients in a design study of a web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention program prototype. Participants were 26 patients observed going through the program prototype using both a laptop computer and mouse, and an iPad. The majority of patients were able to do all the basic laptop and basic iPad skills to complete the program prototype, including older patients (aged 50 years or older) and patients with a high school degree or less. Patient computer preference was 3:1 for the use of an iPad versus a laptop computer, and the majority of patients preferred to complete a web-based versus an in-person brief intervention health program. Inner-city hospitalized medical patients appear able to complete and may be receptive to web-based alcohol screening and brief intervention programs.


Assuntos
Alcoolismo/diagnóstico , Alcoolismo/terapia , Computadores , Internet , Psicoterapia Breve/métodos , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Computadores de Mão , Feminino , Hospitais Urbanos , Humanos , Pacientes Internados/psicologia , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Minicomputadores , Preferência do Paciente , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Interface Usuário-Computador
5.
Arch Clin Neuropsychol ; 34(4): 524-530, 2019 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30260372

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparability of National Institutes of Health Toolbox Cognitive Battery test scores across iPad application and web-based personal computer administration platforms. Original test norms were developed using a personal computer-based administration and no previous studies assessing platform comparability have been published. METHOD: Participants (N = 62; final analyzed sample n = 49) were combat-exposed post-deployment veterans without neurologic disorder, severe mental illness, current substance use disorder, or a history of moderate or severe traumatic brain injury. All participants completed both iPad and web-based versions of tests on the same day in an experimental within-subjects crossover design. Standalone validity measures were incorporated to exclude invalid performance. Outcome measures included the Dimensional Change Card Sort Test, Flanker Inhibitory Control and Attention Test, List Sorting Working Memory Test, and Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test. RESULTS: Score differences between platforms were found on the Flanker Inhibitory Control and Attention Test. Scores were moderately correlated across tests, with the exception of low correlations for the Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test. Most participants preferred iPad to web administration, regardless of administration order. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest caution when interpreting iPad-acquired scores, particularly for the Flanker Inhibitory Control and Attention Test. iPad-based testing offers valuable improvements; however, the development of iPad-specific norms may be necessary to ensure valid interpretation of acquired data.


Assuntos
Cognição , Microcomputadores , Minicomputadores , Testes Neuropsicológicos , Veteranos/psicologia , Adulto , Estudos Cross-Over , Humanos , Internet , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Estados Unidos
7.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 9: CD011479, 2017 09 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28944453

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Excessive alcohol use contributes significantly to physical and psychological illness, injury and death, and a wide array of social harm in all age groups. A proven strategy for reducing excessive alcohol consumption levels is to offer a brief conversation-based intervention in primary care settings, but more recent technological innovations have enabled people to interact directly via computer, mobile device or smartphone with digital interventions designed to address problem alcohol consumption. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of digital interventions for reducing hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, or both, in people living in the community, specifically: (i) Are digital interventions more effective and cost-effective than no intervention (or minimal input) controls? (ii) Are digital interventions at least equally effective as face-to-face brief alcohol interventions? (iii) What are the effective component behaviour change techniques (BCTs) of such interventions and their mechanisms of action? (iv) What theories or models have been used in the development and/or evaluation of the intervention? Secondary objectives were (i) to assess whether outcomes differ between trials where the digital intervention targets participants attending health, social care, education or other community-based settings and those where it is offered remotely via the internet or mobile phone platforms; (ii) to specify interventions according to their mode of delivery (e.g. functionality features) and assess the impact of mode of delivery on outcomes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, HTA and Web of Knowledge databases; ClinicalTrials.com and WHO ICTRP trials registers and relevant websites to April 2017. We also checked the reference lists of included trials and relevant systematic reviews. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of digital interventions compared with no intervention or with face-to-face interventions for reducing hazardous or harmful alcohol consumption in people living in the community and reported a measure of alcohol consumption. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. MAIN RESULTS: We included 57 studies which randomised a total of 34,390 participants. The main sources of bias were from attrition and participant blinding (36% and 21% of studies respectively, high risk of bias). Forty one studies (42 comparisons, 19,241 participants) provided data for the primary meta-analysis, which demonstrated that participants using a digital intervention drank approximately 23 g alcohol weekly (95% CI 15 to 30) (about 3 UK units) less than participants who received no or minimal interventions at end of follow up (moderate-quality evidence).Fifteen studies (16 comparisons, 10,862 participants) demonstrated that participants who engaged with digital interventions had less than one drinking day per month fewer than no intervention controls (moderate-quality evidence), 15 studies (3587 participants) showed about one binge drinking session less per month in the intervention group compared to no intervention controls (moderate-quality evidence), and in 15 studies (9791 participants) intervention participants drank one unit per occasion less than no intervention control participants (moderate-quality evidence).Only five small studies (390 participants) compared digital and face-to-face interventions. There was no difference in alcohol consumption at end of follow up (MD 0.52 g/week, 95% CI -24.59 to 25.63; low-quality evidence). Thus, digital alcohol interventions produced broadly similar outcomes in these studies. No studies reported whether any adverse effects resulted from the interventions.A median of nine BCTs were used in experimental arms (range = 1 to 22). 'B' is an estimate of effect (MD in quantity of drinking, expressed in g/week) per unit increase in the BCT, and is a way to report whether individual BCTs are linked to the effect of the intervention. The BCTs of goal setting (B -43.94, 95% CI -78.59 to -9.30), problem solving (B -48.03, 95% CI -77.79 to -18.27), information about antecedents (B -74.20, 95% CI -117.72 to -30.68), behaviour substitution (B -123.71, 95% CI -184.63 to -62.80) and credible source (B -39.89, 95% CI -72.66 to -7.11) were significantly associated with reduced alcohol consumption in unadjusted models. In a multivariable model that included BCTs with B > 23 in the unadjusted model, the BCTs of behaviour substitution (B -95.12, 95% CI -162.90 to -27.34), problem solving (B -45.92, 95% CI -90.97 to -0.87), and credible source (B -32.09, 95% CI -60.64 to -3.55) were associated with reduced alcohol consumption.The most frequently mentioned theories or models in the included studies were Motivational Interviewing Theory (7/20), Transtheoretical Model (6/20) and Social Norms Theory (6/20). Over half of the interventions (n = 21, 51%) made no mention of theory. Only two studies used theory to select participants or tailor the intervention. There was no evidence of an association between reporting theory use and intervention effectiveness. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is moderate-quality evidence that digital interventions may lower alcohol consumption, with an average reduction of up to three (UK) standard drinks per week compared to control participants. Substantial heterogeneity and risk of performance and publication bias may mean the reduction was lower. Low-quality evidence from fewer studies suggested there may be little or no difference in impact on alcohol consumption between digital and face-to-face interventions.The BCTs of behaviour substitution, problem solving and credible source were associated with the effectiveness of digital interventions to reduce alcohol consumption and warrant further investigation in an experimental context.Reporting of theory use was very limited and often unclear when present. Over half of the interventions made no reference to any theories. Limited reporting of theory use was unrelated to heterogeneity in intervention effectiveness.


Assuntos
Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/terapia , Terapia Comportamental/métodos , Telefone Celular , Computadores de Mão , Minicomputadores , Terapia Assistida por Computador/métodos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/terapia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool/epidemiologia , Consumo Excessivo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Consumo Excessivo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/terapia , Análise Custo-Benefício , Humanos , Entrevista Motivacional , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
8.
Res Dev Disabil ; 64: 56-63, 2017 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28351764

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders of movement and posture that cause activity limitations. Due to the different motor problems these individuals encounter there is a need to offer rehabilitation programs that promote motor learning. Additionally, the understanding of the learning patterns of these individuals can help us attend to their learning needs to maximize their learning efficiency. AIMS: The present study aimed to add to the knowledge base in regards to motor learning and the contextual interference (CI) effect. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: The study included 40 individuals with CP and 40 typically developing (TD) participants matched for age and gender with the CP group. Both groups were divided into 2 subgroups regarding the practice schedule (random or constant practice) of a manual maze test on the computer. The participants who performed in the constant practice schedule performed the same standard maze 30 times, while participants in the random practice schedule performed a total of 30 trials on 5 mazes with a different spatial layout including the standard maze. After 5min of rest, retention was studied with a task in which all participants performed the standard maze. To examine the transfer effect, all participants also performed a maze with a new layout. Time of completion was registered in seconds for each trial. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: The results showed that the performance was lower in individuals with CP compared to typically developing individuals. In addition, only the participants with CP showed a contextual interference effect, with performance after the random practice schedule being superior compared to participants who practiced with a constant practice schedule. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Overall performance was lower in individuals with CP compared to individuals with TD. Additionally, both TD individuals and individuals with CP showed the contextual interference effect in the transfer phase, with the execution of random practice leading to better performance than constant practice. These findings provide important information to assist clinicians in developing rehabilitation programs for children with CP.


Assuntos
Atividades Cotidianas , Paralisia Cerebral , Minicomputadores , Destreza Motora , Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas , Paralisia Cerebral/psicologia , Paralisia Cerebral/reabilitação , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Masculino , Desempenho Psicomotor , Pesquisa de Reabilitação , Transferência de Experiência , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
J Clin Nurs ; 26(11-12): 1575-1583, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27381423

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop and test feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT platform integrated in a tablet for collecting and managing patient-reported concerns of older adults in home care. BACKGROUND: Using different ICT applications, for example interactive tablets for self-assessment of health and health issues based on health monitoring as well as other somatic and psychiatric monitoring systems may improve quality of life, staff and patient communication and feelings of being reassured. The European Commission hypothesises that introduction of ICT applications to the older population will enable improved health. However, evidence-based and user-based applications are scarce. DESIGN: The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council's complex intervention evaluation framework. A mixed-method approach was used combining interviews with older adults and healthcare professionals, and logged quantitative data. METHODS: In cooperation with a health management company, a platform operated by an interactive application for reporting and managing health-related problems in real time was developed. Eight older adults receiving home care were recruited to test feasibility. They were equipped with the application and reported three times weekly over four weeks, and afterwards interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses caring for them were interviewed. The logged data were extracted as a coded file. RESULTS: The older adults reported as instructed, in total 107 reports (Mean 13). The most frequent concerns were pain, fatigue and dizziness. The older adults experienced the application as meaningful with overall positive effects as well as potential benefits for the nurses involved. CONCLUSIONS: The overall findings in this study indicated high feasibility among older adults using the ICT platform. The study's results support further development of the platform, as well as tests in full-scale studies and in other populations. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: An ICT platform increased the older adults' perception of involvement and facilitated communication between the patient and nurses.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar , Minicomputadores , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros/psicologia , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Padrões de Prática em Enfermagem , Avaliação de Sintomas/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Vida Independente , Internet , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Relações Enfermeiro-Paciente , Qualidade de Vida , Avaliação de Sintomas/instrumentação
10.
Sensors (Basel) ; 15(8): 19709-22, 2015 Aug 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26274961

RESUMO

Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications.


Assuntos
Lógica , Minicomputadores , Pulso Arterial , Análise Espectral/métodos , Transistores Eletrônicos , Análise de Fourier , Humanos , Masculino , Fluxo Sanguíneo Regional , Adulto Jovem
11.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; (7): MR000042, 2015 Jul 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26212714

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Self-administered survey questionnaires are an important data collection tool in clinical practice, public health research and epidemiology. They are ideal for achieving a wide geographic coverage of the target population, dealing with sensitive topics and are less resource-intensive than other data collection methods. These survey questionnaires can be delivered electronically, which can maximise the scalability and speed of data collection while reducing cost. In recent years, the use of apps running on consumer smart devices (i.e., smartphones and tablets) for this purpose has received considerable attention. However, variation in the mode of delivering a survey questionnaire could affect the quality of the responses collected. OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact that smartphone and tablet apps as a delivery mode have on the quality of survey questionnaire responses compared to any other alternative delivery mode: paper, laptop computer, tablet computer (manufactured before 2007), short message service (SMS) and plastic objects. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, IEEEXplore, Web of Science, CABI: CAB Abstracts, Current Contents Connect, ACM Digital, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Health Management Information Consortium, the Campbell Library and CENTRAL. We also searched registers of current and ongoing clinical trials such as ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We also searched the grey literature in OpenGrey, Mobile Active and ProQuest Dissertation & Theses. Lastly, we searched Google Scholar and the reference lists of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. We performed all searches up to 12 and 13 April 2015. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs), crossover trials and paired repeated measures studies that compared the electronic delivery of self-administered survey questionnaires via a smartphone or tablet app with any other delivery mode. We included data obtained from participants completing health-related self-administered survey questionnaire, both validated and non-validated. We also included data offered by both healthy volunteers and by those with any clinical diagnosis. We included studies that reported any of the following outcomes: data equivalence; data accuracy; data completeness; response rates; differences in the time taken to complete a survey questionnaire; differences in respondent's adherence to the original sampling protocol; and acceptability to respondents of the delivery mode. We included studies that were published in 2007 or after, as devices that became available during this time are compatible with the mobile operating system (OS) framework that focuses on apps. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data from the included studies using a standardised form created for this systematic review in REDCap. They then compared their forms to reach consensus. Through an initial systematic mapping on the included studies, we identified two settings in which survey completion took place: controlled and uncontrolled. These settings differed in terms of (i) the location where surveys were completed, (ii) the frequency and intensity of sampling protocols, and (iii) the level of control over potential confounders (e.g., type of technology, level of help offered to respondents). We conducted a narrative synthesis of the evidence because a meta-analysis was not appropriate due to high levels of clinical and methodological diversity. We reported our findings for each outcome according to the setting in which the studies were conducted. MAIN RESULTS: We included 14 studies (15 records) with a total of 2275 participants; although we included only 2272 participants in the final analyses as there were missing data for three participants from one included study.Regarding data equivalence, in both controlled and uncontrolled settings, the included studies found no significant differences in the mean overall scores between apps and other delivery modes, and that all correlation coefficients exceeded the recommended thresholds for data equivalence. Concerning the time taken to complete a survey questionnaire in a controlled setting, one study found that an app was faster than paper, whereas the other study did not find a significant difference between the two delivery modes. In an uncontrolled setting, one study found that an app was faster than SMS. Data completeness and adherence to sampling protocols were only reported in uncontrolled settings. Regarding the former, an app was found to result in more complete records than paper, and in significantly more data entries than an SMS-based survey questionnaire. Regarding adherence to the sampling protocol, apps may be better than paper but no different from SMS. We identified multiple definitions of acceptability to respondents, with inconclusive results: preference; ease of use; willingness to use a delivery mode; satisfaction; effectiveness of the system informativeness; perceived time taken to complete the survey questionnaire; perceived benefit of a delivery mode; perceived usefulness of a delivery mode; perceived ability to complete a survey questionnaire; maximum length of time that participants would be willing to use a delivery mode; and reactivity to the delivery mode and its successful integration into respondents' daily routine. Finally, regardless of the study setting, none of the included studies reported data accuracy or response rates. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Our results, based on a narrative synthesis of the evidence, suggest that apps might not affect data equivalence as long as the intended clinical application of the survey questionnaire, its intended frequency of administration and the setting in which it was validated remain unchanged. There were no data on data accuracy or response rates, and findings on the time taken to complete a self-administered survey questionnaire were contradictory. Furthermore, although apps might improve data completeness, there is not enough evidence to assess their impact on adherence to sampling protocols. None of the included studies assessed how elements of user interaction design, survey questionnaire design and intervention design might influence mode effects. Those conducting research in public health and epidemiology should not assume that mode effects relevant to other delivery modes apply to apps running on consumer smart devices. Those conducting methodological research might wish to explore the issues highlighted by this systematic review.


Assuntos
Telefone Celular/estatística & dados numéricos , Minicomputadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Aplicativos Móveis/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Confiabilidade dos Dados , Humanos , Envio de Mensagens de Texto/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Tempo
12.
Am J Pharm Educ ; 79(7): 107, 2015 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27168620

RESUMO

Most educators consider note-taking a critical component of formal classroom learning. Advancements in technology such as tablet computers, mobile applications, and recorded lectures are altering classroom dynamics and affecting the way students compose and review class notes. These tools may improve a student's ability to take notes, but they also may hinder learning. In an era of dynamic technology developments, it is important for educators to routinely examine and evaluate influences on formal and informal learning environments. This paper discusses key background literature on student note-taking, identifies recent trends and potential implications of mobile technologies on classroom note-taking and student learning, and discusses future directions for note-taking in the context of digitally enabled lifelong learning.


Assuntos
Educação em Farmácia/métodos , Escrita Manual , Aprendizagem , Minicomputadores , Aplicativos Móveis , Estudantes de Farmácia , Educação em Farmácia/tendências , Humanos
13.
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol ; 10(2): 170-80, 2015 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24377758

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of using tablet device as user interface for students with upper extremity disabilities to input mathematics efficiently into computer. METHODS: A touch-input system using tablet device as user interface was proposed to assist these students to write mathematics. User-switchable and context-specific keyboard layouts were designed to streamline the input process. The system could be integrated with conventional computer systems only with minor software setup. A two-week pre-post test study involving five participants was conducted to evaluate the performance of the system and collect user feedback. RESULTS: The mathematics input efficiency of the participants was found to improve during the experiment sessions. In particular, their performance in entering trigonometric expressions by using the touch-input system was significantly better than that by using conventional mathematics editing software with keyboard and mouse. The participants rated the touch-input system positively and were confident that they could operate at ease with more practice. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed touch-input system provides a convenient way for the students with hand impairment to write mathematics and has the potential to facilitate their mathematics learning. Implications for Rehabilitation Students with upper extremity disabilities often face barriers to learning mathematics which is largely based on handwriting. Conventional computer user interfaces are inefficient for them to input mathematics into computer. A touch-input system with context-specific and user-switchable keyboard layouts was designed to improve the efficiency of mathematics input. Experimental results and user feedback suggested that the system has the potential to facilitate mathematics learning for the students.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência/reabilitação , Aprendizagem , Matemática , Tecnologia Assistiva , Extremidade Superior , Interface Usuário-Computador , Adolescente , Estudos Cross-Over , Desenho de Equipamento , Humanos , Minicomputadores , Satisfação do Paciente , Software , Adulto Jovem
14.
Dev Neurorehabil ; 17(2): 110-4, 2014 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24694311

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This paper explores possible connections among existing literature on parental stress, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and use of mobile technology for persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). METHODS: A narrative review of the literature. RESULTS: Parental support contributes to positive outcomes for children who use AAC. Parents identify communication as a high priority, but describe the process as challenging. AAC is often used with children with ASD, a population in which parental stress is especially high. Though there is research evidence that mobile technology is a promising tool for individuals with ASD, potentially misleading media anecdotes exist, and the effects on parental expectations and stress remain unstudied questions. CONCLUSION: Increased understanding of the connections in these research areas should help clarify the potential impact of mobile technologies on parental stress level, help to define appropriate future research directions, and contribute to development of appropriate caregiver training.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Transtornos Globais do Desenvolvimento Infantil/psicologia , Auxiliares de Comunicação para Pessoas com Deficiência/psicologia , Minicomputadores , Aplicativos Móveis , Pais/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Adulto , Atitude Frente aos Computadores , Criança , Comunicação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
15.
Diving Hyperb Med ; 44(4): 193-201, 2014 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25596832

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Dive computers are used in some occupational diving sectors to manage decompression but there is little independent assessment of their performance. A significant proportion of occupational diving operations employ single square-wave pressure exposures in support of their work. METHODS: Single examples of 43 models of dive computer were compressed to five simulated depths between 15 and 50 metres' sea water (msw) and maintained at those depths until they had registered over 30 minutes of decompression. At each depth, and for each model, downloaded data were used to collate the times at which the unit was still registering "no decompression" and the times at which various levels of decompression were indicated or exceeded. Each depth profile was replicated three times for most models. RESULTS: Decompression isopleths for no-stop dives indicated that computers tended to be more conservative than standard decompression tables at depths shallower than 30 msw but less conservative between 30-50 msw. For dives requiring decompression, computers were predominantly more conservative than tables across the whole depth range tested. There was considerable variation between models in the times permitted at all of the depth/decompression combinations. CONCLUSIONS: The present study would support the use of some dive computers for controlling single, square-wave diving by some occupational sectors. The choice of which makes and models to use would have to consider their specific dive management characteristics which may additionally be affected by the intended operational depth and whether staged decompression was permitted.


Assuntos
Descompressão/instrumentação , Mergulho/fisiologia , Minicomputadores , Algoritmos , Minicomputadores/classificação , Valores de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Água do Mar , Software , Temperatura , Fatores de Tempo
17.
J Am Coll Surg ; 217(4): 648-55, 2013 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23891066

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Electronic health information platforms have the potential to support standardized care delivery models, engage patients, and deliver patient self-assessment tools. STUDY DESIGN: We tested whether an e-health platform could support the delivery and acquisition of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) during hospitalization after cardiac surgery. Secondarily, we tested if patient reported data were predictive of resource use (length of stay) or outcomes (discharge disposition). Subjects were 149 cardiac surgical patients, over age 50 years, undergoing routine surgery, with an expected length of stay of 5 to 7 days. While hospitalized, patients were provided with iPads (Apple), which delivered a personalized care plan. That plan included daily patient "To Do" lists with self-assessment modules that included recovery-related patient reported outcomes. Those included an early screen for discharge planning (ESDP) as well as daily pain and mobility self-assessments using the visual analog pain scale and the I-MOVE mobility scale. We measured completion rates for the self assessments, determined length of stay (short, intermediate, or long) and discharge disposition (home independently or other), and evaluated whether patient self-assessments were predictive of these outcomes. RESULTS: Patients completed 98% of the 1,418 self-assessments that were delivered. The ESDP and mobility self-assessments were predictive of length of hospital stay (p = 0.004 and p = 0.012, respectively) and of discharge disposition (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.007, respectively). Lower ESDP scores and higher I-MOVE scores were predictive of shorter lengths of stay and a higher likelihood of discharge to home independently. CONCLUSIONS: Our trial demonstrated that an e-health platform, combined with mobile computing, can effectively deliver customized care plans with which patients can interact. Furthermore, patient self-reported data are predictive of length of stay and discharge disposition.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Cardíacos , Cardiopatias/psicologia , Participação do Paciente , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Autoavaliação (Psicologia) , Telemedicina , Idoso , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Cardiopatias/fisiopatologia , Cardiopatias/cirurgia , Hospitalização , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Minicomputadores , Resultado do Tratamento
18.
J Vis Commun Med ; 36(1-2): 6-10, 2013 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23641759

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Poster presentations are an important part of presenting scientific techniques and represent an integral part of conferences and meetings. Traditionally, paper format is used; however, in recent years electronic posters and other methods, such as incorporating a DVD player as part of a poster, have been successfully used. We describe and demonstrate the use of an augmented reality application for smartphones and tablets as a potential future addition to the presentation of scientific work and surgical techniques in poster format. This method allows the audience to view surgical techniques and research as 3D animation or video by using a trigger image in a poster/journal/text book via their smart device. METHOD: The author used the free Aurasma© application available on both iOS and Android 2.2 and higher platforms from iTunes App Store and Google Play. Once installed, any user with a 3G or WiFi connection via a smart phone or tablet can subscribe to the Medical Illustration channel for free. The user can then scan the trigger image placed on a poster with a mobile device to view videos, animations or 3D data. Further interaction can direct the user to a website for more content. RESULT: The author has trialled this method at a regional burns and plastic surgery centre and found it to be highly effective. CONCLUSION: The use of this novel method adds a new dimension to the presentation of scientific work at surgical and medical conferences and as part of journals and textbooks by permitting users to view scientific data and techniques on mobile devices as videos or as three dimensional environments at their own leisure.


Assuntos
Recursos Audiovisuais , Telefone Celular , Ilustração Médica , Minicomputadores , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios/educação , Humanos
20.
J Lab Autom ; 18(4): 264-8, 2013 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23592569

RESUMO

Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are increasingly replacing paper notebooks in life science laboratories, including those in industry, academic settings, and hospitals. ELNs offer significant advantages over paper notebooks, but adopting them in a predominantly paper-based environment is usually disruptive. The benefits of ELN increase when they are integrated with other laboratory informatics tools such as laboratory information management systems, chromatography data systems, analytical instrumentation, and scientific data management systems, but there is no well-established path for effective integration of these tools. In this article, we review and evaluate some of the approaches that have been taken thus far and also some radical new methods of integration that are emerging.


Assuntos
Automação Laboratorial/instrumentação , Sistemas de Informação em Laboratório Clínico/instrumentação , Equipamentos e Provisões Elétricas , Minicomputadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Minicomputadores/tendências , Animais , Eletrônica Médica/tendências , Humanos , Pesquisa
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