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1.
Res Social Adm Pharm ; 18(1): 2157-2163, 2022 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33903066

RESUMO

Video-reflexive ethnography (VRE) is a qualitative methodology that explores the complex nature of healthcare 'as it really is'. Its collaborative and reflexive process invites stakeholders (e.g. pharmacists and pharmacy support staff) to participate in analysing their everyday work practices as captured on video footage. Through close collaboration with practitioners and attention to their work contexts, VRE may be a useful methodology to engage a time-poor pharmacy workforce in research about themselves, encouraging more practitioner involvement in practice-based research. Aside from research, VRE has also been used effectively as an intervention to facilitate learning and change in healthcare settings, and could be effective in provoking change in otherwise resistant pharmacy environments. Much like traditional ethnographic approaches, VRE researchers have relied on being present 'in the field' to observe, record and make sense of practices with participants. The COVID-19 pandemic however, has introduced restrictions around travel and physical distancing, which has required researchers to contemplate the conduct of VRE 'at a distance', and to imagine new ways in which the methodological 'closeness' to stakeholders and their workplace contexts can be maintained when researchers cannot be on site. In this commentary, we outline the rationale for participatory methods, in the form of VRE, in pharmacy research. We describe the underlying principles of this innovative methodology, and offer examples of how VRE can be used in pharmacy research. Finally, we offer a reflexive account of how we have adapted the method for use in community pharmacy research, to adapt to physical distancing, without sacrificing its methodological principles. This paper offers not only a new methodology to examine the complexity of pharmacy work, but demonstrates also the responsiveness of VRE itself to complexity, and the potential breadth of future research applications in pharmacy both during and beyond the current pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Farmácias , Pesquisa em Farmácia , Antropologia Cultural , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos , Pandemias , Farmacêuticos , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34769621

RESUMO

Work is a key social determinant of health. Community health and well-being may be impacted in neighborhoods with high proportions of people engaged in precarious work situations compounded by health inequities produced by other social determinants associated with their residential geography. However, little is known about how community residents experience work at the neighborhood level nor how work impacts health at the community-level, particularly in communities with a high proportion of residents engaged in precarious work. We sought to understand, through participatory research strategies, how work is experienced at the community level and to identify community interventions to establish a culture of healthy work. As part of a mixed-methods community health assessment, community researchers conducted focus groups with residents in two high social and economic hardship neighborhoods on Chicago's southwest side. Community and academic researchers engaged in participatory data analysis and developed and implemented member-checking modules to engage residents in the data interpretation process. Twelve focus group discussions (77 community resident participants) were completed. Three major themes emerged: systematic marginalization from the pathways to healthy work situations; contextual and structural hostility to sustain healthy work; and violations in the rights, agency, and autonomy of resident workers. Findings were triangulated with findings from the concept-mapping research component of the project to inform the development of a community health survey focused on work characteristics and experiences. Listening to residents in communities with a high proportion of residents engaging in precarious work allows for the identification of nuanced community-informed intervention points to begin to build a culture of healthy work.


Assuntos
Pobreza , Características de Residência , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Percepção , Saúde Pública
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34769623

RESUMO

This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a participatory action research (PAR) on reducing the metabolic syndrome risk factors among the Koran adult women. The effectiveness of the PAR intervention was examined using a one-group pretest-post-test design. The data were collected from 58 adult women living in a community health center in Ulsan, Korea, between May and November 2016. The psychosocial factors (empowerment, social support, and quality of life), metabolic-related indices, and health behaviors were collected to measure the intervention's efficiency. After applying it, the participants' empowerment, social support, and health-related quality of life increased significantly, as compared to the pre-test. Furthermore, their metabolic-related indices improved significantly in the post-test, as compared to the pre-test. Therefore, the PAR intervention was found to be effective in enhancing the psychosocial factors, metabolic-related indices, and health behaviors in the aforementioned population and could be applied to other community health centers.


Assuntos
Síndrome Metabólica , Adulto , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Síndrome Metabólica/prevenção & controle , Qualidade de Vida
4.
Am J Occup Ther ; 75(4)2021 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34780614

RESUMO

IMPORTANCE: Disability studies-informed occupational therapy is predicated on full and equal partnerships among occupational therapy practitioners, researchers, and disability communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an approach to research that aligns with this vision yet is not without challenges. Understanding the tensions that arise from stakeholders' perspectives and priorities is critical for promoting collaboration between occupational therapy professionals and disability community partners. OBJECTIVE: To understand the group dynamics and relational processes of a CPBR team in the context of an intervention development study focused on health management for people with disabilities (PWD). DESIGN: This 9-mo ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and participant observation. Data were analyzed thematically. SETTING: Community-based multiagency collaborative. PARTICIPANTS: Nine participants (6 academic team members, 4 of whom were trained as occupational therapists; 2 disability partners; and 1 managed-care organization representative) took part. Three participants self-identified as PWD. FINDINGS: CBPR processes, although productive, were fraught with challenges. Team members navigated competing priorities, varying power dynamics, and multifaceted roles and identities. Flexibility was needed to address diverse priorities, respond to unexpected challenges, and facilitate the project's success. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Deep commitment to a shared goal of health care justice for PWD and team members' willingness to address tensions promoted successful collaboration. Intentional relationship building is needed for occupational therapy researchers to collaborate with members of disability communities as equal partners. What This Article Adds: Disability studies-informed occupational therapy research demands that team members intentionally nurture equitable relationships through shared governance, clear communication, and recognition of the fluid nature of power dynamics.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Terapia Ocupacional , Antropologia Cultural , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Promoção da Saúde , Humanos
5.
Ann Fam Med ; 19(6): 540-546, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34750129

RESUMO

The case study design is particularly useful for implementation analysis of complex health care innovations in primary care that can be influenced by the context of dynamic environments. Case studies may be combined with participatory approaches where academics conduct joint research with nonacademic stakeholders, to foster translation of findings results into practice. The aim of this article is to clarify epistemological and methodological considerations of case studies with a participatory approach. It also aims to propose best practice recommendations when using this case study approach. We distinguish between the participatory case study with full co-construction and co-governance, and the case study with a participatory approach whereby stakeholders are consulted in certain phases of the research. We then compare the epistemological posture of 3 prominent case study methodologists, Yin, Stake, and Merriam, to present the epistemological posture of case studies with a participatory approach. The relevance, applications, and procedures of a case study with a participatory approach methodology are illustrated through a concrete example of a primary care research program (PriCARE). We propose 12 steps for designing and conducting a case study with a participatory approach that may help guide researchers in the implementation analysis of complex health care innovations in primary care.


Assuntos
Projetos de Pesquisa , Participação dos Interessados , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Encaminhamento e Consulta
6.
N C Med J ; 82(6): 398-405, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34750214

RESUMO

Among the eight tribes within North Carolina, American Indian communities experience disparate rates of poverty, low education, chronic disease, low access to health care, and low quality of life. Addressing inequities and knowledge gaps will require novel and culturally appropriate approaches designed in partnership with AI communities, and should be underscored by the cultural assets those communities possess.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Índios Norte-Americanos , Humanos , North Carolina , Qualidade de Vida
7.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 18: E91, 2021 10 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34618667

RESUMO

Marshallese and Latino communities in Benton and Washington counties, Arkansas, were disproportionately affected by COVID-19. We evaluated the effectiveness of a comprehensive community-based intervention to reduce COVID-19 disparities in these communities. We examined all laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases in the 2 counties reported from April 6, 2020, through December 28, 2020. A 2-sample serial t test for rate change was used to evaluate changes in case rates before and after implementation of the intervention. After implementation, the proportions of cases among Marshallese and Latino residents declined substantially and began to align more closely with the proportions of these 2 populations in the 2 counties. Infection rates remained lower throughout the evaluation period, and weekly incidence also approximated Marshallese and Latino population proportions. Leveraging community partnerships and tailoring activities to specific communities can successfully reduce disparities in incidence among populations at high-risk for COVID-19 .


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Arkansas/epidemiologia , COVID-19/etnologia , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/organização & administração , Humanos , /estatística & dados numéricos
8.
J Prim Health Care ; 13(2): 139-156, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34620296

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION Knowledge translation (KT) is a relatively new concept referring to transfers of knowledge into practice in collaboration with multiple sectors that work for the health and wellness of society. Knowledge translation is crucial to identifying and addressing the health needs of immigrants. AIM To scope the evidence on KT research engaging immigrants in the host country regarding the health and wellness of immigrants. METHODS This study followed a scoping review approach suggested by Arksey O'Malley. We identified relevant studies from both academic and grey literature using structured criteria, charted the data from the selected studies, collated, summarised and report the results. RESULTS Analysis of the eligible studies found two types of KT research: integrated KT and end-of-grant KT. Meeting or discussion with community-level knowledge-users were common KT activities among immigrants, but they were involved in the entire research process only if they were hired as members of research teams. Most KT research among immigrants explored cancer screening and used a community-based participatory action research approach. Barriers and enablers usually came from researchers rather than from the community. There was little practice of evaluation and defined frameworks to conduct KT research among immigrants in Canada. CONCLUSION This study can help the researchers and other stakeholders of health and wellness of the immigrant population to identify appropriate KT research activities for immigrants and where KT research is required to facilitate the transfer of research knowledge into action.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos , Conhecimento , Projetos de Pesquisa
10.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 226, 2021 10 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34663330

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Healthcare quality measurements in the United States illustrate disparities by racial/ethnic group, socio-economic class, and geographic location. Redressing healthcare inequities, including measurement of and reimbursement for healthcare quality, requires partnering with communities historically excluded from decision-making. Quality healthcare is measured according to insurers, professional organizations and government agencies, with little input from diverse communities. This community-based participatory research study aimed to amplify the voices of community leaders from seven diverse urban communities in Minneapolis-Saint Paul Minnesota, view quality healthcare and financial reimbursement based on quality metric scores. METHODS: A Community Engagement Team consisting of one community member from each of seven urban communities -Black/African American, Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender-Queer-Two Spirit, Hmong, Latino/a/x, Native American, Somali, and White-and two community-based researchers conducted listening sessions with 20 community leaders about quality primary healthcare. Transcripts were inductively analyzed and major themes were identified. RESULTS: Listening sessions produced three major themes, with recommended actions for primary care clinics. #1: Quality Clinics Utilize Structures and Processes that Support Healthcare Equity. #2: Quality Clinics Offer Effective Relationships, Education, and Health Promotion. #3: Funding Based on Current Quality Measures Perpetuates Health Inequities. CONCLUSION: Community leaders identified ideal characteristics of quality primary healthcare, most of which are not currently measured. They expressed concern that linking clinic payment with quality metrics without considering social and structural determinants of health perpetuates social injustice in healthcare.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Afro-Americanos , Atenção à Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Estados Unidos
11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34574678

RESUMO

This paper describes the first six years of a government-initiated project to train Indigenous health professionals in digital mental health (d-MH). It illustrates how community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods were used to enable this "top-down" project to be transformed into a 'ground-up' community-guided process; and how, in turn, the guidance from the local Indigenous community partners went on to influence the national government's d-MH agenda. The CBPR partnership between five community partners and a university rural health department is described, with illustrations of how CBPR harnessed the community's voice in making the project relevant to their wellbeing needs. The local Indigenous community's involvement led to a number of unexpected outcomes, which impacted locally and nationally. At an early stage, the conceptual framework of the project was changed from d-MH to the culturally-relevant Indigenous framework of digital social and emotional wellbeing (d-SEWB). This led to a significant expansion of the range and type of digital resources; and to other notable outcomes such as successful advocacy for an Aboriginal-specific online therapy program and for a dedicated "one-stop-shop" d-SEWB website, Wellmob, which was funded by the Australian government in 2019-2021. Some of the implications of this project for future Indigenous CBPR projects are discussed.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Austrália , Governo , Humanos , Saúde Mental
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34586625

RESUMO

This article discusses a community-based participatory research project with university researchers, an urban inter-tribal center, and other community partners to develop, administer, and deliver a community needs assessment of an urban American Indian (AI) community. In the development process, community focus groups identified major domains of inquiry for a needs assessment survey: mental health and substance abuse, medical care, and social services, including cultural programming. Results are presented and discussed in each domain. Overall, this community needs assessment contributes to a better understanding of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) urban challenges by providing information about the AI/AN population in a large southwest metropolitan area. Specifically, it highlights the relevance of local and state contexts for understanding issues facing AI/AN populations. A growing body of research indicates that AI/AN populations demonstrate some similar challenges in terms of health, social service needs, and mental health and substance abuse needs due to shared histories of colonization and misguided or underfunded government programs, among other factors. It remains true that AI/AN communities nonetheless are each distinctive and face unique challenges and opportunities within the local, state, and regional contexts in which they reside. The process described in this paper will inform policy, practice, and research communities interested in understanding the unique realities of an urban community representing many different AI tribes.


Assuntos
Nativos do Alasca , Índios Norte-Americanos , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos , Texas
15.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257696, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34551005

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite several intervention programs, the Bedouin population living in the Southern District of Israel has the highest mortality rate among children and adolescents from unintentional injuries. Our research questions asked: (1) How does increasing the involvement and participation of Bedouin community members influence the issue of unintentional injuries among children? (2) How does reframing of the technical issue of safety into security influence community involvement and cooperation? OBJECTIVES: 1) To identify effective and efficacious positive deviance practices through community-based participatory research with adults, children, and professionals in the Bedouin community. 2) To create wider and deeper connections and cohesion between and among diverse Bedouin communities by seeding and sparking opportunities for social networking and cross-learning. METHODS: The study used a qualitative multi-method approach to generate a hybrid intervention model for reducing unintentional childhood injuries among the Bedouins. To frame the issue of unintentional injuries from the lived perspective of the Bedouins, we employed the Positive Deviance (PD) and Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach. Drawing upon theatrical traditions, entertainment-education (EE), was employed as a way to narratively engage and persuade the Bedouins. RESULTS: Our research resulted in: (1) the emergence of several PD ideas and practices for preventing and avoiding children's injuries; (2) the actual creation of a safe and secure playroom for children at a neighborhood mosque; and (3) the creation of cascading and cross-learning social networks between and among members of the Bedouin community spread across various locations. CONCLUSION: This study helped in reframing the technical issue of accidents and safety into the notion of sacredness and security, enhanced the association between emotions and cognition by means of experiential and EE methods, and stimulated creative thinking and the emergence of new culturally and contextually relevant ideas and practices through the PD process. It demonstrated the synergistic power of using a hybrid model that combined the rigor and vigor of different health communication approaches to address a significant disparity in the burden of child accidents faced by the Bedouins. Our study generated solutions that emerged from, and directly benefitted, Bedouin children-those, who face overwhelming risk of injury and death from preventable accidents.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Prevenção de Acidentes , Lesões Acidentais , Adolescente , Adulto , Árabes , Criança , Humanos
16.
Syst Rev ; 10(1): 256, 2021 09 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34560897

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are health problems that demonstrate high death and prevalence rates, and exhibit large health inequalities across different socio-economic status. Although interest in community-based participatory research (CBPR) is increasing because of the efforts to improve health equity, not enough literature review has been conducted on CBPR-based CVD management programs. The objective of this scoping review is to identify the key elements that should be considered when developing CBPR-based CVD management programs, and explore the effects of CBPR-based CVD management programs. METHODS: This study will use the databases of PubMed, Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) including grey literature. The criteria for selecting literature will be research that was published in or after 2000, applied CBPR, and either developed or implemented CVD management programs. No limit will be placed on the research design or method. Data extraction will be conducted independently by two researchers, and in the case of data mismatch, a consensus will be reached through discussion. The extracted data will be combined through narrative synthesis. DISCUSSION: This scoping review will identify specific methods in the development and implementation process of CBPR-based CVD management programs, as well as the characteristics of the programs that were shown to be effective. Therefore, it will be able to provide specific guidelines to researchers, government agencies, and local organizations to design and implement participatory health promotion programs related to CVDs. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/ZW2UY.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares , Equidade em Saúde , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Promoção da Saúde , Humanos , Literatura de Revisão como Assunto
17.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Aug 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34578820

RESUMO

Descriptions of the implementation of community-based participatory mixed-methods research (CBPMMR) in all phases of the engagement approach are limited. This manuscript describes the explicit integration of mixed-methods in four stages of CBPR: (1) connecting and diagnosing, (2) prescribing-implementing, (3) evaluating, and (4) disseminating and refining an intervention that aimed to motivate Latino parents (predominantly Central American in the US) of infants and toddlers to replace sugary drinks with filtered tap water. CBPMMR allowed for co-learning that led to the identification of preliminary behavioral outcomes, insights into potential mechanisms of behavior change, and revisions to the intervention design, implementation and evaluation.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade/métodos , Água Potável/administração & dosagem , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/métodos , Bebidas Adoçadas com Açúcar , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , América Central/etnologia , Pré-Escolar , Filtração , Humanos , Lactente , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pais , Projetos Piloto , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34574356

RESUMO

Scaling up community-based participatory research (CBPR) remains challenging. This case-study reports on how, and under which conditions, a CBPR project aiming at promoting exercise among socially disadvantaged women (BIG) scaled up at four project sites. As part of BIG, researchers support city administrations in implementing a participatory project to reach socially disadvantaged women for exercise. The case study was conducted in winter 2020 in southern Germany and is based on a co-creative process involving city administrators and researchers. Following Kohl and Cooley's scaling up dimensions, scaling up BIG was investigated at the four sites using a mixed-method approach. Course registrations and offers were analysed, and qualitative interviews (n = 4) with administrative staff members were conducted and analysed using content analysis. The geographical coverage of exercise classes, the addressed groups, and the utilisation of participatory methods by city administrations are described. All four sites managed to scale-up project activities. Three of the four sites reported that further growth of the project was no longer possible due to limited resources. All sites attempted to reach a larger number of, and more diverse, women. One site managed to scale-up the use of participatory methods within the city administration. The following important facilitators for scaling up CBPR projects were reported: advertisements tailored to the needs of the addressed women, utilising participatory approaches, and equipping project coordinators with sufficient resources.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Promoção da Saúde , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Terapia por Exercício , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos
19.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e051184, 2021 09 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34521673

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To combat misinformation, engender trust and increase health literacy, we developed a culturally and linguistically appropriate virtual reality (VR) vaccination education platform using community-engaged approaches within a Somali refugee community. DESIGN: Community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods including focus group discussions, interviews, and surveys were conducted with Somali community members and expert advisors to design the educational content. Co-design approaches with community input were employed in a phased approach to develop the VR storyline. PARTICIPANTS: 60 adult Somali refugees and seven expert advisors who specialise in healthcare, autism research, technology development and community engagement. SETTING: Somali refugees participated at the offices of a community-based organisation, Somali Family Service, in San Diego, California and online. Expert advisors responded to surveys virtually. RESULTS: We find that a CBPR approach can be effectively used for the co-design of a VR educational programme. Additionally, cultural and linguistic sensitivities can be incorporated within a VR educational programme and are essential factors for effective community engagement. Finally, effective VR utilisation requires flexibility so that it can be used among community members with varying levels of health and technology literacy. CONCLUSION: We describe using community co-design to create a culturally and linguistically sensitive VR experience promoting vaccination within a refugee community. Our approach to VR development incorporated community members at each step of the process. Our methodology is potentially applicable to other populations where cultural sensitivities and language are common health education barriers.


Assuntos
Refugiados , Vacinas , Realidade Virtual , Adulto , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Humanos , Saúde Pública
20.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 117, 2021 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34526137

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America, but it has become a disease of global concern due to migration flows. Asymptomatic carriers may host the parasite for years, without knowing they are infected. The aim of this study is to assess prevalence of Chagas disease and evaluate the participants' level of knowledge between Latin American migrants attending a community-based screening campaign. METHODS: Three community-based campaigns were performed in Alicante (Spain) in 2016, 2017 and 2018, including educational chats and blood tests for Trypanosoma cruzi serology. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing knowledge about the mechanisms of transmission, disease presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. People seropositive for T. cruzi underwent diagnostic confirmation by two different tests. Results were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression and expressed as adjusted odds ratios (aORs), adjusting for age, sex, and time in Spain. RESULTS: A total of 596 participants were included in the study; 17% were aged under 18 years. Prevalence in adults was 11% [54/496; 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.3-14.5%] versus 0% among children. All but one case were in Bolivians. Diagnosis was independently associated with having been born in Bolivia (aOR: 102, 95% CI: 13-781) and a primary school-level education (aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.14-5.06). Of 54 people diagnosed with Chagas disease (most of whom were asymptomatic), 42 (77.7%) returned to the clinic at least once, and 24 (44.4%) received treatment. Multivariable analysis showed that coming from Argentina (aOR: 13, 95% CI: 1.61-1188) or Bolivia (aOR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.19-3.39) and having received information about Chagas disease in Spain (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.54-8.97) were associated with a good level of knowledge on the disease. Having primary level studies (aOR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.34-0.98) and coming from Ecuador (aOR: 4.63, 95% CI: 2.52-847) were independently associated with a lower level of knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based interventions are a good strategy for diagnosing neglected diseases such as Chagas disease in non-endemic countries and for identifying and treating infected, asymptomatic individuals.


Assuntos
Doença de Chagas/diagnóstico , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Trypanosoma cruzi/isolamento & purificação , Adulto , Doença de Chagas/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde Comunitária , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Estudos Transversais , Diagnóstico Precoce , Humanos , América Latina/etnologia , Programas de Rastreamento , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Espanha/epidemiologia
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