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1.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(1): 7050, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35119906

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Past studies examined factors associated with rural practice, but none employed newer machine learning (ML) methods to explore potential predictors. The primary aim of this study was to identify factors related to practice in a rural area. Secondary aims were to capture a more precise understanding of the demographic characteristics of the healthcare professions workforce in Utah (USA) and to assess the viability of ML as a predictive tool. METHODS: This study incorporated four datasets - the 2017 dental workforce, the 2016 physician workforce, the 2014 nursing workforce and the 2017 pharmacy workforce - collected by the Utah Medical Education Council. Supervised ML techniques were used to identify factors associated with practice location, the outcome variable of interest. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 11 259 healthcare professionals with an average age of 46.6 years, of which 36.6% were males and 94.5% Caucasian. Four ML methods were applied to assess model performance by comparing accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of the methods used, support vector machine performed the best (accuracy 99.7%, precision 100%, sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.4% and ROC 0.997). The models identified income and rural upbringing as the top factors associated with rural practice. CONCLUSION: By far, income emerged as the most important factor associated with rural practice, suggesting that attractive income offers might help rural communities address health professional shortages. Rural upbringing was the next most important predictive factor, validating and updating earlier research. The performance of the ML algorithms suggests their usefulness as a tool to model other databases for individualized prediction.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Atenção à Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Área de Atuação Profissional , Recursos Humanos
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 445, 2022 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35676739

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Japan, community medicine clerkships facilitate positive attitudes toward rural medical practice and encourage rural recruitment. Rural self-efficacy has been shown to influence rural career intent following a rural clinical placement. However, the impact of subjective difficulties of living in a rural area on future rural career intent is also important. This study aims to explore whether rural self-efficacy influences the relationship between difficulty with living in a rural area and rural career intent.  METHODS: The subjects included 308 male and 255 female participants aged 20-41 [median (interquartile range): 22 (21-22)] years. Rural self-efficacy was based on a validated scale consisting of 15 questions. Difficulty with living in a rural area was measured asking students. A cohort survey was conducted to evaluate the effect of the rural self-efficacy score on the rural career intent of Japanese medical students after they completed their rural clinical training. RESULTS: The following variables were significantly associated with a higher rural self-efficacy score: female sex (p = 0.003), age < 21 years (p = 0.013), having a doctor as a role model (p < 0.001), gaining admission through a school recommendation (p = 0.016), living in a rural or remote area until the age of 18 years (p = 0.018), and orientation towards general medicine (p < 0.001). In addition, baseline difficulty with living in a rural area was significantly associated with a lower self-efficacy score (p < 0.001). Participants with a stronger intent to practice in a rural area before rural clinical training had higher rural self-efficacy and showed a stronger positive rural career intent after rural clinical training (p < 0.001). A multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that difficulty with living in a rural area [odds ratio (OR): 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.39-0.84] was still associated with lower rural career intent after rural clinical training, independent of all confounders such as gender, age, scholarship for regional duty, rural background, and orientation towards general medicine. However, when rural self-efficacy (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.07-1.16) was added as a factor for rural career intent, difficulty with living in a rural area (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.43-1.06) was no longer observed as an associated factor. CONCLUSION: Subjective difficulty with living in a rural area was shown to reduce future rural career intent, but high rural self-efficacy ameliorated this decline.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Área de Atuação Profissional , Autoeficácia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Recursos Humanos
5.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 31, 2022 04 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35392954

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Physician maldistribution is a global problem that hinders patients' abilities to access healthcare services. Medical education presents an opportunity to influence physicians towards meeting the healthcare needs of underserved communities when establishing their practice. Understanding the impact of educational interventions designed to offset physician maldistribution is crucial to informing health human resource strategies aimed at ensuring that the disposition of the physician workforce best serves the diverse needs of all patients and communities. METHODS: A scoping review was conducted using a six-stage framework to help map current evidence on educational interventions designed to influence physicians' decisions or intention to establish practice in underserved areas. A search strategy was developed and used to conduct database searches. Data were synthesized according to the types of interventions and the location in the medical education professional development trajectory, that influence physician intention or decision for rural and underserved practice locations. RESULTS: There were 130 articles included in the review, categorized according to four categories: preferential admissions criteria, undergraduate training in underserved areas, postgraduate training in underserved areas, and financial incentives. A fifth category was constructed to reflect initiatives comprised of various combinations of these four interventions. Most studies demonstrated a positive impact on practice location, suggesting that selecting students from underserved or rural areas, requiring them to attend rural campuses, and/or participate in rural clerkships or rotations are influential in distributing physicians in underserved or rural locations. However, these studies may be confounded by various factors including rural origin, pre-existing interest in rural practice, and lifestyle. Articles also had various limitations including self-selection bias, and a lack of standard definition for underservedness. CONCLUSIONS: Various educational interventions can influence physician practice location: preferential admissions criteria, rural experiences during undergraduate and postgraduate medical training, and financial incentives. Educators and policymakers should consider the social identity, preferences, and motivations of aspiring physicians as they have considerable impact on the effectiveness of education initiatives designed to influence physician distribution in underserved locations.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Médicos , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Humanos , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Área de Atuação Profissional , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
6.
Med J Aust ; 216(11): 572-577, 2022 06 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35365852

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between extended medical graduates' rural clinical school (RCS) experience and geographic origins with practising in rural communities five and eight years after graduation. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS: Cohort study of 2011 domestic medical graduates from ten Australian medical schools with rural clinical or regional medical schools. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Practice location types eight years after graduation (2019/2020) as recorded by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, classified as rural or metropolitan according to the 2015 Modified Monash Model; changes in practice location type between postgraduate years 5 (2016/2017) and 8 (2019/2020). RESULTS: Data were available for 1321 graduates from ten universities; 696 were women (52.7%), 259 had rural backgrounds (19.6%), and 413 had extended RCS experience (31.3%). Eight years after graduation, rural origin graduates with extended RCS experience were more likely than metropolitan origin graduates without this experience to practise in regional (relative risk [RR], 3.6; 95% CI, 1.8-7.1) or rural communities (RR, 4.8; 95% CI, 3.1-7.5). Concordance of location type five and eight years after graduation was 92.6% for metropolitan practice (84 of 1136 graduates had moved to regional/rural practice, 7.4%), 26% for regional practice (56 of 95 had moved to metropolitan practice, 59%), and 73% for rural practice (20 of 100 had moved to metropolitan practice, 20%). Metropolitan origin graduates with extended RCS experience were more likely than those without it to remain in rural practice (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9) or to move to rural practice (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1). CONCLUSION: The distribution of graduates by practice location type was similar five and eight years after graduation. Recruitment to and retention in rural practice were higher among graduates with extended RCS experience. Our findings reinforce the importance of longitudinal rural and regional training pathways, and the role of RCSs, regional training hubs, and the rural generalist training program in coordinating these initiatives.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Área de Atuação Profissional , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
7.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(4): 520-528, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35384122

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To understand how contemporary socio-cultural factors may impact medical students' rural career intent. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using data from the national Federation of Rural Australian Medical Educators survey. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: Medical students across 18 Australian universities who completed a full academic year of clinical training in rural areas in 2019. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Preferred location of practice post-training reported to be either: (i) a major city; (ii) a regional area or large town; or (iii) a small rural location. RESULTS: In total, 626 students completed the survey (70.1% response rate). A small rural location was the most preferred location of practice after graduation for 28.3% of the students (95% CI 21.6-36.0). Four socio-cultural factors were positively associated with a preference for a rural career location: poor health status of rural people, motor vehicle traffic congestion in cities, rural generalist training opportunities in the state and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Other socio-cultural factors, including specialists' under-employment, Medicare freeze effect on doctors' income, bullying/sexual harassment in hospitals, climate change/natural disasters or recognised rural health personalities did not influence the investigated outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a novel association between contemporary socio-cultural factors and rural career intention in a cohort of Australian rural clinical school students. These findings advocate for further consideration of research exploring socio-cultural factors shaping rural career intent and workforce outcomes.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Intenção , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
Acad Med ; 97(9): 1264-1267, 2022 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35442906

RESUMO

To help increase the supply and retention of rural family physicians, Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP) in 1974. The program selectively admits medical school applicants who both grew up in a rural area and plan to practice in a rural area. During medical school, PSAP students have ongoing mentoring and rural clinical experiences. As the program now approaches the half-century mark, this commentary summarizes several important lessons learned. First, outcomes research is critical, and program leaders have been able to publish 15 papers and a book about the PSAP and its outcomes. Second, these studies have shown that the program has been highly successful, with PSAP graduates 8.5-9.9 times more likely to enter rural family medicine than their peers, and that the PSAP contributed 12% of all rural family physicians in Pennsylvania. Other similar medical school rural programs have had comparable success, with more than half of all graduates combined (including PSAP graduates) practicing rural. Third, long-term retention has a multiplicative impact. Long-term retention of PSAP graduates in rural family medicine was greater than 70% after 20-25 years. Fourth, research has shown that the admissions component accounted for approximately three-quarters of the PSAP's success. Three factors available at the time of matriculation (rural background, plans for rural practice, and plans for family medicine) identified almost 80% of all Jefferson graduates in rural practice 3 decades later. Having a peer group with similar backgrounds, mentoring, and the rural curriculum were also very important. Fifth, wanting to live rural appears key to the rural practice decision. Finally, given that medical school programs like the PSAP produce substantial increases in the supply and retention of rural physicians while requiring modest resources, medical schools can have a critical role in addressing the rural physician shortage.


Assuntos
Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Escolha da Profissão , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/educação , Humanos , Médicos de Família , Área de Atuação Profissional , Faculdades de Medicina , Universidades , Recursos Humanos
9.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(4): 529-535, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35324046

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the work location (metropolitan, regional, rural and remote) of graduates in nursing, allied health and oral health disciplines who complete their professional training, end-to-end training, in a regional or rural area noting the potential inclusion of a metropolitan-based placement for speciality practice not available in rural or regional Victoria. METHODS: We tracked the place of employment from the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (AHPRA) of all graduates from a regional/rural tertiary education provider. The student home address at enrolment, locations where they undertook all placements and their current place of work were described using an objective geographical model of access, the Modified Monash Model. RESULTS: Seventy-five per cent of 5506 graduates were located in the AHPRA database. About one third of graduates were working in metropolitan areas, 1/3 in regional cities and 1/3 in rural areas. Students' origin accounted for 1/3 of variance in current workplace location. The more placement days students completed in regional/ rural areas was also a significant predictor of working in a regional or rural area. CONCLUSION: End-to-end training in regional/rural areas is an effective approach to retaining a regional/rural workforce. Student origin is a strong predictor of working rural or regionally, as is undertaking placements in rural areas. This suggests that priority for rural/ regional student placements should be given to students in end-to-end regional/ rural programs and students from a regional/ rural background.


Assuntos
Área de Atuação Profissional , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
10.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(2): 197-207, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35103353

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate students' perceptions of the impact of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 on rural and remote placements facilitated by 16 University Departments of Rural Health in Australia in 2020. DESIGN: A mixed-method design comprising an online survey and semi-structured interviews. SETTING: Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Allied health, nursing and medical students with a planned University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural or remote placement between February and October 2020. INTERVENTION: A planned rural or remote placement in 2020 facilitated by a University Departments of Rural Health, regardless of placement outcome. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaire included placement outcome (completed or not), discipline of study (nursing, allied health, medicine), and Likert measures of impact to placement (including supervision, placement tasks, location, accommodation, client contact and student learning) and placement experience (overall, support, supervision, university support). Semi-structured interviews asked about placement planning, outcome, decisions, experience and student perceptions. RESULTS: While coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 reportedly impacted on the majority of planned placements, most students (80%) were able to complete their University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated placement in some form and were satisfied with their placement experience. Common placement changes included changes to tasks, setting, supervisors and location. Allied health students were significantly more likely to indicate that their placement had been impacted and also felt more supported by supervisors and universities than nursing students. Interview participants expressed concerns regarding the potential impact of cancelled and adapted placements on graduation and future employment. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was reported to impact the majority of University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural and remote placements in 2020. Fortunately, most students were able to continue to undertake a rural or remote placement in some form and were largely satisfied with their placement experience. Students were concerned about their lack of clinical learning and graduating on time with adequate clinical competence.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Austrália , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 142(1)2022 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês, Norueguês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35026076

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Every year since 2009, up to 24 medical students at UiT The Arctic University of Norway have undertaken the last two years of their undergraduate medical education in Bodø (referred to as the Bodø model). We mapped the municipalities where the students had grown up, their preferences as to future specialties, where they worked and what they worked with after Part 1 of their specialist training. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Medical students who graduated from the Bodø model in the period 2012-18 completed a questionnaire in the first week of their sixth year of study, containing questions about where they had grown up and their preferences for future place of work and specialty. We mapped their place of work and specialty as of January 2021 as well as that of the two cohorts graduating in 2010-11. The place where the latter had grown up was mapped via direct contact, contact with their cohort or open internet sources. The covariation between where they grew up and their place of work, specialty preferences and choice of specialty were analysed using chi-square tests and logistic regression. RESULTS: Out of a total of 146 doctors, 91 of whom were women (62.3 %), who had completed their undergraduate medical education under the Bodø model as well as Part 1 of their specialist training, 40 (27.4 %) had grown up in Bodø municipality and for 56 (38.4 %) this was their place of work. For the remainder of the county of Nordland, the corresponding figures were 54 (37.0 %) and 38 (26.0 %), for Troms og Finnmark 23 (15.8) and 19 (13 %) and for the remainder of Norway 29 (19.9 %) and 33 (22.6 %). A total of 51 (34.9 %) worked as GPs, of whom 34 (66.7 %) worked in rural municipalities. There was a higher probability of working in a rural area if the doctor had grown up in a rural community (odds ratio (OR) 3.0 (95 % CI 1.5 to 6.1)) and of working in general medicine if this had been their preference as a student (OR 3.7 (95 % CI 1.8 to 7.6)). INTERPRETATION: The Bodø model has mainly attracted students with an affiliation to the region. At the time of the survey, a large percentage of the graduates who took part of their undergraduate medical education in Bodø worked at the Nordland Hospital in Bodø and in general practice, particularly in rural municipalities.


Assuntos
Medicina Geral , Médicos , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0263132, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35081175

RESUMO

We devised and assessed open recruitment of host families for medical student homestays in a rural area of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, so that program organizers would not have to depend on professional and personal connections. The duration of the homestays was one night and two days, and they were conducted in August 2016, 2017, and 2018. The purpose of this community-based medical education program was to promote interactions between medical students and residents of Tamba area. The study asked one family member from each host family to complete a questionnaire after the homestay, and their experiences were evaluated in the study. The questionnaire results were analyzed using a visual analog scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Thirty-three host families participated in the homestay program over three years. Results showed that VAS scores were high for enjoyment of homestays (VAS; 92.4 ± 13.0), continuation of the homestay program (91.7 ± 12.7), continuation of participation in the homestay program (89.2 ± 16.2), and desire for the homestay students to work in the area in the future (95.4 ± 6.3). The recruitment of host families through advertising was an efficient method for this community-based medical education homestay program. The results indicate that it is possible to attract more host families through open recruitment, which will contribute to the sustainability of the homestay program. Further research, including a follow-up of the students who participated and whether they chose a rural area or Tamba to practice is needed in the future. Since this is an ongoing program, further research in a similar format can be conducted in the future.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Família , Área de Atuação Profissional , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Recursos Humanos
13.
J Med Radiat Sci ; 69(2): 182-190, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34802192

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: While studies have investigated influences on graduate practice locations of other health professionals, especially medicine, none have investigated practice locations of medical radiation science (MRS) graduates. This study aimed to explore factors influencing the registered principal place of practice (PPP) of diagnostic radiography, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine graduates from the University of Newcastle (UON), Australia, in their second post-graduate year. METHODS: Data were extracted from the UON enrolment and clinical placement databases and linked to Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (Ahpra) registration data for PPP location in 2019 for 187 graduates who completed their studies in 2017. Explanatory variables included age at enrolment, gender, MRS discipline, location of origin, socio-economic index for location of origin, and locations and duration of undergraduate professional placements. Descriptive statistics, tests of association and logistic regression compared rural and non-rural origin, and professional placement locations with Ahpra PPP. RESULTS: Factors related to non-metropolitan PPP were location of origin (P = 0.002), number (P = 0.002) and duration (P = 0.007) of rural placements, and MRS discipline (P = 0.033). Controlling for other variables, location of origin and MRS discipline remained significant. Graduates of rural origin had up to 3.54 (95%CI = 1.51-8.28) times the odds of a rural PPP. Diagnostic radiography graduates had up to 5.46 (95%CI = 1.55-19.20) times the odds of nuclear medicine of a rural PPP. CONCLUSION: To help reduce the gap between rural and metropolitan medical radiation service availability, there is a need for targeted recruitment of rural origin students. Further investigation of the effect of rural undergraduate MRS placements is justified.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Estudos Retrospectivos
14.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(1): 95-102, 2022 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34787946

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether General Practice placement experience or locations (urban/metropolitan vs non-metropolitan) promote student interest in pursuing general practice. DESIGN: SurveyMonkey was used in the design of the survey. SETTING: The study was conducted online. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 520 and 705 clinical-year students were surveyed in 2009 and 2019, respectively. The study was conducted online, using SurveyMonkey, and the participants were mostly non-indigenous Australian medical students, between the ages of 18 and 30. INTERVENTIONS: Students were recruited from the General Practice Students' Network membership database to complete the survey online. Chi-squared testing, Pearson's correlation and a multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to investigate the correlation between general practice placements and intention to become a general practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The association and causation between general practice placement location, student experience and students' intended career outcomes. RESULTS: In 2009, majority of students rated their general practice experience 'mostly positive' while most metropolitan participants and majority of non-metropolitan placement participants in the 2019 survey responded with 'mostly positive' in 2019. Based on 2009 and 2019 data, general practice placement location had no association with the likelihood of pursuing general practice as a career, while student experience had a stronger positive correlation with the likelihood of pursuing general practice as a career. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that students' overall experience with their general practice placements significantly encourages medical students to pursue the general practice pathway. As such, increasing both metropolitan and non-metropolitan placement experiences can potentially overcome general practice shortage.


Assuntos
Medicina Geral , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Adolescente , Adulto , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários , Recursos Humanos , Adulto Jovem
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34886297

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ophthalmology workforce distribution and location stability using Modified Monash Model category of remoteness. METHODS: Whole of ophthalmologist workforce analysis using Australian Health Practitioner Registration Agency (AHPRA) data. Modified Monash Model (MMM) category was mapped to postcode of primary work location over a six-year period (2014 to 2019). MMM stability was investigated using survival analysis and competing risks regression. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Ophthalmologists registered with AHPRA. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Retention within MMM category of primary work location. RESULTS: A total of 948 ophthalmologists were identified (767 males, 181 females). Survival estimates indicate 84% of ophthalmologists remained working in MMM1, while 79% of ophthalmologists working in MMM2-MMM7remained in these regions during the six-year period. CONCLUSION: The Australian ophthalmology workforce shows a high level of location stability and is concentrated in metropolitan areas of Australia. Investment in policy initiatives designed to train, recruit and retain ophthalmologists in regional, rural and remote areas is needed to improve workforce distribution outside of metropolitan areas.


Assuntos
Oftalmologia , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Área de Atuação Profissional , Estudos Retrospectivos , Recursos Humanos
18.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1371762

RESUMO

Neste ensaio focamos na influência do mercado profissional na formação em Educação Física, e temos como objetivo central analisar como as Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais de Educação Física (Resolução no 03/1987 e Resolução no 07/2004), embasadas nos princípios capitalistas, fomentaram a precarização do trabalho no campo da Educação Física através da segmentação do curso em Licenciatura e Bacharelado. Como metodologia, utilizamos a pesquisa bibliográfica das diretrizes referidas. Concluímos que a forte influência do setor econômico capitalista acabou por ampliar uma precarização na área da Educação Física, tendo uma especialização precoce de conhecimentos científicos voltados para a área de atuação profissional (AU).;


In this essay we focus on the influence of the professional market in Physical Education training, with the central objective of analyzing how the National Curriculum Guidelines for Physical Education (Resolution No. 03/1987 and Resolution No. 07/2004), based on capitalist principles, fostered the precariousness of the work in the field of Physical Education through the segmentation of the course in Licenciatura and Bacharelado. As methodology we use the bibliographic research of the referred guidelines. We conclude that the strong influence of the capitalist economic sector ended up increasing a precariousness in the area of Physical Education, having an early specialization of scientific knowledge aimed at the area of professional performance (AU).


En este ensayo nos enfocamos en la influencia del mercado profesional en la formación en Educación Física, con el objetivo central de analizar cómo los Lineamientos Curriculares Nacionales de Educación Física (Resolución No. 03/1987 y Resolución No. 07/2004), basados en principios capitalistas, fomentaron la precariedad de la trabajar en el campo de la Educación Física a través de la segmentación del curso en Licenciatura y Bacharelado. Como metodología utilizamos la búsqueda bibliográfica de las referidas guías. Concluimos que la fuerte influencia del sector económico capitalista terminó por incrementar una precariedad en el área de la Educación Física, teniendo una temprana especialización del conocimiento científico orientado al área del desempeño profesional (AU).


Assuntos
Humanos , Educação Física e Treinamento , Área de Atuação Profissional , Adaptação Psicológica , Currículo , Mercado de Trabalho
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34831590

RESUMO

Producing enough doctors working in general practice or rural locations, or both, remains a key global policy focus. However, there is a lack of evidence about doctors' emerging commitment to these decisions. This study aimed to explore changes in the level of certainty about career interest in working in general practice and working rurally, as doctors pass through various early career stages. The participants were 775 eligible respondents to a 2019 survey of medical graduates of The University of Queensland from 2002-2018. Certainty levels of specialty choice were similar between GPs and specialists up until the beginning of registrar training. At that point, 65% of GPs compared with 80% of other specialists had strong certainty of their specialty field. Consistently (and significantly) less of those working rurally had strong certainty of the location where they wanted to practice medicine at each career time point. At the start of registrar training, a similar gap remained (strong certainty: 51% rural versus 63% metropolitan). This study provides new evidence that career intent certainty is more delayed for the cohort choosing general practice and rural practice than the other options. The low level of certainty in early career highlights the importance of regular positive experiences that help to promote the uptake of general practice and rural practice.


Assuntos
Medicina Geral , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Escolha da Profissão , Medicina de Família e Comunidade , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários , Recursos Humanos
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