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1.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 565, 2024 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38745301

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The etiology of sleep bruxism in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is not yet fully clarified. This prospective clinical study aimed to investigate the connection between probable sleep bruxism, electromyographic muscle tone, and respiratory sleep patterns recorded during polysomnography. METHODS: 106 patients with OSA (74 males, 31 females, mean age: 56.1 ± 11.4 years) were divided into two groups (sleep bruxism: SB; no sleep bruxism: NSB). Probable SB were based on the AASM criteria: self-report of clenching/grinding, orofacial symptoms upon awakening, abnormal tooth wear and hypertrophy of the masseter muscle. Both groups underwent clinical examination for painful muscle symptoms aligned with Temporomandibular Disorders Diagnostic Criteria (DC/TMD), such as myalgia, myofascial pain, and headache attributed to temporomandibular disorder. Additionally, non-complaint positive muscle palpation and orofacial-related limitations (Jaw Functional Limited Scale-20: JFLS-20) were assessed. A one-night polysomnography with electromyographic masseter muscle tone (EMG) measurement was performed. Descriptive data, inter-group comparisons and multivariate logistic regression were calculated. RESULTS: OSA patients had a 37.1% prevalence of SB. EMG muscle tone (N1-N3, REM; P = 0.001) and the number of hypopneas (P = 0.042) were significantly higher in the sleep bruxism group. While measures like apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI), respiratory-disturbance-index (RDI), apnea index (AI), hypopnea-index (HI), number of arousals, and heart rate (1/min) were elevated in sleep bruxers, the differences were not statistically significant. There was no difference in sleep efficiency (SE; P = 0.403). Non-complaint masseter muscle palpation (61.5%; P = 0.015) and myalgia (41%; P = 0.010) were significant higher in SB patients. Multivariate logistic regression showed a significant contribution of EMG muscle tone and JFLS-20 to bruxism risk. CONCLUSION: Increased EMG muscle tone and orofacial limitations can predict sleep bruxism in OSA patients. Besides, SB patients suffer more from sleep disorder breathing. Thus, sleep bruxism seems to be not only an oral health related problem in obstructive apnea. Consequently, interdisciplinary interventions are crucial for effectively treating these patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Philipps-University Marburg (reg. no. 13/22-2022) and registered at the "German Clinical Trial Register, DRKS" (DRKS0002959).


Assuntos
Eletromiografia , Polissonografia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/fisiopatologia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/complicações , Bruxismo do Sono/complicações , Bruxismo do Sono/fisiopatologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Músculo Masseter/fisiopatologia , Saúde Bucal , Adulto , Tono Muscular/fisiologia
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38791756

RESUMO

Sleep bruxism (SB) can be determined with different diagnostic procedures. The relationship between psychometric variables and SB varies depending on the diagnostic method. The aim of the study was to compare the association between SB and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL; measured by the Oral Health Impact Profile, OHIP), anxiety (measured by the State-Trait anxiety inventory, STAI), and stress (single scale variable) depending on the diagnostic method in the same sample. N = 45 participants were examined by non-instrumental (possible/probable SB) and instrumental methods (definite SB). The OHIP differed significantly between possible SB (median = 4) and non-SB (median = 0) with W = 115, p = 0.01, and probable SB (median = 6) and non-SB (median = 0) with W = 101, p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the OHIP score between definite SB and non-SB. For the other psychometric variables, the analyses revealed no significant differences between SB and non-SB in all diagnostic procedures. The results suggest that there is a difference between possible/probable and definite SB with respect to the association with OHRQoL. Certain aspects of possible/probable SB might be responsible for the poor OHRQoL, which are not measured in definite SB.


Assuntos
Psicometria , Qualidade de Vida , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/psicologia , Feminino , Masculino , Adulto , Adulto Jovem , Ansiedade , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estresse Psicológico , Saúde Bucal , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
J. negat. no posit. results ; 9(1): 645-655, Abr 5, 2024. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-232274

RESUMO

Objetivo: Caracterizar la arquitectura del sueño en un grupo poblacional de adultos con bruxismo del sueño, en forma general y según sexo.Materiales y método: Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo, con un muestreo por intención de 33 polisomnografías que identificaban sujetos con bruxismo del sueño, según el “cut off” sugerido por Lavigne et al (25 eventos /hora), entre los años 2011-2019. Se consideraron las variables sexo, edad, peso, talla e índice de masa corporal (IMC). Se determinó la arquitectura del sueño en cuanto a duración de las etapas del sueño, micro despertares y eventos de bruxismo. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de las variables y se compraron los resultados entre los sexos.Resultados: En el grupo poblacional 64% eran mujeres y 36% hombres. El promedio de edad fue de 32.5 años, de talla 1.65, de peso 68 kg, con un IMC promedio de 24.89 (peso normal). Los sujetos tuvieron un promedio de 387.6 horas de sueño, 270 minutos en NMOR y 10.8 en MOR, con un promedio de 50 micro despertares durante la noche y de 48.64 eventos de bruxismo por hora. Según sexo los valores en minutos fueron (p>0.05): NMOR (H: 316.2 – M:256.8); MOR (H: 105 – M:104.4); microdespertares (H :58.9 – M: 45.1); Eventos de BS/hora: (H:48.6 – M: 46.6) Los sujetos con BS durmieron, en promedio, un mayor número de minutos en decúbito lateral (196,59).Conclusión: Los sujetos con BS registran determinadas características en la arquitectura del sueño que deben considerarse. No hubo diferencia en la arquitectura del sueño según sexo. (AU)


Objective: To characterize sleep architecture in a population group of adults with sleep bruxism, in general and by sex. Materials and method: Retrospective descriptive study, with intentional sampling of 33 polysomnographies that identified subjects with sleep bruxism,according to the “cut off” suggested by Lavigne et al (25 events /hour/), between the years 2011-2019. The variables sex, age, weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were considered. Sleep architecture was determined in terms of duration of sleep stages, micro-awakenings, and bruxism events. A descriptive anlysis of the variables was carried out and the results were compared between the sexes.Results: In the population group, 64% were women and 36% men. The average age was 32.5 years, height 1.65 m, weight 68 kg, with an average BMI of 24.89 (normal weight). Subjects had an average of 387.6 minutes of sleep, 270 minutes in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and 10.8 in rapid eye movement (REM), with an average of 50 micro-awakenings during the night and 48.64 bruxism events per hour. According to sex, the values in minutes were: NMOR (H:316.2 – M:256.8); MOR (H:105 – M:104.4); microawakenings (H:58.9 – M:45.1); BS events/hour: (H:48.6 – M: 46.6), no significant differences were found between them (p>0.05). Subjects with BS slept, on average, a greater number of minutes in the lateral decubitus position (196.59). Conclusion: Subjects with BS register certain characteristics in their sleep architecture that must be considered. There was no difference in sleeparchitecture according to sex.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília , Bruxismo do Sono , Fases do Sono , Sono , Epidemiologia Descritiva , Estudos Retrospectivos
4.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 131(4): 151-158, 2024 04.
Artigo em Holandês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591118

RESUMO

What is the prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis? 3 groups (of 50 participants each) were examined for a possible TMD diagnosis: 1. patients with early rheumatoid arthritis, 2. at-risk individuals, and 3. healthy controls. A possible association with bruxism, determined on the basis of self-reporting and clinical features, was also examined. At-risk patients had a higher prevalence of TMD pain diagnoses compared to healthy controls (p = 0.046). Within the early rheumatoid arthritis group, seronegative patients had a higher prevalence of TMD pain diagnoses than seropositive patients (p = 0.048). No further differences in the prevalence of TMD diagnoses were found between the groups. Participants with a TMD pain diagnosis were more often diagnosed with probable sleep bruxism than those without a TMD pain diagnosis. The prevalence of TMD pain is increased in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative early rheumatoid arthritis patients, and is associated with signs of bruxism.


Assuntos
Artrite Reumatoide , Bruxismo , Bruxismo do Sono , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular , Humanos , Bruxismo/epidemiologia , Bruxismo/complicações , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Bruxismo do Sono/epidemiologia , Dor Facial/epidemiologia , Dor Facial/etiologia , Artrite Reumatoide/complicações , Artrite Reumatoide/epidemiologia
5.
Acta Odontol Scand ; 83: 120-125, 2024 Apr 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38578211

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to assess the effects of respiratory exercises (inspiratory and expiratory) in individuals with sleep bruxism (SB) and associated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial including individuals with SB and associated respiratory events in OSA. Respiratory physical therapy was performed using inspiratory (Threshold® IMT), expiratory (Threshold® PEP) muscle training, and compared with a placebo group. A total of 30 daily respiratory cycles (inspiration and expiration) were performed five times a week for 12 weeks. Individuals were reassessed at two times, at baseline (T1) and after 12 weeks of training (T2) by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Polysomnography. RESULTS: Awakening was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between the inspiratory group and placebo 12 weeks after respiratory physical therapy. The number of contractions of the masseter muscle differed between the inspiratory, expiratory, and placebo groups (p ≤ 0.05). CONCLUSION: Respiratory physical therapy for OSA improved awaking levels in 80 and 67% of the number of masseter muscle contractions, when compared to placebo. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (No. RBR-9F6JKM).


Assuntos
Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Brasil , Exercícios Respiratórios , Método Duplo-Cego , Polissonografia , Sono , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/terapia , Bruxismo do Sono/terapia
6.
J Oral Rehabil ; 51(7): 1207-1212, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38572841

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most of the respiratory events in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in supine position. It has been reported that the contraction of masseter muscles is dependent on the occurrence of arousals rather than on the occurrence of respiratory events. OBJECTIVES: This study had two aims: (1) to compare the rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) index in supine position (RMMA_sup) and in non-supine positions (RMMA_nsup) in adults with OSA; and (2) to determine the associations between RMMA index in both supine position and non-supine positions on the one hand, and several demographic and polysomnographic variables on the other hand. METHODS: One hundred OSA participants (36 females and 64 males; mean age = 50.3 years (SD = 10.5)) were selected randomly from among patients with a full-night polysomnographic recording. RMMA_sup index and RMMA_nsup index were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to predict RMMA index both in supine and non-supine positions based on several demographic and polysomnographic variables. RESULTS: In patients with OSA, the RMMA_sup index was significantly higher than the RMMA_nsup index (p < .001). RMMA_sup index was significantly associated with the arousal index (p = .002) and arousal index in supine position (p < .001). RMMA_nsup index was only significantly associated with the arousal index in non-supine positions (p = .004). CONCLUSION: Within the limitations of this study, RMMAs occur more frequently in supine position than in non-supine positions in patients with OSA. In both sleep positions, RMMAs are associated with arousals.


Assuntos
Polissonografia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/fisiopatologia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/complicações , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Bruxismo do Sono/fisiopatologia , Bruxismo do Sono/complicações , Decúbito Dorsal/fisiologia , Adulto , Músculo Masseter/fisiopatologia , Eletromiografia
7.
Braz Oral Res ; 38: e017, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38477803

RESUMO

Occlusal stabilization splints are the most common treatment for controlling the deleterious effects of sleep bruxism. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a low-cost, mixed occlusal splint (MOS) compared to that of a rigid splint. A randomized clinical trial was performed on 43 adults of both sexes with possible sleep bruxism and satisfactory dental conditions. They were divided into rigid occlusal splint (ROS) (n = 23) and MOS (n = 20) groups. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain intensity (visual analog scale), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), indentations in the oral mucosa, anxiety, and depression (HADS), number of days of splint use, and splint wear were evaluated. All variables were evaluated at baseline (T0), 6 months (T6), and 12 months (T12) after splint installation (T0), and splint wear was evaluated at T6 and T12. Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, non-parametric Friedman's analysis of variance for paired samples and pairwise multiple comparisons, Pearson's chi-square test, two-proportion z-test, non-parametric McNemar's and Cochran's Q, and Wilcoxon tests were used (p < 0.05). In both groups, there was a decrease in TMJ pain and pain intensity over time and improvements in the quality of life scores. At T6, there was a higher rate of splint wear in the MOS group than in the ROS group (p = 0.023). The MOS showed a higher rate of wear than the rigid splint but had similar results for the other variables. Therefore, the use of a mixed splint appears to be effective in controlling the signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism.


Assuntos
Placas Oclusais , Bruxismo do Sono , Adulto , Feminino , Masculino , Humanos , Contenções , Qualidade de Vida , Espécies Reativas de Oxigênio
8.
Dent Med Probl ; 61(2): 165-167, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38488764

RESUMO

This commentary on sleep medicine explores whether the potential relationship between sleep bruxism (SB), masticatory muscle pain (MMP) and sleep breathing disorders (SBDs)contributes to improving the management of co-occurring conditions.The paper is divided into 2 sections: (1) reviewing the debate on SB nosology; and (2) based on the publications from the Martynowicz & Wieckiewicz research group, exploringthe role of intermittent hypoxia as a putative mechanism endotype that may link such co-occurrence among individuals for whom characteristics are not yet clear.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/complicações , Músculos da Mastigação/fisiologia , Sono/fisiologia , Dor , Hipóxia/complicações
9.
Eur J Oral Sci ; 132(2): e12979, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38421263

RESUMO

This systematic review answers the question: "Does occlusal appliance use influence masticatory muscle function of dentate individuals with sleep bruxism?". The literature search included six databases, grey literature, and manual search for articles. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials were included comparing muscle function of sleep bruxers before and after receiving occlusal appliances. Risk of bias was assessed with risk of bias assessment for randomized and non-randomized clinical trials tool. Twelve studies, three represent randomized clinical trials, were included. Risk of bias was considered low, moderate, or serious. Meta-analyses indicated that soft and hard appliances did not influence muscle activity and bite force of bruxers. Qualitative analysis showed that occlusal appliance use did not influence masticatory performance and muscle volume. However, it was effective in reducing tongue force. Certainty of evidence was considered very low for muscle activity when evaluated with hard appliances, and for bite force evaluated with both appliance materials. Low certainty of evidence was observed for muscle activity with soft appliances. Based on the findings of this meta-analysis, occlusal appliances do not affect masticatory muscle function of sleep bruxers. Regardless of appliance material, the activity of masseter and temporal, and bite force of sleep bruxers was not influenced.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Músculos da Mastigação , Músculo Masseter/fisiologia , Placas Oclusais , Sono
10.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(2): 142, 2024 Feb 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38347236

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional school-based study explored the influence of malocclusion on temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain complaints, and whether this association would be mediated by sleep bruxism in a representative sample of 7- to 8-year-old children. METHODS: Path analysis estimated direct, indirect, and total effects of occlusal features on sleep bruxism and TMD pain in 7- to 8-year-old children. Occlusal features were assessed with Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), orofacial pain complaints using the TMD pain screener, possible sleep bruxism based on self-reports, and probable sleep bruxism based on self-reports combined with clinical findings. Structural equation modeling analyzed data with confounding factors. RESULTS: From 580 participants, possible sleep bruxism was observed in 136 children (31.5%), probable sleep bruxism in 30 children (6.7%), and TMD pain complaints in 78 children (13.8%). Malocclusion had no direct effect on either possible sleep bruxism [standardized coefficient (SC) 0.000; p = 0.992], or TMD pain complaints (SC - 0.01; p = 0.740). When probable sleep bruxism was set as the mediator of interest, malocclusion did not directly affect probable sleep bruxism (SC 0.01; p = 0.766), nor TMD pain complaints (SC - 0.02; p = 0.515). A direct effect of probable sleep bruxism on TMD pain complaints was observed with an SC of 0.60 (p < 0.001). However, in neither case, malocclusion indirectly affected TMD pain complaints via bruxism. CONCLUSION: Malocclusion in 7- to 8-year-old children did not directly influence possible or probable sleep bruxism or TMD pain complaints. Instead, probable sleep bruxism was strongly associated with TMD pain complaints. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The impact of occlusal features on TMD pain complaints and bruxism has been a long-standing controversy in dentistry. However, the scientific literature linking this association may be inconsistent, mainly due to biased sample selection methods with inadequate consideration of confounders. Further research should try to identify additional risk factors for TMD pain in addition to probable sleep bruxism in children.


Assuntos
Bruxismo , Má Oclusão , Bruxismo do Sono , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular , Criança , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/complicações , Bruxismo/complicações , Estudos Transversais , Dor Facial/complicações , Autorrelato , Transtornos da Articulação Temporomandibular/complicações , Má Oclusão/complicações
11.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(2): 152, 2024 Feb 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38363350

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to investigate the association between self-reported awake/sleep bruxism, and orofacial pain with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHODS: A case-control study with a convenience sample was designed. Participants were recruited from a university-based Trauma Ambulatory. The diagnosis of PTSD was established through a clinical interview and the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I/P). Thirty-eight PTSD patients and 38 controls completed the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders Axis-II to categorize awake/sleep bruxism and orofacial pain. Following this, we performed a short clinical examination of the temporomandibular joint and extraoral muscles. RESULTS: Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that awake bruxism was associated with PTSD (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.01-11.27, p = 0.047). Sleep bruxism was not associated with any covariate included in the model. In a Poisson regression model, PTSD (IRR = 3.01, 95% CI = 1.38-6.55, p = 0.005) and the muscle pain/discomfort (IRR = 5.12, 95% CI = 2.80-9.36, p < 0.001) were significant predictors for current orofacial pain. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD was associated with self-reported awake bruxism and low-intensity orofacial pain. These conditions were frequent outcomes in patients previously exposed to traumatic events. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: We suggest including a two-question screening for bruxism in psychiatry/psychology interviews to improve under-identification and to prevent harmful consequences at the orofacial level.


Assuntos
Bruxismo , Bruxismo do Sono , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos , Humanos , Bruxismo/complicações , Bruxismo/diagnóstico , Bruxismo do Sono/complicações , Autorrelato , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Dor Facial/etiologia , Dor Facial/diagnóstico
12.
J Atten Disord ; 28(6): 1017-1023, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38327066

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Literature presents conflicting results regarding malocclusions, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and sleep bruxism in children with ADHD. Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of these parameters. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted on 40 consecutive ADHD children referred to the Paediatric Dentistry Unit of Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "A. Gemelli" IRCCS, Rome. All subjects underwent an orthodontic examination and were screened for OSA and sleep bruxism. Data were compared to a sex- and aged-matched control group. RESULTS: Prevalence of high risk of OSA in children with ADHD was 62.5% compared to 10% in the control group (p < .00001). No differences were found in any of the occlusal variables examined between children with ADHD and controls (p > .05). An increased prevalence of sleep bruxism was observed in ADHD children (40%) compared to controls (7.5%) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: A higher prevalence of OSA risk and probable sleep bruxism were observed in ADHD patients compared with controls. No significant differences were observed in malocclusions d.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade , Má Oclusão , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Criança , Idoso , Estudos Prospectivos , Bruxismo do Sono/epidemiologia , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/epidemiologia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/epidemiologia , Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono/diagnóstico , Má Oclusão/epidemiologia , Má Oclusão/diagnóstico
13.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 155(4): 329-343, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38363252

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The concept of sleep bruxism (SB) has evolved exponentially over the past several decades. Many theories and hypotheses have been proposed as to the definition, pathophysiology, and management of SB, from the early 1960s through the present. The role of peripheral factors, such as dental occlusion, in the pathogenesis of SB has been discarded. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors searched several electronic databases (ie, PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Embase, and Ovid MEDLINE) for studies on bruxism. The search was conducted from January 1961 through May 2023 and yielded 4,612 articles, of which 312 were selected for comprehensive review after eliminating duplicates and nonfocused articles. RESULTS: There has been an evident progressive shift from the role of peripheral factors, such as dental occlusion, to more central factors, such as the involvement of a central pattern generator as well as the autonomic nervous system, in the genesis of bruxing movements. There is continued robust interest in the dental community to elucidate the contributing factors involved in SB. CONCLUSIONS AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The neurophysiology of SB appears to be leaning more toward central rather than peripheral factors. There is increasing evidence of the role of the autonomic nervous system, genetics, and comorbidities in the genesis of SB. The scientific literature seems to refute the role of dental occlusion in the causation of bruxing movements. As per the literature, there has been a paradigm shift in the definition and genesis of SB and its possible dental implications and management, which also highlights the need for succinct scientific studies in this regard.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/diagnóstico , Bruxismo do Sono/terapia , Polissonografia/efeitos adversos
14.
J Oral Biosci ; 66(1): 1-4, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38309695

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The Journal of Oral Biosciences is dedicated to advancing and disseminating fundamental knowledge with regard to every aspect of oral biosciences. This review features review articles in the fields of "bone regeneration," "periodontitis," "periodontal diseases," "salivary glands," "sleep bruxism," and "Sjögren's syndrome." HIGHLIGHT: This review focuses on human demineralized dentin and cementum matrices for bone regeneration, oxidized low-density lipoprotein in periodontal disease and systemic conditions, the relationship between inflammatory mediators in migraine and periodontitis, phosphoinositide signaling molecules in the salivary glands, and the pathophysiologies of sleep bruxism and Sjögren's syndrome. CONCLUSION: The review articles featured in the Journal of Oral Biosciences have broadened the knowledge of readers regarding various aspects of oral biosciences. The current editorial review discusses the findings and significance of these review articles.


Assuntos
Doenças Periodontais , Periodontite , Síndrome de Sjogren , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Glândulas Salivares , Literatura de Revisão como Assunto
15.
J Oral Sci ; 66(1): 66-69, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38233157

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study aimed to compare awake bruxism events between subjective and objective evaluations using a questionnaire survey and a modified portable electromyography (EMG) device, and to examine correlations between sleep quality and awake bruxism. METHODS: The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and awareness of awake bruxism as clarified via interviews were conducted on 34 participants as subjective evaluations. The EMG device was used to record left temporal muscle activity for 6.5 h (from 09:00 to 15:30) and the number of awake bruxism episodes per hour. The participants were then classified into "bruxer" and "non-bruxer" groups based on the number of awake bruxism episodes. RESULTS: The mean number of awake bruxism episodes per hour was 33.6 ± 21.4, and 23% of the participants who reported having no awareness of awake bruxism in the interviews were defined as "bruxers" in the objective evaluations. In the bruxer group, positive correlations were found between the number of awake bruxism episodes and both ESS and PSQI scores. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that objective measurements using a portable EMG device can increase the diagnostic accuracy for awake bruxism, and that sleep quality is a major risk factor for awake bruxism.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/diagnóstico , Vigília , Eletromiografia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Músculo Temporal
16.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 81, 2024 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38221633

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In the classification of bruxism patients based on electroencephalogram (EEG), feature extraction is essential. The method of using multi-channel EEG fusing electrocardiogram (ECG) and Electromyography (EMG) signal features has been proved to have good performance in bruxism classification, but the classification performance based on single channel EEG signal is still understudied. We investigate the efficacy of single EEG channel in bruxism classification. METHODS: We have extracted time-domain, frequency-domain, and nonlinear features from single EEG channel to classify bruxism. Five common bipolar EEG recordings from 2 bruxism patients and 4 healthy controls during REM sleep were analyzed. The time domain (mean, standard deviation, root mean squared value), frequency domain (absolute, relative and ratios power spectral density (PSD)), and non-linear features (sample entropy) of different EEG frequency bands were analyzed from five EEG channels of each participant. Fine tree algorithm was trained and tested for classifying sleep bruxism with healthy controls using five-fold cross-validation. RESULTS: Our results demonstrate that the C4P4 EEG channel was most effective for classification of sleep bruxism that yielded 95.59% sensitivity, 98.44% specificity, 97.84% accuracy, and 94.20% positive predictive value (PPV). CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate the feasibility of sleep bruxism classification using single EEG channel and provides an experimental foundation for the development of a future portable automatic sleep bruxism detection system.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Fases do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/diagnóstico , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Eletroencefalografia/métodos , Algoritmos
17.
J Craniofac Surg ; 35(4): 1157-1159, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38284877

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the information on YouTube regarding night guards (NGs). YouTube was systematically searched using the keyword "night guards." Two independent reviewers examined the first 100 videos and exclusion criteria were applied. Descriptive characteristics of the remaining 60 videos were recorded. In addition, the purpose, target audience, and source of the included videos were collected. A 12-point content scale (CS) was used to evaluate video content, and the Global Quality Scale (GQS) was used to determine video quality. Statistical analyses were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, and the correlation between scores was evaluated using Spearman rho. Of the included videos, 50% were uploaded by dentists/health institutions, 26% by commercial sources and 24% by laypersons. The aim of 80% of the videos was to inform laypeople and 14% to inform professionals only. The content discussed the most (59.3%) was the production stages of NGs. The mean CS and GQS score of the videos were 2.06 ± 1.35 (poor) and 1.71 ± 0.88 (generally poor), respectively. A positive correlation was found between the CS and GQS scores ( r = 0.447). YouTube videos were found to be poor in terms of both content and quality. Since NGs for treating bruxism will always be a trending topic for patients on social media, the content of YouTube videos should be checked and enriched by professionals so that patients can access accurate information, especially about NGs obtained over the counter.


Assuntos
Mídias Sociais , Gravação em Vídeo , Humanos , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/normas , Dispositivos para o Cuidado Bucal Domiciliar , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Bruxismo do Sono
18.
Sleep Med Rev ; 74: 101906, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38295573

RESUMO

This systematic review and meta-analysis (MA) aimed to evaluate the diagnostic validity of portable electromyography (EMG) diagnostic devices compared to the reference standard method polysomnography (PSG) in assessing sleep bruxism. This systematic review was completed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement and was registered with PROSPERO prior to the accomplishment of the main search. Ten clinical studies on humans, assessing the diagnostic accuracy of portable instrumental approaches with respect to PSG, were included in the review. Methodological shortcomings were identified by QUADAS-2 quality assessment. The certainty of the evidence analysis was established by different levels of evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) framework. A meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy was performed with multiple thresholds per study applying a two-stage random effects model, using the thresholds offered by the studies and based on the number of EMG bruxism events per hour presented by the participants. Five studies were included. The MA indicated that portable EMG diagnostic devices showed a very good diagnostic capacity, although a high variability is evident in the studies with some outliers. Very low quality of evidence due to high risk of bias and high heterogeneity among included studies suggests that portable devices have shown high sensitivity and specificity when diagnosing sleep bruxism (SB) compared to polysomnography. The tests performed in the MA found an estimated optimal cut-off point of 7 events/hour of SB with acceptably high sensitivity and specificity for the EMG portable devices.


Assuntos
Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/diagnóstico , Polissonografia/métodos , Eletromiografia/métodos
19.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 108, 2024 Jan 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238683

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bruxism, a common oral parafunctional behavior characterized by the grinding or clenching of teeth, is a multifactorial condition with potentially detrimental effects on oral health and overall well-being. In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between bruxism and alcohol abuse, as both are prevalent issues that may share underlying factors and exacerbate each other. This systematic review, following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement, aims to evaluate the frequency of bruxism among individuals with alcohol abuse. METHODS: A comprehensive search of electronic databases, including PubMed, Lilacs, Scopus and Web of Science, will be conducted to identify relevant studies published up to the knowledge cutoff date in January 2023. The search strategy will include keywords related to bruxism, alcohol abuse, and their synonyms. Inclusion criteria will encompass original research studies, such as observational, cross-sectional, cohort, and case-control studies, as well as clinical trials, that examine the relationship between bruxism and alcohol abuse. Two independent reviewers will perform the study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment, with discrepancies resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The systematic review will present a summary of the identified studies, including the study design, characteristics of the study populations, and key findings related to the association between bruxism and alcohol abuse. The potential mechanisms underlying this relationship will also be explored. Subgroup analyses and the quality of evidence will be assessed. Finally, the implications of this association for clinical practice and further research will be discussed. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review will contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between bruxism and alcohol abuse, shedding light on potential risk factors, mechanisms, and clinical implications. The findings may have significant implications for the prevention, management, and treatment of bruxism, particularly in individuals with a history of alcohol abuse.


Assuntos
Alcoolismo , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Alcoolismo/complicações , Alcoolismo/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Bruxismo do Sono/epidemiologia , Bruxismo do Sono/etiologia , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
20.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 29, 2024 01 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38182999

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sleep bruxism is a prevalent condition in dentistry practice, characterized by involuntary grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep. Several therapies, including occlusal splints, have been used to manage sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorders, including occlusal splints. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of different occlusal splints in managing sleep bruxism. METHODS: The PICO framework encompasses the characterization of the population, intervention, comparison, and pertinent outcomes. A comprehensive and systematic literature review was conducted on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar to identify grey literature. The search specifically targeted scientific studies published before September 20, 2023. The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool assessed the accuracy of the included Randomized Control Trials (RCTs). The modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale assessed non-randomized studies. Data were systematically extracted, synthesized, and reported thematically. RESULTS: Out of the total of 808 articles that were evaluated, only 15 articles were found to meet the specified inclusion criteria. Adjustable splints, such as full-occlusion biofeedback splints, were more effective in reducing sleep bruxism episodes, improving patient-reported symptoms, and enhancing overall well-being. The impact of different occlusal sprints on electromyographic activity varies, and potential adverse effects should be considered individually. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides valuable insights into the effectiveness of occlusal splints in managing sleep bruxism. The results of this study indicate that occlusal splint therapy is a viable treatment approach for sleep bruxism.


Assuntos
Placas Oclusais , Bruxismo do Sono , Humanos , Bruxismo do Sono/terapia , Sono
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