Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 1.191
Filtrar
1.
Vet J ; 305: 106133, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38740176

RESUMO

Tooth resorption (TR) is one of the most common dental diseases of cats. It is a painful condition leading to tooth loss. The etiology of TR remains unclear, but old age, breed, other oral and dental diseases, and environmental factors are suspected predisposing factors. In our study, we used part of the data from the extensive feline health online survey of 8115 Finnish cats. As TR is difficult to detect and as the feline health survey included diagnoses defined by both veterinarians and the owners, we limited our study to a subpopulation of cats diagnosed with oral or dental disease by a veterinarian and had dental examination or surgery under sedation (n=944). We utilized case-control study analysed by multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk factors and breed variation of feline TR. The 202 cats diagnosed with TR were defined as TR cases and the remaining 742 cats as controls. The frequency of veterinarian-diagnosed TR was 3.9% in the health survey data (316/8115) and 21% in the subpopulation (202/944). The risk of TR increased with age (14.7% in youngest and 25.3% in oldest age group). Our finding that TR was significantly associated with gingivitis or periodontitis in cats that had also calculus (OR: 2.49 and 3.70, respectively) suggests that inflammatory changes caused by calculus increase the risk of TR. We found that Cornish Rex, European, and Ragdoll are at higher risk for TR (OR: 2.44, 2.98 and 2.90, respectively). Exotic-Persians breed group had lower risk (OR: 0.28). TR was not observed in Turkish van or Devon Rex. The differences between breeds highlight a genetic contribution. In addition, female cats that had food available constantly had significantly less TR than female cats that had feeding times (OR: 0.44). The underlying reasons for this remain unexplained in our study.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Reabsorção de Dente , Animais , Gatos , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/genética , Doenças do Gato/etiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/genética , Feminino , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Finlândia/epidemiologia , Predisposição Genética para Doença
2.
Clin Oral Investig ; 28(5): 279, 2024 Apr 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38671170

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Pre-eruptive intramural resorption (PEIR) is defined as an abnormal, well-circumscribed radiolucency within the coronal dentin of the tooth, which is often overlooked in plain radiographs. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of PEIR and its related factors using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). METHODS: CBCT images of 590 unerupted teeth were evaluated for the presence of PEIR, location of PEIR, number of lesions in the affected tooth, PEIR score, tooth angulation, tooth position, and pericoronal space. Binary logistic tests were used to analyze the association between the characteristics of PEIR and the patient's demographic data and related factors. RESULTS: The tooth prevalence of PEIR was 13.6% among unerupted teeth. However, it was noteworthy that 19.2% of the unerupted teeth with PEIR were planned to be kept. PEIR was significantly associated with transverse (p = 0.020), inverted-angulated (p = 0.035), and centrally-positioned teeth (p = 0.043). The severity of PEIR was more pronounced in teeth with distal (p = 0.019), lingual (p = 0.023), or inverted-angulated (p = 0.040) positions, and in the absence of pericoronal space (p = 0.036). CONCLUSION: PEIR should be suspected in transverse, inverted-angulated, centrally positioned unerupted teeth, particularly in molars, with no pericoronal space. Further monitoring through CBCT is recommended in such cases. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The management of unerupted teeth does not always involve surgical removal. Instead, they could be utilized for artificial eruption or tooth transplantation. The present study emphasizes the significance of early detection of PEIR. Clinical recommendations for screening PEIR in unerupted teeth are also proposed, which can be applied to routine plain radiographs.


Assuntos
Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Reabsorção de Dente , Dente não Erupcionado , Humanos , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico/métodos , Dente não Erupcionado/diagnóstico por imagem , Masculino , Feminino , Prevalência , Adulto , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Adolescente , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Criança , Idoso , Estudos Retrospectivos
3.
Chin J Dent Res ; 27(1): 89-99, 2024 Mar 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38546524

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore the genetic background and clinical phenotypes of multiple idiopathic cervical root resorption (MICRR) in a Chinese family. METHODS: The proband and his three family members were clinically examined and had radiographs taken with a radiovisiography (RVG) system and CBCT to define the diagnosis of MICRR. Genomic DNA (gDNA) was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the patient, his father, mother and younger sister for whole exome sequencing (WES). The pathogenicity of rare variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) less than 0.005 were analysed following possible inheritance patterns, predicted results from 12 software programs, the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) 2015 criteria, and information from ClinVar, OMIM and HGMD databases as well as gene function. RESULTS: The proband presented the typical MICRR phenotypes such as thin cervical pulp wall and apple core-like lesions in radiographs. Following the recessive inheritance pattern, WES analysis identified SHROOM2, SYTL5, MAGED1 and FLNA with a higher chance of causing MICRR. Four genes with compound heterozygous variants and another 27 genes with de novo variants either in autosomal-dominant or autosomal-recessive pattern were also found to have the potential pathogenicity. CONCLUSION: A total of 35 novel potential pathogenic genes were found to be associated with MICRR from a Chinese family through WES. The new genetic background of MICRR may be helpful for clinical and molecular diagnosis.


Assuntos
Reabsorção da Raiz , Reabsorção de Dente , Feminino , Humanos , Proteínas de Transporte , Genes Reguladores , Proteínas de Membrana , Reabsorção da Raiz/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção da Raiz/genética , Masculino , População do Leste Asiático
4.
J Small Anim Pract ; 65(6): 387-393, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38234230

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the relative diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of oral clinical examination, full-mouth dental radiography, and cone-beam CT for the detection of tooth resorption in cats, and to estimate the prevalence of tooth resorption in unowned, unsocialised cats in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cadavers of 144 adult cats underwent an oral examination, full-mouth dental radiography, and cone-beam CT. Sensitivity and specificity of the three tests, along with the true prevalence, overall and stratified by sex and tooth location, were estimated using latent class methods. RESULTS: We found cone-beam CT to be the superior image modality, with a sensitivity of 99.5% and a specificity of 99.8%. Dental radiography had a sensitivity of 78.9% and a specificity of 100%, and oral clinical examination had a sensitivity of only 36.0% and specificity of 99.9%. We estimated the prevalence of tooth resorption among unowned unsocialised cats in Denmark to be 40% of adult individuals, and 6.1% of teeth. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: When dealing with tooth resorption, cone-beam CT can help the operator to find and treat affected teeth that could otherwise go undiagnosed. The prevalence of tooth resorption among unowned, unsocialised cats in Denmark does not appear to differ from other populations of cats.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico , Radiografia Dentária , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Reabsorção de Dente , Animais , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico , Gatos , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Feminino , Masculino , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico/veterinária , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico por imagem , Radiografia Dentária/veterinária , Prevalência , Cadáver
5.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 28(6): e2323177, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38198391

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare alignment efficiency and root resorption between nickel-titanium (NiTi) and copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi) archwires after complete alignment in mandibular anterior region. METHODS: In this two-arm parallel single-blind randomized controlled trial, forty-four patients with Class I malocclusion with mandibular anterior crowding were recruited form orthodontic clinic of All India Institute of Medical Sciences (Jodhpur, India). Patients were randomly allocated into NiTi and CuNiTi groups, with a 1:1 allocation. Alignment was performed using 0.014-in, 0.016-in, 0.018-in, 0.019x0.025-in archwire sequence in the respective groups, which terminated in 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless-steel working archwire. The primary outcome was alignment efficiency, measured on study models from baseline (T0) to the first, second, third, fourth and fifth-month (T5). Secondary outcome was root resorption, measured from CBCT scans taken at T0 and T5. Mixed-factorial ANOVA was used to compare Little's Irregularity Index (LII). For assessing the proportion of patients with complete alignment at the end of each month, Kaplan-Meier survival curve was built and time to treatment completion was compared between groups using log rank test. Paired t-test was used to assess external apical root resorption (EARR) within groups, whereas independent t-test was used to evaluate LII and EARR between the groups. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were recruited in each group. One patient was lost to follow-up in the CuNiTi group. No statistically significant differences were observed in alignment efficiency between the groups (p>0.05). Intergroup comparison revealed that the changes in root measurement in three-dimensions were not statistically significant (p>0.05), except for mandibular right central incisor, which showed increased resorption at root apex in NiTi group (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: The two alignment archwires showed similar rate of alignment at all time points. Root resorption measurement did not differ between the NiTi and CuNiTi groups, except for the mandibular right central incisor, which showed more resorption in NiTi group.


Assuntos
Reabsorção da Raiz , Reabsorção de Dente , Humanos , Reabsorção da Raiz/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção da Raiz/etiologia , Cobre , Níquel , Método Simples-Cego , Titânio
6.
Odontology ; 112(1): 256-263, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37248355

RESUMO

This retrospective study aimed to investigate the prevalence of pre-eruptive intracoronal resorption (PEIR) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to explore the mechanism and characteristics of PEIR development. CBCT images of patients aged ≤ 20 years with unerupted teeth at Hiroshima University Hospital were collected. We examined 1530 patients with 10,576 unerupted teeth. Teeth with PEIR were identified for the detailed location and size of the PEIR in the crown using multiplanar reconstruction. The subject and tooth prevalence rates of PEIR were 1.96% and 0.31%, respectively. The teeth that were the most commonly affected by PEIR were mandibular third molars (3.09%). The prevalence of PEIR was significantly higher in females than in males, and higher in the mandible than in the maxilla. No significant difference between in the position of PEIR within the crown was observed. Moreover, CBCT imaging revealed the onset of PEIR in one case. This study demonstrated the prevalence of PEIR and identified statistically significant sex- and location-based differences. Furthermore, one case of CBCT imaging supports the hypothesis that the onset of PEIR was due to resorption after completion of the crown.


Assuntos
Reabsorção de Dente , Dente não Erupcionado , Masculino , Feminino , Humanos , Dente não Erupcionado/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico
7.
J Vet Dent ; 41(4): 301-311, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38130130

RESUMO

This study evaluated observer variations in the interpretation of radiographic evidence for periodontal disease, tooth resorption, and endodontic disease in dogs. Forty dental radiographs were evaluated for 12 different parameters (periapical destruction of bone, wider than expected root canal, narrower than expected root canal, apical root resorption, loss of alveolar bone, external surface resorption, external replacement resorption, external inflammatory resorption, external cervical root resorption, internal surface resorption, internal replacement resorption, internal inflammatory resorption). Interpretations by 20 veterinary dentists, 10 veterinary dental residents, and 10 veterinary students were analyzed for consistency within groups and between groups by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs [95% CI]). Additionally, the agreement rate between groups compared to histopathological diagnosis, when available, and to a consensus group were evaluated. The results showed fair to good interobserver agreement for all participants when looking at all questions simultaneously (0.578 [0.515-0.635]) and with the consensus group (0.483 [0.451-0.517]). However, questions pertaining to various types of tooth resorption scored the lowest ICCs ranging from 0.005 (-0.311 to 0.321) to 0.189 (-0.105 to 0.402) across individual groups. Students had the lowest agreement compared to the consensus group for all questions (0.383 [0.347-0.421]) with fair to good agreement involving groups of residents (0.501 [0.465-0.538]), recently boarded diplomates (0.541 [0.506-0.578]), and more experienced diplomates (0.545 [0.510-0.582]). While dental radiographs are essential for clinical decision making, this study shows that interpretation of radiographs is highly subjective.


Assuntos
Variações Dependentes do Observador , Radiografia Dentária , Animais , Cães , Radiografia Dentária/veterinária , Radiografia Dentária/métodos , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudantes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Doenças Periodontais/diagnóstico por imagem , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Reabsorção da Raiz/veterinária , Reabsorção da Raiz/diagnóstico por imagem
8.
Sensors (Basel) ; 23(21)2023 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37960639

RESUMO

Dental diagnostic imaging has progressed towards the use of advanced technologies such as 3D image processing. Since multidetector computed tomography (CT) is widely available in equine clinics, CT-based anatomical 3D models, segmentations, and measurements have become clinically applicable. This study aimed to use a 3D segmentation of CT images and volumetric measurements to investigate differences in the surface area and volume of equine incisors. The 3D Slicer was used to segment single incisors of 50 horses' heads and to extract volumetric features. Axial vertical symmetry, but not horizontal, of the incisors was evidenced. The surface area and volume differed significantly between temporary and permanent incisors, allowing for easy eruption-related clustering of the CT-based 3D images with an accuracy of >0.75. The volumetric features differed partially between center, intermediate, and corner incisors, allowing for moderate location-related clustering with an accuracy of >0.69. The volumetric features of mandibular incisors' equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) degrees were more than those for maxillary incisors; thus, the accuracy of EOTRH degree-related clustering was >0.72 for the mandibula and >0.33 for the maxilla. The CT-based 3D images of equine incisors can be successfully segmented using the routinely achieved multidetector CT data sets and the proposed data-processing approaches.


Assuntos
Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Cavalos , Animais , Incisivo/diagnóstico por imagem , Tomografia Computadorizada Multidetectores , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Hipercementose/veterinária , Análise por Conglomerados , Maxila
9.
Int J Paleopathol ; 43: 72-84, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37839223

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To utilize standardized clinical veterinary methods to analyze dental health in a series of Roman dog maxillae and mandibles and to compare results to modern clinical data. MATERIALS: 28 skulls of juvenile and adult dogs from three archaeological sites in Switzerland and Germany dating to the Roman period. METHODS: Standardized examination was carried out, which included metric radiographic assessment to diagnose oral pathology and estimate age at death. In one case, CT analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: The estimated average age at death was between three and four years old. Tooth fracture, periodontal disease, the presence of non-vital teeth, and brachycephalic skull form were found in the sample. Tooth resorption was unexpectedly noted. CONCLUSION: The study provides valuable insights into the dental health of dogs in the Roman era. Compared to modern dogs, Roman dogs examined in this study appear to have a shorter lifespan but display a high rate of pathological dental disease, while disease patterns were very similar to those of modern dogs. Dogs with pronounced brachycephalic features were found. SIGNIFICANCE: This pilot study is the first to use standardized clinical examination and recording techniques to assess dental health in dogs from archaeological contexts. It provides insight into the dental health of Roman era dogs and offers data upon which cross-populational studies can be initiated. LIMITATIONS: The sample size and geographic location of the archaeological sites were limited. SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Subsequent standardized studies, preferably in as many different Roman Empire regions as possible, are recommended.


Assuntos
Canidae , Doenças Periodontais , Reabsorção de Dente , Animais , Cães , Projetos Piloto , Doenças Periodontais/veterinária , Doenças Periodontais/patologia , Reabsorção de Dente/patologia , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Crânio/patologia , Mandíbula/patologia
10.
J Endod ; 49(12): 1747-1753, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37758063

RESUMO

Tooth resorption can occur either physiologically or pathologically and can be classified as internal or external. The term "external invasive resorption" (EIR) has been used to describe lesions originating from any surface defect exposing dentin. The absence of bacterial contamination, an intact pulp space, and a lesion consisting mainly of fibrovascular tissue characterize EIR. This study presents three cases of invasive resorption in unerupted teeth, emphasizing the importance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In two cases, the primary defect localized on the enamel surface, while in the third case, the focal point of the defect was not clear. CBCT provided detailed visualization of the resorption lesion's size and its relationship with surrounding structures, enhancing the diagnosis of EIR. Histological analysis of the third case confirmed the initial diagnosis. Invasive resorption can occur due to any surface defect in the case of unerupted teeth. Further research and correlation between radiographic and histological analysis are essential for the detection and classification systems in unerupted teeth.


Assuntos
Reabsorção da Raiz , Reabsorção de Dente , Dente não Erupcionado , Humanos , Tomografia Computadorizada de Feixe Cônico/métodos , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Polpa Dentária/patologia , Mandíbula , Reabsorção da Raiz/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção da Raiz/patologia
11.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 261(S2): S102-S107, 2023 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37734718

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare anamnestic factors in Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) in affected and nonaffected horses to detect risk factors for horses developing EOTRH. ANIMALS: A total of 154 Icelandic horses, aged 15 years and older, examined at 22 locations in Lower Saxony, Germany. The investigations took place from October 2020 to December 2021. METHODS: Anamnestic data were collected using an owner-completed questionnaire. Horses underwent a thorough physical examination and CBC. The rostral oral cavity was clinically examined, and intraoral radiographs of the incisors were taken. Clinical and radiographic findings were scored. Based on the results, the study population was separated into "EOTRH-affected" and "EOTRH-healthy" horses. Both groups were compared to identify differences within the anamnestic factors. In case of inconclusive findings, some horses were classified as "suspicious". RESULTS: The diagnosis of EOTRH was made in 72.2% (109/151) of horses. The risk of contracting the disease increased with the age of the horse (P = .004). In addition, there was a predisposition for male animals (P = .032). Feeding, keeping, and dental treatments showed no significant influence, while place of birth seemed to influence horses developing EOTRH (P = .017). CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The results highlight how widespread EOTRH is among the German Icelandic horse population and the need for raising awareness of EOTRH, as many horses were not suspected of having EOTRH beforehand. Moreover, numerous etiological propositions exist, but, to date, no studies have investigated their relevance.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Cavalos , Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Humanos , Masculino , Cavalos , Animais , Hipercementose/etiologia , Hipercementose/veterinária , Islândia , Prevalência , Doenças dos Cavalos/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/etiologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/diagnóstico , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/etiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária
12.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 165(9): 564-572, 2023 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37646096

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) is an increasingly diagnosed degenerative dental disease in aged horses. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of EOTRH in horses admitted to the Equine Hospital, University of Zurich, for dental procedures from 2004 to 2017. A secondary goal was to measure and compare interincisal angles on two-dimensional radiographs of horses with EOTRH to determine whether the interincisal angle is associated with age and severity of the disease. Radiographs were assessed for the presence of lysis and/or hypercementosis, and the number and position of the teeth affected were determined. Each tooth was also evaluated using the modified classification system introduced by Rehrl et al. (2018), in which stage 0 indicates no radiographic abnormalities and stage 3 denotes severe abnormalities. The overall stage was defined by the tooth with the most severe lesions. The interincisal angle was determined in horses that had suitable radiographs. The medical records of 838 horses admitted for dental procedures were evaluated, and 85 (10,1 %) had clinical evidence of EOTRH. The mean interincisal angle was 136,06 ° in horses with mild to moderate EOTRH and 135,10 ° (SD = 11,90 °) in severely affected patients. In conclusion, the angle measurements on lateral radiographs were highly reproducible. However, the interincisal angle was not associated with age or the severity of EOTRH. The interincisal angle and the disease pattern were not correlated.


INTRODUCTION: La résorption et l'hypercémentose odontoclastique des dents chez le cheval (EOTRH) est une maladie dentaire dégénérative de plus en plus diagnostiquée chez les animaux âgés. L'objectif principal de cette étude rétrospective était de déterminer la prévalence de l'EOTRH chez les chevaux admis à l'Hôpital équin de l'Université de Zurich pour des interventions dentaires entre 2014 et 2017. Un objectif secondaire était de mesurer et de comparer les angles inter-incisifs sur des radiographies bidimensionnelles de chevaux atteints d'EOTRH afin de déterminer si cet angle est associé à l'âge et à la gravité de la maladie. Les radiographies ont été évaluées pour la présence de lyse et/ou d'hypercémentose, et le nombre et la position des dents affectées ont été déterminés. Chaque dent a également été évaluée à l'aide du système de classification modifié introduit par Rehrl et al. (2018), dans lequel le stade 0 indique l'absence d'anomalies radiographiques et le stade 3 indique des anomalies graves. Le stade global a été défini par la dent présentant les lésions les plus sévères. L'angle inter-incisif a été déterminé chez les chevaux qui avaient des radiographies appropriées. Les dossiers médicaux de 838 chevaux admis pour des interventions dentaires ont été évalués et 85 (10,1 %) présentaient des signes cliniques d'EOTRH. L'angle inter-incisif moyen était de 136,06° chez les chevaux présentant une EOTRH légère à modérée et de 135,10° (écart-type = 11,90°) chez les patients gravement atteints. En conclusion, les mesures d'angle sur les radiographies latérales étaient très reproductibles. Cependant, l'angle inter-incisif n'était pas associé à l'âge ou à la sévérité de l'EOTRH. L'angle inter-incisif et le profil de la maladie n'étaient pas corrélés.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Cavalos , Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Cavalos , Animais , Prevalência , Suíça/epidemiologia , Hipercementose/diagnóstico por imagem , Hipercementose/epidemiologia , Hipercementose/veterinária , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Gravidade do Paciente , Doenças dos Cavalos/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças dos Cavalos/epidemiologia
13.
BMC Vet Res ; 19(1): 116, 2023 Aug 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37559089

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) syndrome is a dental disease where the radiographic signs may be quantified using radiographic texture features. This study aimed to implement the scaled-pixel-counting protocol to quantify and compare the image structure of teeth and the density standard in order to improve the identification of the radiographic signs of tooth resorption and hypercementosis using the EOTRH syndrome model. METHODS AND RESULTS: A detailed examination of the oral cavity was performed in 80 horses and maxillary incisor teeth were evaluated radiographically, including an assessment of the density standard. On each of the radiographs, pixel brightness (PB) was extracted for each of the ten steps of the density standard (S1-S10). Then, each evaluated incisor tooth was assigned to one of 0-3 EOTRH grade-related groups and annotated using region of interest (ROI). For each ROI, the number of pixels (NP) from each range was calculated. The linear relation between an original X-ray beam attenuation and PB was confirmed for the density standard. The NP values increased with the number of steps of the density standard as well as with EOTRH degrees. Similar accuracy of the EOTRH grade differentiation was noted for data pairs EOTRH 0-3 and EOTRH 0-1, allowing for the differentiation of both late and early radiographic signs of EOTRH. CONCLUSION: The scaled-pixel-counting protocol based on the use of density standard has been successfully implemented for the differentiation of radiographic signs of EOTRH degrees.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Cavalos , Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Cavalos , Animais , Hipercementose/veterinária , Incisivo/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças dos Cavalos/diagnóstico , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária , Radiografia Dentária/veterinária
14.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 24(6): 351-356, 2023 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37534500

RESUMO

AIM: To evaluate the calcium ions (Ca2+) diffusion of calcium hydroxide-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biodegradable nanoparticles [Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs] compared with conventional Ca(OH)2 in a simulated external root resorption ex vivo model using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty human mandibular premolars were prepared by sectioning the root segments to create roots measuring 10 mm from the anatomical apex. The root canals were instrumented and irrigated. The external root surface cavities were created. The specimens were randomly divided into the following three groups: Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA; control group, n = 10), conventional calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] (Metapaste, n = 10), and Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs [15% Ca(OH)2, n = 10]. The intracanal materials were placed in the root canals, and the teeth were stored in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C. The release of Ca2+ was measured at 7, 30, and 60 days using ICP-MS. RESULTS: Both Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs and Metapaste groups exhibited higher levels of Ca2+ release compared to the PLGA group at all time points. During the initial 7-day period, the Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs exhibited a significantly greater release of Ca2+ compared to Metapaste. From day 7 to day 30, Metapaste displayed a significantly higher release of Ca2+ than the Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs, but it experienced a subsequent decline in Ca2+ release after the 30-day period. After the 30-day mark, the Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs once again exhibited a significantly higher release of Ca2+ compared to Metapaste. CONCLUSION: The Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs exhibited sustained release of Ca2+ that exceeded conventional Ca(OH)2, particularly during the first week, demonstrating a greater amount of Ca2+ release. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The utilization of Ca(OH)2-loaded PLGA NPs as an intracanal medication for external inflammatory root resorption provided sustained release and had the potential to enhance the efficacy of inhibiting root resorption more effectively than conventional Ca(OH)2.


Assuntos
Nanopartículas , Reabsorção da Raiz , Reabsorção de Dente , Humanos , Copolímero de Ácido Poliláctico e Ácido Poliglicólico , Ácido Láctico/química , Ácido Poliglicólico/química , Hidróxido de Cálcio , Preparações de Ação Retardada , Glicóis , Nanopartículas/química
15.
Clin Oral Investig ; 27(9): 5595-5604, 2023 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37493728

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: External cervical root resorption (ECR) is a poorly understood and aggressive form of resorption. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence, characteristics, and risk factors associated with the occurrence of ECR in patients seeking endodontic care from private practice settings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Records of 343 patients with 390 teeth diagnosed with ECR were identified from 3 private endodontic practices from 2008 to 2022. The patients' demographic information, systemic conditions, and dental history were recorded. The characteristics of the cases including Heithersay classification, pulpal and periapical status, and their management were documented. The association between case severity and potential predisposing factors was examined using chi-square analysis. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of ECR among patients seeking endodontic care was low (< 1%). However, there was a greater than twofold increase in the pooled prevalence from 2016 to 2021 (0.99%) compared to the data from 2010 to 2015 (0.46%). The most commonly affected teeth were anterior teeth (48.7%). Class II (30.0%) and class III (45.4%) defects were the most often identified. Patients with a history of trauma or orthodontic treatment were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with severe cervical resorption (class III or IV) (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There has been an increase in the prevalence of ECR in patients seeking endodontic care. A history of orthodontic treatment and traumatic dental mechanical injuries may predict the severity of resorption. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The upward trend in the occurrence of ECR warrants close monitoring of the patients at high risk of developing the condition to facilitate early detection and management.


Assuntos
Reabsorção da Raiz , Reabsorção de Dente , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reabsorção da Raiz/epidemiologia , Reabsorção da Raiz/terapia , Colo do Dente , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco
16.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 5048, 2023 03 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36977746

RESUMO

Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) is a common, painful and poorly understood disease. Enamel, dentin and cementum accumulate both essential and toxic trace elements during mineralization. Characterization of the spatial accumulation pattern of trace elements may provide insight into the role that toxic elements play and inform biological processes affecting these hard dental tissues for future research. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to map the distribution of multiple trace elements and heavy metals across equine healthy and diseased (hypercementosis-affected) hard dental tissues among four teeth extracted from horses with EOTRH. Results showed banding patterns of some trace elements (lead, strontium, barium), reflecting the temporal component of accumulation of trace elements during dentin mineralization. Essential elements zinc and magnesium did not show banding patterns. Comparison to the unaffected cementum and dentin adjacent to the hypercementosis region showed that there is an underlying incremental pattern in the uptake of some metals with spatial irregularities. This supports a possible metabolic change involved in hypercementosis lesion development. This represents the first use of LA-ICP-MS to study the microspatial distribution of trace elements in equine teeth, establishing a baseline for elemental distribution in normal and EOTRH impacted dental hard tissue.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Cavalos , Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Oligoelementos , Animais , Cavalos , Hipercementose/patologia , Hipercementose/veterinária , Doenças dos Cavalos/patologia , Magnésio , Reabsorção de Dente/patologia
18.
Nat Commun ; 14(1): 742, 2023 02 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36765054

RESUMO

Whether snakes evolved their elongated, limbless bodies or their specialized skulls and teeth first is a central question in squamate evolution. Identifying features shared between extant and fossil snakes is therefore key to unraveling the early evolution of this iconic reptile group. One promising candidate is their unusual mode of tooth replacement, whereby teeth are replaced without signs of external tooth resorption. We reveal through histological analysis that the lack of resorption pits in snakes is due to the unusual action of odontoclasts, which resorb dentine from within the pulp of the tooth. Internal tooth resorption is widespread in extant snakes, differs from replacement in other reptiles, and is even detectable via non-destructive µCT scanning, providing a method for identifying fossil snakes. We then detected internal tooth resorption in the fossil snake Yurlunggur, and one of the oldest snake fossils, Portugalophis, suggesting that it is one of the earliest innovations in Pan-Serpentes, likely preceding limb loss.


Assuntos
Reabsorção de Dente , Dente , Animais , Evolução Biológica , Fósseis/diagnóstico por imagem , Serpentes/anatomia & histologia , Répteis/anatomia & histologia , Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Filogenia
19.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 27(5): e22ins5, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36629629

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In clinical practice, submerged roots are found with high frequency, and their presence can change the planning of dental movements and implant placement. OBJECTIVES: To provide explanations of possible developments in the area involved, according to the evolutionary stage of the process, at the time of diagnosis. DISCUSSION: After atrophy of the periodontal ligament and epithelial remnants of Malassez, ankylosis of the bone with the submerged root occurs, and initiates a process of replacement resorption. Until this process reaches the most advanced stage, this area represents an increased "bone" density, and if some care is not taken, this can generate resorption problems in the tooth to be moved. Whereas implants can be placed, despite the presence of the submerged root, irrespective of the stage of evolution. CONCLUSION: It is natural for the onset of alveolodental ankylosis and tooth replacement resorption to occur in submerged roots, and its stage of evolution will be decisive in the approach to be adopted in clinical planning.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Anquilose Dental , Reabsorção de Dente , Humanos , Raiz Dentária , Ligamento Periodontal
20.
Equine Vet J ; 55(2): 261-269, 2023 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35302672

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In clinical practice, early diagnosis of Equine Odontoclastic Tooth Resorption and Hypercementosis (EOTRH) and other resorptive incisor diseases is difficult to achieve. The radiographic appearance of subtle pathological changes has not been described in detail and might be confused with age-related changes. OBJECTIVES: The study was performed to define typical radiographic signs of early incisor lesions and to evaluate the reliability of the radiographic findings. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive and comparative study using post mortem clinical, radiographic, macroscopic and µCT examination. METHODS: The incisor region of 20 cadaveric horse heads, divided into three different age groups, was examined visually and by palpation. Intraoral radiographs were taken. After extraction, each incisor was macroscopically evaluated. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) scans were obtained. These scans were processed with Scry (v6.0, Kuchel & Sautter GbR) to obtain surface meshes which then were transferred to Meshlab (ISTI-CNR, version 2016.12). Attached tissues were virtually removed and surface curvature was computed to visualise and evaluate the quantity of unevenness (roughness) of the teeth's surface. Scoring systems for each diagnostic modality were developed. Scores were compared to describe and evaluate the radiographic appearance of early incisor lesions. RESULTS: The prevalence and severity of incisor lesions increased with age. Early, subtle lesions develop on the palatal/lingual side of incisors. While radiographically detected lesions were confirmed macroscopically and on the µCT scans, numerous teeth which were radiographically classified as healthy displayed lesions by macroscopic inspection (13.7%) and µCT analysis (58.1%). MAIN LIMITATIONS: Cadavers were studied and dental history was unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of early and subtle incisor lesions indicating first signs of EOTRH on dorsoventral intraoral radiographs is limited due to the typical localisation of the lesions on the palatal/lingual side of the incisors.


Assuntos
Doenças dos Cavalos , Hipercementose , Reabsorção de Dente , Cavalos , Animais , Incisivo/diagnóstico por imagem , Microtomografia por Raio-X , Hipercementose/diagnóstico por imagem , Hipercementose/veterinária , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Doenças dos Cavalos/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças dos Cavalos/patologia , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...