Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 474
Filtrar
1.
J Sport Rehabil ; 31(1): 10-16, 2022 01 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34544904

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Dynamic stretching (DS) is typically suggested during warm-up protocols. Also, foam rolling (FR), which is applied with a foam cylinder, has increased popularity in recent years. However, the combined effects of DS and FR in improving flexibility, dynamic balance, and agility performance are unclear in current literature. Therefore, this study aim to evaluate and compare the acute effects of DS as well as DS followed by FR (DS + FR) on flexibility, dynamic balance, and agility in male soccer players. DESIGN: This study was a crossover study with a within-subject design. METHODS: Thirty volunteer male soccer players (mean age 18.80 [0.66] y) were included in the study. Each participant performed the 2 sessions (DS and DS + FR) on separate occasions in a randomized order, with an interval of 72 hours. All sessions were performed in the indoor gym at the sports club. Flexibility was assessed by sit-and-reach test, dynamic balance was assessed by Y balance test, and agility was assessed by t test. RESULTS: Compared with the pretest results, significant improvement in flexibility was observed in both groups (change = 0.55, percentage change = 2.05, effect size [ES] = 0.15, P = .041; change = 0.64, percentage change = 2.36, ES = 0.20, P = .025; respectively). Balance scores did not significantly improve in either group (change = 0.40, percentage change = 0.45, ES = 0.09, P = .342; change = 0.93, percentage change = 1.02, ES = 0.23, P = .103; respectively). Agility performance significantly improved in both groups (change = -0.12, percentage change = -1.18, ES = 0.19, P = .021; change = -0.21, percentage change = -2.18, ES = 0.38, P = .005; respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Both DS and DS + FR improved flexibility and agility and did not affect balance. DS + FR was not superior to DS at improving flexibility and agility as compared only with DS. Both methods are effective warm-up protocols to augment factors related to injury risk and performance. It seems that further studies that investigate the combined effects of FR and DS are needed.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Exercícios de Alongamento Muscular , Futebol , Exercício de Aquecimento , Adolescente , Estudos Cross-Over , Humanos , Masculino
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36361000

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to compare the warm-up effects of treadmill walking (TW) with a dynamic (DY) bodyweight warm-up on maximal aerobic exercise performance in children. Sixteen children (10.9 ± 1.5 vrs) were tested for peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) on 2 nonconsecutive days following different 6 min warm-up protocols. TW consisted of walking on a motor-driven treadmill at 2.2 mph and 0% grade whereas the DY warm-up consisted of 9 body weight movements including dynamic stretches, lunges, and jumps. Maximal heart rate was significantly higher following DY than TW (193.9 ± 6.2 vs. 191.6 ± 6.1 bpm, respectively; p = 0.008). VO2 peak (54.8 ± 9.6 vs. 51.8 ± 8.7 mL/kg/min; p = 0.09), maximal minute ventilation (68.9 ± 14.8 vs. 64.9 ± 9.4 L/min; p = 0.27), maximal respiratory exchange ratio (1.12 ± 0.1 vs. 1.11 ± 0.1; p = 0.85) and total exercise time (614.0 ± 77.1 vs. 605 ± 95.0 s; p = 0.55) did not differ significantly between DY and TM warm-ups, respectively. These findings indicate that the design of the warm-up protocol can influence the heart rate response to maximal aerobic exercise and has a tendency to influence VO2 peak. A DY warm-up could be a viable alternative to a TW warm-up prior to maximal exercise testing in children.


Assuntos
Consumo de Oxigênio , Exercício de Aquecimento , Criança , Humanos , Consumo de Oxigênio/fisiologia , Frequência Cardíaca/fisiologia , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Teste de Esforço
3.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275545, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36264894

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The effects of the FIFA11+ programme (the 11+) on ankle and groin injuries and performance have remained questionable. The latter, particularly, has potentially reduced the implementation rate and applicability of the programme. This study aimed to evaluate the mid-to-long-term effects of the 11+ and a modified programme including football-specific exercises on injury prevention and performance improvement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three teams of the Iranian Youth League (division two) volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned to two intervention groups (F11+; n = 29, M11+; n = 31) and a control group (n = 30). The F11+ followed the FIFA 11+ programme, whereas the M11+ performed modified exercises three times weekly as a warm-up protocol before training and competition through a football season. The control group carried out its routine warm-ups, including joggings, basic football drills, and static stretches, while having no injury prevention approaches. Lower extremity injuries, as well as exposure time for each player, were recorded. The football-specific performance was assessed using the Illinois Agility and Slalom Dribbling tests. ANOVA, Fisher Freeman Halton, and chi-square tests were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Injury incidences differed significantly between groups (p = 0.02, C = 0.40), with M11+ reporting the lowest incidence. Significant differences between the pre- and posttest as well as differences between the groups for development over time were revealed for the Illinois agility and dribbling speed (p≤0.01). Both performance tests demonstrated a large time effect, as the effect sizes for time in agility and dribbling speed were 0.74 (CI = [0.66; 0.79]) and 0.86 (CI = [0.79; 0.87]), respectively. The effect size for the interaction can be categorized as medium, with 0.38 (CI = [0.25; 0.49]) for agility and 0.52 (CI = [0.40; 0.61]) for dribbling speed. M11+ showed the largest improvement in both. DISCUSSION: Mid-to-long-term application of a structured dynamic warm-up that integrates injury prevention and performance approaches may lower injury incidences and improve youth subelite players' performance. Although additional studies with larger samples are needed to prove the results of the current study, the amateur clubs/teams could integrate such twofold dynamic warm up into their routine training plan and benefit its advantages on injury prevention and performance improvement.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas , Futebol Americano , Futebol , Exercício de Aquecimento , Adolescente , Humanos , Masculino , Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Futebol/lesões
4.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36231344

RESUMO

FIFA11+ Kids is a warm-up program specially designed to prevent football injuries in children. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to summarize the effects of FIFA11+ Kids on injury prevention in young football players. PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched from 1 January 2016 to 24 August 2022. The primary outcome was overall injuries, and the secondary outcomes were severe, ankle, knee, and lower extremity injuries. Risk ratios (RRs) were calculated for each outcome. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. A total of 230 articles were screened, 6 of which were finally included in the meta-analysis. Compared with normal warm-up training, FIFA11+ Kids significantly reduced overall injury risk (RR = 0.52 [95% CI, 0.44-0.62]; p < 0.00001), severe injury risk (RR = 0.33 [95% CI, 0.18-0.61]; p = 0.0004), lower extremity injury risk (RR = 0.51 [95% CI, 0.41-0.65]; p < 0.00001), knee injury risk (RR = 0.45 [95% CI, 0.29-0.72]; p = 0.0009), and ankle injury risk (RR = 0.56 [95% CI, 0.35-0.89]; p = 0.01) in young football players. FIFA11+ Kids was found to be an effective approach to decrease the injury risk among young football players, which is worth generalizing extensively.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas , Futebol Americano , Traumatismos do Joelho , Traumatismos da Perna , Futebol , Exercício de Aquecimento , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Criança , Humanos , Futebol/lesões
5.
J Dance Med Sci ; 26(4): 244-254, 2022 Dec 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36096663

RESUMO

Neuromuscular warm-up exercises (NMWU) have been shown to prevent injuries. In dance, research on warming-up is scarce. We investigated warm-up habits among ballet dancers and the effects of NMWU and traditional ballet-specific warm-up (TBSWU) on injuries. Using a cross-sectional survey among ballet dancers over the age of 18 years, we recorded acute and overuse injuries sustained in the previous 2 years. Warm-up behavior was assessed through 28 items. Dancers were grouped into NMWU or TBSWU: NMWU was based on neuromuscular warm-up programs in sports science and included exercises improving strength, power, proprioception, sensorimotor control, or cardiovascular stimulus; and TBSWU consisted of stretching, dance-technical exercises, marking steps and running-through-choreographies, or stretching with tools. Separate linear regression analyses adjusted for confounding factors were performed for acute and overuse injuries. A total of 192 dancers (26.7 ± 7.82 years, 159 females, 132 professionals) reported 203 acute and 469 overuse injuries. In total, 47.4% of dancers always warmed up (mean duration 20.7 ± 13.2 minutes) based on stretching (63%), technical-exercises (58.9%), strength-training (54.7%), and the barre (53.6%); and 9.4% never warmed up. A total of 31 dancers (16.15%) were classified as TBSWU, 16 dancers (8.3%) for NMWU, and 145 dancers did combined exercises. Those in the NMWU group were associated with fewer overuse injuries compared to those in the TBSWU group (ß = -2.34; 95%CI -3.54 to -1.14). No association was found with acute injuries. As in other athletes, NMWU might be protective against overuse injuries in dancers. Large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to gain more insight into NMWU as a possible component of injury prevention in ballet.


Assuntos
Transtornos Traumáticos Cumulativos , Dança , Exercício de Aquecimento , Feminino , Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dança/lesões , Estudos Prospectivos , Estudos Transversais , Transtornos Traumáticos Cumulativos/prevenção & controle
6.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273248, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35980952

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In swimming, the period between the end of the swimming warmup and the beginning of competition is critical to performance, here termed the transition phase. Several options are available during this phase, necessitating a systematic review to understand if optimal strategies exist. OBJECTIVES: To synthesise and critically evaluate the current literature investigating land-based warmup interventions on subsequent performance in competitive swimmers. METHODS: A search of three electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCO SPORTDiscus and Web of Science) was conducted to identify original studies until February 2022. Selection criteria dictated that (i) a control condition was used, (ii) participants were ≥ 15 years of age, (iii) a pool-based warmup was done prior to the land-based warmup. A total of 25 articles met the selection criteria. RESULTS: Reducing the transition phase duration by at least half led to consistently faster time-trial times of between 1.1-1.5% for all included studies. Passive warmups using clothing interventions resulted in mostly faster time-trial's of 0.4-0.8% with increases in skin temperature frequent, though little change occurred in core temperature. The methodology of passive respiratory warmups were vastly different with positive time-trial's effects ranging between 0.9-1.1% for two studies, though one reported no meaningful difference. Active warmups led to consistently faster time-trial's between 0.7-0.9%, though the unpinning factors are not clear. Warmups which combined passive and active options frequently led to faster time-trial's between 0.8-3%. Upper and combined limb post-activation performance enhancement led to mostly unfavourable time-trial changes. Lower limb exclusive protocols results were inconsistent, with limited beneficial effects on time-trial or start performance reported following plyometric protocols. However, there does appear merit in heavier loaded lower limb protocols. CONCLUSION: Each of a reduced transition phase length, and passive, active or combination warmup have demonstrated improvements in swimming performance. Conversely, PAPE protocols should be used with caution, especially when including the upper limbs.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Exercício de Aquecimento , Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Humanos , Temperatura Cutânea , Natação/fisiologia , Fatores de Tempo , Exercício de Aquecimento/fisiologia
7.
J Strength Cond Res ; 36(8): 2218-2222, 2022 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35916747

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Darrall-Jones, J, Roe, G, Cremen, E, and Jones, B. Can team-sport athletes accurately run at submaximal sprinting speeds? Implications for rehabilitation and warm-up protocols. J Strength Cond Res 36(8): 2218-2222, 2022-The aim of this study is to examine the ability of team-sport athletes to accurately run at a range of submaximal sprint velocities (60-90% maximal velocity; Vmax) under verbal instruction without any objective feedback. Twelve professional male rugby union players (age 19.7 ± 0.9 years, body mass 98.3 ± 13.9 kg, height 184.0 ± 7.5 cm) were verbally instructed to complete three 40-m sprints at each of 60, 70, 80, and 90% of Vmax in a randomized order. Percentage Vmax achieved during each sprint was compared with criterion velocities calculated from Vmax testing undertaken a week prior. Players underestimated (ran faster) their sprint velocity when asked to run at 60% (very large to extremely large mean bias, 23%; range, 57-88% Vmax), 70% (large to very large, 11%; 67-93% Vmax), and 80% (small, 2%; 71-91% Vmax) of their Vmax, whereas overestimated (ran slower) their sprint velocity when asked to run at 90% Vmax (moderate, -4%; 77-95% Vmax). Team sport players may require objective feedback when performing submaximal sprinting to ensure that velocities achieved are similar to those prescribed. This may be particularly important where graded exposure to maximum velocities is required, for example during rehabilitation or warm-ups.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Corrida , Exercício de Aquecimento , Adolescente , Adulto , Atletas , Humanos , Masculino , Esportes de Equipe , Adulto Jovem
8.
J Strength Cond Res ; 36(8): 2262-2267, 2022 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35916749

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Chen, CH, Chang, CK, Tseng, WC, Chiu, CH, Dai, X, and Ye, X. Acute effects of different warm-up protocols on sports performance in elite male collegiate handball players. J Strength Cond Res 36(8): 2262-2267, 2022-This study aimed to examine the effects of 3 different warm-up protocols on subsequent sports performance in elite male collegiate handball players. Fifteen handball players (19.0 ± 2.4 years) completed 3 separated randomly sequenced experimental visits. During each visit, they started with different warm-up protocols (traditional warm-up [TRAD] vs. warm-up with core stability exercises [CORE] vs. warm-up with elastic band exercises [ELAS]) and completed with a series of randomly ordered sport-specific performance testing measurements: 30-m sprint, countermovement jump, medicine ball overhead forward throw, and standing and jump handball throw tests. Both CORE and ELAS protocols induced statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) on overall sports performance (sprint time, jump height, medicine ball throwing peak velocity and power, and handball throwing velocities), as compared to the TRAD. In addition, the ELAS protocol imposed small-to-medium effects (effect size range: 0.45-0.82), enhancing handball throwing velocity and medicine ball throwing performance comparing with the CORE. Sport-specific warm-up protocols that contain core stability or elastic band-based exercises likely induced subsequent performance enhancements (sprint, jump, and throw) in elite male collegiate handball players when compared with TRAD. Furthermore, including elastic band exercises in the warm-up protocol even induced superior upper-body performance enhancement (explosive power and handball throwing velocity) than other protocols. Therefore, preconditioning warm-up activities using elastic band-based exercises can be integrated into a traditional sport-specific warm-up protocol for elite collegiate handball players before competition or training.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Exercício de Aquecimento , Teste de Esforço , Humanos , Masculino , Força Muscular , Músculo Esquelético
9.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270898, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35853011

RESUMO

This study compared the effects of a 7-min shuttle jog during halftime to a control condition (seated rest) on subsequent athletic performance and lower-leg temperature in the second half. Eighteen male football players (22 years, 179 cm, 70 kg, 10 years of athletic career) randomly performed a 20-m shuttle jog (at an intensity of 70% of heart rate maximum) and a seated rest (sitting on a bench) during halftime in two separate sessions. A 5-min football simulation protocol consisting of football-specific activities (jumping, sprinting, kicking, passing, and dribbling at various intensities and distances) was repeated nine times to mimic the first and second half of a football match. Athletic performance (maximal vertical jump height, 20-m sprint time, and the Arrowhead agility test time) recorded during a 15-min period were averaged to represent each time point (first half: T1 to T3; second half: T4 to T6). Lower-leg skin and muscle (using the insulation disk technique) temperature was recorded before and after the first and second half. There was no condition effect over time in maximal vertical jump: F5,187 = 0.53, p = 0.75, Arrowhead agility test time: F5,187 = 1.25, p = 0.29, and lower-leg temperature (skin: F3,119 = 1.40, p = 0.25; muscle: F3,119 = 1.08, p = 0.36). The 20-m sprint time between conditions during the initial 15-min of the second half was different (condition × time: F5,187 = 2.42, p = 0.04) that subjects who performed the shuttle jog ran 0.09 sec faster (3.08 sec, p = 0.002, ES = 0.68), as compared with those who did the seated rest (3.17 sec). The results of our study confirmed that a decremental effect of the static rest on sprinting performance during the initial period of the second halftime can be attenuated by a halftime warm-up.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Futebol Americano , Corrida , Futebol , Exercício de Aquecimento , Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Corrida/fisiologia , Futebol/fisiologia
10.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 11223, 2022 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35780133

RESUMO

Inspiratory muscle warm-up (IMW) has been used as a resource to enhance exercises and sports performance. However, there is a lack of studies in the literature addressing the effects of different IMW loads (especially in combination with a shorter and applicable protocol) on high-intensity running and recovery phase. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of three different IMW loads using a shorter protocol on mechanical, physiological and muscle oxygenation responses during and after high-intensity running exercise. Sixteen physically active men, randomly performed four trials 30 s all-out run, preceded by the shorter IMW protocol (2 × 15 breaths with a 1-min rest interval between sets, accomplished 2 min before the 30 s all-out run). Here, three IMW load conditions were used: 15%, 40%, and 60% of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), plus a control session (CON) without the IMW. The force, velocity and running power were measured (1000 Hz). Two near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) devices measured (10 Hz) the muscle's oxygenation responses in biceps brachii (BB) and vastus lateralis (VL). Additionally, heart rate (HR) and blood lactate ([Lac]) were also monitored. IMW loads applied with a shorter protocol promoted a significant increase in mean and minimum running power as well as in peak and minimum force compared to CON. In addition, specific IMW loads led to higher values of peak power, mean velocity (60% of MIP) and mean force (40 and 60% of MIP) in relation to CON. Physiological responses (HR and muscles oxygenation) were not modified by any IMW during exercise, as well as HR and [Lac] in the recovery phase. On the other hand, 40% of MIP presented a higher tissue saturation index (TSI) for BB during recovery phase. In conclusion, the use of different loads of IMW may improve the performance of a physically active individual in a 30 s all-out run, as verified by the increased peak, mean and minimum mechanical values, but not in performance assessed second by second. In addition, 40% of the MIP improves TSI of the BB during the recovery phase, which can indicate greater availability of O2 for lactate clearance.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Corrida , Exercício de Aquecimento , Humanos , Lactatos , Masculino , Músculos Respiratórios/fisiologia , Corrida/fisiologia , Exercício de Aquecimento/fisiologia
11.
J Sports Sci Med ; 21(2): 145-152, 2022 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35719234

RESUMO

Foam rolling (FR) is a common intervention used as a warm-up to increase the range of motion (ROM) of a joint, without changes in subsequent performance. It has been shown that, in similar techniques (e.g., stretching), an additional intense warm-up can lead to performance potentiation. However, to date, it is not clear if this also holds true for FR, and if this effect is similar in both sexes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an intense warm-up either before or after FR with the effects of FR without any additional intense warm-up, in both females and males. In total, 27 volunteers (14 male, 13 female) visited the laboratory on three separate days. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of the three interventions. ROM was assessed with a Sit n' Reach box, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height with a force plate, both before and after the interventions. In addition, maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) peak torque and maximum voluntary dynamic contraction (MVDC) peak torque were assessed with a dynamometer. ROM increased to the same extent following the interventions in all groups, with a large magnitude of change (P < 0.001; d = 1.12 to 1.83). In addition, male participants showed significantly higher increases in ROM when the intense warm-up was performed after FR (P < 0.001; d = 1.44), but not without the intense warm-up (P = 0.45; d = 0.57) or when the intense warm-up was performed before FR (P = 0.24; d = 0.69). No significant changes in CMJ height, MVIC peak torque, or MVDC peak torque were observed (P > 0.05). We therefore conclude that the time-efficient athlete might skip further intense warm-up, besides FR, when the goal is to increase ROM and to sustain performance parameters.


Assuntos
Exercício de Aquecimento , Atletas , Feminino , Humanos , Contração Isométrica , Masculino , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Torque
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35627873

RESUMO

Sports participation by children and adolescents often results in injuries. Therefore, injury prevention warm-up programs are imperative for youth sports safety. The purpose of this paper was to assess the effectiveness of Warm-up Intervention Programs (WIP) on upper and lower limb sports injuries through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches for relevant studies were performed on PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane databases. Studies selected met the following criteria: original data; analytic prospective design; investigated a WIP and included outcomes for injury sustained during sports participation. Two authors assessed the quality of evidence using Furlan's criteria. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis 3.3 software was used to process and analyze the outcome indicators of the literature. Across fifteen studies, the pooled point estimated injury rate ratio (IRR) was 0.64 (95% CI = 0.54-0.75; 36% reduction) while accounting for hours of risk exposure. Publication bias assessment suggested a 6% reduction in the estimate (IRR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.60-0.82), and the prediction interval intimated that any study estimate could still fall between 0.34 and 1.19. Subgroup analyses identified one significant moderator that existed in the subgroup of compliance (p < 0.01) and might be the source of heterogeneity. Compared with the control group, WIPs significantly reduced the injury rate ratio of upper and lower limb sports injuries in children and adolescents.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas , Exercício de Aquecimento , Esportes Juvenis , Acidentes por Quedas , Adolescente , Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Criança , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos
13.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268515, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35584106

RESUMO

Athletes are currently fond of vibration foam rollers (VFRs) and commercial portable vibration percussion devices (PVPDs). It is still unknown whether using these devices during warm-up has an immediate impact on athletic performance. A randomized block design was used in this study. The acute effects of VFR and PVPD on tennis players' athletic performance during warm-up were compared. For the countermovement jump (CMJ), reactive strength index (RSI), and hexagon test (HT), the difference in performance between all interventions was significant (p = 0.007-0.034, η2p = 0.266-0.364). Only those who received VFR had significantly different CMJ and HT results when compared to the control group (CMJ height = 53.18 ±4.49 cm, p = 0.03, d = 1.26; HT time = 10.73 ±0.4 s, p = 0.03, d = 1.12). Participants' RSI values were significantly different after VFR (RSI = 2.01 ±0.11 cm·mm-1, p = 0.012, d = 1.76) and PVPD (RSI = 1.99 ±0.11 cm·mm-1, p = 0.025, d = 1.52) compared to the control group. Therefore, when using VFR and PVPD as part of warm-up protocols for tennis players of varying skill levels, VFR could have an immediate positive effect on power, reactive strength, and change of direction performance, while PVPD could immediately improve reactive strength performance.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Tênis , Exercício de Aquecimento , Humanos , Força Muscular , Amplitude de Movimento Articular , Vibração
14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35565176

RESUMO

With this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of different warm-up intensities on counter-movement jump (CMJ) performance over time under cold conditions. Eleven male collegiate athletes volunteered. The participants performed high-intensity warm-up (HWU) at 80% VO2max and moderate-intensity warm-up (MWU) at 60% VO2max for 15 min on a bicycle ergometer in a laboratory room at 10 °C. CMJ height, vastus lateralis muscle temperature, heart rate, and perceived fatigue were measured before warm-up (Pre), immediately after (Post 0), 10 min after (Post 10), and 20 min after (Post 20). Significant main effects and interactions were found for CMJ height (time, p < 0.001 and ηp2 = 0.859; interaction, p = 0.007 and ηp2 = 0.327). HWU significantly increased CMJ height at Post 0 to Post 20 compared to that at Pre (p < 0.01), whereas MWU increased CMJ height at Post 0 only compared to that at Pre (p < 0.001). The results indicate that HWU achieved an increase in CMJ height for 20 min. MWU changed CMJ height instantly, but the change did not last compared to HWU in a cold environment.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Exercício de Aquecimento , Atletas , Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Movimento/fisiologia , Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35457430

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of a warm-up on balance control and inter-limb balance asymmetries by analyzing the influence of the nature of the sport practiced by participants. Twelve sportspeople were recruited. They had to stand on a force plate for 30 s in a one-leg stance on their dominant (used to perform skilled movements) and non-dominant leg (used to support the body) before and 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min after a 10 min warm-up exercise performed at moderate intensity on a cycle ergometer. The center of foot pressure displacements was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed by considering one group of all participants and with two subgroups according to the symmetrical or asymmetrical nature of the sport they practiced. The warm-up exercise improved acute balance control only on the dominant leg after a 20 min rest without significantly reducing inter-limb balance asymmetries. This effect was more characteristic of participants with experience in asymmetric sports. These results confirm previous findings of the greater sensitivity of the dominant leg to the physiological state and reveal that between-leg differences in balance control appear mainly in subjects with experience in asymmetric sports in a specific physiological condition (post-warm-up state).


Assuntos
Exercício de Aquecimento , Pé/fisiologia , Humanos , Perna (Membro)/fisiologia , Movimento/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia
16.
Sci Med Footb ; 6(2): 148-152, 2022 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35475749

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Considering individual beliefs and preferences is a pillar of the evidence-based practice and determines compliance and outcomes of an intervention. However, little is known about the professional football (soccer) players' perceptions on injury issues. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the professional football players' perceptions towards injury risk factors and prevention strategies. METHODS: One-hundred male professional football players answered an online questionnaire. RESULTS: The top-five risk factors included poor muscle strength/power; poor rest/sleep; short interval between matches; high number of matches in season; and excessive training. More than ¾ of football players in our study considered the following strategies as being effective in reducing injury risk: workload monitoring; warm-up; lumbo-pelvic stability training; proprioceptive training; functional training; monitoring diet; flexibility training; and conventional strength training. CONCLUSION: Perceptions of professional male football players regarding injury risk factors and prevention strategies are only partially in line with current scientific evidence. These perceptions have been usually overlooked, and should be considered by medical/coaching staffs in order to get greater compliance to injury prevention programs.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas , Futebol Americano , Futebol , Exercício de Aquecimento , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Futebol Americano/lesões , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Futebol/lesões
17.
Eur J Appl Physiol ; 122(7): 1695-1707, 2022 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35471257

RESUMO

PURPOSE: In sport and exercise, warm-ups induce various physiological changes that facilitate subsequent performance. We have shown that delivering patterned stimulation to cutaneous afferents during sprint cycling mitigates fatigue-related decrements in performance, and that repeated sensory stimulation amplifies spinal reflex excitability. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess whether sensory enhancement of warm-up would affect subsequent high-intensity arm cycling performance. METHODS: Participants completed three experimental sessions, in which they randomly performed either a control, stim, or sleeve warm-up condition prior to maximal duration arm cycling. During the control condition, warmup consisted of low-intensity arm cycling for 15 min. The stim condition was the same, except they received alternating pulses (400 ms, 50 Hz) of stimulation just above their perceptual threshold to the wrists during warm-up. The third condition required participants to wear custom fabricated compression sleeves around the elbow during warm-up. Grip strength and spinal reflex excitability were measured before and after each warm-up and fatigue protocol, which required participants to arm cycle at 85% of peak power output until they reached volitional fatigue. Peak power output was determined during an incremental test at minimum 72 h prior to the first session. RESULTS: Both sensory enhanced warm-up conditions amplified subsequent high-intensity arm cycling performance by ~ 30%. Additionally, the stim and sleeve warm-up conditions yielded improvements in grip strength (increased by ~ 5%) immediately after the sensory enhanced warm-ups. Ergogenic benefits from the sensory enhanced warm-up conditions did not differ between one another. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that enhanced sensory input during warm-up can elicit improvements in both maximal and submaximal performance measures.


Assuntos
Exercício de Aquecimento , Ciclismo , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Fadiga , Força da Mão , Humanos , Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia , Exercício de Aquecimento/fisiologia
18.
Phys Ther Sport ; 55: 146-154, 2022 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35421834

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide consensus on how to plan, organize and implement exercise-based injury prevention program (IPP) in sports. DESIGN: Delphi. SETTING: LimeSurvey platform. PARTICIPANTS: Experienced sports physical therapists from the International Federation of Sports Physical Therapy member countries. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Factors related to sports IPP planning, organization and implementation. RESULTS: We included 305 participants from 32 countries. IPP planning should be based on an athlete's injury history, on pre-season screening results, and on injury rates (respectively, 98%, 92%, 89% agreement). In total 97% participants agreed that IPP organization should depend on the athlete's age, 93% on the competition level, and 93% on the availability of low-cost materials. It was agreed that IPP should mainly be implemented in warm-up sessions delivered by the head or strength/conditioning coach, with physical training sessions and individual physical therapy sessions (respectively, 94%, 92%, 90% agreement). CONCLUSION: Strong consensus was reached on (1) IPP based on the athlete's injury history, pre-season screening and evidence-based sports-specific injury rates; (2) IPP organization based on the athlete's age, competition level, and the availability of low-cost materials and (3) IPP implementation focussing on warm-up sessions implemented by the strength/conditioning coach, and/or individual prevention sessions by the physical therapist.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas , Fisioterapeutas , Esportes , Exercício de Aquecimento , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Humanos
20.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0249969, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35358204

RESUMO

The purpose of this research was to establish the optimal recovery duration following a pre-load stimulus on performance measures related to handball players. Seventeen senior male University handball players (mean ± SD: age 23.6 ± 2.3 yrs., height 1.79 ± 0.06 m and body mass 72.5 ± 10.7 kg) performed three experimental sessions. All sessions consisted of a standardised warm-up followed by a pre-load stimulus (HSR) back squats followed by a passive rest for either 4-min (PAP4), 8-min (PAP8), or 12-min (PAP12). Following the completion of the passive recovery, players then performed a countermovement jump (CMJ), a 20-m linear sprint and a modified agility t-test. The significance level was set at P < 0.05. There was a significant main effect of passive rest duration after the pre-load stimulus. The PAP12 condition improved CMJ scores (2.3-2.6%; effect size = small), 20-m linear sprint times (3.3-3.7%; effect size = small to moderate) and agility times (1.6-1.9%; effect size = trivial) compared to PAP4 and PAP8 conditions (P < 0.0005). Values of heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were also significantly lower during the PAP12 condition compared to the PAP4 and PAP8 conditions (P < 0.0005). A positive Pearson correlation was established between agility and CMJ for all conditions (P < 0.001). The findings provide novel data observing that a pre-load stimulus, followed by 12-min of recovery, results in greater maximal jump, sprint and agility measures when compared with a 4-min or 8-min recovery in male handball players.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Corrida/fisiologia , Exercício de Aquecimento/fisiologia , Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Desempenho Físico Funcional , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...