Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 3.316
Filtrar
1.
Rural Remote Health ; 22(1): 7050, 2022 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35119906

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Past studies examined factors associated with rural practice, but none employed newer machine learning (ML) methods to explore potential predictors. The primary aim of this study was to identify factors related to practice in a rural area. Secondary aims were to capture a more precise understanding of the demographic characteristics of the healthcare professions workforce in Utah (USA) and to assess the viability of ML as a predictive tool. METHODS: This study incorporated four datasets - the 2017 dental workforce, the 2016 physician workforce, the 2014 nursing workforce and the 2017 pharmacy workforce - collected by the Utah Medical Education Council. Supervised ML techniques were used to identify factors associated with practice location, the outcome variable of interest. RESULTS: The study sample consisted of 11 259 healthcare professionals with an average age of 46.6 years, of which 36.6% were males and 94.5% Caucasian. Four ML methods were applied to assess model performance by comparing accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of the methods used, support vector machine performed the best (accuracy 99.7%, precision 100%, sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.4% and ROC 0.997). The models identified income and rural upbringing as the top factors associated with rural practice. CONCLUSION: By far, income emerged as the most important factor associated with rural practice, suggesting that attractive income offers might help rural communities address health professional shortages. Rural upbringing was the next most important predictive factor, validating and updating earlier research. The performance of the ML algorithms suggests their usefulness as a tool to model other databases for individualized prediction.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Atenção à Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Área de Atuação Profissional , Recursos Humanos
2.
Fam Med ; 54(9): 700-707, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36219426

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The John Peter Smith (JPS) Family Medicine Residency Program participated in two national experiments: Preparing the Personal Physician for Practice (P4, 2007-2012) and the Length of Training Pilot, which began in 2013. In these experiments, JPS created optional integrated 4-year areas of emphasis (AOE). The objective of this study was to examine the career outcomes of JPS graduates differentiated by those who completed a 4-year AOE, versus traditional fourth-year fellowship, vs 3-year only. METHODS: We surveyed each graduate who started residency from 2007-2016 on their scope of practice. We also searched each graduate via Google to identify each of their practice sites and ascertain their status as a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) or Medically Underserved Area for primary care (MUA-P). RESULTS: Of the 220 residents who entered the program as interns, 70 completed an integrated AOE (31.8%), 54 completed 3 years of training with a traditional fourth-year fellowship (24.5%, 40 at JPS, 14 at another location), and 93 completed only 3 years of training (42.3%). The overall percentage of JPS graduates who work in the United States (n=201) in HPSAs or MUA-Ps is similar to national numbers (45.3% vs 43.5% for HPSAs, 35.3% vs 33.3% for MUA-Ps). Graduates of a JPS integrated AOE track were more likely to work in a HPSA or MUA-P than other graduates (81.4% vs 38.5% traditional fellowship vs 45.6% 3-year only, P<.001; US practice sites only). Graduates of sports medicine fellowships were particularly less likely to work in HPSAs/MUA-Ps than other graduates (26.1%). Graduates of integrated AOEs provided much broader scopes of cognitive and procedural services than fellowship or 3-year graduates. CONCLUSIONS: In JPS graduates, 4 years of training with an integrated AOE had a large association with serving vulnerable populations, and providing broader cognitive and procedural services.


Assuntos
Medicina de Família e Comunidade , Internato e Residência , Escolha da Profissão , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Área de Atuação Profissional , Âmbito da Prática , Estados Unidos
3.
South Med J ; 115(10): 734-739, 2022 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36191908

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Primary health care (PHC) is essential for a well-functioning health system. Although PHC has been shown to have adverse effects on health outcomes, many barriers prevent adequate access, including a shortage of primary care physicians. In New Mexico, 32 of 33 counties are designed as primary care health professional shortage areas, and the state has a lower-than-average primary care provider density compared with other states. This study explored the predictors of job placement among New Mexican Family Medicine residents. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study design was used, which included a subset of data from The University of New Mexico (UNM) Family Medicine Residency Alumni Database and hard copy personnel files. The study's population consisted of the 260 graduates from the UNM Family Medicine Residency Program between 1998 and 2019. Analysis included simple and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: Results indicated that, consistently, approximately two-thirds of first practices are in New Mexico, whereas the percentage with a current practice in New Mexico decreases over time. Those born in New Mexico or who attended the UNM School of Medicine were more likely to have their first and current practice in New Mexico. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study provide further evidence that the relationship between place of birth and place of medical training are determining factors for both place of first and current practice. These results can inform practice, policy, and future research to address the pressing need for PHC in underserved and rural communities.


Assuntos
Medicina de Família e Comunidade , Internato e Residência , Escolha da Profissão , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/educação , Humanos , New Mexico , Área de Atuação Profissional , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Med Educ ; 56(12): 1203-1213, 2022 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35953464

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Many countries are driving forward policies and practices to train medical students for later rural practice. Previous research has investigated individual (e.g., rural upbringing) and structural factors (e.g., curricular exposure) associated with rural practice intention. However, the relationship between academic performance in medical school and rural practice intention has been neglected, although optimisation theory suggests there may be a relationship. To address this gap, our aim was to identify the relationship between academic performance and rural practice intention. METHODS: Data were collected via a cross-sectional (self-report) survey in 2021. Participants were students from 60 of the 96 rural order directed (RODs) medical programmes across China. We asked students their rural practice intention. We conducted univariate analyses to test for associations between rural practice intention and independent variables, including socio-demographics, ROD location, grade year and academic performance measures. We used multilevel logistic regression models to test whether students' academic performance in medical school could be used to predict rural practice intention, holding the other factors constant. RESULTS: There were 13 123 respondents, representing roughly 77.6% of the student population from the 60 schools. There was a statistically significant relationship between student (self)-reported academic performance in medical school and rural practice intention. Higher performers had a lower likelihood (ORs: 0.65-0.78) of rural practice intention. This held across all performance measures (GPA rank, academic awards and student leadership) and for the sub-group with rural upbringing (ORs: 0.68-0.78). DISCUSSION: This is the first study to identify a relationship between medical school performance and rural practice intention. The findings suggest that students maximise their utility when choosing career options, with higher performers having lower rural practice intention. These data provide insight into the complexity of medical career decision making and can be used by medical school and workforce planners to inform rural training, recruitment and retention strategies.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Humanos , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos Transversais , Intenção , Inquéritos e Questionários , Área de Atuação Profissional
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 445, 2022 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35676739

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Japan, community medicine clerkships facilitate positive attitudes toward rural medical practice and encourage rural recruitment. Rural self-efficacy has been shown to influence rural career intent following a rural clinical placement. However, the impact of subjective difficulties of living in a rural area on future rural career intent is also important. This study aims to explore whether rural self-efficacy influences the relationship between difficulty with living in a rural area and rural career intent.  METHODS: The subjects included 308 male and 255 female participants aged 20-41 [median (interquartile range): 22 (21-22)] years. Rural self-efficacy was based on a validated scale consisting of 15 questions. Difficulty with living in a rural area was measured asking students. A cohort survey was conducted to evaluate the effect of the rural self-efficacy score on the rural career intent of Japanese medical students after they completed their rural clinical training. RESULTS: The following variables were significantly associated with a higher rural self-efficacy score: female sex (p = 0.003), age < 21 years (p = 0.013), having a doctor as a role model (p < 0.001), gaining admission through a school recommendation (p = 0.016), living in a rural or remote area until the age of 18 years (p = 0.018), and orientation towards general medicine (p < 0.001). In addition, baseline difficulty with living in a rural area was significantly associated with a lower self-efficacy score (p < 0.001). Participants with a stronger intent to practice in a rural area before rural clinical training had higher rural self-efficacy and showed a stronger positive rural career intent after rural clinical training (p < 0.001). A multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that difficulty with living in a rural area [odds ratio (OR): 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.39-0.84] was still associated with lower rural career intent after rural clinical training, independent of all confounders such as gender, age, scholarship for regional duty, rural background, and orientation towards general medicine. However, when rural self-efficacy (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.07-1.16) was added as a factor for rural career intent, difficulty with living in a rural area (OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.43-1.06) was no longer observed as an associated factor. CONCLUSION: Subjective difficulty with living in a rural area was shown to reduce future rural career intent, but high rural self-efficacy ameliorated this decline.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Área de Atuação Profissional , Autoeficácia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Recursos Humanos
8.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(5): 666-675, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35567770

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: It is well established that rural workforce outcomes are more likely among medical graduates who spend time training in non-urban areas; however, fewer studies have assessed whether graduates are more likely to return to the specific area where they undertook rural training. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine whether graduates who had undertaken a regional-rural immersion program in Northland, NZ, were more likely to have returned to work in Northland as of mid-2021, relative to peers who did not participate. DESIGN: This prospective cohort study used longitudinal tracking survey responses, medical school administrative data and workforce outcome information. A multinomial model, accounting for other covariates, was built to determine the association between graduates practising in Northland (population ⟨ 100 000), which encompasses both rural (population ⟨ 25 000) and regional (25 000 ⟩ population ⟨ 100 000) areas, and having participated in a Northland-based immersion program during medical school. The study population was University of Auckland domestic medical students graduating between 2009 and 2018, inclusive. Immersion program participants who responded to longitudinal career tracking surveys were included in the study sample. FINDINGS: The final sample size was 1320 students (80% of population of interest). Graduates who undertook the Northland immersion program (n = 169) were more likely than non-participants (n = 1151) to be working in Northland as of 2020-2021 (relative risk: 3.2). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Regional-rural immersion programs might preferentially build workforces in that specific region; however, further research is required to understand whether these findings are generalizable, and the main reasons for this effect.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , Nova Zelândia , Área de Atuação Profissional , Estudos Prospectivos
10.
J Rural Health ; 38(4): 865-875, 2022 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35384064

RESUMO

PURPOSE: How care delivery influences urban-rural disparities in cancer outcomes is unclear. We sought to understand community oncologists' practice settings to inform cancer care delivery interventions. METHODS: We conducted secondary analysis of a national dataset of providers billing Medicare from June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020 in 13 states in the central United States. We used Kruskal-Wallis rank and Fisher's exact tests to compare physician characteristics and practice settings among rural and urban community oncologists. FINDINGS: We identified 1,963 oncologists practicing in 1,492 community locations; 67.5% practiced in exclusively urban locations, 11.3% in exclusively rural locations, and 21.1% in both rural and urban locations. Rural-only, urban-only, and urban-rural spanning oncologists practice in an average of 1.6, 2.4, and 5.1 different locations, respectively. A higher proportion of rural community sites were solo practices (11.7% vs 4.0%, P<.001) or single specialty practices (16.4% vs 9.4%, P<.001); and had less diversity in training environments (86.5% vs 67.8% with <2 medical schools represented, P<.001) than urban community sites. Rural multispecialty group sites were less likely to include other cancer specialists. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 2 potentially distinct styles of care delivery in rural communities, which may require distinct interventions: (1) innovation-isolated rural oncologists, who are more likely to be solo providers, provide care at few locations, and practice with doctors with similar training experiences; and (2) urban-rural spanning oncologists who provide care at a high number of locations and have potential to spread innovation, but may face high complexity and limited opportunity for care standardization.


Assuntos
Neoplasias , Área de Atuação Profissional , Idoso , Humanos , Medicare , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/terapia , População Rural , Especialização , Estados Unidos
11.
Acad Med ; 97(9): 1264-1267, 2022 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35442906

RESUMO

To help increase the supply and retention of rural family physicians, Thomas Jefferson University initiated the Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP) in 1974. The program selectively admits medical school applicants who both grew up in a rural area and plan to practice in a rural area. During medical school, PSAP students have ongoing mentoring and rural clinical experiences. As the program now approaches the half-century mark, this commentary summarizes several important lessons learned. First, outcomes research is critical, and program leaders have been able to publish 15 papers and a book about the PSAP and its outcomes. Second, these studies have shown that the program has been highly successful, with PSAP graduates 8.5-9.9 times more likely to enter rural family medicine than their peers, and that the PSAP contributed 12% of all rural family physicians in Pennsylvania. Other similar medical school rural programs have had comparable success, with more than half of all graduates combined (including PSAP graduates) practicing rural. Third, long-term retention has a multiplicative impact. Long-term retention of PSAP graduates in rural family medicine was greater than 70% after 20-25 years. Fourth, research has shown that the admissions component accounted for approximately three-quarters of the PSAP's success. Three factors available at the time of matriculation (rural background, plans for rural practice, and plans for family medicine) identified almost 80% of all Jefferson graduates in rural practice 3 decades later. Having a peer group with similar backgrounds, mentoring, and the rural curriculum were also very important. Fifth, wanting to live rural appears key to the rural practice decision. Finally, given that medical school programs like the PSAP produce substantial increases in the supply and retention of rural physicians while requiring modest resources, medical schools can have a critical role in addressing the rural physician shortage.


Assuntos
Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Escolha da Profissão , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/educação , Humanos , Médicos de Família , Área de Atuação Profissional , Faculdades de Medicina , Universidades , Recursos Humanos
12.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(4): 520-528, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35384122

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To understand how contemporary socio-cultural factors may impact medical students' rural career intent. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study using data from the national Federation of Rural Australian Medical Educators survey. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING: Medical students across 18 Australian universities who completed a full academic year of clinical training in rural areas in 2019. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Preferred location of practice post-training reported to be either: (i) a major city; (ii) a regional area or large town; or (iii) a small rural location. RESULTS: In total, 626 students completed the survey (70.1% response rate). A small rural location was the most preferred location of practice after graduation for 28.3% of the students (95% CI 21.6-36.0). Four socio-cultural factors were positively associated with a preference for a rural career location: poor health status of rural people, motor vehicle traffic congestion in cities, rural generalist training opportunities in the state and the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Other socio-cultural factors, including specialists' under-employment, Medicare freeze effect on doctors' income, bullying/sexual harassment in hospitals, climate change/natural disasters or recognised rural health personalities did not influence the investigated outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a novel association between contemporary socio-cultural factors and rural career intention in a cohort of Australian rural clinical school students. These findings advocate for further consideration of research exploring socio-cultural factors shaping rural career intent and workforce outcomes.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Intenção , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 31, 2022 04 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35392954

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Physician maldistribution is a global problem that hinders patients' abilities to access healthcare services. Medical education presents an opportunity to influence physicians towards meeting the healthcare needs of underserved communities when establishing their practice. Understanding the impact of educational interventions designed to offset physician maldistribution is crucial to informing health human resource strategies aimed at ensuring that the disposition of the physician workforce best serves the diverse needs of all patients and communities. METHODS: A scoping review was conducted using a six-stage framework to help map current evidence on educational interventions designed to influence physicians' decisions or intention to establish practice in underserved areas. A search strategy was developed and used to conduct database searches. Data were synthesized according to the types of interventions and the location in the medical education professional development trajectory, that influence physician intention or decision for rural and underserved practice locations. RESULTS: There were 130 articles included in the review, categorized according to four categories: preferential admissions criteria, undergraduate training in underserved areas, postgraduate training in underserved areas, and financial incentives. A fifth category was constructed to reflect initiatives comprised of various combinations of these four interventions. Most studies demonstrated a positive impact on practice location, suggesting that selecting students from underserved or rural areas, requiring them to attend rural campuses, and/or participate in rural clerkships or rotations are influential in distributing physicians in underserved or rural locations. However, these studies may be confounded by various factors including rural origin, pre-existing interest in rural practice, and lifestyle. Articles also had various limitations including self-selection bias, and a lack of standard definition for underservedness. CONCLUSIONS: Various educational interventions can influence physician practice location: preferential admissions criteria, rural experiences during undergraduate and postgraduate medical training, and financial incentives. Educators and policymakers should consider the social identity, preferences, and motivations of aspiring physicians as they have considerable impact on the effectiveness of education initiatives designed to influence physician distribution in underserved locations.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Médicos , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Humanos , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Área de Atuação Profissional , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
14.
Med J Aust ; 216(11): 572-577, 2022 06 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35365852

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between extended medical graduates' rural clinical school (RCS) experience and geographic origins with practising in rural communities five and eight years after graduation. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS: Cohort study of 2011 domestic medical graduates from ten Australian medical schools with rural clinical or regional medical schools. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Practice location types eight years after graduation (2019/2020) as recorded by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency, classified as rural or metropolitan according to the 2015 Modified Monash Model; changes in practice location type between postgraduate years 5 (2016/2017) and 8 (2019/2020). RESULTS: Data were available for 1321 graduates from ten universities; 696 were women (52.7%), 259 had rural backgrounds (19.6%), and 413 had extended RCS experience (31.3%). Eight years after graduation, rural origin graduates with extended RCS experience were more likely than metropolitan origin graduates without this experience to practise in regional (relative risk [RR], 3.6; 95% CI, 1.8-7.1) or rural communities (RR, 4.8; 95% CI, 3.1-7.5). Concordance of location type five and eight years after graduation was 92.6% for metropolitan practice (84 of 1136 graduates had moved to regional/rural practice, 7.4%), 26% for regional practice (56 of 95 had moved to metropolitan practice, 59%), and 73% for rural practice (20 of 100 had moved to metropolitan practice, 20%). Metropolitan origin graduates with extended RCS experience were more likely than those without it to remain in rural practice (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9) or to move to rural practice (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1). CONCLUSION: The distribution of graduates by practice location type was similar five and eight years after graduation. Recruitment to and retention in rural practice were higher among graduates with extended RCS experience. Our findings reinforce the importance of longitudinal rural and regional training pathways, and the role of RCSs, regional training hubs, and the rural generalist training program in coordinating these initiatives.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Área de Atuação Profissional , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
15.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(4): 529-535, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35324046

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the work location (metropolitan, regional, rural and remote) of graduates in nursing, allied health and oral health disciplines who complete their professional training, end-to-end training, in a regional or rural area noting the potential inclusion of a metropolitan-based placement for speciality practice not available in rural or regional Victoria. METHODS: We tracked the place of employment from the Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency (AHPRA) of all graduates from a regional/rural tertiary education provider. The student home address at enrolment, locations where they undertook all placements and their current place of work were described using an objective geographical model of access, the Modified Monash Model. RESULTS: Seventy-five per cent of 5506 graduates were located in the AHPRA database. About one third of graduates were working in metropolitan areas, 1/3 in regional cities and 1/3 in rural areas. Students' origin accounted for 1/3 of variance in current workplace location. The more placement days students completed in regional/ rural areas was also a significant predictor of working in a regional or rural area. CONCLUSION: End-to-end training in regional/rural areas is an effective approach to retaining a regional/rural workforce. Student origin is a strong predictor of working rural or regionally, as is undertaking placements in rural areas. This suggests that priority for rural/ regional student placements should be given to students in end-to-end regional/ rural programs and students from a regional/ rural background.


Assuntos
Área de Atuação Profissional , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Austrália , Escolha da Profissão , Humanos , População Rural , Recursos Humanos
16.
Distúrb. comun ; 34(1): e51934, mar. 2022.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1396628

RESUMO

Introdução: os bancos de leite humano foram criados para apoiar e incentivar o aleitamento materno, atuando como estratégia de política pública na redução da mortalidade neonatal e proteção à saúde do binômio. Por se tratar de um espaço de atuação multidisciplinar, os bancos de leite tornam-se um ambiente ideal para a atuação do fonoaudiólogo, profissional que contribui no suporte às mães, especialmente durante o estabelecimento da amamentação exclusiva. Objetivo: relatar as possibilidades de atuação fonoaudiológica em um banco de leite humano. Descrição da experiência: estudo de abordagem qualitativa descritiva do tipo relato de experiência, realizado entre os meses de março e julho de 2020, em um Banco de Leite Humano de uma maternidade pública do Nordeste, credenciada na Iniciativa Hospital Amigo da Criança. A vivência compreendeu dois seguimentos: atuação técnica e atuação assistencial. As experiências foram apresentadas por meio da narração discursiva. O espaço de atuação da Fonoaudiologia em um banco de leite humano pode ser diversificado, pois abrange a atuação técnica e assistencial, desde o recebimento do leite humano doado à assistência a puérpera e ao recém-nascido. É necessário capacitação específica para que o profissional seja inserido dentro da equipe de um banco de leite humano. Considerações finais: Foi possível identificar, por meio da experiência, o papel do fonoaudiólogo no banco de leite humano, bem como compreender a necessidade da sua inserção na equipe deste setor no âmbito hospitalar.


Introduction: human milk banks were created to support and encourage breastfeeding, acting as a public policy strategy to reduce neonatal mortality and protect the health of the binomial. Because it is a space for multidisciplinary activities, milk banks become an ideal environment for the performance of the speech therapist, a professional who contributes to support mothers, especially during the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Objective: to report the possibilities of speech therapy activities in a human milk bank. Description of the experience: a qualitative descriptive study of an experience report type, carried out between March and July 2020, at a Human Milk Bank of a public maternity hospital in the Brazilian Northeast, accredited by the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. The experience comprised two segments: technical performance and assistance performance. The experiences were presented through discursive narration. The area of performance of Speech Therapy in a human milk bank can be diversified, as it covers technical and assistance activities, from the receipt of donated human milk to assistance to the puerperal woman and the newborn. Specific training is necessary for the professional to be inserted into the team of a human milk bank. Final considerations: It was possible to identify, through experience, the role of the speech therapist in the human milk bank, as well as to understand the need for his insertion in the team of this sector in the hospital environment.


Introducción: los bancos de leche humana fueron creados para apoyar e incentivar en el amamantamiento materno, actuando como estrategia de política pública en la reducción de la mortalidad neonatal y la protección de la salud del binomio. Por tratarse de un espacio de actuación multidisciplinar, los bancos de leche se convirtieron en un ambiente ideal para la actuación del fonoaudiólogo, profesional que contribuye en apoyo a las madres, especialmente durante el establecimiento del amamantamiento exclusivo. Objetivo: relatar las posibilidades de actuación fonoaudiológica en un banco de leche humana. Descripción de la experiencia: estudio de abordaje cualitativo descriptivo de tipo relato de experiencia, realizado entre los meses de marzo a julio del 2020, en un Banco de leche humana de una maternidad pública del Noroeste, bajo la iniciativa del Hospital Amigo de los Niños. La vivencia comprendió dos seguimientos: actuación técnica y actuación asistencial. Las experiencias fueron presentadas por medio de la narración discursiva. El espacio de actuación de la fonoaudiología en un banco del hecho humana puede ser diversificado, pues comprende tanto la actuación técnica como la asistencial, desde el recibimiento de la leche materna donada a la asistencia, la matrona y al recién nacido. Es necesario capacitación específica para que el profesional sea inserto dentro del equipo de un Banco de leche humana. Consideraciones finales: fue posible identificar, por medio de la experiencia del papel del fonoaudiólogo en el banco de leche humana, así como comprender la necesidad de su inserción en el equipo de este sector en el ámbito hospitalario.


Assuntos
Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Bancos de Leite Humano , Fonoaudiologia , Aleitamento Materno/métodos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Capacitação Profissional , Extração de Leite , Leite Humano
17.
Aust J Rural Health ; 30(2): 197-207, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35103353

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate students' perceptions of the impact of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 on rural and remote placements facilitated by 16 University Departments of Rural Health in Australia in 2020. DESIGN: A mixed-method design comprising an online survey and semi-structured interviews. SETTING: Australia. PARTICIPANTS: Allied health, nursing and medical students with a planned University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural or remote placement between February and October 2020. INTERVENTION: A planned rural or remote placement in 2020 facilitated by a University Departments of Rural Health, regardless of placement outcome. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaire included placement outcome (completed or not), discipline of study (nursing, allied health, medicine), and Likert measures of impact to placement (including supervision, placement tasks, location, accommodation, client contact and student learning) and placement experience (overall, support, supervision, university support). Semi-structured interviews asked about placement planning, outcome, decisions, experience and student perceptions. RESULTS: While coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 reportedly impacted on the majority of planned placements, most students (80%) were able to complete their University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated placement in some form and were satisfied with their placement experience. Common placement changes included changes to tasks, setting, supervisors and location. Allied health students were significantly more likely to indicate that their placement had been impacted and also felt more supported by supervisors and universities than nursing students. Interview participants expressed concerns regarding the potential impact of cancelled and adapted placements on graduation and future employment. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was reported to impact the majority of University Departments of Rural Health-facilitated rural and remote placements in 2020. Fortunately, most students were able to continue to undertake a rural or remote placement in some form and were largely satisfied with their placement experience. Students were concerned about their lack of clinical learning and graduating on time with adequate clinical competence.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Austrália , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , SARS-CoV-2
18.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0263132, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35081175

RESUMO

We devised and assessed open recruitment of host families for medical student homestays in a rural area of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, so that program organizers would not have to depend on professional and personal connections. The duration of the homestays was one night and two days, and they were conducted in August 2016, 2017, and 2018. The purpose of this community-based medical education program was to promote interactions between medical students and residents of Tamba area. The study asked one family member from each host family to complete a questionnaire after the homestay, and their experiences were evaluated in the study. The questionnaire results were analyzed using a visual analog scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Thirty-three host families participated in the homestay program over three years. Results showed that VAS scores were high for enjoyment of homestays (VAS; 92.4 ± 13.0), continuation of the homestay program (91.7 ± 12.7), continuation of participation in the homestay program (89.2 ± 16.2), and desire for the homestay students to work in the area in the future (95.4 ± 6.3). The recruitment of host families through advertising was an efficient method for this community-based medical education homestay program. The results indicate that it is possible to attract more host families through open recruitment, which will contribute to the sustainability of the homestay program. Further research, including a follow-up of the students who participated and whether they chose a rural area or Tamba to practice is needed in the future. Since this is an ongoing program, further research in a similar format can be conducted in the future.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Família , Área de Atuação Profissional , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Recursos Humanos
19.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 142(1)2022 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês, Norueguês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35026076

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Every year since 2009, up to 24 medical students at UiT The Arctic University of Norway have undertaken the last two years of their undergraduate medical education in Bodø (referred to as the Bodø model). We mapped the municipalities where the students had grown up, their preferences as to future specialties, where they worked and what they worked with after Part 1 of their specialist training. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Medical students who graduated from the Bodø model in the period 2012-18 completed a questionnaire in the first week of their sixth year of study, containing questions about where they had grown up and their preferences for future place of work and specialty. We mapped their place of work and specialty as of January 2021 as well as that of the two cohorts graduating in 2010-11. The place where the latter had grown up was mapped via direct contact, contact with their cohort or open internet sources. The covariation between where they grew up and their place of work, specialty preferences and choice of specialty were analysed using chi-square tests and logistic regression. RESULTS: Out of a total of 146 doctors, 91 of whom were women (62.3 %), who had completed their undergraduate medical education under the Bodø model as well as Part 1 of their specialist training, 40 (27.4 %) had grown up in Bodø municipality and for 56 (38.4 %) this was their place of work. For the remainder of the county of Nordland, the corresponding figures were 54 (37.0 %) and 38 (26.0 %), for Troms og Finnmark 23 (15.8) and 19 (13 %) and for the remainder of Norway 29 (19.9 %) and 33 (22.6 %). A total of 51 (34.9 %) worked as GPs, of whom 34 (66.7 %) worked in rural municipalities. There was a higher probability of working in a rural area if the doctor had grown up in a rural community (odds ratio (OR) 3.0 (95 % CI 1.5 to 6.1)) and of working in general medicine if this had been their preference as a student (OR 3.7 (95 % CI 1.8 to 7.6)). INTERPRETATION: The Bodø model has mainly attracted students with an affiliation to the region. At the time of the survey, a large percentage of the graduates who took part of their undergraduate medical education in Bodø worked at the Nordland Hospital in Bodø and in general practice, particularly in rural municipalities.


Assuntos
Medicina Geral , Médicos , Serviços de Saúde Rural , Estudantes de Medicina , Escolha da Profissão , Feminino , Humanos , Área de Atuação Profissional , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Rev. ABENO ; 22(2): 1256, jan. 2022. tab
Artigo em Português | LILACS, BBO - Odontologia | ID: biblio-1397309

RESUMO

O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a inserção no mercado de trabalho e o perfil de egressos da Faculdade de Odontologia do Recife. A amostra foi composta por 107 egressos que se formaram no período de 2012 a 2018 e os dados foram coletados no período de agosto a outubro de 2020, por meioda aplicação de um questionário onlinena plataforma Google Forms. A idade dos participantes teve média de 29,5 anos e mais da metade (55,1%) era do sexo feminino. A maioria expressiva (90,7%) tinha cursado o ensino médio em escola particular e a renda mais citada, trabalhando como cirurgião-dentista, foi de 6 a 10 salários mínimos (38,3%). A maior parte (64,5%) se estabeleceu profissionalmente na Região Metropolitana do Recife e a maioria atua como profissional liberal (75,7%). A Ortodontia foi a especialização mais citada (22,2%), seguida pela Prótese (21,1%) e pela Endodontia (20%). A maior parte (94,4%) dos egressos se consideraram aptos a exercer aprofissão logo após se formar, citando os estágios(74,3%)e os professores (74,3%) como principais fatores para essa aptidão. Os egressos classificaram o conhecimento adquirido na graduação como suficiente e adequado ao mercado de trabalho (40,2%) e fariamo curso novamente na mesma faculdade (83,2%). Dos egressos,73,8% acreditamque o mercado irámelhorar e que se sente preparado. Conclui-se que o perfil dos egressos é predominantemente de jovens adultos, do sexo feminino, atuantes na Região Metropolitana do Recife, profissionais liberais, pós graduados e satisfeitos com a instituição que escolheram para formação profissional (AU).


The aim of this work was to analyze the insertion in the labor market and the graduate profile of the Recife School of Dentistry.The sample comprised 107 graduates who graduated from 2012 to 2018 and the data were collected from August to October 2020, through the application of an onlinesurvey on Google Forms. The average age of the respondents was 29.5 years old, and over half (55.1%) of the participants were female. The expressive majority (90.7%) had attended private high school institutions and the most cited income, working as a dental surgeon, was 6 to 10 minimum wages (38.3%). The majority (64.5%) has settled professionally in the Greater Recifeareaand most are self-employed (75.7%). Orthodontics was the most cited field of specialization (22.2%), followed by Prothesis (21.1%) and Endodontics (20%). Most (94.4%) of the graduates considered themselves able to start their professional practice soon after graduating, mentioning curricular internships (74.3%) and professors (74.3%) as the main contributing factors for this ability. The graduates deemed the knowledge acquired in the undergraduate course as sufficient and suitable for the labor market requirements (40.2%) and would study again in the same institution (83.2%). 73.8% of the graduates believe that the labor market will grow and that they feel prepared. It can be concluded that the graduate profile is predominantly young adults, female, working in the Greater Recifearea,self-employed, holding graduate degrees, and satisfied with the institution they chose for professional education (AU).


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Área de Atuação Profissional , Odontólogos , Mercado de Trabalho , Capacitação Profissional , Satisfação Pessoal , Brasil , Estudos Transversais/métodos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Interpretação Estatística de Dados , Estudo Observacional
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...