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1.
Eur J Health Law ; 29(2): 285-295, 2022 May 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35508357
2.
Harm Reduct J ; 19(1): 42, 2022 May 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501857

RESUMEN

To offer a critical reflection on an impoverished neighborhood in Vancouver, Canada, and their access to oral health care. A review of how a lack of publicly funded oral health care affects the most vulnerable, uninsured, and underserved citizens is performed. Personal and professional accounts on how entrepreneurial innovations of not-for-profit organizations can help to close the gap in access to oral health care are offered using the Vancouver Area Network of drug users (VANDU) and the PHS Community Services Society as case studies in British Columbia. Despite the efforts put forward by not-for-profit organizations such as the VANDU and the PHS Community Services Society, a national oral health care plan is warranted though still not a political imperative. Underserved citizens have a right to oral health care that is compassionate, collaborative, accessible, and affordable.


Asunto(s)
Participación de la Comunidad , Consumidores de Drogas , Colombia Británica , Derechos Humanos , Humanos
3.
J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs ; 49(3): 251-260, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35523241

RESUMEN

An estimated 725,000 to 1 million people are living with an ostomy or continent diversion in the United States, and approximately 100,000 ostomy surgeries are performed each year in the United States. As a result of ostomy surgery, bodily waste is rerouted from its usual path because of malfunctioning parts of the urinary or digestive system. An ostomy can be temporary or permanent. The ostomy community is an underserved population of patients. United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc (UOAA), is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting quality of life for people with ostomies and continent diversions through information, support, advocacy, and collaboration. Over the years, UOAA has received hundreds of stories from people who have received inadequate care. In the United States, patients receiving medical care have certain health rights. For ostomy and continent diversion patients, these rights are known as the "You Matter! Know What to Expect and Know Your Rights-Ostomy and Continent Diversion Patient Bill of Rights" (PBOR). These rights define and provide a guide to patients and health care professionals as to what the best practices are when receiving and providing high-quality ostomy care during all phases of the surgical experience. This includes preoperative to postoperative care and throughout the life span when living with an ostomy or continent diversion. In 2020, the National Quality Forum released "The Care We Need: Driving Better Health Outcomes for People and Communities," a National Quality Task Force report that provides a road map where every person in every community can expect to consistently and predictably receive high-quality care by 2030 (thecareweneed.org). One of the core strategic objectives this report stated is to ensure appropriate, safe, and accessible care. Actionable opportunities to drive change include accelerating adoption of leading practices. The adoption of the PBOR best practices will drive the health care quality improvement change needed for the ostomy and continent diversion population. There are concerns in the ostomy and continent diversion communities among patients and health care professionals that the standards of care outlined in the PBOR are not occurring across the United States in all health care settings. There are further concerns stated by health care professionals that the patient-centered recommendations outlined in the PBOR need to be strengthened by being supported with available published health care evidence. The work of this task force was to bring together members of UOAA's Advocacy Committee, members of the Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN Society) Public Policy and Advocacy Committee, and representatives from surgical organizations and industry to create a systemic change by validating through evidence the Ostomy and Continent Diversion PBOR. Through the work of the task force, each component of the PBOR has been substantiated as evidence-based. Thus, this article validates the PBOR as a guideline for high-quality standards of ostomy care. We show that when patients receive the standards of care as outlined in the PBOR, there is improved quality of care. We can now recognize that until every ostomy or continent diversion patient receives these health care rights, in all health care settings, will they truly be realized and respected as human rights in the United States and thus people living with an ostomy or continent diversion will receive "the care they need."


Asunto(s)
Estomía , Derivación Urinaria , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Nivel de Atención , Estados Unidos
4.
East Mediterr Health J ; 28(4): 247-248, 2022 Apr 28.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35545904

RESUMEN

Cognizant that every human has the right to the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organization (WHO) is promoting the health and well-being of all by all. To achieve this mission in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), a strategic vision was adopted calling on Member States and partners to anchor solidarity and action to achieve Health for All by All in the Region. The vision focuses on the need to address the environmental causes of diseases while targeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and fulfilling the human rights to live in a healthy environment.


Asunto(s)
Planetas , Desarrollo Sostenible , Salud Global , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Región Mediterránea , Organización Mundial de la Salud
5.
Int J Prison Health ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 Apr 21.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35439405

RESUMEN

PURPOSE: The first prison system case in Zimbabwe was notified in July 2020 shortly after State declaration of disaster. A legal-realist assessment was conducted of the Zimbabwean correctional system response to COVID-19 during state disaster measures, with a focus on assessing right to health, infectious disease mitigation and the extent to which minimum state obligations complied with human and health rights standards. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The Zimbabwean correctional system operations during COVID-19 disaster measures are scrutinized using a range of international, African and domestic human rights instruments in relation to the right to health of prisoners. This study focused particularly on standards of care, environmental conditions of detention and right of access to health care. FINDINGS: Systemic poor standards of detention are observed, where prisoners experience power outages, water shortages and a lack of access to clean drinking water and water for ablution purposes, a severe lack of safe space and adequate ventilation, poor quality food and malnutrition and a lack of sufficient supply of food, medicines, clothing and bedding. Whilst access to health care of prisoners in Zimbabwe has greatly improved in recent times, the standard of care was severely stretched during COVID-19 due to lack of government resourcing and reliance on non-governmental organisation and faith-based organisations to support demand for personal protective equipment, disinfection products and medicines. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Prison conditions in Zimbabwe are conducive to chronic ill health and the spread of many transmissible diseases, not limited to COVID-19. The developed legal-realist account considers whether Zimbabwe had a culture of respect for the rule of law pertinent to human and health rights of those detained during COVID-19 disaster measures, and whether minimum standards of care were upheld.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Prisioneros , COVID-19/epidemiología , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Prisiones , Agua , Zimbabwe/epidemiología
6.
Artículo en Chino | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35439862

RESUMEN

Objective: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of pneumoconiosis in Qinghai Province from 2011 to 2020, and to provide a basis for the formulation of prevention and control strategy. Methods: In April 2021 , the cases of pneumoconiosis were monitored by the Occupational Disease and Health Hazard Factors Monitoring Information System in Qinghai Province from 2011 to 2020. The distribution of pneumoconiosis, the composition of diseases and the working years exposed to dust were analyzed. Results: All 1026 cases of pneumoconiosis were newly diagnosed in Qinghai Province from 2011 to 2020, silicosis and coal worker pneumoconiosis were the main diseases (78.36% ,804/1026). Stage Ⅰ pneumoconiosis were 484 (47.17%,484/1026) cases. 359 (34.99%,359/1026) cases, 315 (30.70%,315/1026) cases and 252 (24.56%, 252/1026) cases had been diagnosed respectively in Xining City, Haidong City and Haixi Prefecture; 628 (61.21%,628/1026) cases and 418 (40.74%, 418/1026) cases engaged in mining industry and large-sized enterprise, respectively. The working years exposed to dust in silicosis cases were shorter than that in coal worker pneumoconiosis and other pneumoconiosis (P <0.05). Conclusion: The pneumoconiosis area and industry focus in Qinghai Province is obvious. The supervision and adninistration of small and micro scale employers should be strengthened to protect the health rights and interests of workers, especially for the key area and industry.


Asunto(s)
Antracosis , Minas de Carbón , Neumoconiosis , Silicosis , Antracosis/epidemiología , China/epidemiología , Polvo , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Neumoconiosis/diagnóstico , Neumoconiosis/epidemiología , Silicosis/epidemiología
7.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35457706

RESUMEN

Climate change is a multidimensional issue that affects all aspects of society, including public health and human rights. Climate change is already severely impacting people's health and threatening people's guaranteed fundamental rights, including those to life, health, self-determination, and education, among others. Across geographical regions, population groups and communities who are already marginalized due to age, gender, ethnicity, income, and other socioeconomic factors, are those who are disproportionately affected by climate impacts despite having contributed the least to global emissions. Although scholars have been calling for a human rights-based approach and a health perspective to climate action, the literature looking at this multidisciplinary intersection is still nascent, and governments have yet to implement such intersectoral policies. This commentary begins to reflect on the relationship between climate change, human rights, and public health from the perspective of young people engaged in climate action and discourse at the national and international levels. It presents a way forward on what we, as youth climate advocates and researchers, believe is a priority to bring intersectoral integration of human rights and public health approaches to climate change to fruition. First, scholars and practitioners should examine and support youth-led climate interventions that tackle human rights and public health violations incurred by the climate crisis. Second, participatory approaches to climate change must be designed by working synergistically with climate-vulnerable groups, including children and young people, practitioners and scholars in public health and human rights sectors to holistically address the social, health, and environmental impacts of the climate crisis and root causes of injustice. Finally, we recommend more holistic data collection to better inform evidence-based climate policies that operationalize human rights and public health co-benefits.


Asunto(s)
Derechos Humanos , Salud Pública , Adolescente , Niño , Cambio Climático , Humanos
8.
Australas Psychiatry ; 30(2): 195-199, 2022 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35382610

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the medical assessments of involuntary community patients in a regional mental health service, determine the compliance with requirements under Queensland's Mental Health Act 2016 (the Act) to regularly review orders and assess patients' mental capacity. METHOD: We audited 183 patient records on community treatment authorities (CTAs) to determine whether medical assessments undertaken under the Act included consideration of the person's capacity, and regular reviews by an authorised doctor as required1s205. RESULTS: The audit revealed that 51% of the CTA patients did not comply with legal requirements either to complete a capacity assessment and/or be medically assessed within three months of the last review. CONCLUSIONS: Over 50% of medical assessments did not comply with the legislative requirements to record capacity assessments and review involuntary treatment on at least a three-month basis. However, when the treatment criteria were met, it did not appear to be a basis for CTA revocation. Further research may help determine whether the Mental Health Review Tribunal (Tribunal) could play a greater role in overseeing compliance with the new legislative requirements or if other clinical oversight mechanisms would be appropriate to improve the assessment process.


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Mental , Salud Mental , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Queensland
9.
Washington, D.C.; OPS; 2022-04-27. (OPS/FPL/HL/21-0039).
No convencional en Español | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-55939

RESUMEN

Hemos hecho grandes progresos en la mejora de la supervivencia infantil, pero también tenemos que crear las condiciones adecuadas para ayudar a los niños y niñas a prosperar a medida que crecen y se desarrollan. Los entornos limpios, seguros y protegidos contribuyen a crear lugares propicios para el cuidado cariñoso y sensible. Estas son condiciones esenciales para que los niños sobrevivan y prosperen. En el presente resumen se presentan algunos de los riesgos ambientales más importantes que enfrentan los niños y niñas hoy en día, y se explica por qué los lactantes y los niños pequeños son particularmente vulnerables. Se mencionan además los componentes del cuidado cariñoso y sensible, especialmente la buena salud y la seguridad y protección. El objetivo es alertar a los encargados de formular las políticas públicas, a los profesionales de salud y a aquellos que trabajan en cuestiones ambientales sobre la importancia de tener en cuenta las necesidades de la primera infancia a fin de crear entornos en los que los niños pequeños y sus cuidadores puedan prosperar. Proporciona ejemplos de acciones prácticas para entornos clave que afectan el desarrollo temprano de los niños como la consulta médica habitual, el hogar y la guardería, así como los entornos urbanos y comunitarios más amplios que pueden crear tanto riesgos como oportunidades para el desarrollo de los niños.


Asunto(s)
Salud del Niño , Servicios de Salud del Niño , Desarrollo Infantil , Salud Ambiental , Seguridad Alimentaria , Protección a la Infancia
10.
Violence Against Women ; 28(8): 1723-1727, 2022 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35475771
11.
Reprod Health ; 19(1): 95, 2022 Apr 18.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35436888

RESUMEN

Many components of abortion care in early pregnancy can safely be provided on an outpatient basis by mid-level providers or by pregnant people themselves. Yet, some states impose non-evidence-based provider restrictions, understood as legal or regulatory restrictions on who may provide or manage all or some aspects of abortion care. These restrictions are inconsistent with the World Health Organization's support for the optimization of the roles of various health workers, and do not usually reflect evidence-based determinations of who can provide abortion. As a matter of international human rights law, states should ensure that the regulation of abortion is evidence-based and proportionate, and disproportionate impacts must be remedied. Furthermore, states are obliged take steps to ensure women do not have to undergo unsafe abortion, to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, and to effectively protect women and girls from the physical and mental risks associated with unsafe abortion. States must revise their laws to ensure this. Where laws restrict those with the training and competence to provide from participating in abortion care, they are prima facie arbitrary and disproportionate and thus in need of reform. This review, developed by experts in reproductive health, law, policy, and human rights, examined the impact of provider restrictions on people seeking abortion, and medical professionals. The evidence from this review suggests that provider restrictions have negative implications for access to quality abortion, contributing inter alia to delays and recourse to unsafe abortion. A human rights-based approach to abortion regulation would require the removal of overly restrictive provider restrictions. The review provides evidence that speaks to possible routes for regulatory reform by expanding the health workforce involved in abortion-related care, as well as expanding health workers' roles, both of which could improve timely access to first trimester surgical and medical abortion, reduce costs, save time, and reduce the need for travel.


This review identifies evidence of the impacts of provider restrictions on people seeking to access abortion and on abortion providers. It pursues a methodology designed to ensure the full integration of public health and human rights standards developed by the research team and published elsewhere. The evidence from this review points clearly to provider restrictions having negative implications for health outcomes, health systems, and human rights. This is especially important as international guidance provided by the WHO indicates best practice in provision and management of abortion and shows clearly that undue provider restrictions are not justified by reference to the nature and complexity of abortion.


Asunto(s)
Aborto Inducido , Aborto Legal , Femenino , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Masculino , Embarazo
12.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 639, 2022 04 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35366832

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In 2012, Ghana ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and enacted a Mental Health Act to improve the quality of mental health care and stop human rights violations against people with mental health conditions. In line with these objectives, Ghanaian stakeholders collected data on the quality of mental health services and respect for human rights in psychiatric facilities to identify challenges and gather useful information for the development of plans aimed to improve the quality of the services offered. This study aimed to assess psychiatric facilities from different Ghanaian regions and provide evidence on the quality of care and respect of human rights in mental health services. METHODS: Assessments were conducted by independent visiting committees that collected data through observation, review of documentation, and interviews with service users, staff, and carers, and provided scores using the World Health Organization QualityRights Toolkit methodology. RESULTS: This study revealed significant key challenges in the implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities principles in Ghanaian psychiatric services. The rights to an adequate standard of living and enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health were not fully promoted. Only initial steps had been taken to guarantee the right to exercise legal capacity and the right to personal liberty and security. Significant gaps in the promotion of the right to live independently and be included in the community were identified. CONCLUSIONS: This study identifies shortcomings and critical areas that the Ghanaian government and facilities need to target for implementing a human rights-based approach in mental health and improve the quality of mental health care throughout the country.


Asunto(s)
Hospitales Psiquiátricos , Derechos Humanos , Ghana , Humanos , Calidad de la Atención de Salud , Organización Mundial de la Salud
13.
Rev Saude Publica ; 56: 31, 2022.
Artículo en Inglés, Portugués | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35476109

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the sociodemographic profile and self-reported health conditions of asylum-seekers in Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of secondary data, collected from asylum claims forms completed in 2016 and 2017, at Cáritas Arquidiocesana do Rio de Janeiro (Cáritas-RJ). Descriptive analyses were performed and absolute and relative frequencies and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: Claims completed by 818 asylum-seekers from 49 different countries were identified, of whom 126 (20.3%) were stateless, 510 (62.7%) were male, 797 (97.4%) were adults, with a mean age of 30.5 years, 551 (73.5%) were single, 340 (44.1%) had higher education, and 27 (4.0%) were unemployed in their country of origin before coming to Brazil. Fear of persecution for political opinion, violation of human rights, and risk of torture stood out among the reasons stated for requesting asylum. To reach Brazil, 629 (80.5%) traveled only by plane. Regarding health conditions, 216 (29.0%) reported having some symptom, disease or health problem, the most frequent being pain, vision problems, infectious diseases (including HIV/AIDS), and hypertension. Only 15 individuals (2.2%) reported being in some medical or psychological treatment; 42 (6.0%) reported visual impairments, 14 (2.0%) reported physical impairments and 4 (0.6%) hearing impairments. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike other countries, where forced migrants with a low level of education enter clandestinely by sea or land, asylum-seekers residing in Rio de Janeiro between 2016 and 2017 were mostly adults with higher education who migrated using air transport. They had primary care-sensitive health conditions that could be treated via access to public primary health care services.


Asunto(s)
Refugiados , Adulto , Brasil/epidemiología , Estudios Transversales , Femenino , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Masculino
14.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 52(2): 4-6, 2022 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35476360

RESUMEN

In 2006, the United Nations issued the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention, together with an accompanying commentary, urges governments to abandon laws authorizing guardianship and substitute decision-making for people with intellectual disabilities and to replace them with supportive decision-making laws that give all individuals the freedom to make choices reflecting their "will and preferences." Although critics point to ethical and legal problems with this approach, the Convention and commentary offer guidance to clinicians, ethicists, and others involved in evaluating medical decision-making. Whether or not it leads to formal legal action, the Convention rightly urges us to give people with cognitive impairments a greater role in decisions about their lives.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad , Discapacidad Intelectual , Toma de Decisiones , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Naciones Unidas
15.
AMA J Ethics ; 24(4): E267-274, 2022 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés, Español | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35405052

RESUMEN

The process of being granted asylum is complex, often taking months and years. Asylum seekers face high risk of being denied asylum in the United States. As medical and psychological evaluations assist in achieving successful asylum outcomes, human rights asylum clinics are being established throughout the country to facilitate these types of evaluations. The Midwest Human Rights Consortium, a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary initiative, is working to streamline the referral process and increase the evaluator workforce through training and mentorship of practitioners. More work is needed to establish evidence-based, child-centered, and trauma-informed best practices in training evaluators and performing evaluations.


El proceso para recibir asilo es complejo y normalmente lleva meses o años. Quienes solicitan asilo enfrentan un alto riesgo de ser rechazados en los Estados Unidos. Debido a que las evaluaciones médicas y psicológicas ayudan a obtener resultados exitosos en cuanto al asilo, se han estado estableciendo clínicas de derechos humanos de asilo en todo el país para facilitar este tipo de evaluaciones. El Consorcio de Derechos Humanos del Centro de EE.UU., una iniciativa multiinstitucional e interdisciplinaria, trabaja para agilizar el proceso de derivaciones y aumentar la cantidad de evaluadores mediante la capacitación y mentoría de los profesionales. Se necesita más información para establecer mejores prácticas con base en evidencia, centradas en los niños y con datos sobre traumas en las capacitaciones de los evaluadores y las evaluaciones.


Asunto(s)
Refugiados , Medicina Legal , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Examen Físico , Estados Unidos
16.
J Law Med ; 29(1): 62-66, 2022 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35362279

RESUMEN

This article provides an overview of recent scholarship calling for the defence of mental impairment to be abolished on the grounds that it breaches international human rights law. It outlines how differing interpretations of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) suggest that arguments for abolition will continue to be contested. On a practical level, no Australasian law reform body has called for the abolition of the defence and it seems unlikely that government policy will shift towards this in the absence of such a recommendation from these bodies. However, highlighting the obligations on States Parties to the CRPD to ensure the right to equal treatment before the law necessitates a careful consideration of whether the defence of mental impairment is still fit for purpose.


Asunto(s)
Personas con Discapacidad , Trastornos Mentales , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Naciones Unidas
18.
Camb Q Healthc Ethics ; 31(2): 177-184, 2022 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35243972

RESUMEN

Robert Baker and Rosamond Rhodes each argue against the universality "common morality," the approach to ethics that comprises four fundamental principles and their application in various settings. Baker contends that common morality cannot account for cultural diversity in the world and claims that a human rights approach is superior in the context of global health. Rhodes maintains that bioethics is not reducible to common morality because medical professionals have special privileges and responsibilities that people lack in everyday life. Baker fails to demonstrate how the human rights approach to global ethics is more sensitive to culture than the use of bioethics principles that comprise common morality. Rhodes has a narrow interpretation of "common morality," which when understood more broadly, accounts for the special privileges and obligation of medical professionals.


Asunto(s)
Bioética , Principios Morales , Diversidad Cultural , Derechos Humanos , Humanos
19.
Camb Q Healthc Ethics ; 31(2): 230-246, 2022 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35243973

RESUMEN

In her important and well-known discussion "On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion," Mary Anne Warren regrets that "it is not possible to produce a satisfactory defense of a woman's right to obtain an abortion without showing that the fetus is not a human being, in the morally relevant sense." Unlike some more cautious philosophers, Warren thinks that we can definitively demonstrate that the fetus is not a person. In this paper, Warren's argument is critically examined with a focus especially on the question of the foundation and the boundaries of the moral community. The fundamental thesis of the paper is that Warren's approach is flawed for at least four reasons: (1) that being a person is not as obviously central to having full moral rights as Warren assumes, (2) that her exclusivism regarding moral status has dubious moral consequences independent of the abortion issue, (3) that it is not clear that a fetus is not a person, even on Warren's own criteria, and (4) her criteria for personhood are themselves suspect.


Asunto(s)
Aborto Inducido , Derechos Humanos , Femenino , Feto , Humanos , Obligaciones Morales , Principios Morales , Personeidad , Embarazo
20.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(3): e0010165, 2022 03.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35239651

RESUMEN

Female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) affects tens of millions of women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa, yet this inequitable threat is often overlooked by advocates in both the neglected tropical disease (NTD) and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) communities. FGS causes both acute infection and long-term sexual and reproductive health harm to marginalized women and girls, with gender, poverty, and rurality combining to invisibilize the disease. Human rights and gender imperatives can help to galvanize efforts to control and eliminate FGS, as they have for other NTDs. Specifically, international human rights obligations can frame state efforts to address FGS across healthcare settings, upstream social determinants of health, scientific research, and policy implementation. This article analyzes human rights-based approaches to FGS control and elimination efforts, outlining several areas for forward-looking reforms to health policy, programing, and practice. Building from the lessons learned in applying human rights-based approaches to advance progress on other NTDs, this analysis seeks to provide the NTD community with shared understanding around international legal obligations to engage SRHR advocates and draw heightened attention to FGS. Such human rights-based approaches to FGS control and elimination can help to reduce stigma and improve care for the millions of women and girls currently affected by this preventable disease.


Asunto(s)
Esquistosomiasis , Femenino , Genitales Femeninos , Derechos Humanos , Humanos , Masculino , Enfermedades Desatendidas/prevención & control , Salud Reproductiva , Conducta Sexual
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