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1.
Nurs Philos ; 22(3): e12361, 2021 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34157208

RESUMEN

Canadian and international nursing educators are increasingly concerned with the quality of university nursing education. Contemporary nursing education is fraught by a growing anti-intellectualism coupled with the dominance of neoliberalism and corporate university business culture. Amid these challenges, nursing schools must prepare nurses to provide care in an era compounded by social and health inequities. The purpose of this paper was to explore the philosophical and contextual factors influencing anti-intellectualism in nursing education. We use John Henry Newman's view of the purpose of a university education as a heuristic perspective to examine anti-intellectualism in nursing. We contend that the ideological worship of technological advances, a culture of consumerism, quality improvement and risk management, the primacy of doing over thinking, competency-based curricula and business models rooted in neoliberal financial policies reinforce anti-intellectualism in nursing. Anti-intellectualism is a complex issue to address within the corporate university culture. We propose multiple strategies at the disciplinary, university and sociopolitical levels to decrease anti-intellectualism. Counteracting anti-intellectualism requires critical thinking, praxis and emancipation. Nurses should critically examine this anti-intellectual trend as it limits the advancement of the discipline and marginalizes its contributions within the academy. If nurses do not address this challenge, the survival of nursing as an academic discipline may be jeopardized.


Asunto(s)
Educación en Enfermería/métodos , Inteligencia , Enfermería/normas , Universidades/normas , Humanos , Universidades/organización & administración
2.
Linacre Q ; 87(3): 292-301, 2020 Aug.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32699439

RESUMEN

Only one year after starting the Catholic University of Ireland (1854), John Henry Newman arranged for the purchase of a medical school, the Cecilia-Street Medical School, which gained immediate success and has continued to this day as a part of University College Dublin. This article is a historical piece that examines the importance Newman gave to Catholic doctrine for the formation of medical students. He understood that according to a hierarchy of sciences, theology and religion are above medicine and its practice and that there are some important religious truths that future Catholic physicians need to learn. In this article, we present a brief history of the origins of the medical school, and discuss his choice of only Catholic professors, and his concern for the doctrinal and moral formation of future doctors. Summary: When John Henry Newman established a medical school in Dublin he chose from only Catholic professors to ensure that the students, almost all Catholic, would receive teaching consistent with their faith, and also that they would have as role models Catholic physicians. He understood the harmony between science and faith, and thus sought professors with very good medical knowledge, who at the same time professed the Catholic faith.

3.
Sci Eng Ethics ; 25(6): 1679-1698, 2019 12.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31872363

RESUMEN

There is a need to provide an appropriate normative conception of the modern university: a conception which identifies its unifying purposes and values and, thereby, gives direction to institutional role occupants, governments, public policymakers and other would-be institutional designers. Such a conception could admit differences between modern universities; differences, for example, between so-called universities of technology and other universities. Indeed, it is preferable to frame the issue at the level of higher education or university systems rather than at the level of individual universities. According to the teleological normative theory of social institutions, social institutions are organizations or systems of organizations that provide collective goods by means of joint activity; universities are no exception. So what are the fundamental collective good(s) that universities of technology, or the larger systems of which they are a part, ought to be providing and how are they travelling in this regard? This is the question addressed in this paper.


Asunto(s)
Objetivos , Valores Sociales , Tecnología , Universidades , Formación de Concepto , Educación Profesional , Gobierno , Humanos , Organizaciones , Política Pública , Responsabilidad Social
4.
Am Psychol ; 71(8): 797, 2016 Nov.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27977267

RESUMEN

The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is sponsored jointly by Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and the APA. The award is presented annually to the psychology graduate student who submits the best research paper that was published or presented at a national, regional, or state psychological association conference during the past calendar year. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. Members of the 2016 Edwin B. Newman Award Committee were Shawn Carlton, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Christina Frederick-Recascino, PhD; John Norcross, PhD, APA representative; Karenna Malavanti, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Steven Kohn, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Warren Fass, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Chris Lovelace, PhD, Psi Chi representative; and Cathy Epkins, PhD, APA representative. (PsycINFO Database Record

5.
Endeavour ; 38(3-4): 222-34, 2014.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25455541

RESUMEN

For Victorian men of science, the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century represented a moral awakening. Great theoretical triumphs of inductive science flowed directly from a philosophical spirit that embraced the virtues of self-discipline, courage, patience and humility. Isaac Newton exemplified this union of moral and intellectual excellence. This, at least, was the story crafted by scientific leaders like David Brewster, Thomas Chalmers, John Herschel, Adam Sedgwick and William Whewell. Not everyone accepted this reading of history. Evangelicals who decried the 'materialism' of mainstream science assigned a different meaning to Newton's legacy on behalf of their 'scriptural' alternative. High-church critics of science like John Henry Newman, on the other hand, denied that Newton's secular achievements carried any moral significance at all. These debates over Newtonian standards of philosophical behavior had a decisive influence on Charles Darwin as he developed his theory of evolution by natural selection.


Asunto(s)
Evolución Biológica , Historia Natural/historia , Selección Genética , Animales , Historia del Siglo XVII , Historia del Siglo XVIII , Historia del Siglo XIX , Reino Unido
6.
RBM rev. bras. med ; 70(supl.2)jul. 2013.
Artículo en Portugués | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: lil-740536

RESUMEN

A humanização assume notável protagonismo na agenda da sociedade atual. Humanizar é, além de uma obrigação educacional, uma condição de sucesso profissional. A universidade, que deveria contribuir para a humanização do estudante, está em crise de identidade. Neste contexto as ideias de J. H. Newman se tornam uma reflexão necessária para os professores que querem fazer a diferença na vida dos seus alunos. A ideia da universidade de Newman é baseada no alargamento intelectual, na expansão da mente, com vista à formação do caráter; uma proposta que vai muito além da perspectiva imediatista e utilitarista pautada pelo desenvolvimento nacional ou empresarial. Segundo a visão que oferece a narrativa newmaniana, os desafios que a universidade enfrenta na formação dos alunos, não se resolvem com planos de aprendizagem e currículos. Impõe-se uma reforma interior de professores e alunos, uma volta às humanidades para nos lembrar quem somos, o que realmente importa e o que nos distingue como seres humanos. A coragem do professor por se conhecer e ensinar com o exemplo é o passo necessário para resgatarmos à humanização e a universidade de Newman.

8.
Nurs Inq ; 19(2): 98-106, 2012 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22530857

RESUMEN

Cardinal John Henry Newman's book, The Idea of a University, first published in the mid nineteenth century, is often invoked as the epitome of the liberal Enlightenment University in discussions and debates about the role and purpose of nurse education. In this article I will examine Newman's book in greater detail and with a more critical eye than is generally the case in the writing of nurse academics. In particular, I will focus on the claims that Newman was a champion of the Enlightenment University of the nineteenth century, that he promoted the idea of 'disinterested' universal knowledge for its own sake, that he was an early advocate of the pursuit of knowledge through scientific research, and the supposition that he would have welcomed the discipline of nursing into the University. In each case, I will suggest that these claims are based on an extremely selective reading of Newman's work. I will conclude by employing the example of practice development to propose an alternative way for nursing to find its place in the modern University that does not involve a retreat into what I will argue is an outdated and nostalgic view of the aims and purpose of higher education.


Asunto(s)
Libros/historia , Educación en Enfermería/tendencias , Investigación en Enfermería/tendencias , Pautas de la Práctica en Medicina/tendencias , Facultades de Enfermería/tendencias , Escolaridad , Personajes , Historia de la Enfermería , Historia del Siglo XIX , Humanos , Conocimiento
9.
Memorandum ; 18: 50-55, jun. 2010.
Artículo en Inglés | Index Psicología - Revistas | ID: psi-71604

RESUMEN

This issue is a contribution about John Henry Newman’s thought on faith, reason and education. These dimensions are strictly linked together, not only because Newman’sconversion from Anglicanism to Catholicism (1845) is the result of a path of faith, that isconsidered by himself as an act of implicit reason (and reason is something greater than the evidences of logic), but also because the assent the faith requires is the result of "cumulation of probabilities”: faith, since it’s not an idea but a living faith, can develop within life and culture and, as he explains in The Idea of a University, means not only areason rightly exercised, that corresponds to liberal education of gentleman, but also catholic faith, because, according to him, “liberal” means not “indifferentism”, but“catholic”.(AU)


Asunto(s)
Psicología
10.
Memorandum ; 18: 50-55, abr. 2010.
Artículo en Inglés | LILACS | ID: biblio-914014

RESUMEN

This issue is a contribution about John Henry Newman's thought on faith, reason and education. These dimensions are strictly linked together, not only because Newman's conversion from Anglicanism to Catholicism (1845) is the result of a path of faith, that is considered by himself as an act of implicit reason (and reason is something greater than the evidences of logic), but also because the assent the faith requires is the result of "cumulation of probabilities": faith, since it's not an idea but a living faith, can develop within life and culture and, as he explains in The Idea of a University, means not only a reason rightly exercised, that corresponds to liberal education of gentleman, but also catholic faith, because, according to him, "liberal" means not "indifferentism", but "catholic".(AU)


Asunto(s)
Educación , Psicología , Universidades
11.
Int J Dev Biol ; 53(5-6): 663-71, 2009.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19557675

RESUMEN

Stuart A. Newman grew up in New York City. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Columbia University and obtained a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Chicago in 1970. He did post-doctoral studies in several institutions and disciplines with a focus on theoretical and developmental biology. He had a rich experience interacting with people like Stuart Kauffman, Arthur Winfree, Brian Goodwin, and John W. Saunders, Jr. He was also exposed to many interesting experimental models of development. These early experiences fostered his interest in biological pattern formation. He joined the State University of New York at Albany as a junior faculty member when Saunders was still there. With his physical science background, Newmans approach to limb bud patterning was refreshing. In his major Science paper in 1979, he and H.L. Frisch proposed a model showing how reaction-diffusion can produce chemical standing waves to set up limb skeletal patterns. He then used limb bud micromass cultures for further development and testing of the model. Extending earlier ideas, he developed a comprehensive framework for the role of physical mechanisms (diffusion, differential adhesion, oscillation, dynamical multistability, reaction diffusion, mechano-chemical coupling, etc.) in morphogenesis. He also applied these mechanisms to understand the origin of multicellularity and evolution of novel body plans. Here Newman reflects on his intellectual growth, and shares with us his ideas on how pattern formation works, and how generic physical mechanisms interact with genetic mechanisms to achieve the evolution and development of animal forms.


Asunto(s)
Esbozos de los Miembros/embriología , Esbozos de los Miembros/fisiología , Animales , Evolución Biológica , Tipificación del Cuerpo , Biología Evolutiva/métodos , Difusión , Humanos , Modelos Biológicos , Biología de Sistemas
12.
Clin Pharmacol Ther ; 76(4): 330-40, 2004 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-15470332

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: Hyperforin (HYF) has been discussed as a potential cause of the reduction in the bioavailability of numerous drugs seen with St John's wort (SJW) comedication. This study compared the effects of 2 SJW preparations with high and low HYF content on the pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine (INN, ciclosporin) (CSA). METHODS: In a crossover study, 10 renal transplant patients were randomized into 2 groups and received SJW extract (900 mg/d) containing low or high concentrations of HYF for 14 days in addition to their regular regimen of CSA. After a 27-day washout phase, patients were crossed over to the other SJW treatment for 14 days. Blood concentrations of CSA were measured by immunoassay. RESULTS: The study showed a significant difference between the effects of the 2 SJW preparations on CSA pharmacokinetics (area under the plasma concentration-time curve within one dosing interval [AUC 0-12 ], P < .0001, ANOVA). AUC 0-12 values (monoclonal) with high-HYF SJW comedication were 45% lower (95% confidence interval [CI], -37% to -54%; P < .05, Student-Newman-Keuls test) than for low-HYF SJW. The dose-corrected AUC 0-12 for CSA (monoclonal) decreased significantly compared with baseline by 52% (95% CI, -46% to -56%; P < .05) after 2 weeks of comedication with high-HYF SJW. Values of peak concentration in plasma and drug concentration at the end of one dosing interval were affected to a similar extent, with reductions by 43% (95% CI, -36% to -48%) and 55% (95% CI, -48% to -60%), respectively. In addition, a 65% (95% CI, 53% to 85%; P < .05) increase in daily CSA doses was required during high-HYF SJW treatment. In contrast, coadministration of low-HYF SJW did not significantly affect CSA pharmacokinetics and did not require CSA dose adjustments compared with baseline. CONCLUSION: HYF content of SJW extracts significantly affects the extent of the pharmacokinetic interaction between CSA and SJW.


Asunto(s)
Antidepresivos/farmacología , Ciclosporina/farmacocinética , Hypericum , Inmunosupresores/farmacocinética , Fitoterapia , Extractos Vegetales/farmacología , Terpenos/análisis , Adulto , Antidepresivos/administración & dosificación , Antidepresivos/efectos adversos , Antidepresivos/química , Área Bajo la Curva , Compuestos Bicíclicos con Puentes , Estudios Cruzados , Interacciones Farmacológicas , Femenino , Humanos , Trasplante de Riñón , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Floroglucinol/análogos & derivados , Extractos Vegetales/administración & dosificación , Extractos Vegetales/efectos adversos , Extractos Vegetales/química
13.
Food Addit Contam ; 15(5): 555-62, 1998 Jul.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-9829040

RESUMEN

Blood plasma samples collected from 144 healthy volunteers in 16 locations across Canada in 1994 were analysed for ochratoxin A (OTA). The method of analysis included cleanup by C18 solid phase extraction and immunoaffinity columns followed by liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence detection, which gave 86.5% (s.d. = 9.7) recovery (n = 31) of OTA (added at 2 ng/ml) with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/ml. The arithmetic mean concentration found in the plasma samples, corrected for volume of anticoagulant added, was 0.88 ng/ml with a standard deviation of 0.35 ng/ml and a range of 0.29-2.37 ng/ml. Confirmation of identity of OTA was by methyl ester formation for 65 samples and by LC-tandem mass spectrometry for 17 samples (some of which were included in pooled samples). Statistical analysis, by ANOVA of the log OTA plasma concentrations, showed a highly significant effect due to location in Canada (p = < 0.0001) but no effect due to age, sex or blood group of donors. The highest mean concentration was found in Winnipeg, significantly different (p = 0.05) by the Student-Newman-Keuls multiple range test from the lowest levels found in Toronto, Vancouver and Saint John.


Asunto(s)
Contaminación de Alimentos , Micotoxinas/sangre , Ocratoxinas/sangre , Adulto , Anciano , Análisis de Varianza , Canadá , Cromatografía Liquida , Femenino , Humanos , Masculino , Espectrometría de Masas , Persona de Mediana Edad
15.
Conn Med ; 54(3): 163, 1990 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-2182287
17.
Bull N Y Acad Med ; 56(8): 749-50, 1980 Oct.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19313003
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