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Polypropylene oxygenators: Risk of SARS-CoV-2 contamination in the operation theatre?
Neto, Caetano Nigro; Lineburger, Eric Benedet; Slullitel, Alexandre.
Affiliation
  • Neto, Caetano Nigro; Dante Pazzanese Cardiological Institute. São Paulo. BR
  • Lineburger, Eric Benedet; Hospital São José. Criciuma. BR
  • Slullitel, Alexandre; Medical School of the University of São Paulo. São Paulo. BR
Int. j. artif. organs ; 45(1): 3-4, Jan. 2022.
Article in English | Sec. Est. Saúde SP, Sec. Est. Saúde SP, CONASS, SESSP-IDPCPROD, Sec. Est. Saúde SP | ID: biblio-1147026
Responsible library: BR79.1
Localization: BR79.1
ABSTRACT
It is established that coronaviruses are transmitted most through aerosols produced when an infected individual coughs or sneezes.1 Although there is no clear evidence of person-to-person airborne transmission, it is possible that part of this component could be due to microscopic respiratory droplets at short to medium distances (up to several meters, or room scale) and deposits from respiratory droplets on surfaces.2,3 However, recent studies revealed that infected patients can potentially be a source of the virus not only through respiratory but also fecal­oral or body fluid routes, raising also the theoretical possibility of bloodborne transmission.4 Based on these arguments, the possibility has also been raised of some equipment that could be a new source of transmission, like the membranes used for extracorporeal oxygenation, which act the same as lungs and also have a direct contact with the blood. Most centers worldwide report a reduction in the cardiac procedures due to the pandemic, however emergency surgeries with conventional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) procedures have been performed every day. Despite guidelines and modifications for operating theatre preparation for the management of suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV-2 patients submitted to cardiac surgery, many aspects still need to be clarified.5 Potential risk of transmission with these membranes exists, so much that Dres et al.6 reported a study evaluating the risks of SARS-CoV-2 dissemination through membranes used for extra corporeal organ support in critically ill patients, within 48 h after ECMO and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) initiation. They investigated whether SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in the dialysis effluent fluid or in the condensate collected from the ECMO membrane gas outlet, when the virus was present in the lower respiratory tract and the plasma. Results showed that in 25 patients on veno-venous ECMO, SARSCoV-2 RNA was not detected in the membrane oxygenator gas outlet condensate in any of 25 patients of whom 13 were plasma RNA positive. Also, they were not able to measure any SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the dialysate of those patients who additionally were treated by CRRT.
Subject(s)

Full text: Available Collection: National databases / Brazil Database: CONASS / Sec. Est. Saúde SP / SESSP-IDPCPROD Main subject: Oxygenators, Membrane / Coronavirus / Aerosols Type of study: Etiology study / Practice guideline / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Int. j. artif. organs Year: 2022 Document type: Article Institution/Affiliation country: Dante Pazzanese Cardiological Institute/BR / Hospital São José/BR / Medical School of the University of São Paulo/BR

Full text: Available Collection: National databases / Brazil Database: CONASS / Sec. Est. Saúde SP / SESSP-IDPCPROD Main subject: Oxygenators, Membrane / Coronavirus / Aerosols Type of study: Etiology study / Practice guideline / Risk factors Language: English Journal: Int. j. artif. organs Year: 2022 Document type: Article Institution/Affiliation country: Dante Pazzanese Cardiological Institute/BR / Hospital São José/BR / Medical School of the University of São Paulo/BR
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