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Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG prevents progesterone metabolite epiallaopregnanolone sulfate-induced hepatic bile acid accumulation and liver injury.
Biochem Biophys Res Commun ; 520(1): 67-72, 2019 Nov 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31575408
ABSTRACT
Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is gestation-specific liver disease associated with liver injury and increased serum and hepatic bile acids. Although the mechanism of ICP is still not fully understood, the reproductive hormones seem to play an important role. Recent studies show that a progesterone metabolite, epiallopregnanolone sulfate (PM5S), is supraphysiologically elevated in the serum of ICP patients, indicating it may play an etiology role in ICP. Bile acid homeostasis is controlled by multiple mechanisms including farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-mediated bile acid export and synthesis. It is known that cholic acid (CA), a primary bile acid, can activate FXR, which is inhibited by PM5S, an FXR antagonist. Here we employed a mouse model of concurrent exposure of CA and PM5S-induced liver injury and determined the effects of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in the prevention of the bile acid disorders and liver injury. Mice challenged with CA + PM5S had significantly increased levels of serum and hepatic bile acids and bilirubin and liver enzyme. Pretreatment with LGG significantly reduced bile acid and bilirubin levels associated with reduced liver enzyme level and mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also showed that the beneficial effects of LGG is likely mediated by hepatic FXR activation and bile salt export pump (BSEP) upregulation. In conclusion, our results provide a rationale for the application of probiotics in the management of ICP through gut microbiota-mediated FXR activation.

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Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: Biochem Biophys Res Commun Ano de publicação: 2019 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: Estados Unidos