Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Gender Differences in Hypertension Treatment and Control in Young Adults.
J Nurs Res ; 2020 Jan 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31904736
ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:

Compared with older adults, young adults exhibit poor treatment and control of hypertension. However, little is known about the factors affecting the treatment and control of hypertension in young adults.

PURPOSE:

This study was aimed to identify the factors affecting the treatment and control of hypertension in early adulthood by gender in South Korea.

METHODS:

This secondary data analysis study used a data set from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) 19-44 years old and (b) having an indicator of hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg, or taking antihypertensive drugs). Seven hundred eighty participants were included in this study. The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived using composite-sample multiple logistic regression.

RESULTS:

In men, age, marital status, family history of hypertension, treatment of hyperlipidemia, abdominal obesity, high-sodium diet, cholesterol, and aerobic exercise were found to be associated with hypertension treatment and control. In women, age, employment status, cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index, high-sodium diet, and drinking were found to be associated with hypertension treatment and control.

CONCLUSIONS:

The factors affecting the treatment and control of hypertension differed between the two genders. Therefore, healthcare providers should consider the differences in the factors between the two genders in early adulthood. To improve the treatment and control of hypertension, the guidelines for treatment interventions and management should be gender-specific from early adulthood. Nurses should actively suggest health-related behavioral modifications such as performing aerobic exercise for young adult men and reducing alcohol consumption for women.

Similares

MEDLINE

...
LILACS

LIS

Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Aspecto clínico: Etiologia Idioma: Inglês Assunto da revista: Enfermagem / Medicina Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo