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The use of South African botanical species for the control of blood sugar.
Cock, I E; Ndlovu, N; Van Vuuren, S F.
Afiliação
  • Cock IE; School of Environment and Science, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd, Nathan, Queensland, 4111, Australia; Environmental Futures Research Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd, Nathan, Queensland, 4111, Australia.
  • Ndlovu N; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Parktown, Gauteng, 2193, South Africa.
  • Van Vuuren SF; Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Parktown, Gauteng, 2193, South Africa. Electronic address: sandy.vanvuuren@wits.ac.za.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 113234, 2021 Jan 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32768640
ABSTRACT
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent diseases globally and is of considerable concern to global health. Approximately 425 million people are estimated to have DM globally and this is predicted to increase to >642 million by 2040. Whilst the prevalence of DM in South Africa is slightly lower than the global average, it is expected to rise rapidly in future years as more South Africans adopt a high calorie "westernised" diet. Traditional medicines offer an alternative for the development of new medicines to treat DM and the usage of South African plants is relatively well documented. AIM OF THE STUDY To critically review the literature on the anti-diabetic properties of South African plants and to document plant species used for the treatment of DM. Thereafter, a thorough examination of the related research will highlight where research is lacking in the field. MATERIALS AND

METHODS:

A review of published ethnobotanical books, reviews and primary scientific studies was undertaken to identify plants used to treat DM in traditional South African healing systems and to identify gaps in the published research. The study was non-biased, without taxonomic preference and included both native and introduced species. To be included, species must be recorded in the pharmacopeia of at least one South African ethnic group for the treatment of DM.

RESULTS:

One hundred and thirty-seven species are recorded as therapies for DM, with leaves and roots most commonly used. The activity of only 43 of these species have been verified by rigorous testing, and relatively few studies have examined the mechanism of action.

CONCLUSION:

Despite relatively extensive ethnobotanical records and a diverse flora, the anti-diabetic properties of South African medicinal plants is relatively poorly explored. The efficacy of most plants used traditionally to treat DM are yet to be verified and few mechanistic studies are available. Further research is required in this field.
Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Contexto em Saúde: ODS3 - Saúde e Bem-Estar Tema em saúde: Meta 3.8 Atingir a cobertura universal de saúde Base de dados: MEDLINE Tipo de estudo: Fatores de risco Idioma: Inglês Revista: J Ethnopharmacol Ano de publicação: 2021 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: Austrália

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Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Contexto em Saúde: ODS3 - Saúde e Bem-Estar Tema em saúde: Meta 3.8 Atingir a cobertura universal de saúde Base de dados: MEDLINE Tipo de estudo: Fatores de risco Idioma: Inglês Revista: J Ethnopharmacol Ano de publicação: 2021 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: Austrália