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Effects of cooking methods on total isothiocyanate yield from cruciferous vegetables.
Wang, Zinian; Kwan, Marilyn L; Pratt, Rachel; Roh, Janise M; Kushi, Lawrence H; Danforth, Kim N; Zhang, Yuesheng; Ambrosone, Christine B; Tang, Li.
Afiliação
  • Wang Z; Department of Cancer Prevention and Control Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Buffalo NY USA.
  • Kwan ML; Division of Research Kaiser Permanente Northern California Oakland CA USA.
  • Pratt R; Department of Cancer Prevention and Control Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Buffalo NY USA.
  • Roh JM; Division of Research Kaiser Permanente Northern California Oakland CA USA.
  • Kushi LH; Division of Research Kaiser Permanente Northern California Oakland CA USA.
  • Danforth KN; Department of Research and Evaluation Kaiser Permanente Southern California Pasadena CA USA.
  • Zhang Y; Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Buffalo NY USA.
  • Ambrosone CB; Department of Cancer Prevention and Control Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Buffalo NY USA.
  • Tang L; Department of Cancer Prevention and Control Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center Buffalo NY USA.
Food Sci Nutr ; 8(10): 5673-5682, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33133569
ABSTRACT
Cruciferous vegetables are primary sources of dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs), a group of phytochemicals showing promising cancer-chemopreventive activities in multiple cancer models. However, no study has thoroughly examined how cooking affects the yields of ITCs from cruciferous vegetables. In this study, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based cyclocondensation assay was performed to examine the ITC yields from four major cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale) under six cooking conditions (stir-frying, steaming, microwaving, boiling, stewing, and chip-baking for kale only) and measured the level of ITCs under the raw condition for a comprehensive list of cruciferous vegetables and ITC-containing condiments. A wide range of ITC yields was found across vegetables and condiments. Cooking significantly altered the ITC yields, showing an averagely four-fold increase by lightly cooking (stir-frying, steaming, and microwaving) and a 58% decrease by heavily cooking (boiling, stewing, and chip-baking). These findings will provide the evidence-based cooking guidance on cruciferous vegetable consumption and help better estimate dietary ITC exposure in epidemiologic studies.
Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: Food Sci Nutr Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo

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Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: Food Sci Nutr Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo