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The role of sex and femininity in preferences for unfamiliar infants among Chinese adults.
Ding, Fangyuan; Cheng, Gang; Jia, Yuncheng; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Nan; Zhang, Dajun; Mo, Wenjing.
Afiliação
  • Ding F; Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, China.
  • Cheng G; Center for Mental Health Education, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, China.
  • Jia Y; School of Psychology, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, Guizhou, China.
  • Zhang W; Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, China.
  • Lin N; Center for Mental Health Education, Southwest University, Beibei, Chongqing, China.
  • Zhang D; School of Psychology, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, Guizhou, China.
  • Mo W; School of Psychology, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, Guizhou, China.
PLoS One ; 15(11): e0242203, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33180806
ABSTRACT
Guided by parental investment theory and social role theory, this study aimed to understand current contradictory results regarding sex differences in response to infant faces by considering the effect of gender role orientation. We recruited 300 adults in China and asked them to complete an Interest in Infants questionnaire and a Bem Sex Role Inventory and then administered a behavioral assessment that used unfamiliar infant faces with varying expressions (laughing, neutral, and crying) as stimuli to gauge three components of motivation towards infants (i.e., liking, representational responding, and evoked responding). The results demonstrated that sex differences emerged only in self-reported interest in infants, but no difference was found between the sexes in terms of their hedonic reactions to infant faces. Furthermore, femininity was found to correlate with preferences for infants in both verbal and visual tests, but significant interactive effects of feminine traits and sex were found only in the behavioral test. The findings indicated that men's responses to infants were influenced more by their feminine traits than were women's responses, potentially explaining the greater extent to which paternal (vs. maternal) investment is facultative.
Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: PLoS One Assunto da revista: Ciência / Medicina Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: China

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Texto completo: Disponível Coleções: Bases de dados internacionais Base de dados: MEDLINE Idioma: Inglês Revista: PLoS One Assunto da revista: Ciência / Medicina Ano de publicação: 2020 Tipo de documento: Artigo País de afiliação: China
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