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The Use of Law to Address Noncommunicable Diseases in the Caribbean. Subregional Workshop Report. Miami, 3–5 March 2020

Pan American Health Organization.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2021-04-26. (PAHO/NMH/CRB/21-0003).
em Inglês | PAHOIRIS | ID: phr-53821
The Pan American Health Organization and the International Legal Consortium at the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, with support from the European Union, held the subregional workshop The Use of Law to Address Noncommunicable Diseases in the Caribbean on 3–5 March 2020 in Miami, the United States of America. The three-day workshop sought to build capacity to advance the use of law and regulations to address noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and their risk factors in the Caribbean. NCDs and their four main risk factors (tobacco use, physical inactivity, the harmful use of alcohol, and unhealthy diets) remain leading causes of mortality, morbidity, and disability in the Caribbean. However, this subregion lags in terms of the implementation of NCD risk factor policies that require regulatory action. In this context, the use of law has a central role to play. Therefore, the workshop familiarized participants with the best practices in the use of law to regulate and control NCDs and their risk factors. This Subregional Workshop Report reflects the contributions made during the technical presentations and question and answer segments, round-table discussions, plenary discussions, and working groups. It highlights the important connections made across NCD risk factors, particularly in relation to marketing regulations and labelling requirements. Finally, the Subregional Workshop Report reflects the set of strategic actions to advance the enactment, implementation, and enforcement of NCD risk factor policies through laws and regulations in the Caribbean. These include the establishment of a Caribbean Public Health Law Forum for continued communication, collaboration, and engagement on health and law matters.