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1.
Singapore medical journal ; : 23-29, 2024.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1007306

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION@#Ultrasonography (US) is the current standard of care for imaging surveillance in patients at risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as an alternative, given the higher sensitivity of MRI, although this comes at a higher cost. We performed a cost-effective analysis comparing US and dual-sequence non-contrast-enhanced MRI (NCEMRI) for HCC surveillance in the local setting.@*METHODS@#Cost-effectiveness analysis of no surveillance, US surveillance and NCEMRI surveillance was performed using Markov modelling and microsimulation. At-risk patient cohort was simulated and followed up for 40 years to estimate the patients' disease status, direct medical costs and effectiveness. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were calculated.@*RESULTS@#Exactly 482,000 patients with an average age of 40 years were simulated and followed up for 40 years. The average total costs and QALYs for the three scenarios - no surveillance, US surveillance and NCEMRI surveillance - were SGD 1,193/7.460 QALYs, SGD 8,099/11.195 QALYs and SGD 9,720/11.366 QALYs, respectively.@*CONCLUSION@#Despite NCEMRI having a superior diagnostic accuracy, it is a less cost-effective strategy than US for HCC surveillance in the general at-risk population. Future local cost-effectiveness analyses should include stratifying surveillance methods with a variety of imaging techniques (US, NCEMRI, contrast-enhanced MRI) based on patients' risk profiles.


Subject(s)
Humans , Adult , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnostic imaging , Liver Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Cost-Effectiveness Analysis , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
2.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1102-1113, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-1002403

ABSTRACT

Objective@#To elucidate the use of radiological studies, including nuclear medicine, and biopsy for the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PCA) in clinical practice and understand the current status of PCA in Asian countries via an international survey. @*Materials and Methods@#The Asian Prostate Imaging Working Group designed a survey questionnaire with four domains focused on prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), other prostate imaging, prostate biopsy, and PCA backgrounds. The questionnaire was sent to 111 members of professional affiliations in Korea, Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan who were representatives of their working hospitals, and their responses were analyzed. @*Results@#This survey had a response rate of 97.3% (108/111). The rates of using 3T scanners, antispasmodic agents, laxative drugs, and prostate imaging-reporting and data system reporting for prostate MRI were 21.6%−78.9%, 22.2%−84.2%, 2.3%−26.3%, and 59.5%−100%, respectively. Respondents reported using the highest b-values of 800−2000 sec/mm2 and fields of view of 9−30 cm. The prostate MRI examinations per month ranged from 1 to 600, and they were most commonly indicated for biopsy-naïve patients suspected of PCA in Japan and Singapore and staging of proven PCA in Korea and Taiwan.The most commonly used radiotracers for prostate positron emission tomography are prostate-specific membrane antigen in Singapore and fluorodeoxyglucose in three other countries. The most common timing for prostate MRI was before biopsy (29.9%). Prostate-targeted biopsies were performed in 63.8% of hospitals, usually by MRI-ultrasound fusion approach. The most common presentation was localized PCA in all four countries, and it was usually treated with radical prostatectomy. @*Conclusion@#This survey showed the diverse technical details and the availability of imaging and biopsy in the evaluation of PCA. This suggests the need for an educational program for Asian radiologists to promote standardized evidence-based imaging approaches for the diagnosis and staging of PCA.

3.
Singapore medical journal ; : 91-97, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-969646

ABSTRACT

With the advent of artificial intelligence (AI), machines are increasingly being used to complete complicated tasks, yielding remarkable results. Machine learning (ML) is the most relevant subset of AI in medicine, which will soon become an integral part of our everyday practice. Therefore, physicians should acquaint themselves with ML and AI, and their role as an enabler rather than a competitor. Herein, we introduce basic concepts and terms used in AI and ML, and aim to demystify commonly used AI/ML algorithms such as learning methods including neural networks/deep learning, decision tree and application domain in computer vision and natural language processing through specific examples. We discuss how machines are already being used to augment the physician's decision-making process, and postulate the potential impact of ML on medical practice and medical research based on its current capabilities and known limitations. Moreover, we discuss the feasibility of full machine autonomy in medicine.


Subject(s)
Humans , Artificial Intelligence , Machine Learning , Algorithms , Neural Networks, Computer , Medicine
4.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 177-179, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-968276

ABSTRACT

With the surge of interest in the development and application of artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology, we propose that know-how on the development and clinical evaluation of AI models needs to be incorporated in radiologist training curricula to prepare our specialty to lead in the new era of radiology practice augmented by AI.

5.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 43-49, 2023.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-970989

ABSTRACT

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted prostate biopsy is the recommended investigation in men with suspicious lesion(s) on MRI. The role of concurrent systematic in addition to targeted biopsies is currently unclear. Using our prospectively maintained database, we identified men with at least one Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) ≥3 lesion who underwent targeted and/or systematic biopsies from May 2016 to May 2020. Clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) was defined as any Gleason grade group ≥2 cancer. Of 545 patients who underwent MRI fusion-targeted biopsy, 222 (40.7%) were biopsy naïve, 247 (45.3%) had previous prostate biopsy(s), and 76 (13.9%) had known prostate cancer undergoing active surveillance. Prostate cancer was more commonly found in biopsy-naïve men (63.5%) and those on active surveillance (68.4%) compared to those who had previous biopsies (35.2%; both P < 0.001). Systematic biopsies provided an incremental 10.4% detection of csPCa among biopsy-naïve patients, versus an incremental 2.4% among those who had prior negative biopsies. Multivariable regression found age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.03, P = 0.03), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density ≥0.15 ng ml-2 (OR = 3.24, P < 0.001), prostate health index (PHI) ≥35 (OR = 2.43, P = 0.006), higher PI-RADS score (vs PI-RADS 3; OR = 4.59 for PI-RADS 4, and OR = 9.91 for PI-RADS 5; both P < 0.001) and target lesion volume-to-prostate volume ratio ≥0.10 (OR = 5.26, P = 0.013) were significantly associated with csPCa detection on targeted biopsy. In conclusion, for men undergoing MRI fusion-targeted prostate biopsies, systematic biopsies should not be omitted given its incremental value to targeted biopsies alone. The factors such as PSA density ≥0.15 ng ml-2, PHI ≥35, higher PI-RADS score, and target lesion volume-to-prostate volume ratio ≥0.10 can help identify men at higher risk of csPCa.


Subject(s)
Male , Humans , Prostate/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostate-Specific Antigen , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Image-Guided Biopsy/methods , Retrospective Studies
6.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 697-719, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-938769

ABSTRACT

Gadoxetate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in clinical practice for liver imaging. For optimal use, we must understand both its advantages and limitations. This article is the outcome of an online advisory board meeting and subsequent discussions by a multidisciplinary group of experts on liver diseases across the Asia-Pacific region, first held on September 28, 2020. Here, we review the technical considerations for the use of gadoxetate, its current role in the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and its relevance in consensus guidelines for HCC imaging diagnosis. In the latter part of this review, we examine recent evidence evaluating the impact of gadoxetate on clinical outcomes on a continuum from diagnosis to treatment decision-making and follow-up. In conclusion, we outline the potential future roles of gadoxetate MRI based on an evolving understanding of the clinical utility of this contrast agent in the management of patients at risk of, or with, HCC.

7.
Singapore medical journal ; : 203-208, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-927278

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION@#This study aimed to evaluate the potential of non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as an imaging surveillance tool for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in at-risk patients and to compare the performance of non-contrast MR imaging with ultrasonography (US) as a screening modality for the same.@*METHODS@#In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with HCC between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2015 were selected from our institution's cancer registry. Patients who underwent MR imaging and had US performed within three months of the MR imaging were included. For each MR imaging, two non-contrast MR imaging sequences - T2-weighted fat-saturated (T2-W FS) sequence and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) - were reviewed for the presence of suspicious lesions. A non-contrast MR image was considered positive if the lesion was seen on both sequences. The performance of non-contrast MR imaging was compared to that of hepatobiliary US for the detection of HCC.@*RESULTS@#A total of 73 patients with 108 HCCs were evaluated. Sensitivity of non-contrast MR imaging for the detection of HCC using T2-W FS and DWI was 93.2%, which was significantly higher than that of US, which was 79.5% (p = 0.02). In a subgroup of 55 patients with imaging features of liver cirrhosis, the sensitivity of non-contrast MR imaging was 90.9%, which was also significantly higher than that of US, which was 74.5% (p = 0.02).@*CONCLUSION@#Our pilot study showed that non-contrast MR imaging, using a combination of T2-W FS and DWI, is a potential alternative to US as a screening tool for surveillance of patients at risk for HCC.


Subject(s)
Humans , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Contrast Media , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Gadolinium DTPA , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Pilot Projects , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity
8.
Singapore medical journal ; : 458-465, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-920941

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION@#Chest radiographs (CXRs) are widely used for the screening and management of COVID-19. This article describes the radiographic features of COVID-19 based on an initial national cohort of patients.@*METHODS@#This is a retrospective review of swab-positive patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to four different hospitals in Singapore between 22 January and 9 March 2020. Initial and follow-up CXRs were reviewed by three experienced radiologists to identify the predominant pattern and distribution of lung parenchymal abnormalities.@*RESULTS@#In total, 347 CXRs of 96 patients were reviewed. Initial CXRs were abnormal in 41 (42.7%) out of 96 patients. The mean time from onset of symptoms to CXR abnormality was 5.3 ± 4.7 days. The predominant pattern of lung abnormality was ground-glass opacity on initial CXRs (51.2%) and consolidation on follow-up CXRs (51.0%). Multifocal bilateral abnormalities in mixed central and peripheral distribution were observed in 63.4% and 59.2% of abnormal initial and follow-up CXRs, respectively. The lower zones were involved in 90.2% of initial CXRs and 93.9% of follow-up CXRs.@*CONCLUSION@#In a cohort of swab-positive patients, including those identified from contact tracing, we found a lower incidence of CXR abnormalities than was previously reported. The most common pattern was ground-glass opacity or consolidation, but mixed central and peripheral involvement was more common than peripheral involvement alone.


Subject(s)
Humans , COVID-19 , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore
9.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1087-1099, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-902440

ABSTRACT

MRI has become important for the detection of prostate cancer. MRI-guided biopsy is superior to conventional systematic biopsy in patients suspected with prostate cancer. MRI is also increasingly used for monitoring patients with low-risk prostate cancer during active surveillance. It improves patient selection for active surveillance at diagnosis, although its role during follow-up is unclear. We aim to review existing evidence and propose a practical approach for incorporating MRI into active surveillance protocols.

10.
Korean Journal of Radiology ; : 1087-1099, 2021.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-894736

ABSTRACT

MRI has become important for the detection of prostate cancer. MRI-guided biopsy is superior to conventional systematic biopsy in patients suspected with prostate cancer. MRI is also increasingly used for monitoring patients with low-risk prostate cancer during active surveillance. It improves patient selection for active surveillance at diagnosis, although its role during follow-up is unclear. We aim to review existing evidence and propose a practical approach for incorporating MRI into active surveillance protocols.

11.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore ; : 456-461, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-827328

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization on 11 March 2020. A definitive diagnosis of COVID-19 is made after a positive result is obtained on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. In Singapore, rigorous contact tracing was practised to contain the spread of the virus. Nasal swabs and chest radiographs (CXR) were also taken from individuals who were suspected to be infected by COVID-19 upon their arrival at a centralised screening centre. From our experience, about 40% of patients who tested positive for COVID-19 had initial CXR that appeared "normal". In this case series, we described the temporal evolution of COVID-19 in patients with an initial "normal" CXR. Since CXR has limited sensitivity and specificity in COVID-19, it is not suitable as a first-line diagnostic tool. However, when CXR changes become unequivocally abnormal, close monitoring is recommended to manage potentially severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections , Diagnosis , Diagnostic Imaging , Lung , Diagnostic Imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Diagnostic Imaging , Radiography , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
Singapore medical journal ; : 387-391, 2020.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-827285

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is typically diagnosed by specific assays that detect viral nucleic acid from the upper respiratory tract; however, this may miss infections involving only the lower airways. Computed tomography (CT) has been described as a diagnostic modality in the COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment plan. We present a case series with virologically confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia. Variable CT features were observed: consolidation with ground-glass opacities, ground-glass opacities with subpleural reticular bands, and an anterior-posterior gradient of lung abnormalities resembling that of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Evolution of CT findings was observed in one patient, where there was interval resolution of bilateral lung consolidation with development of bronchiolectasis and subpleural fibrotic bands. While sensitive for detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities in COVID-19 pneumonia, the use of CT for initial diagnosis is discouraged and should be reserved for specific clinical indications. Interpretation of chest CT findings should be correlated with duration of symptoms to better determine the disease stage and aid in patient management.


Subject(s)
Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Lung , Diagnostic Imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Methods
13.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore ; : 16-24, 2019.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-777407

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence (AI) has been positioned as being the most important recent advancement in radiology, if not the most potentially disruptive. Singapore radiologists have been quick to embrace this technology as part of the natural progression of the discipline toward a vision of how clinical medicine, empowered by technology, can achieve our national healthcare objectives of delivering value-based and patient-centric care. In this article, we consider 3 core questions relating to AI in radiology, and review the barriers to the widespread adoption of AI in radiology. We propose solutions and describe a "Centaur" model as a promising avenue for enabling the interfacing between AI and radiologists. Finally, we introduce The Radiological AI, Data Science and Imaging Informatics (RADII) subsection of the Singapore Radiological Society. RADII is an enabling body, which together with key technological and institutional stakeholders, will champion research, development and evaluation of AI for radiology applications.


Subject(s)
Humans , Artificial Intelligence , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Machine Learning , Neural Networks, Computer , Radiology , Singapore , Societies, Medical
14.
The Medical Journal of Malaysia ; : 322-327, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-630883

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Positive oral contrast is no longer deemed necessary for abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scans. Studies have shown water to be an equally effective oral contrast agent. However, to our knowledge no study has compared effectiveness between gastrografin and water in the same patient, which will provide a more objective evaluation of the two oral contrast agents. We aim to make a head-to-head comparison of water as neutral oral contrast (OC) against gastrografin as positive OC for abdominopelvic CT scans in the same patient. Methods: A retrospective review of 206 abdominopelvic CT scans of 103 patients was performed. The scans were reviewed in consensus by two blinded radiologists. The ability to visualise each abdominopelvic organ, contrastassociated artefacts and small bowel wall delineation, was qualitatively scored on a 5-point scale. Each patient had two sets of scores, one with water and another with gastrografin as OC. Paired scores from the two OCs were evaluated by Wilcoxon signed rank test to determine any significant difference in performance between the two OCs for visualisation of abdominopelvic anatomy on CT. Results: There was significantly better delineation of duodenal wall (p<0.001) and overall visualisation of the duodenum (p=0.011) using water as OC compared to gastrografin. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated between water and gastrografin for visualisation of the rest of the abdominopelvic organs, walldelineation of the rest small bowel and contrast-associated artefacts. Conclusions: Water can be used in place of gastrografin as oral contrast in abdominopelvic CT without compromising visualization of abdominopelvic organs.

15.
Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore ; : 157-164, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-353715

ABSTRACT

Iodinated radiocontrast media (IRCM) is widely used in current clinical practice. Although IRCM is generally safe, serious adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may still occur. IRCM-induced ADRs may be subdivided into chemotoxic and hypersensitivity reactions. Several factors have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of ADRs, including previous contrast media reactions, history of asthma and allergic disease, etc. Contrast media with lower osmolality is generally recommended for at-risk patients to prevent ADRs. Current premedication prophylaxis in at-risk patients may reduce the risk of ADRs. However, there is still a lack of consensus on the prophylactic role of premedication. Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is another component of IRCM-related ADRs. Hydration remains the mainstay of CIN prophylaxis in at-risk patients. Despite several preventive measures, ADRs may still occur. Treatment strategies for potential contrast reactions are also summarised in this article. This article summarises the pathophysiology, epidemiology and risk factors of ADRs with emphasis on prevention and treatment strategies. This will allow readers to understand the rationale behind appropriate patient preparation for diagnostic imaging involving IRCM.


Subject(s)
Humans , Acute Kidney Injury , Therapeutics , Contrast Media , Drug Hypersensitivity , Therapeutics , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Therapeutics , Fluid Therapy , Iodine Radioisotopes
16.
Gut and Liver ; : 672-686, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-166361

ABSTRACT

Recent advances in the noninvasive imaging of chronic liver disease have led to improvements in diagnosis, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comprehensive evaluation of the liver may be performed with the quantification of the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver iron concentration, and liver fibrosis. In addition, MRI of the liver may be used to identify complications of cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, ascites, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review article, we discuss the state of the art techniques in liver MRI, namely, magnetic resonance elastography, hepatobiliary phase MRI, and liver fat and iron quantification MRI. The use of these advanced techniques in the management of chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, will be elaborated.


Subject(s)
Ascites , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Diagnosis , Elasticity Imaging Techniques , Fatty Liver , Fibrosis , Hypertension, Portal , Iron , Liver Cirrhosis , Liver Diseases , Liver , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
17.
Singapore medical journal ; : 497-502, 2016.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-276713

ABSTRACT

<p><b>INTRODUCTION</b>This study aimed to assess the ability of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to detect active abdominopelvic haemorrhage in patients with blunt trauma, as compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA).</p><p><b>METHODS</b>In this retrospective study, patients who underwent DSA within 24 hours following CECT for blunt abdominal and/or pelvic trauma were identified. The computed tomography (CT) trauma protocol consisted of a portal venous phase scan without CT angiography; delayed phase study was performed if appropriate. All selected CECT studies were independently reviewed for the presence of active extravasation of contrast by two radiologists, who were blinded to the DSA results. Fisher's exact test was used to correlate the presence of extravasation on CT with subsequent confirmed haemorrhage on DSA.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b>During the eight-year study period, 51 patients underwent CECT prior to emergent DSA for abdominal or pelvic trauma. Evidence of active extravasation of contrast on CECT was observed in 35 patients and active haemorrhage was confirmed on DSA in 31 of these patients; embolisation was performed in all 31 patients. Two patients who were negative for active extravasation of contrast on CECT but positive for active haemorrhage on DSA had extensive bilateral pelvic fractures and haematomas. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CECT in detecting active abdominopelvic haemorrhage, as compared to DSA, were 93.9%, 77.8%, 88.6% and 87.5%, respectively.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b>When compared with DSA, dual-phase CECT without CT angiography shows high sensitivity and positive predictive value for the detection of active haemorrhage in patients with blunt abdominopelvic trauma.</p>


Subject(s)
Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Angiography, Digital Subtraction , Multidetector Computed Tomography , Observer Variation , Pelvic Bones , Pelvis , Wounds and Injuries , Radiology , Methods , Retrospective Studies , Wounds, Nonpenetrating , Diagnostic Imaging
18.
Singapore medical journal ; : 186-193, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-337169

ABSTRACT

Renal-related adverse effects of intravascular contrast media (CM) include contrast-induced nephropathy in computed tomography and angiography. While large retrospective studies have been published, the exact pathogenesis of this condition is still unknown. We review the main international guidelines, including the American College of Radiology white paper and the guidelines of European Society of Urogenital Radiology, Royal College of Radiologists and Canadian Association of Radiologists, as well as their references, regarding this subject. We present a simplified, concise approach to renal-related adverse effects of CM, taking into consideration the basis for each recommendation in these published guidelines. This will allow the reader to better understand the rationale behind appropriate patient preparation for cross-sectional imaging.


Subject(s)
Humans , Angiography , Methods , Contrast Media , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Kidney Diseases , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Methods
19.
Singapore medical journal ; : e96-9, 2015.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-337129

ABSTRACT

Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation (SANT) is an exceedingly rare, benign and proliferative vascular lesion that arises from the splenic red pulp. It is often an incidental finding on imaging. The diagnosis of SANT is confirmed via histopathological examination of the resected spleen. Herein, we present a case of SANT and describe its typical imaging characteristics. An asymptomatic 39-year-old man was found to have a 3.1 cm × 2.7 cm × 2.3 cm hypoechoic splenic lesion during abdominal ultrasonography, which was performed to investigate his elevated gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alanine transaminase levels. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography suggested a vascular splenic lesion, while magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated features consistent with SANT. In view of the increasing size of the lesion on follow-up imaging, the patient elected for splenectomy. Histopathological examination confirmed SANT, and the lesion was completely resected by laparoscopic splenectomy.


Subject(s)
Adult , Humans , Male , Alanine Transaminase , Blood , Cell Proliferation , Contrast Media , Chemistry , Disease Progression , Image Processing, Computer-Assisted , Methods , Incidental Findings , Laparoscopy , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Multimodal Imaging , Methods , Spleen , Diagnostic Imaging , Splenectomy , Splenic Diseases , Diagnostic Imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography , gamma-Glutamyltransferase , Blood
20.
Singapore medical journal ; : 564-quiz 568, 2014.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-244740

ABSTRACT

A 50-year-old Chinese man presented to the clinic with left hypochondrial pain, more than 10 kg of weight loss over a 3-month period, and a firm, large, ill-defined mass in the left upper quadrant. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a well-circumscribed exophytic pancreatic mass with features suggestive of acinar cell carcinoma (ACC). The patient underwent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with no evidence of local recurrence detected at one-year follow-up. He remains under close surveillance by his oncologist. Treatment for ACC includes surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy. Better overall survival is seen in patients with surgically resectable ACC as compared to those with the more common ductal cell carcinoma.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Carcinoma, Acinar Cell , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Diagnostic Imaging , Pathology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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