Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
Add filters








Main subject
Year range
1.
Kampo Medicine ; : 180-184, 2014.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-375887

ABSTRACT

We investigated original texts for yokukansan, a familiar Kampo formula, focusing on the classical literature <i>Xue-shi yi-an</i> (薛氏医案) . Yokukansan was described in the <i>Bao-ying jin-jing-lu</i> (保嬰金鏡録) written by Xue ji (薛己) in 1550, the <i>Xiao-er yao-zheng zhi-jue</i> (小児薬証直訣) revised by Xue ji (薛己) in 1551,the <i>Bao-ying cuo-yao</i> (保嬰撮要) by Xue kai (薛鎧) in 1556, and the <i>Xiao-er dou-zhen fang-lun</i> (小児痘疹方論) in 1550. The phrase “one's own work” was used in “<i>Bao-ying jin-jing-lu</i> (保嬰金鏡録)” and in the <i>Xiao-er dou-zhen fang-lun</i> (小児痘疹方論) by Chen wen-zhong (陳文仲). However, there was no mention of “one's own work” in the same title, the <i>Xiao-er dou-zhen fang-lun</i> (小児痘疹方論), as summarized by Xiong zong-li (熊宗立).<br>Yokukansan was found only in the <i>Xiao-er yao-zheng zhi-jue</i> (小児薬証直訣) revised by Xue ji (薛己) in 1551, but not in the other copies of the same text. Therefore, it seems likely that yokukansan was created by Xue ji (薛己) himself.<br>Yokukansan was previously thought to have originated with the <i>Bao-ying cuo-yao</i> (保嬰撮要). However, based on use of the phrase “one's own work” in the classical literature, it appears that the original text for yokukansan should be the <i>Bao-ying jin-jing-lu</i> (保嬰金鏡録). Therefore, yokukansan seems to have been made by Xue ji (薛己), and not Xue kai (薛鎧), who was his father.

2.
Kampo Medicine ; : 93-97, 2009.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-379547

ABSTRACT

Kakkonkokato is a special formula used for the treatment of rosacea-like dermatitis lesions in the nasal region, but very few cases treated with this formulation have been reported so far. Here, we report three patients with refractory facial eruptions of rosacea-like dermatitis treated successfully with kakkonkokato. Case1was a 39-year-old man who presented with a 15-year history of rosacea-like dermatitis lesions in the nasal region. After 3 weeks' treatment with kakkonkokato, a marked improvement of his lesions was seen, with disappearance of the redness of his face. Case 2 was a 56-year-old woman who presented with a prolonged history of itchy eruptions around her mouth and nasal region. After 8 weeks' treatment with kakkonkokato, an almost complete disappearance of her eruptions was observed. Case 3 was a 26-year-old woman who presented with atopic dermatitis and intractable erythema under her nose, which was refractory to treatment with steroid ointments and antiallergic agents. After 2 months' treatment with kakkonkokato, her erythema completely resolved, along with improvement of the systemic lesions of atopic dermatitis. The observations in these three cases suggest that kakkonkokato may be a useful formula for the treatment of not only rosacea-like dermatitis in the nasal region, but also of refractory facial eruptions of other causes.


Subject(s)
Rosacea
3.
Kampo Medicine ; : 749-762, 2003.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-368433

ABSTRACT

On one hand a matchless Kampo clinician, on the other a dedicated collector of antique books, Otsuka Yoshinori (1900-1980) left for posterity his immense personal library: The Shukindo bunko. We at the Medical History Department (Kitasato Research Institute) have organized and catalogued Otsuka's library. In addition to our announcement of the completion of the catalogue, we wish to introduce a summary of his life and his collection.<br>I. Brief biography/achievements/the person<br>1) the origins of the Shukindo, 2) medical specialization in Kumamoto, 3) opening a clinic in Kochi, 4) to the capital to study Kampo, 5) clinical research and educational pursuits, 6) the dispersal of the library during the war and the post-war Nishi Ogikubo years.<br>II. Shukindo bunko<br>1) the order of things, 2) the special nature of the collection, 3) the prominence of the ‘Shang Han Lun’ and ‘Jin Kui Yao Lue’ texts, 4)the substantiality of the Koho-school, 5)the Gosei-school; the Kosho-school; acupuncture and moxibustion texts.

4.
Kampo Medicine ; : 179-189, 2001.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-368366

ABSTRACT

This article analyzes the Okada Documents that were kept by the descendents of Okada Shôshun (1827-97) for over a hundred years and recently became available for scholarly use. In the existing scholarship, Okada Shôshun was considered merely one of many practitioners of East Asian medicine in the early Meiji period. His family background was obscure. This study of the newly emerged documents shows that his family practiced medicine for six generations-from the mid-Edo until the Meiji period-and produced medical administrators in the Bakufu. Also, a book on pharmaceuticals preserved in the Documents and written by his adoptive father, Shôseki, reveals that the family originally specialized in surgery. In addition, because Shôshun studied at the Bakufu's official medical school, Igakkan, under the guidance of the Taki family, the Documents include rare books such as Taki Motonori's “Rankei sensei yakushitsu kijô” (draft), Taki Motoyasu's “Isekikô” (the first draft), “Byômei san, ” and “Qianjin yueling.” Since the mid-1870s, Shôshun participated earnestly in the movement to preserve East Asian medicine and was particularly close to Asada Sôhaku (1815-94). The Documents include Sôhaku's medical essay (untitled), a book manuscript written by Shôshun with commentary by Sôhaku, and sixty-two letters that were exchanged between Shôshun and Sôhaku.

5.
Journal of the Japan Society of Acupuncture and Moxibustion ; : 167-173, 2000.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-370954

ABSTRACT

Since a lot of things are unclear about the life of MIWA TOsaku, the author of “Shiraku bunkenroku”. We collected, organized, and analyzed materials about him from various texts, such as “Shiraku bunkenroku”, “Kushimitama”, “Nihon ihu”, “Zoku shoka jimbutsushi”, “Kokon bokuseki kantei benran”, “Ika sentetsu shOzOshu”. As a result, We discovered the following. His father's name was UEDA Sado.<BR>Miwa's name was Tosaku. His “azana” was BOkei, and his “go” was Sensban. He also called himself Omiwa Masaaki or Miwadan. He was born in Kyoto in 1747. Having also lived in ChOshi, he practiced medicine in Asakusa. He had at least one son, Omiwa Yoshiaki. The year of Miwa's death is not clear, but he lived at least until 1819.

6.
Kampo Medicine ; : 91-102, 1987.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367825

ABSTRACT

The general survey for the curricula of traditional medicine (TM) in medical, dental and pharmaceutical courses (Universities and Colleges) has been carried out in Japan.<br>In this survey, TM in medical specialist education has come to focus on the following items;<br>1) A status of the introduction of TM in the curricula of medical, dental and pharmaceutical courses respectively<br>2) A comparision of the above status between public and private courses<br>3) Contents of the curricula of traditional medicine<br>4) An analysis of education system and contents in the medical specialist education<br>It was shown that TM education has been introduced 26% of the universities and the rate of introduction was higher in private universities than that of public.<br>Other statistical results of the survey are presented in this report.

7.
Kampo Medicine ; : 103-112, 1987.
Article in Japanese | WPRIM | ID: wpr-367821

ABSTRACT

The general survey for the curricula of traditional medicine (TM) in medical, dental and pharmaceutical courses (Universities and Colleges) has been carried out in Japan.<br>In this survey, TM in medical specialist education has come to focus on the following items;<br>1) Execution of TM educational issues<br>2) Prospect of education<br>3) Courses should be introduced from now<br>As a result: more than half of the Universities which does not introduce TM state reason for shortning of School hours and lack of the teaching staff. The total percentage of Universities which already introduced or intended to introduced TM soon exceed 37%. In medical and dental courses, TM will be introduced in clinical medicine as well as an optional subject. On the other hand, TM will be introduced as a postgraduate curriculum and optional subject in pharmaceutical courses.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL