Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 49(6): 677-687, Nov.-Dec. 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1550288

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Salvage robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (S-RARP) has gained prominence in recent years for treating patients with cancer recurrence following non-surgical treatments of Prostate Cancer. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the role and outcomes of S-RARP over the past decade. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was conducted, encompassing articles published between January 1st, 2013, and June 1st, 2023, on S-RARP outcomes. Articles were screened according to PRISMA guidelines, resulting in 33 selected studies. Data were extracted, including patient demographics, operative times, complications, functional outcomes, and oncological outcomes. Results: Among 1,630 patients from 33 studies, radiotherapy was the most common primary treatment (42%). Operative times ranged from 110 to 303 minutes, with estimated blood loss between 50 to 745 mL. Intraoperative complications occurred in 0 to 9% of cases, while postoperative complications ranged from 0 to 90% (Clavien 1-5). Continence rates varied (from 0 to 100%), and potency rates ranged from 0 to 66.7%. Positive surgical margins were reported up to 65.6%, and biochemical recurrence ranged from 0 to 57%. Conclusion: Salvage robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy in patients with cancer recurrence after previous prostate cancer treatment is safe and feasible. The literature is based on retrospective studies with inherent limitations describing low rates of intraoperative complications and small blood loss. However, potency and continence rates are largely reduced compared to the primary RARP series, despite the type of the primary treatment. Better-designed studies to assess the long-term outcomes and individually specify each primary therapy impact on the salvage treatment are still needed. Future articles should be more specific and provide more details regarding the previous therapies and S-RARP surgical techniques.

2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 49(3): 391-392, may-June 2023.
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1440262

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction Urolift® is a surgical modality to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with enlarged prostates (1). However, the inflammatory process caused by the device usually displaces the prostate's anatomical landmarks and challenges surgeons performing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). In this video, we will illustrate several technical challenges in patients with Urolift ® who underwent RARP. Material and Methods We performed a video compilation with several surgical steps illustrating key aspects and critical details of the anterior bladder neck access, lateral bladder dissection from the prostate, and posterior prostate dissection to avoid ureteral and neural bundles injuries. Results We perform our RARP technique with our standard approach in all patients (2 -6). The beginning of the case is performed like every patient with an enlarged prostate. We first identify the anterior bladder neck and then complete its dissection with Maryland and Scissors. However, extra care must be taken in the anterior and posterior bladder neck approach due to the clips found during the dissection. The challenge starts when opening the lateral sides of the bladder until the base of the prostate. It is crucial to perform the bladder neck dissection beginning at the internal plane of the bladder wall. Such dissection is the easiest way to recognize the anatomical landmarks and potential foreign materials, such as clips, placed during previous surgeries. We cautiously work around the clip to avoid using cautery on the top of the metal clips because energy is transmitted from one edge to the other of the Urolift ®. This can be dangerous if the edge of the clip is close to the ureteral orifices. The clips are usually removed to minimize cautery conduction energy. Finally, after isolating and removing the clips, the prostate dissection and subsequent surgical steps are continued with our conventional technique. Before proceeding, we ensure that all clips are removed from the bladder neck to avoid complications during the anastomosis. Conclusions Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy in patients with Urolift ® is challenging due to modified anatomical landmarks and intense inflammatory processes in the posterior bladder neck. When dissecting the clips placed next to the base of the prostate, it is crucial to avoid cautery because energy conduction to the other edge of the Urolift ® can cause thermal damage to the ureters and neural bundles.

3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 49(2): 211-220, March-Apr. 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1440233

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background The results and benefits of Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) are already established in the literature. However, new robotic platforms have been released recently in the market and their outcomes are still unknown. In this scenario, our objective is to describe our experience implementing the HugoTM RAS robot and report the clinical data of patients who underwent Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Material and Methods We retrospectively analyzed fifteen consecutive patients who underwent RARP with HugoTM RAS System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) from June to October 2021. The patients underwent transperitoneal RARP on lithotomy position, using six trocars (4 robotic trocars and 2 for the assistant). We reported the clinical feasibility and safety of this platform, assessing perioperative data, including complications and early outcomes. Continuous variables were reported as median and interquartile ranges, categorical variables as frequencies and proportions. Results and Limitations All procedures were safe and feasible with no major complications or conversion. Median operative time was 235 minutes (213-271), and median estimated blood loss was 300ml (100-310). Positive surgical margins were reported in 5 patients (33%). The median hospitalization time was 2 days (2-2), and the median time to remove the foley was 7 days (7-7). On the first appointment four weeks after surgery, all patients had undetectable PSA values, and 61% were continent. Conclusions We described preliminary results with safe and feasible procedures performed with HugoTM RAS System robotic platform. The surgeries were successfully executed with acceptable perioperative outcomes, without conversions or major complications. However, as this technology is very recent, further studies with a long-term follow-up are awaited to access postoperative functional and oncological outcomes.

4.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 49(1): 123-135, Jan.-Feb. 2023. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1421714

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: Global cancer incidence ranks Prostate Cancer (CaP) as the second highest overall, with Africa and the Caribbean having the highest mortality. Previous literature suggests disparities in CaP outcomes according to ethnicity, specifically functional and oncological are suboptimal in black men. However, recent data shows black men achieve post radical prostatectomy (RP) outcomes equivalent to white men in a universally insured system. Our objective is to compare outcomes of patients who self-identified their ethnicity as black or white undergoing RP at our institution. Materials and methods: From 2008 to 2017, 396 black and 4929 white patients underwent primary robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Exclusion criteria were concomitant surgery and cancer status not available. A propensity score (PS) match was performed with a 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 ratio without replacement. Primary endpoints were potency, continence recovery, biochemical recurrence (BCR), positive surgical margins (PSM), and post-operative complications. Results: After PS 1:1 matching, 341 black vs. 341 white men with a median follow-up of approximately 8 years were analyzed. The overall potency and continence recovery at 12 months was 52% vs 58% (p=0.3) and 82% vs 89% (p=0.3), respectively. PSM rates was 13.4 % vs 14.4% (p = 0.75). Biochemical recurrence and persistence PSA was 13.8% vs 14.1% and 4.4% vs 3.2% respectively (p=0.75). Clavien-Dindo complications (p=0.4) and 30-day readmission rates (p=0.5) were similar. Conclusion: In our study, comparing two ethnic groups with similar preoperative characteristics and full access to screening and treatment showed compatible RARP results. We could not demonstrate outcomes superiority in one group over the other. However, this data adds to the growing body of evidence that the racial disparity gap in prostate cancer outcomes can be narrowed if patients have appropriate access to prostate cancer management. It also could be used in counseling surgeons and patients on the surgical intervention and prognosis of prostate cancer in patients with full access to gold-standard screening and treatment.

6.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(4): 728-729, July-Aug. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1385143

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction Several techniques of robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) using the da Vinci SP (SP) have been described since its clearance by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in 2018 ( 1 , 2 ). Even with the expanding literature about this robot, the SP technology has been restricted to a few centers in the US and Asia due to the recent release of this robot in the marked.3 In this scenario, we provided, in this video compilation, a consensus of SP referral centers describing the current approaches and techniques of da Vinci SP Radical prostatectomy (SP-RARP). Surgical Technique We have illustrated five different techniques, including transperitoneal, extraperitoneal, Retzius-sparing, transvesical, and transperineal ( 4 - 6 ). Each surgery demonstrated crucial steps from the trocar placement until anastomosis. All approaches follow anatomic concepts and landmarks to minimize positive surgical margins, optimize oncological outcomes and promote optimal functional recovery. The trocar placement and the use of an assistant port were selected according to the operative technique of each institution. None of these surgeries had intra- or postoperative complications, and the pain management until discharge was controlled without using narcotics. All patients were discharged in less than 16 hours of surgery. Conclusion Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy performed with the da Vinci SP is feasible and safe with optimal perioperative outcomes. Five different approaches were described in this video compilation, and we believe that the technical details provided by this multicentric collaboration are crucial for centers willing to initiate the SP approach to radical prostatectomy.

7.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(4): 696-705, July-Aug. 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1385146

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background The da Vinci SP robot consists of an innovative single port trocar that houses a flexible camera and three biarticulated arms, which minimizes the number of incisions to assess the surgical site, allowing a less invasive procedure. However, due to its recent release in the market, the current literature reporting SP-RARP is still restricted to a few centers. In this scenario, after performing a literature search with all available techniques of SP-RARP, our objective is to report a multicentric opinion of referral centers on different techniques to approach SP-RARP. Results The SP literature is provided by only a few centers due to the limited number of this new console in the market. Five different approaches are available: transperitoneal, extraperitoneal, Retzius-Sparing, transperineal and transvesical. None of the current studies describe long-term functional or oncological outcomes. However, all approaches had satisfactory operative performance with minimum complication rates. Conclusions Several techniques of SP-RARP have been reported in the literature. We performed a multicentric collaboration describing and illustrating the most challenging steps of this surgery. We believe that the details provided in this article are useful teaching material for new centers willing to adopt the SP technology.

8.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(3): 600-601, May-June 2022.
Article in English | LILACS-Express | LILACS | ID: biblio-1385120

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Surgical training will be complemented by digitalisation, as the COVID 19 pandemic continues (1). Proximie is an augmented reality (AR) platform that can display up to 4 native camera views, with live or semi live telementoring. It can optimise ergonomics of the surgeon at the console (2), and robotic instrument orientation. We describe the utilisation of Proximie as a step-by-step guide in a robotic assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Surgical Technique: Author V. P. performed a transperitoneal multiport da Vinci Xi RARP with the Proximie platform: a laptop computer, multiple HD webcams, microphones and speakers. Using an HDMI cable to the Intuitive Surgical tower, output display from the console and an additional laparoscopic tower is shown. Each webcam was mounted to the side armrests of the console, directed at the surgeon's hands. An independent 'drop in' laparoscope via an additional 5mm left upper quadrant port was utilised. Observers can visualise the AR platform's recordings on a laptop and/or smartphone. A PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom) camera can capture the operating room, bedside assistant, ports and patient position. Our video demonstrates three of four camera views for posture, forearm, wrist, hand, and finger orientation, relative to the translated robotic steps. A pincer grasp of the endowrist manipulator during anastomosis allows optimal robotic wrist rotation. The second laparoscopic camera view demonstrated intracorporeal angles of robotic arm and bedside assistant's instrument position for critical steps such as nerve sparing and anastomosis (3). The console time was 100 minutes, no intraoperative complications, or delay in image transmission occurred with utilising the platform. Considerations: An AR platform can create deeper learning for RARP in real time or recorded sessions. Two-way verbal and visual communication with ability to annotate on screen, allows long distance mentoring. The platform's utility can be accessed in anywhere, to project surgeons beyond their immediate environment. This allows for democratisation of access to high volume institutions and their evolution of techniques (4), to assist patients globally. Potential developments are artificial intelligence (AI) networks analysing repository of such recorded data, to identify intraoperative hand motion and robotic instrument tracking. AR is a pertinent building block to enhance robotic training, skill dissemination, precision medicine (5) and surgery overall.

9.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 212-219, March-Apr. 2022. graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364948

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Despite the neuroanatomy knowledge of the prostate described initially in the 1980's and the robotic surgery advantages in terms of operative view magnification, potency outcomes following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy still challenge surgeons and patients due to its multifactorial etiology. Recent studies performed in our center have described that, in addition to the surgical technique, some important factors are associated with erectile dysfunction (ED) following robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). These include preoperative Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) score, age, preoperative Gleason score, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). After performing 15,000 cases, in this article we described our current Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy technique with details and considerations regarding the optimal approach to neurovascular bundle preservation.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Erectile Dysfunction/etiology , Erectile Dysfunction/prevention & control , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy/adverse effects , Prostatectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
10.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 363-364, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364954

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Background: Reports in the literature describe lymphocele formation in up to half of patients following pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) (1) in robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), with 1-2% requiring intervention (2). The advantage of surgical approach is permanent excision of the lymphocele capsule and fewer days with pelvic drains compared to percutaneous drainage. This study aims to describe the step-by-step surgical management of symptomatic lymphoceles using a less invasive robotic platform, the Da Vinci® Single Port (SP). Material and Methods: We describe the technique of lymphocelectomy and marsupialization with the Da Vinci® SP for symptomatic lymphocele. For this study, several treatment modalities for symptomatic lymphoceles were available, including percutaneous drainage, sclerosing agents, and surgical marsupialization. All the data for this study were obtained through the procedure via Da Vinci® SP. Results: Operative time for the case was 84 minutes. Blood loss was 25ml. No intra- or post- operative complications were reported. The patient had his drain removed in under 24 hours after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 7.7 months. There were no complications or lymphocele recurrence. Conclusion: Da Vinci® SP lymphocelectomy is safe and feasible with satisfactory outcomes. The SP enables definitive treatment of the lymphocele sac (3), reducing the number of days with abdominal drains and allows further decrease in surgical invasiveness with fewer incisions and better cosmesis.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Robotics , Lymphocele/surgery , Lymphocele/etiology , Robotic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Prostatectomy/methods , Drainage/adverse effects , Drainage/methods , Lymph Node Excision/methods
11.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 369-370, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364947

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Introduction: Over the years, since Binder and Kramer described the first Robotic-assisted Radical Prostatectomy (RARP) in 2000, different Nerve-sparing (NS) techniques have been proposed by several authors (1). However, even with the robotic surgery advantages, functional outcomes following RARP, especially erection recovery, still challenge surgeons and patients (2, 3). In this scenario, we have described different ways and grades of neurovascular bundle preservation (NVB) using the prostatic artery as a landmark until our most recent technique with lateral prostatic fascia preservation and modified apical dissection (4-6). In this video compilation, we have illustrated the anatomical and technical details of different grades of NVB preservation. Surgical technique: After the anterior and posterior bladder neck dissection, we lift the prostate by the seminal vesicles to access the posterior aspect of the prostate. Then, we incise the Denonvilliers layers and work between an avascular plane to release the posterior NVB from 5 to 1 and 7 to 11 o'clock positions on the right and left sides, respectively6. In sequence, we access the prostate anteriorly by incising the endopelvic fascia bilaterally (close to the prostate) until communicating the anterior and posterior planes. Finally, we control the prostatic pedicles with Hem-o-lok clips and then proceed for the apical dissection preserving the maximum amount of urethra length and periurethral tissues. Considerations: Potency recovery following radical prostatectomy remains a challenge due to its multifactorial etiology. However, basic concepts for nerve-sparing are crucial to achieving optimal outcomes, such as minimizing the amount of traction used on dissection, avoiding excessive cautery, and neural preservation based on anatomical landmarks (arteries and planes of dissection).


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Prostate/surgery , Prostatectomy/methods , Penile Erection
12.
Article | IMSEAR | ID: sea-207766

ABSTRACT

Background: Iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy is a serious global concern specially in developing country, which is preventable with effective measures. In women who cannot tolerate oral iron or have moderate to severe anemia, parenteral iron in the form of iron sucrose or ferric carboxymaltose can be very much useful. This study aimed to compare efficacy and safety of iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose in iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy.Methods: This prospective interventional comparative study was conducted during May 2016 to April 2018 at tertiary care hospital and total 100 antenatal women from 28 to 34 weeks of gestation having moderate to severe anemia were included in this study and all women were divided in to 2 groups randomly and were given either iron sucrose or ferric carboxymaltose according to iron requirement. Rise in haemoglobin and serum ferritin were noted and data analysed statistically.Results: The mean rise of haemoglobin with iron sucrose was 1.8 gm% and with ferric carboxymaltose was 2.6 gm%. The mean rise of serum ferritin with iron sucrose was 82.4 ng/ml and with ferric carboxymaltose was 100.9 ng/ml. Other than minimal local reaction one woman had developed severe anaphylactic reaction after receiving iron sucrose.Conclusions: Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is better and safe molecule than iron sucrose and it has advantage of ability to administer large dose in single sitting which reduce overall cost of therapy.  Hence ferric carboxymaltose is a drug of choice as parenteral iron therapy in iron deficiency anemia during second trimester of pregnancy.

13.
Article | IMSEAR | ID: sea-212178

ABSTRACT

Background: Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition triggered due to body's response to an infection. If empirical treatment for sepsis and bacteraemia is held up it will increase chances of mortality as well as duration of stay and cost. Hence, there is a need for risk stratification. So, we planned to study the clinicohematological profile of patients of sepsis admitted to this hospital in ICU.Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 50 patients of sepsis were included. All included participants were subject to CBC, RFT, LFT, RBS, Urine RM, ESR, chest X-ray, USG Abdomen.  Laboratory evaluations were performed in the institutional pathology and biochemistry labs. Data was analysed to assess the clinicohematological profile of the patients of sepsis to identify common factors which if taken care of in time can reduce development to sepsis and the morbidity and mortality related to it.Results: Most common presenting complaint was fever (72%), followed by altered sensorium (58%), vomiting (30%), jaundice (30%) and breathlessness (20%). Most noticed signs were pallor (36%), icterus (36%), edema (6%), reduced air entry (34%) and crepitations (26%). Most common source of the infection were abdomen (28%), urinary tract infection (26%) and community acquired pneumonia (24%).Conclusions: Most common presenting complaints were fever, breathlessness, altered sensorium. Most common source of sepsis were urinary tract infection, lung, and abdomen which if adequately treated in time would aid in reducing the number of sepsis patients and thus will control the morbidity, mortality and cost associated with sepsis.

14.
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-152211

ABSTRACT

Introduction: First year undergraduate medical students find it difficult to identify histology slides in the laboratory, even though they have a good theoretical knowledge about them. Aim: The present study was undertaken to improve histology slide identification skills of the students using a new innovative method and also to compare the same with traditional methods of teaching histology. Materials & Methods: 150 first year medical undergraduates (MBBS) from JIPMER, Pondicherry formed the subjects of the present study. Digital images from slides available at our department in JIPMER (Jawaharlal institute of post graduate medical education and research), Pondicherry were labeled and used in lecture classes as well as for subsequent student assessment. Results: 94% of the students identified all the slides correctly and mentioned important identifying points using the newer method whereas only 52% and 64% of the students identified all the slides correctly and mentioned important identifying points using pointers in the eye piece method and live/ real time demonstration (older/traditional methods ) respectively. Conclusion: The new method has been shown to be effective and makes efficient use of the available time and superior to older methods of teaching histology.

16.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 36(3): 259-272, May-June 2010. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-555185

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nerve sparing radical prostatectomy is the gold standard for the treatment of prostate cancer. Over the past decade, more and more surgeons and patients are opting for a robot-assisted procedure. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review different techniques and outcomes of nerve sparing robot assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a MEDLINE search from 2001 to 2009 using the keywords “robotic prostatectomy”, “cavernosal nerve”, “pelvic neuroanatomy”, “potency”, “outcomes” and “comparison”. Extended search was also performed using the references from these articles. RESULTS: Several techniques of nerve sparing are available in literature for RALP, which have been described in this manuscript. These include, “the veil of Aphrodite”, “athermal retrograde neurovascular release”, “clipless antegrade nerve sparing” and “clipless cautery free technique”. The comparative and the non comparative series showing outcomes of RALP have been described in the manuscript. CONCLUSIONS: The basic principles for nerve sparing revolve around minimal traction, athermal dissection, and approaching the correct planes. It has not been documented if any one technique is better than the other. Regardless of technique, patient selection, wise clinical judgment and a careful dissection are the keys to achieve optimal oncological outcomes following RALP.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Laparoscopy/methods , Penile Erection/physiology , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Robotics/methods , Erectile Dysfunction/prevention & control , Penis/innervation , Prostate/innervation , Treatment Outcome
17.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 35(3): 344-353, May-June 2009. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: lil-523160

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a unique technology, developed to provide high resolution, cross sectional images of human tissue. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of OCT for the evaluation of positive surgical margins and extra capsular extension in robotic prostatectomy specimens and compare it to histopathology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Radical prostatectomy was performed in 100 patients. Twenty OCT images of each specimen were taken from the base of the seminal vesicles (SV), apical and vesicle margins, peripheral and posterolateral area and any palpable nodule. Predictions were made regarding positive surgical margin, SV involvement, capsular invasion and compared with the final histopathology. RESULTS: A total of 2000 OCT images were taken and analyzed. Out of 100 specimens, 85 had T2 disease, 15 had T3 disease with a median Gleason's score of 7 (range 6 to 9) and 10 had positive surgical margins. We predicted 21 specimens to have positive margins based on OCT images out of which 7 were truly positive and 14 were falsely positive. Based on OCT images, 79 specimens were predicted to have negative margins out of which 76 were truly negative and 3 were falsely negative. We found the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value to be 70 percent, 84 percent, 33 percent and 96 percent respectively. CONCLUSION: Our initial feasibility study established the template for the visual OCT characteristics of the prostate, SV and cancerous tissue. The negative predictive value of evaluating surgical margins was high.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Image Enhancement/methods , Prostatectomy/methods , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Robotics , Tomography, Optical Coherence/instrumentation , Feasibility Studies , Prostate/pathology , Prostate/surgery , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, Optical Coherence/methods
19.
Indian J Pathol Microbiol ; 2003 Jul; 46(3): 482-3
Article in English | IMSEAR | ID: sea-74596

ABSTRACT

Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition manifested by central nervous system hemangioblastoma, retinal angiomas, cysts of pancreas, kidney and epididymis, pheochromocytomas and renal cell carcinoma. We present such a case in a 45 years old male patient.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Hemangioblastoma/pathology , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Supratentorial Neoplasms/pathology , von Hippel-Lindau Disease/pathology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL