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1.
Braz. j. biol ; 83: e245329, 2023. graf
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1285618

ABSTRACT

Abstract The cold storage of milt implies potentials alterations in its quality because the storage generates as main process, free radicals that produce spermatozoa membrane lipids damage with the consequent motility and fertilising capacity disruptions. To decrease the damage generated by free radicals the cells have antioxidant defences (proteins, enzymes, and low molecular weight substances). The objective of the present study evaluated the time storage effect and different antioxidants prepared in spermatic diluents on sperm viability of O. mykiss milt stored at 4°C. The two-way ANOVA denoted that the time storage and antioxidant influence have significant effects separated or combined on viability parameters (sperm motility and viability, proteins concentrations and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activity in seminal plasma). In contrast, only the storage time affected the fertilising capacity and catalase enzymatic activity in seminal plasma. The resulting analysis can conclude that the antioxidant presence improves the viability of cold stored milt, especially the transport conditions and the antioxidants allow the fecundity despite motility decrease.


Resumo O armazenamento a frio de leite implica potenciais alterações em sua qualidade, pois gera como processo principal radicais livres que provocam danos aos lipídios da membrana dos espermatozoides, com as consequentes alterações na motilidade e na capacidade de fertilização. Para diminuir os danos causados pelos radicais livres, as células têm defesas antioxidantes (proteínas, enzimas e substâncias de baixo peso molecular). O presente estudo avaliou o efeito do tempo de armazenamento e diferentes antioxidantes preparados em diluentes espermáticos no armazenamento de viabilidade de O. mykiss milt a 4°C. A ANOVA de duas vias denotou que o armazenamento no tempo e a influência antioxidante têm efeitos significativos separados ou combinados nos parâmetros de viabilidade (motilidade espermática, viabilidade espermática, concentrações de proteínas e atividade enzimática da superóxido dismutase no plasma seminal), enquanto apenas o tempo de armazenamento afetou a capacidade de fertilização e atividade enzimática da catalase no plasma seminal. A análise resultante pode concluir que a presença de antioxidante melhora a viabilidade do leite frio, especialmente as condições de transporte, e os antioxidantes permitem a fecundidade apesar da diminuição da motilidade.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Semen Preservation/veterinary , Oncorhynchus mykiss , Sperm Motility , Spermatozoa , Cryopreservation , Antioxidants
2.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(2): 347-348, March-Apr. 2022.
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1364950
3.
Int. braz. j. urol ; 48(1): 131-156, Jan.-Feb. 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1356297

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Purpose: Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) and seminal oxidative stress are emerging measurable factors in male factor infertility, which interventions could potentially reduce. We evaluated (i) the impact of lifestyle changes combined with oral antioxidant intake on sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP), and (ii) the correlation between DFI and sORP. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective study involving 93 infertile males with a history of failed IVF/ICSI. Ten healthy male volunteers served as controls. Semen analysis was carried out according to 2010 WHO manual, whereas seminal sORP was measured using the MiOXSYS platform. SDF was assessed by sperm chromatin structure assay. Participants with DFI >15% underwent a three-month lifestyle intervention program, primarily based on diet and exercise, combined with oral antioxidant therapy using multivitamins, coenzyme Q10, omega-3, and oligo-elements. We assessed changes in semen parameters, DFI, and sORP, and compared DFI results to those of volunteers obtained two weeks apart. Spearman rank correlation tests were computed for sORP and DFI results. Results: Thirty-eight (40.8%) patients had DFI >15%, of whom 31 participated in the intervention program. A significant decrease in median DFI from 25.8% to 18.0% was seen after the intervention (P <0.0001). The mean DFI decrease was 7.2% (95% CI: 4.8-9.5%; P <0.0001), whereas it was 0.42% (95%CI; -4.8 to 5.6%) in volunteers (P <0.00001). No differences were observed in sperm parameters and sORP. Based on paired sORP and DFI data from 86 patients, no correlation was observed between sORP and DFI values (rho=0.03). Conclusion: A 3-month lifestyle intervention program combined with antioxidant therapy reduced DFI in infertile men with elevated SDF and a history of failed IVF/ICSI. A personalized lifestyle and antioxidant intervention could improve fertility of subfertile couples through a reduction in DFI, albeit controlled trials evaluating reproductive outcomes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. Trial registration number and date: clinicaltrials.gov NCT03898752, April 2, 2019.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Infertility, Male/drug therapy , Antioxidants/metabolism , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Spermatozoa , Fertilization in Vitro , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Oxidative Stress , DNA Fragmentation , Life Style
4.
Frontiers of Medicine ; (4): 176-184, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-929190

ABSTRACT

Studies of human and mammalian have revealed that environmental exposure can affect paternal health conditions as well as those of the offspring. However, studies that explore the mechanisms that meditate this transmission are rare. Recently, small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in sperm have seemed crucial to this transmission due to their alteration in sperm in response to environmental exposure, and the methodology of microinjection of isolated total RNA or sncRNAs or synthetically identified sncRNAs gradually lifted the veil of sncRNA regulation during intergenerational inheritance along the male line. Hence, by reviewing relevant literature, this study intends to answer the following research concepts: (1) paternal environmental factors that can be passed on to offspring and are attributed to spermatozoal sncRNAs, (2) potential role of paternal spermatozoal sncRNAs during the intergenerational inheritance process, and (3) the potential mechanism by which spermatozoal sncRNAs meditate intergenerational inheritance. In summary, increased attention highlights the hidden wonder of spermatozoal sncRNAs during intergenerational inheritance. Therefore, in the future, more studies should focus on the origin of RNA alteration, the target of RNA regulation, and how sncRNA regulation during embryonic development can be sustained even in adult offspring.


Subject(s)
Animals , Environmental Exposure , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Humans , Male , Mammals/genetics , Pregnancy , RNA, Small Untranslated/genetics , Spermatozoa
5.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-929006

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES@#As a remedy for the failure of in vitro fertilization (IVF), rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (R-ICSI) has been widely carried out, but it has failed to significantly improve the fertilization rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) was highly correlated with pregnancy outcome of artificial assisted reproduction. This study aims to investigate the effect of the sperm DFI on the outcome of R-ICSI and the clinical value of R-ICSI.@*METHODS@#This retrospective analysis was conducted among 140 infertile couples receiving R-ICSI in from January 2014 to December 2019. The subjects were assigned into a total fertilization failure (TFF)+low DFI group (R-ICSI after TFF and DFI<30%) (n=63), a TFF+high DFI group (R-ICSI after TFF and DFI≥30%) (n=16), a partial fertilization failure (PFF)+low DFI group (R-ICSI after PFF and DFI<30%) (n=52), a PFF+high DFI group (R-ICSI after PFF and DFI≥30%) (n=9). All transferred embryos were come from R-ICSI. The general clinical data [infertility duration, male age, female age, basal serum level of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), basal serum level of luteinizing hormone (LH), antral follicle count, endometrial thickness of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) day, and eggs] and R-ICSI cycle outcomes (fertilization rate, normal fertilization rate, cleavage rate, good embryo rate, implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate) were analyzed. In addition, the effect of R-ICSI on the fertilization outcome of conventional IVF total fertilization failure and partial fertilization failure was explored.@*RESULTS@#There was no significant difference in the general clinical data and R-ICSI cycle outcome between the TFF+low DFI group and the TFF+high DFI group (all P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the general clinical data between the PFF+low DFI group and the PFF+high DFI group (all P>0.05). The fertilization rate and normal fertilization rate in the PFF+low DFI group were significantly higher than those in the PFF+high DFI group (85.40% vs 72.41%, 71.90% vs 58.62%, respectively; both P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in cleavage rate, good embryo rate, implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and live birth rate between the 2 groups (all P>0.05). The R-ICSI cycle of TFF: A total of 79 fresh cycles, 57 fresh transplant cycles, a total of 761 unfertilized oocytes, and 584 M II oocytes were treated with R-ICSI, the fertilization rate was 83.22%, the normal fertilization rate was 75.51%, the cleavage rate was 98.15%, the good embryo rate was 40.74%, the implantation rate was 30.56%, and the clinical pregnancy rate was 43.86%; 29 live births were obtained. The R-ICSI cycle of PFF: A total of 61 fresh cycles, 31 fresh transplant cycles, a total of 721 unfertilized oocytes, and 546 M II oocytes were treated with R-ICSI; the fertilization rate was 83.33%, the normal fertilization rate was 69.78%, the cleavage rate was 97.36%, the good embryo rate was 44.39%, the implantation rate was 25.42%, and the clinical pregnancy rate was 45.16%; 12 live births were obtained.@*CONCLUSIONS@#In the case of partial fertilization failure of IVF, the sperm DFI affects the fertilization rate and normal fertilization rate of R-ICSI; whether it is a TFF of IVF or PFF of IVF, ICSI can be used as an effective remedy way.


Subject(s)
DNA Fragmentation , Female , Fertilization in Vitro , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic , Spermatozoa
6.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 260-265, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928559

ABSTRACT

Obtaining high-quality embryos is one of the key factors to improve the clinical pregnancy rate of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). So far, the clinical evaluation of embryo quality depends on embryo morphology. However, the clinical pregnancy rate is still low. Therefore, new indicators are needed to further improve the evaluation of embryo quality. Several studies have shown that the decrease of sperm-specific protein actin-like 7A (ACTL7A) leaded to low fertilization rate, poor embryo development, and even infertility. The aim of this study was to study whether the different expression levels of ACTL7A on sperm can be used as a biomarker for predicting embryo quality. In this study, excluding the factors of severe female infertility, a total of 281 sperm samples were collected to compare the ACTL7A expression levels of sperms with high and low effective embryo rates and analyze the correlation between protein levels and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) laboratory outcomes. Our results indicated that the ACTL7A levels were significantly reduced in sperm samples presenting poor embryo quality. Furthermore, the protein levels showed a significant correlation with fertilization outcomes of ART. ACTL7A has the potential to be a biomarker for predicting success rate of fertilization and effective embryo and the possibility of embryo arrest. In conclusion, sperm-specific protein ACTL7A has a strong correlation with IVF laboratory outcomes and plays important roles in fertilization and embryo development.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , Female , Fertilization , Fertilization in Vitro , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Spermatozoa/metabolism
7.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 231-237, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928555

ABSTRACT

Acephalic spermatozoa syndrome (ASS) is one of the most severe spermatogenic failures of all infertility in men. The cognition of ASS has experienced a tortuous process. Over the past years, with the in-depth understanding of spermatogenesis and the emergence of new genetic research technologies, the unraveling of the genetic causes of spermatogenic failure has become highly active. From these advances, we established a genetic background and made significant progress in the discovery of the genetic causes of ASS. It is important to identify pathogenic genes and mutations in ASS to determine the biological reasons for the occurrence of the disease as well as provide genetic diagnosis and treatment strategies for patients with this syndrome. In this review, we enumerate various technological developments, which have made a positive contribution to the discovery of candidate genes for ASS from the past to the present. Simultaneously, we summarize the known genetic etiology of this phenotype and the clinical outcomes of treatments in the present. Furthermore, we propose perspectives for further study and application of genetic diagnosis and assisted reproductive treatment in the future.


Subject(s)
Humans , Infertility, Male/pathology , Male , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mutation , Spermatogenesis/genetics , Spermatozoa/pathology
8.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 73-77, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928539

ABSTRACT

This study analyzed the effects of male age and abstinence time on semen quality and explored the best abstinence time for Chinese males among different age groups. Semen parameters, including sperm kinetics, morphology, and DNA fragmentation index (DFI), were reviewed from 2952 men. Samples were divided into six age groups (≤25 years, 26-30 years, 31-35 years, 36-40 years, 41-45 years, and >45 years) and were divided into six groups according to different abstinence time (2 days, 3 days, 4 days, 5 days, 6 days, and 7 days). The differences in semen quality between the groups were compared, and the effect of age and abstinence time on semen quality was analyzed. Significant differences were observed in semen volume, progressive motility (PR), and DFI among the age groups (all P < 0.05), and no significant differences were observed in sperm morphological parameters (all P > 0.05). There were significant differences in semen volume, PR, and DFI among different abstinence time groups (all P < 0.05) and no significant differences in sperm morphological parameters (all P > 0.05). Pearson analysis showed that male age and abstinence time were both significantly correlated with sperm kinetics and DFI (both P < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found with sperm morphological parameters (all P > 0.05). The box plots and histograms of men's age, abstinence time, and semen quality show that most semen quality parameters differ significantly between the 2 days and 7 days abstinence groups and other groups at different ages. Except for the sperm morphology parameters, sperm kinetic parameters and sperm DFI are linearly related to male age and abstinence time.


Subject(s)
Adult , DNA Fragmentation , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Semen , Semen Analysis , Sperm Count , Sperm Motility , Spermatozoa
9.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 299-304, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928537

ABSTRACT

The extent of spermatogenic impairment on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes and the risk of major birth defects have been little assessed. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between various spermatogenic conditions, sperm origin on ICSI outcomes, and major birth defects. A total of 934 infertile men attending the Center for Reproductive Medicine of Ren Ji Hospital (Shanghai, China) were classified into six groups: nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA; n = 84), extremely severe oligozoospermia (esOZ; n = 163), severe oligozoospermia (sOZ, n = 174), mild oligozoospermia (mOZ; n = 148), obstructive azoospermia (OAZ; n = 155), and normozoospermia (NZ; n = 210). Rates of fertilization, embryo cleavage, high-quality embryos, implantation, biochemical and clinical pregnancies, abortion, delivery, newborns, as well as major birth malformations, and other newborn outcomes were analyzed and compared among groups. The NOA group showed a statistically lower fertilization rate (68.2% vs esOZ 77.3%, sOZ 78.0%, mOZ 73.8%, OAZ 76.6%, and NZ 79.3%, all P < 0.05), but a significantly higher implantation rate (37.8%) than the groups esOZ (30.1%), sOZ (30.4%), mOZ (32.6%), and OAZ (31.0%) (all P < 0.05), which was similar to that of Group NZ (38.4%). However, there were no statistically significant differences in rates of embryo cleavage, high-quality embryos, biochemical and clinical pregnancies, abortions, deliveries, major birth malformations, and other newborn outcomes in the six groups. The results showed that NOA only negatively affects some embryological outcomes such as fertilization rate. There was no evidence of differences in other embryological and clinical outcomes with respect to sperm source or spermatogenic status. Spermatogenic failure and sperm origins do not impinge on the clinical outcomes in ICSI treatment.


Subject(s)
Azoospermia/therapy , China , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Oligospermia/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Retrospective Studies , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic/methods , Sperm Retrieval , Spermatogenesis , Spermatozoa
10.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 287-293, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928534

ABSTRACT

Intrauterine insemination with donor sperm (IUI-D) is an assisted reproductive technology (ART) offered to couples with definitive male infertility or risk of genetic disease transmission. Here, we sought to evaluate our practice in IUI-D and identify factors that influenced the success rate. We performed a retrospective, single-center study of all IUI-D procedures performed at Lille University Medical Center (Lille, France) between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2017. Single and multivariate analyses with a mixed logistic model were used to identify factors associated with clinical pregnancies and live births. We included 322 couples and 1179 IUI-D procedures. The clinical pregnancy rate was 23.5%, and the live birth rate was 18.9% per IUI-D. In a multivariate analysis, the women's age was negatively associated with the live birth rate. The number of motile spermatozoa inseminated was the only factor associated with both clinical pregnancies and live births, with a chosen threshold of 0.75 million. The clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were, respectively, 17.3% and 13.0% below the number of motile spermatozoa inseminated threshold and 25.9% and 21.0% at or above the threshold (all P = 0.005). The number of motile spermatozoa inseminated was the only factor that significantly influenced both pregnancies and live-birth rates after IUI-D. Indeed, below a threshold of 0.75 million motile spermatozoa inseminated, those rates were significantly lower. Application of this number of motile spermatozoa inseminated threshold may help centers to allocate donations more effectively while maintaining reasonable waiting times for patients.


Subject(s)
Birth Rate , Female , Humans , Insemination , Insemination, Artificial , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Retrospective Studies , Spermatozoa
11.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 139-146, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928531

ABSTRACT

The renin angiotensin system (RAS) appears to influence male fertility at multiple levels. In this work, we analyzed the relationship between the RAS and DNA integrity. Fifty male volunteers were divided into two groups (25 each): control (DNA fragmentation ≤20%) and pathological (DNA fragmentation >20%) cases. Activities of five peptidases controlling RAS were measured fluorometrically: prolyl endopeptidase (which converts angiotensin [A] I and A II to A 1-7), neutral endopeptidase (NEP/CD10: A I to A 1-7), aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13: A III to A IV), aminopeptidase A (A II to A III) and aminopeptidase B (A III to A IV). Angiotensin-converting enzyme (A I to A II), APN/CD13 and NEP/CD10 were also assessed by semiquantitative cytometry and quantitative flow cytometry assays, as were the receptors of all RAS components: A II receptor type 1 (AT1R), A II receptor type 2 (AT2R), A IV receptor (AT4R or insulin-regulated aminopeptidase [IRAP]), (pro)renin receptor (PRR) and A 1-7 receptor or Mas receptor (MasR) None of the enzymes that regulate levels of RAS components, except for APN/CD13 (decrease in fragmented cells), showed significant differences between both groups. Micrographs of RAS receptors revealed no significant differences in immunolabeling patterns between normozoospermic and fragmented cells. Labeling of AT1R (94.3% normozoospermic vs 84.1% fragmented), AT4R (96.2% vs 95.3%) and MasR (97.4% vs 87.2%) was similar between the groups. AT2R (87.4% normozoospermic vs 63.1% fragmented) and PRR (96.4% vs 48.2%) were higher in non-fragmented spermatozoa. These findings suggest that fragmented DNA spermatozoa have a lower capacity to respond to bioactive RAS peptides.


Subject(s)
Angiotensins , DNA Fragmentation , Humans , Insulin , Male , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Spermatozoa
12.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 26-31, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928522

ABSTRACT

Environmental factors may negatively contribute to a progressive worsening of semen quality, and differences in semen quality may result from different environmental exposures (regional differences) or lifestyle differences. Heavy metals are factors with a confirmed negative influence on male fertility. Among them, lead and cadmium are commonly found in human surroundings. Thus, we analyzed semen parameters (according to the World Health Organization 2010 recommendations) and semen lead and cadmium concentrations in 188 men from two different regions in Poland, a typical agricultural area and an industrial area, in couples that had been diagnosed with infertility. The assays were performed using flameless electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. In the statistical analysis, regional comparisons and then taxonomic comparisons based on three parameters (age, semen concentration, and sperm morphology) were applied. We showed that more cadmium than lead accumulated in semen, a higher cadmium concentration was observed in semen obtained from men from the agricultural region, and better semen quality and lower cadmium concentrations were found in the semen of men from the industrial, more polluted region. We thus showed an existing regionalism in the sperm quality properties. However, semen parameters such as morphology and progressive and nonprogressive motility followed the same trends, regardless of the patient's age, region, or class. We could conclude that the environment has a minor impact on sperm morphology and progressive and nonprogressive motility and that other existing factors could have an indirect influence on semen quality.


Subject(s)
Cadmium , Environmental Exposure/analysis , Humans , Infertility, Male/chemically induced , Male , Semen , Semen Analysis , Sperm Count , Sperm Motility , Spermatozoa
13.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 125-134, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928519

ABSTRACT

Infertility affects 10%-15% of couples worldwide. Of all infertility cases, 20%-70% are due to male factors. In the past, men with severe male factor (SMF) were considered sterile. Nevertheless, the development of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) drastically modified this scenario. The advances in assisted reproductive technology (ART), specifically regarding surgical sperm retrieval procedures, allowed the efficacious treatment of these conditions. Yet, before undergoing ICSI, male factor infertility requires careful evaluation of clinical and lifestyle behavior together with medical treatment. Epidemiologically speaking, women whose male partner is azoospermic tend to be younger and with a better ovarian reserve. These couples, in fact, are proposed ART earlier in their life, and for this reason, their ovarian response after stimulation is generally good. Furthermore, in younger couples, azoospermia can be partially compensated by the efficient ovarian response, resulting in an acceptable fertility rate following in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. Conversely, when azoospermia is associated with a reduced ovarian reserve and/or advanced maternal age, the treatment becomes more challenging, with a consequent reduction in IVF outcomes. Nonetheless, azoospermia seems to impair neither the euploidy rate at the blastocyst stage nor the implantation of euploid blastocysts. Based on the current knowledge, the assessment of male infertility factors should involve: (1) evaluation - to diagnose and quantify seminologic alterations; (2) potentiality - to determine the real possibilities to improve sperm parameters and/or retrieve spermatozoa; (3) time - to consider the available "treatment window", based on maternal age and ovarian reserve. This review represents an update of the definition, prevalence, causes, and treatment of SMF in a modern ART clinic.


Subject(s)
Azoospermia , Female , Fertilization in Vitro/methods , Humans , Infertility, Male/therapy , Male , Prevalence , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic/methods , Spermatozoa
14.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 67-72, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928515

ABSTRACT

Acephalic spermatozoa syndrome is a rare type of teratozoospermia that severely impairs the reproductive ability of male patients, and genetic defects have been recognized as the main cause of acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Spermatogenesis and centriole-associated 1 like (SPATC1L) is indispensable for maintaining the integrity of sperm head-to-tail connections in mice, but its roles in human sperm and early embryonic development remain largely unknown. Herein, we conducted whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 22 infertile men with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. An in silico analysis of the candidate variants was conducted, and WES data analysis was performed using another cohort consisting of 34 patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome and 25 control subjects with proven fertility. We identified biallelic mutations in SPATC1L (c.910C>T:p.Arg304Cys and c.994G>T:p.Glu332X) from a patient whose sperm displayed complete acephalia. Both SPATC1L variants are rare and deleterious. SPATC1L is mainly expressed at the head-tail junction of elongating spermatids. Plasmids containing pathogenic variants decreased the level of SPATC1L in vitro. Moreover, none of the patient's four attempts at intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) resulted in a transplantable embryo, which suggests that SPATC1L defects might affect early embryonic development. In conclusion, this study provides the first identification of SPATC1L as a novel gene for human acephalic spermatozoa syndrome. Furthermore, WES might be applied for patients with acephalic spermatozoa syndrome who exhibit reiterative ICSI failures.


Subject(s)
Centrioles/genetics , Homozygote , Humans , Infertility, Male/genetics , Male , Mutation , Spermatogenesis/genetics , Spermatozoa
15.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 56-61, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928512

ABSTRACT

Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection is the most prevalent sexually transmitted bacterial disease worldwide. However, unlike that in female infertility, the role of CT infection in male infertility remains controversial. The objective of this retrospective study was to explore the impacts of CT infection in the genital tract on sperm quality, sperm acrosin activity, antisperm antibody levels, and inflammation in a large cohort of infertile males in China. A total of 7154 semen samples were collected from infertile male subjects, 416 of whom were CT positive (CT+ group) and 6738 of whom were CT negative (CT- group), in our hospital between January 2016 and December 2018. Routine semen parameters (semen volume, pH, sperm concentration, viability, motility, morphology, etc.), granulocyte elastase levels, antisperm antibody levels, and sperm acrosin activity were compared between the CT+ and CT- groups. Our results showed that CT infection was significantly correlated with an abnormally low semen volume, as well as an increased white blood cell count and granulocyte elastase level (all P < 0.05) in the semen of infertile males; other routine semen parameters were not negatively impacted. The antisperm antibody level and sperm acrosin activity were not affected by CT infection. These findings suggested that CT infection might contribute to inflammation and hypospermia but does not impair sperm viability, motility morphology, and acrosin activity or generate antisperm antibodies in the infertile males of China.


Subject(s)
Chlamydia trachomatis , Female , Genitalia , Humans , Infertility, Male/epidemiology , Inflammation/epidemiology , Male , Retrospective Studies , Semen , Spermatozoa
16.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 62-66, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928510

ABSTRACT

For infertility treatment, the selection of in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is decided by multiplying indicators (including fallopian tube factors, semen count, and semen motility), except for sperm morphology. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis, from implantation to birth, over a period of 5 years. A total of 1873 couples with primary or secondary fallopian tube factors and an increased defective sperm morphology rate (DSMR) were divided into different groups to receive IVF or ICSI cycles. By comparing the outcomes, we found that the F1 group (DSMR <96%, IVF group 1) had higher cleavage rate, biochemical pregnancy rate, clinical pregnancy rate, and live birth rate than the F3 group (DSMR >98%, IVF group 3; P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the ICSI subgroups. Furthermore, a comparison of the outcomes between IVF and ICSI showed that the S3 group (DSMR >98%, ICSI group 3) had higher cleavage rate (P < 0.001), biochemical pregnancy rate (P < 0.05), clinical pregnancy rate (P < 0.05) and live birth rate (P < 0.05) than the F3 group. However, the ICSI subgroup had a lower two pronuclei fertilization rate than the IVF subgroup (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that the sperm morphology should also be considered when selecting IVF or ICSI combined with other semen parameters before the first assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cycle, especially for males with severe sperm defects.


Subject(s)
Female , Fertilization in Vitro , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Retrospective Studies , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic , Spermatozoa
17.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 40-44, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928507

ABSTRACT

Semen analysis has long been used to evaluate male fertility. Recently, several sperm function tests have been developed. Of those, the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI), which describes the status of the sperm DNA, is thought to be a suitable parameter for evaluating male fertility. However, there have been no large-scale studies on the sperm DFI of Japanese men. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of using an in-house flow cytometry-based sperm DFI analysis based on the sperm DNA fragmentation test of sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) to assess male fertility in Japan. This study enrolled 743 infertile and 20 fertile Japanese men. To evaluate reproducibility, inter- and intraobserver precision was analyzed. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to set a cutoff value for the sperm DFI to identify men who could father children by timed intercourse or intrauterine insemination. The variability of the sperm DFI among fertile volunteers was determined. The relationship between semen parameters and the sperm DFI was assessed by Spearman's rho test. A precision analysis revealed good reproducibility of the sperm DFI. The cutoff value of sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men was 24.0%. Semen volume had no relationship with the sperm DFI. Sperm concentration, sperm motility, total motile sperm count, and percentage of normal-shaped sperm were significantly and negatively correlated with the sperm DFI. The median sperm DFI was smaller in fertile volunteers (7.7%) than that in infertile men (19.4%). Sperm DNA fragmentation analysis can be used to assess sperm functions that cannot be evaluated by ordinary semen analysis.


Subject(s)
Child , Chromatin , DNA Fragmentation , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Infertility, Male/genetics , Japan , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Sperm Motility , Spermatozoa
18.
Asian Journal of Andrology ; (6): 109-115, 2022.
Article in English | WPRIM | ID: wpr-928499

ABSTRACT

Damage to sperm DNA was proposed to play an important role in embryonic development. Previous studies focused on outcomes after fresh embryo transfer, whereas this study investigated the influence of sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) on laboratory and clinical outcomes after frozen embryo transfer (FET). This retrospective study examined 381 couples using cleavage-stage FET. Sperm used for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF) underwent density gradient centrifugation and swim up processing. Sperm DFI had a negative correlation with sperm motility (r = -0.640, P < 0.01), sperm concentration (r = -0.289, P < 0.01), and fertilization rate of IVF cycles (r = -0.247, P < 0.01). Sperm DFI examined before and after density gradient centrifugation/swim up processing was markedly decreased after processing (17.1% vs 2.4%, P < 0.01; 65 randomly picked couples). Sperm progressive motility was significantly reduced in high DFI group compared with low DFI group for both IVF and ICSI (IVF: 46.9% ± 12.4% vs 38.5% ± 12.6%, respectively; ICSI: 37.6% ± 14.1% vs 22.3% ± 17.8%, respectively; both P < 0.01). The fertilization rate was significantly lower in high ( ≥25%) DFI group compared with low (<25%) DFI group using IVF (73.3% ± 23.9% vs 53.2% ± 33.6%, respectively; P < 0.01) but was equivalent in high and low DFI groups using ICSI. Embryonic development and clinical outcomes after FET were equivalent for low and high DFI groups using ICSI or IVF. In this study, sperm DFI did not provide sufficient information regarding embryo development or clinical outcomes for infertile couples using FET.


Subject(s)
DNA Fragmentation , Embryo Transfer , Female , Fertilization in Vitro , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Sperm Motility , Spermatozoa
19.
Braz. j. biol ; 82: e250865, 2022. tab, graf
Article in English | LILACS, VETINDEX | ID: biblio-1285604

ABSTRACT

Abstract Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major toxicants, which affects human health through occupational and environmental exposure. In the current study, we evaluated the protective effects of morel mushrooms against Cd-induced reproductive damages in rats. For this purpose, 30 male rats were divided into 6 groups (n=5/group), the first group served as the control group, second group was treated with an intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of 1 mg/kg/day of Cd. Third and fourth groups were co-treated with 1 mg/kg/day of Cd (i.p) and 10 and 20 mg/kg/day of morel mushroom extract (orally) respectively. The final 2 groups received oral gavage of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day of morel mushroom extract alone. After treatment for 17 days, the animals were euthanized, and testes and epididymis were dissected out. One testis and epididymis of each animal were processed for histology, while the other testis and epididymis were used for daily sperm production (DSP) and comet assay. Our results showed that Cd and morel mushrooms have no effect on animal weight, but Cd significantly decreases the DSP count and damages the heritable DNA which is reversed in co-treatment groups. Similarly, the histopathological results of testes and epididymis show that morel mushrooms control the damage to these tissues. Whereas the morel mushroom extract alone could enhance the production of testosterone. These results conclude that morel mushrooms not only control the damage done by Cd, but it could also be used as a protection mechanism for heritable DNA damage.


Resumo O cádmio (Cd) é um dos principais tóxicos, que afeta a saúde humana por meio da exposição ocupacional e ambiental. No presente estudo, avaliamos os efeitos protetores dos cogumelos morel contra os danos reprodutivos induzidos pelo Cd em ratos. Para tanto, 30 ratos machos foram divididos em 6 grupos (n = 5 / grupo); o primeiro grupo serviu de controle, o segundo grupo foi tratado com injeção intraperitoneal (i.p) de 1 mg / kg / dia de Cd. O terceiro e o quarto grupos foram cotratados com 1 mg / kg / dia de Cd (i.p) e 10 e 20 mg / kg / dia de extrato de cogumelo morel (por via oral), respectivamente. Os dois grupos finais receberam gavagem oral de 10 e 20 mg / kg / dia de extrato de cogumelo morel sozinho. Após o tratamento por 17 dias, os animais foram sacrificados e os testículos e o epidídimo foram dissecados. Um testículo e epidídimo de cada animal foram processados ​​para histologia, enquanto o outro testículo e epidídimo foram usados ​​para produção diária de esperma (DSP) e ensaio cometa. Nossos resultados mostraram que os cogumelos Cd e morel não têm efeito sobre o peso do animal, mas o Cd diminui significativamente a contagem de DSP e danifica o DNA hereditário, que é revertido em grupos de cotratamento. Da mesma forma, os resultados histopatológicos dos testículos e do epidídimo mostram que os cogumelos morel controlam os danos a esses tecidos. Considerando que o extrato de cogumelo morel sozinho pode aumentar a produção de testosterona. Esses resultados concluem que os cogumelos morel não apenas controlam os danos causados pelo Cd, mas também podem ser usados ​​como um mecanismo de proteção para danos hereditários ao DNA.


Subject(s)
Animals , Male , Rats , Cadmium/toxicity , Agaricales , Ascomycota , Spermatozoa , Testis
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