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THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF LOW INTENSITY AND SLOW-MOVEMENT REPETITIVE RESISTANCE EXERCISE ON EXCESS POST-EXERCISE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION (EPOC) / 体力科学
Article in Ja | WPRIM | ID: wpr-362466
Responsible library: WPRO
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of low intensity and slow-movement repetitive resistance exercise in moderately trained young men. Seven healthy trained young men (age=22±3 yr ; height=172.5±4.0 cm ; weight=69.5±8.3 kg ; VO<sub>2</sub>max=47.3±6.0 ml/kg/min) performed the following three exercise patterns on separate days 1) high-intensity (80% one-repetition maximum 1RM) and regular-movement repetitive exercise (1 second each of concentric and eccentric action, termed high and regular exercise (HRE) ; 2) low-intensity (50%1RM), regular-movement repetitive exercise (same movement speed as for HRE but termed low and regular exercise (LRE); and 3) low-intensity (50%1RM), slow-movement repetitive exercise (4 sec each of concentric and eccentric action, termed low and slow exercise (LSE). These three exercise patterns consisted of three sets of four exercises performed to maximum repetition. All subjects completed the three exercise sessions in a randomized and counterbalanced fashion. Oxygen consumption (VO<sub>2</sub>) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored during the exercise sessions and for 90 min afterwards. EPOC over 90 min was thus observed after completing the three exercise patterns. However, there were no significant differences in EPOC among the three exercise patterns. The results of this study suggest that low-intensity and slow-movement repetitive resistance exercise with maintaining muscular tension (LSE) is likely to increase EPOC to the same extent as HRE and LRE exercise patterns.
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Full text: 1 Index: WPRIM Type of study: Clinical_trials Language: Ja Journal: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine Year: 2008 Type: Article
Full text: 1 Index: WPRIM Type of study: Clinical_trials Language: Ja Journal: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine Year: 2008 Type: Article