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1.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 43(1): 62, 2024 May 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38730508

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Seasonal influenza causes annual school breaks and student absenteeism in Hong Kong schools and kindergartens. This proposal aims to conduct a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the impact of a school-based influenza vaccination (SIV) programme on absenteeism and outbreaks at schools in Hong Kong. METHODS: The study will compare schools that implemented the SIV programme with schools that did not. The data will be sourced from school records, encompassing absenteeism records, outbreak reports, and vaccination rates. We will recruit 1000 students from 381 schools and kindergartens in 18 districts of Hong Kong starting June 2024. The primary outcome measures will include absenteeism rates due to influenza and school influenza outbreaks. Secondary outcomes will consist of vaccination coverage rates and the impact of the SIV programme on hospitalisations due to influenza-like illness. A t-test will be conducted to compare the outcomes between schools with and without the SIV programme. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The school completed signing the participants' informed consent form before reporting the data to us. Our study has been approved by the Hospital Authority Hong Kong West Cluster IRB Committee (IRB No: UW 17-111) and was a subtopic of the research "The estimated age-group specific influenza vaccine coverage rates in Hong Kong and the impact of the school outreach vaccination program". TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study will be retrospectively registered.


Asunto(s)
Absentismo , Brotes de Enfermedades , Programas de Inmunización , Vacunas contra la Influenza , Gripe Humana , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Instituciones Académicas , Humanos , Hong Kong/epidemiología , Estudios Retrospectivos , Gripe Humana/prevención & control , Gripe Humana/epidemiología , Vacunas contra la Influenza/administración & dosificación , Vacunas contra la Influenza/uso terapéutico , Brotes de Enfermedades/prevención & control , Niño , Femenino , Masculino , Vacunación/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Adolescente , Preescolar , Estudios de Cohortes
2.
Occup Ther Int ; 2024: 2077870, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38707514

RESUMEN

Inclusive education has increased the demand for school-based occupational therapy services and has reconceptualised the practice in mainstream schools. Therapists are now expected to work collaboratively with teachers within tiered intervention models to support access and participation of all students, including those with disabilities, within the natural classroom context. School-based occupational therapy has become a specialised area of practice, as therapists work within educational, rather than health, systems and processes. While the growth in demand and expanded scope of practice is positive for the profession, predicted workforce shortages and the necessity for specialised and enhanced practice present significant challenges. The ability of the profession to fully support the demands of an inclusive education system remains unclear. As accurate, up-to-date information on the school-based therapy workforce is the foundation for planning future personnel needs, knowledge of the current state of the workforce is critical. There is a paucity of national data regarding this growing area of practice. The aim of this study is to describe a current profile of school-based occupational therapists to better understand the workforce, practice patterns, and the funding landscape in Australia. A convenient and purposive sample of 108 Australian paediatric occupational therapists working in mainstream primary schools in New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria was surveyed in this quantitative study, which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results provide some insights into the workforce and practice of school-based therapy in Australia offering preliminary data for future planning in this important and growing area of paediatric practice. While specific to the local context, results invite cross-national and global comparison to reveal universal trends and localised nuances across diverse settings.


Asunto(s)
Terapeutas Ocupacionales , Terapia Ocupacional , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Instituciones Académicas , Humanos , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , Australia , Masculino , Femenino , Niño , Adulto , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Persona de Mediana Edad , Integración Escolar
3.
Ital J Pediatr ; 50(1): 97, 2024 May 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741102

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In Italy, since the 2020-2021 flu season, the flu vaccine recommendation was extended to all children aged 6 months to 6 years and quadrivalent Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (qLAIV) was introduced. Since school-aged children are important carriers of annual influenza epidemics, a school-based influenza vaccination program may potentially increase vaccine uptake. Recent studies, conducted in the UK and the US, show that school-based vaccination can reach higher percentage of paediatric vaccination coverage compared to children vaccinated in other settings. METHODS: During 2022-2023 flu season in 9 preschools located in Milan healthcare personnel vaccinated children with qLAIV at the end of a school day. A Google Form questionnaire was administered to preschoolers' parents of all preschools within the Municipality of Milan. RESULTS: In the preschools engaged in the vaccination program, 233 out of 1939 children were vaccinated (12%). Among these, 61 (26.2%) had never been vaccinated for influenza before. Vaccination coverage was 11.5% for Italian children and 14.3% for children coming from an immigrant background. We collected 3659 questionnaire responses, divided according to study participation status (371 from preschools that participated in the vaccination program and 3288 from other preschools in Milan). 57% of the families who answered to the questionnaire vaccinated their children for flu. qLAIV accounted for 85.6% of vaccinations. We observed a statistically significant difference in the percentage of vaccinated children between those attending a school participating in the project (67.9%) and children attending other schools (56%) (p < 0.001). Vaccination was administered by family pediatricians (48.9%), in vaccination centers (34.8%), in vaccine hubs (11.3%), in schools (2.6%), by private pediatricians (1.6%) and in other settings (0.7%). Focusing on the responses from families whose children attend schools participating in the vaccination program, 21.8% stated that the vaccination was provided in school. CONCLUSION: According to our experience, in Italy, at the moment, only the cooperation between health providers and alternative settings, including schools, may expand flu vaccination coverage. In particular, schools are to be considered a place to inform and reach out to families, useful to increase vaccination coverage.


Asunto(s)
Vacunas contra la Influenza , Gripe Humana , Vacunas Atenuadas , Humanos , Italia , Vacunas contra la Influenza/administración & dosificación , Preescolar , Gripe Humana/prevención & control , Masculino , Femenino , Vacunas Atenuadas/administración & dosificación , Niño , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Cobertura de Vacunación/estadística & datos numéricos , Programas de Inmunización , Vacunación/estadística & datos numéricos , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Estaciones del Año
4.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1217, 2024 May 02.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38698391

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: One in seven adolescents globally are affected by mental health conditions, yet only a minority receive professional help. School-based mental health services have been endorsed as an effective way to increase access to mental health support for people at risk, or currently presenting with mental health conditions, throughout adolescence. Despite this, low treatment utilisation prevails, therefore the aim of this review is to contribute insights into the processes related to adolescents' accessing and engaging with essential targeted mental health support within schools. METHODS: This systematic review extracted qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods data to determine what processes affect adolescents seeking help from targeted school-based mental health services (TSMS). Searches were conducted in EMBASE, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, Web of Science, in addition to manual searching and expert consultations. Data were synthesised following guidelines for thematic synthesis and narrative style synthesis. RESULTS: The search resulted in 22 articles reflecting 16 studies with participant sample sizes ranging from n = 7 to n = 122. Three main themes were identified: 'access-related factors', 'concerns related to stigma', and 'the school setting'. These findings elucidate how help-seeking processes are variable and can be facilitated or hindered depending on the circumstance. We identified disparities with certain groups, such as those from low-socio economic or ethnic minority backgrounds, facing more acute challenges in seeking help. Help-seeking behaviours were notably influenced by concerns related to peers; an influence further accentuated by minority groups given the importance of social recognition. Conflicting academic schedules significantly contribute to characterising treatment barriers. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this review ought to guide the delivery and development of TSMS to facilitate access and promote help-seeking behaviours. Particularly, given the evidence gaps identified in the field, future studies should prioritise investigating TSMS in low- and middle-income settings and through quantitative methodologies. REGISTRATION: The protocol for this systematic review was registered on PROSPERO (ID CRD42023406824).


Asunto(s)
Aceptación de la Atención de Salud , Servicios de Salud Mental Escolar , Humanos , Adolescente , Aceptación de la Atención de Salud/psicología , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud , Conducta de Búsqueda de Ayuda , Trastornos Mentales/terapia , Servicios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , Estigma Social
5.
Trials ; 25(1): 302, 2024 May 04.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38702825

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The Brief Educational Workshops in Secondary Schools Trial (BESST) is an England-wide school-based cluster randomised controlled trial assessing the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an open-access psychological workshop programme (DISCOVER) for 16-18-year-olds. This baseline paper describes the self-referral and other recruitment processes used in this study and the baseline characteristics of the enrolled schools and participants. METHOD: We enrolled 900 participants from 57 Secondary schools across England from 4th October 2021 to 10th November 2022. Schools were randomised to receive either the DISCOVER day-long Stress workshop or treatment as usual which included signposting information. Participants will be followed up for 6 months with outcome data collection at baseline, 3-month, and 6-month post randomisation. RESULTS: Schools were recruited from a geographically and ethnically diverse sample across England. To reduce stigma, students were invited to self-refer into the study if they wanted help for stress. Their mean age was 17.2 (SD = 0.6), 641 (71%) were female and 411 (45.6%) were from ethnic minority groups. The general wellbeing of our sample measured using the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) found 314 (35%) of students exhibited symptoms of depression at baseline. Eighty percent of students reported low wellbeing on the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) suggesting that although the overall sample mean is below the cut-off for depression, the self-referral approach used in this study supports distressed students in coming forward. CONCLUSION: The BESST study will continue to follow up participants to collect outcome data and results will be analysed once all the data have been collected. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN registry ISRCTN90912799. Registered on 28 May 2020.


Asunto(s)
Estrés Psicológico , Humanos , Adolescente , Femenino , Masculino , Inglaterra , Instituciones Académicas , Selección de Paciente , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Salud Mental , Estudiantes/psicología , Análisis Costo-Beneficio , Conducta del Adolescente , Factores de Tiempo
6.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1360210, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38711768

RESUMEN

Background: The problem of sedentary behavior among primary school children is alarming, with numbers gradually increasing worldwide, including Sri Lanka. Physical activity interventions within classroom settings have been acknowledged as a critical strategy to increase students' movement behaviors while enhancing their academic achievement and health. Yet, the busy curriculum and challenging educational demands encourage more sedentary classroom behavior. Hence, this study aims to develop and evaluate an in-classroom physical activity breaks (IcPAB) intervention among fifth graders in Sri Lanka. Methods: The study will adopt a randomized controlled trial (RCT), comprising an in-classroom physical activity breaks program group and a control group to evaluate the effects of IcPAB on academic achievement, movement behaviors and health outcomes. The intervention design is based on the capability (C), opportunity (O) and motivation (M) behavior (B) (COM-B) model. A least 198 fifth graders will be recruited from two schools in Uva province, Sri Lanka. The recruitment process will start in late 2022. Class teachers of the intervention group will implement 5-min activity breaks at least three times a day after completing a training session. The primary variables include mathematics and reading achievement. The secondary variables include physical activity levels, steps count, sedentary behavior, body mass index, aerobic fitness, and perceived stress. Data collection will be implemented at pre-test and post-test, respectively. Intervention fidelity and the process will also be evaluated. Discussion: The IcPAB is designed to prevent pure educational time loss by introducing curriculum-integrated short bouts of physical active breaks into the classroom routine. If the IcPAB is effective, it can (1) improve the mathematics and reading achievement of fifth-grade girls and boys, which is a significant factor determining the performance at the Grade Five National Scholarship Examination in Sri Lanka; (2) improve movement behaviors as well as physical and mental health outcomes among primary school students. Sequentially, the IcPAB will enrich school-based physical activity intervention approaches which can in turn bring academic and health benefits to primary school children in Sri Lanka. Trial registration: The first version of the trial was registered with the ISRCTN registry (Ref: ISRCTN52180050) on 20/07/2022.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Instituciones Académicas , Estudiantes , Humanos , Sri Lanka , Niño , Femenino , Masculino , Conducta Sedentaria , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Promoción de la Salud/métodos
7.
J Sch Health ; 94(6): 529-538, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38594811

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted routine school operations, including school health programs. This study aims to describe the pandemic's impact on school health service delivery from the perspective of Maryland school health partners. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with health service representatives from public schools (K-12) between July and December 2021. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded through an iterative process to develop analytic themes. RESULTS: Twenty school health partners from 15 Maryland school districts participated. Participants identified key impacts of COVID-19 on school health: (1) COVID-19 disrupted delivery of services such as dental, mental health, and preventative care, (2) COVID-19 necessitated changes in service delivery platforms, (3) COVID-19 affected school health staff through increased responsibilities and staffing shortages, and (4) COVID-19 prompted schools to become hubs for community outreach and health education. IMPLICATIONS FOR SCHOOL HEALTH POLICY, PRACTICE, AND EQUITY: Consideration of school health service disruptions and the increased demands on service providers may inform future priorities for school administrators, health departments, and policymakers. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 impacted the timing and method of service delivery as well as the roles of school health staff and schools themselves in public health and education.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , Maryland , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , SARS-CoV-2 , Niño , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Entrevistas como Asunto , Adolescente
9.
JBI Evid Implement ; 22(2): 186-194, 2024 May 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38602126

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: More than one in ten people globally live with a mental health illness. Adolescent mental health is a major contributor to that statistic, as 27% of adolescents have one or more mental, emotional, developmental, or behavioral problems. School-based health care clinics can provide mental health services for this age group. OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to promote evidence-based practices regarding adolescent mental health screening in schools. METHODS: This project used the JBI Evidence Implementation Framework to promote evidence-based practices for adolescent mental health screening in schools. The JBI framework is grounded in an audit and feedback process, along with a structured approach to identifying and managing barriers to compliance with best practices. Five audit criteria representing best practice recommendations were developed. A baseline audit was conducted, followed by the implementation of an improvement strategy. The project was finalized with a follow-up audit to determine any changes in compliance with best practice recommendations. RESULTS: The baseline survey of students revealed a 25% average compliance for audit criteria 1 and 2. The primary barrier to compliance was students' unawareness of the availability of mental health services. The improvement strategy included an educational presentation for students regarding mental health. The follow-up audit revealed an increase in compliance with best practices. CONCLUSIONS: The project achieved a 29% increase in compliance with best practices, although only 23% of the students were reached via the improvement strategy. SPANISH ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/IJEBH/A189.


Asunto(s)
Práctica Clínica Basada en la Evidencia , Tamizaje Masivo , Humanos , Adolescente , Tamizaje Masivo/métodos , Trastornos Mentales/diagnóstico , Servicios de Salud Mental Escolar , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Salud Mental , Masculino , Femenino
10.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1087, 2024 Apr 19.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38641777

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) promotes health in adults as well as children. At the same time, a large proportion of children do not meet the recommendations for PA, and more school-based efforts to increase PA are needed. This study investigates the effectiveness and feasibility of lesson-integrated PA in a Swedish primary school. METHODS: We evaluate a new method called 'Physical Activity and Lesson in Combination' (abbreviated FALK in Swedish) using a mixed methods approach; a quasi-experimental study followed by qualitative interviews. Two schools participated in the study, one constituting the intervention group (I-school, n = 83) and the other the control group (C-school, n = 81). In addition to regular physical education, the I-school had three 30-minute FALK lessons each week. A total of 164 students aged 7-9 years wore pedometers for a whole week, four times over two semesters, and the number of steps per day (SPD) and the proportion of students with < 10,000 SPD were compared. Statistical differences between the schools were tested with ANOVA, Chi2, t-tests, and ANCOVA. Interviews with students (n = 17), parents (n = 9) and teachers (n = 9) were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The results show that FALK led to the I-school getting more SPD and fewer students with < 10,000 SPD. Also, FALK was experienced as a positive, clear, and flexible method, simultaneously encouraging PA and learning. Challenges experienced concerned the teachers' work situation, time, finding suitable learning activities, outdoor school environment changes, and extreme weather conditions. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that FALK has the desired effects on PA and is a feasible method of integrating PA into theoretical teaching. We conclude that FALK is worth testing at more schools, given that implementation and sustainment of FALK considers both general enablers and barriers, as well as context-specific factors at the individual school.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Aprendizaje , Niño , Humanos , Suecia , Estudios de Factibilidad , Instituciones Académicas , Servicios de Salud Escolar
11.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1098, 2024 Apr 22.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38644493

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption are not met, which can cause chronic diseases. Especially adolescence is an important phase for the development of health behaviours. Therefore, in the Netherlands, the Healthy School program was established to aid schools in promoting healthy lifestyles among their students. We examined to what extent the variation between secondary schools regarding students' fruit and vegetable consumption could be explained by differences between schools regarding Healthy School certification, general school characteristics, and the school population. Additionally, we examined whether Healthy School certification was related to the outcomes, and whether the association differed for subgroups. METHODS: We performed a repeated cross-sectional multilevel study. We used data from multiple school years from the national Youth Health Monitor on secondary schools (grades 2 and 4, age ranged from approximately 12 to 18 years) of seven Public Health Services, and added data with regard to Healthy School certification, general school characteristics and school population characteristics. We included two outcomes: the number of days a student consumed fruit and vegetables per week. In total, we analysed data on 168,127 students from 256 secondary schools in the Netherlands. RESULTS: Results indicated that 2.87% of the variation in fruit consumption and 5.57% of the variation in vegetable consumption could be attributed to differences at the school-level. Characteristics related to high parental educational attainment, household income, and educational track of the students explained most of the variance between schools. Additionally, we found a small favourable association between Healthy School certification and the number of days secondary school students consumed fruit and vegetables. CONCLUSIONS: School population characteristics explained more variation between schools than Healthy School certification and general school characteristics, especially indicators of parental socioeconomic status. Nevertheless, Healthy School certification seemed to be slightly related to fruit and vegetable consumption, and might contribute to healthier dietary intake. We found small differences for some subgroups, but future research should focus on the impact in different school contexts, since we were restricted in the characteristics that could be included in this study.


Asunto(s)
Frutas , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Instituciones Académicas , Verduras , Humanos , Estudios Transversales , Países Bajos , Adolescente , Femenino , Masculino , Servicios de Salud Escolar/estadística & datos numéricos , Niño , Promoción de la Salud , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología
13.
Lancet Digit Health ; 6(5): e334-e344, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38670742

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: The CSC study found that the universal delivery of a school-based, online programme for the prevention of mental health and substance use disorders among adolescents resulted in improvements in mental health and substance use outcomes at 30-month follow-up. We aimed to compare the long-term effects of four interventions-Climate Schools Combined (CSC) mental health and substance use, Climate Schools Substance Use (CSSU) alone, Climate Schools Mental Health (CSMH) alone, and standard health education-on mental health and substance use outcomes among adolescents at 72-month follow-up into early adulthood. METHODS: This long-term study followed up adolescents from a multicentre, cluster-randomised trial conducted across three states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Western Australia) enrolled between Sept 1, 2013, and Feb 28, 2014, for up to 72 months after baseline assessment. Adolescents (aged 18-20 years) from the original CSC study who accepted contact at 30-month follow-up and provided informed consent at 60-month follow-up were eligible. The interventions were delivered in school classrooms through an online delivery format and used a mixture of peer cartoon storyboards and classroom activities that were focused on alcohol, cannabis, anxiety, and depression. Participants took part in two web-based assessments at 60-month and 72-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were alcohol use, cannabis use, anxiety, and depression, measured by self-reported surveys and analysed by intention to treat (ie, in all students who were eligible at baseline). This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613000723785), including the extended follow-up study. FINDINGS: Of 6386 students enrolled from 71 schools, 1556 (24·4%) were randomly assigned to education as usual, 1739 (27·2%) to CSSU, 1594 (25·0%) to CSMH, and 1497 (23·4%) to CSC. 311 (22·2%) of 1401 participants in the control group, 394 (26·4%) of 1495 in the CSSU group, 477 (37·%) of 1289 in the CSMH group, and 400 (32·5%) of 1232 in the CSC group completed follow-up at 72 months. Adolescents in the CSC group reported slower year-by-year increases in weekly alcohol use (odds ratio 0·78 [95% CI 0·66-0·92]; p=0·0028) and heavy episodic drinking (0·69 [0·58-0·81]; p<0·0001) than did the control group. However, significant baseline differences between groups for drinking outcomes, and no difference in the predicted probability of weekly or heavy episodic drinking between groups were observed at 72 months. Sensitivity analyses increased uncertainty around estimates. No significant long-term differences were observed in relation to alcohol use disorder, cannabis use, cannabis use disorder, anxiety, or depression. No adverse events were reported during the trial. INTERPRETATION: We found some evidence that a universal online programme for the prevention of anxiety, depression, and substance use delivered in early adolescence is effective in reducing the use and harmful use of alcohol into early adulthood. However, confidence in these findings is reduced due to baseline differences, and we did not see a difference in the predicted probability of drinking between groups at 72-month follow-up. These findings suggest that a universal prevention programme in adolescence is not sufficient to have lasting effects on mental health and substance use disorders in the long term. In addition to baseline differences, substantial attrition warrants caution in interpretation and the latter factor highlights the need for future long-term follow-up studies to invest in strategies to increase engagement. FUNDING: Australian National Health and Medical Research Council.


Asunto(s)
Ansiedad , Depresión , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias , Humanos , Adolescente , Trastornos Relacionados con Sustancias/prevención & control , Femenino , Masculino , Australia , Ansiedad/prevención & control , Depresión/prevención & control , Adulto Joven , Instituciones Académicas , Internet
14.
Prog Community Health Partnersh ; 18(1): 91-101, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38661830

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Schools are rich sites for collaborations between health and educational sectors. OBJECTIVES: To identify lessons learned from formation of a community-academic partnership and application of community-based participatory research (CBPR) to develop a model that integrates community health workers into schools. METHODS: Individuals from an academic medical center, a large public school district, and a community-based research institute applied CBPR principles to reimagine schools as a place for improving the health of children. LESSONS LEARNED: Three lessons emerged. Leveraging each team member's expertise centered the partnership on community strengths, co-learning, and stakeholder engagement. Adherence to CBPR's principles of power sharing and equity helped navigate the challenges of collaboration between large institutions. Early focus on sustainability helped address unexpected issues, build capacity, and boost advocacy. CONCLUSIONS: This partnership demonstrates how CBPR fosters conditions in which equitable partnerships between research institutions and public schools can thrive to promote childhood health.


Asunto(s)
Agentes Comunitarios de Salud , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad , Relaciones Comunidad-Institución , Instituciones Académicas , Investigación Participativa Basada en la Comunidad/organización & administración , Humanos , Agentes Comunitarios de Salud/organización & administración , Instituciones Académicas/organización & administración , Niño , Conducta Cooperativa , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración
15.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301055, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38564529

RESUMEN

The coronavirus pandemic has contributed to increasing the responsibility of school principals for the health of all school community members. Moreover, evidence confirms the significant role of school principals' health literacy (HL) for health promotion in schools. Therefore, the presented study aims to evaluate the associations between Polish school principals HL and the implementation of the Health Promoting School (HPS) approach in Polish schools. The present study was conducted as part of an international survey on the global COVID-HL network (www.covid-hl.eu) between June 2021 and December 2021. Three subscales of the HPS were considered and an exploratory analysis were used in this study. Associations between the median split of each subscale of HPS (outcome) and health literacy (predictor) were performed using logistic regression. Research results showed that the highest level of HPS implementation was directed at pupils. Principals perceived themselves as having the highest HL on the 'accessibility' subscale and these respondents had significantly higher odds of implementing learning opportunities for students. The study suggests that principals with adequate HL may be more likely to effectively implement HPS strategies in schools. This research could provide insights into the complex interplay between HL and the HPS approach and inform the development of more effective strategies for promoting health and HL in schools.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Alfabetización en Salud , Humanos , Pandemias , Polonia/epidemiología , COVID-19/epidemiología , Promoción de la Salud , Servicios de Salud Escolar
16.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 25(4): 1285-1292, 2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38679989

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: In 2016, Indonesia introduced its Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination demonstration program for girls in grades 5 and 6 of primary school, to reduce cervical cancer (CC) burden in selected provinces and test the viability of nationwide vaccination. This study explored schoolgirls' experience of school-based HPV vaccination, their knowledge of HPV and HPV vaccination, and their preferences for cervical cancer (CC) education. METHODS: An online survey was conducted with schoolgirls who experienced HPV vaccination between 2019 and 2021 through the demonstration program. Using purposive sampling, respondents were recruited through partnerships with primary public health centres and primary schools in Jakarta and Yogyakarta. Data analysis was conducted using Chi-square test, Independent-samples t-test, and one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: One hundred and forty primary schoolgirls with a mean age of 12.2 years (SD = 0.70) completed the survey. Schools and mothers were identified as key actors in socialising children about important health information and as girls' preferred sources of information. The average summed score for girls' knowledge of HPV, the HPV vaccine, and CC after being vaccinated was 5.07 out of 10 (SD 0.23). Significant differences in the mean knowledge scores among participants with different preferences regarding CC education in school were observed. CONCLUSION: While schoolgirls' experiences of HPV vaccination were largely positive, their knowledge of critical health information regarding HPV vaccination and CC prevention needs improving. Thus, it is necessary to provide parents, and school-based educators with culturally appropriate strategies and comprehensive evidence-based information about HPV vaccination and CC prevention more effectively to children.


Asunto(s)
Conocimientos, Actitudes y Práctica en Salud , Infecciones por Papillomavirus , Vacunas contra Papillomavirus , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino , Vacunación , Humanos , Femenino , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/prevención & control , Infecciones por Papillomavirus/virología , Vacunas contra Papillomavirus/administración & dosificación , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/prevención & control , Neoplasias del Cuello Uterino/virología , Indonesia , Niño , Vacunación/psicología , Instituciones Académicas , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Educación en Salud/métodos , Adolescente , Estudios de Seguimiento , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Pronóstico , Papillomaviridae/inmunología
17.
Med J Aust ; 220(8): 417-424, 2024 May 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613175

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effectiveness of a school-based multiple health behaviour change e-health intervention for modifying risk factors for chronic disease (secondary outcomes). STUDY DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Students (at baseline [2019]: year 7, 11-14 years old) at 71 Australian public, independent, and Catholic schools. INTERVENTION: Health4Life: an e-health school-based multiple health behaviour change intervention for reducing increases in the six major behavioural risk factors for chronic disease: physical inactivity, poor diet, excessive recreational screen time, poor sleep, and use of alcohol and tobacco. It comprises six online video modules during health education class and a smartphone app. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of Health4Life and usual health education with respect to their impact on changes in twelve secondary outcomes related to the six behavioural risk factors, assessed in surveys at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and 12 and 24 months after the intervention: binge drinking, discretionary food consumption risk, inadequate fruit and vegetable intake, difficulty falling asleep, and light physical activity frequency (categorical); tobacco smoking frequency, alcohol drinking frequency, alcohol-related harm, daytime sleepiness, and time spent watching television and using electronic devices (continuous). RESULTS: A total of 6640 year 7 students completed the baseline survey (Health4Life: 3610; control: 3030); 6454 (97.2%) completed at least one follow-up survey, 5698 (85.8%) two or more follow-up surveys. Health4Life was not statistically more effective than usual school health education for influencing changes in any of the twelve outcomes over 24 months; for example: fruit intake inadequate: odds ratio [OR], 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-2.05); vegetable intake inadequate: OR, 0.97 (95% CI, 0.64-1.47); increased light physical activity: OR, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.72-1.38); tobacco use frequency: relative difference, 0.03 (95% CI, -0.58 to 0.64) days per 30 days; alcohol use frequency: relative difference, -0.34 (95% CI, -1.16 to 0.49) days per 30 days; device use time: relative difference, -0.07 (95% CI, -0.29 to 0.16) hours per day. CONCLUSIONS: Health4Life was not more effective than usual school year 7 health education for modifying adolescent risk factors for chronic disease. Future e-health multiple health behaviour change intervention research should examine the timing and length of the intervention, as well as increasing the number of engagement strategies (eg, goal setting) during the intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12619000431123 (prospective).


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Escolar , Humanos , Adolescente , Masculino , Femenino , Australia/epidemiología , Niño , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , Ejercicio Físico , Telemedicina/métodos , Conductas Relacionadas con la Salud , Conductas de Riesgo para la Salud , Educación en Salud/métodos , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Enfermedad Crónica/prevención & control , Conducta del Adolescente/psicología , Estilo de Vida , Estudiantes/estadística & datos numéricos , Estudiantes/psicología
18.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 21(1): 49, 2024 Apr 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38684991

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Despite a growing body of research investigating high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in schools, there are limited process evaluations investigating their implementation. This is concerning because process evaluations are important for appropriately interpreting outcome findings and augmenting intervention design. This manuscript presents a process evaluation of Making a HIIT, a school-based HIIT intervention. METHODS: The Making a HIIT intervention spanned 8 weeks and was completed at three schools in Greater Brisbane, Australia. Ten classes (intervention group) completed 10-min teacher-led HIIT workouts at the beginning of health and physical education (HPE) lessons, and five classes (control group) continued with regular HPE lessons. The mixed methods evaluation was guided by the Framework for Effective Implementation by Durlak and DuPre. RESULTS: Program reach: Ten schools were contacted to successfully recruit three schools, from which 79% of eligible students (n = 308, x ¯ age: 13.0 ± 0.6 years, 148 girls) provided consent. Dosage: The average number of HIIT workouts provided was 10 ± 3 and the average number attended by students was 6 ± 2. Fidelity: During HIIT workouts, the percentage of time students spent at ≥ 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) was 55% (interquartile range (IQR): 29%-76%). Monitoring of the control group: During lessons, the intervention and control groups spent 32% (IQR: 12%-54%) and 28% (IQR: 13%-46%) of their HPE lesson at ≥ 80% of HRmax, respectively. Responsiveness: On average, students rated their enjoyment of HIIT workouts as 3.3 ± 1.1 (neutral) on a 5-point scale. Quality: Teachers found the HIIT workouts simple to implement but provided insights into the time implications of integrating them into their lessons; elements that helped facilitate their implementation; and their use within the classroom. Differentiation: Making a HIIT involved students and teachers in the co-design of HIIT workouts. Adaption: Workouts were modified due to location and weather, the complexity of exercises, and time constraints. CONCLUSION: The comprehensive evaluation of Making a HIIT provides important insights into the implementation of school-based HIIT, including encouragings findings for student enjoyment and fidelity and recommendations for improving dosage that should be considered when developing future interventions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ACTRN, ACTRN12622000534785 , Registered 5 April 2022 - Retrospectively registered.


Asunto(s)
Frecuencia Cardíaca , Entrenamiento de Intervalos de Alta Intensidad , Educación y Entrenamiento Físico , Instituciones Académicas , Estudiantes , Humanos , Entrenamiento de Intervalos de Alta Intensidad/métodos , Femenino , Masculino , Adolescente , Australia , Educación y Entrenamiento Físico/métodos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Promoción de la Salud/métodos , Servicios de Salud Escolar
19.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1367017, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38601495

RESUMEN

Introduction: An important impediment to the large-scale adoption of evidence-based school nutrition interventions is the lack of evidence on effective strategies to implement them. This paper describes the protocol for a "Collaborative Network Trial" to support the simultaneous testing of different strategies undertaken by New South Wales Local Health Districts to facilitate the adoption of an effective school-based healthy lunchbox program ('SWAP IT'). The primary objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of different implementation strategies to increase school adoption of the SWAP across New South Wales Local Health Districts. Methods: Within a Master Protocol framework, a collaborative network trial will be undertaken. Independent randomized controlled trials to test implementation strategies to increase school adoption of SWAP IT within primary schools in 10 different New South Wales Local Health Districts will occur. Schools will be randomly allocated to either the intervention or control condition. Schools allocated to the intervention group will receive a combination of implementation strategies. Across the 10 participating Local Health Districts, six broad strategies were developed and combinations of these strategies will be executed over a 6 month period. In six districts an active comparison group (containing one or more implementation strategies) was selected. The primary outcome of the trial will be adoption of SWAP IT, assessed via electronic registration records captured automatically following online school registration to the program. The primary outcome will be assessed using logistic regression analyses for each trial. Individual participant data component network meta-analysis, under a Bayesian framework, will be used to explore strategy-covariate interactions; to model additive main effects (separate effects for each component of an implementation strategy); two way interactions (synergistic/antagonistic effects of components), and full interactions. Discussion: The study will provide rigorous evidence of the effects of a variety of implementation strategies, employed in different contexts, on the adoption of a school-based healthy lunchbox program at scale. Importantly, it will also provide evidence as to whether health service-centered, collaborative research models can rapidly generate new knowledge and yield health service improvements. Clinical trial registration: This trial is registered prospectively with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12623000558628).


Asunto(s)
Servicios de Salud Escolar , Instituciones Académicas , Humanos , Australia , Teorema de Bayes , Nueva Gales del Sur , Metaanálisis como Asunto
20.
Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care ; 54(4): 101583, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38480043

RESUMEN

School based health centers (SBHCs) have been providing preventive, acute and chronic care in schools across the United States (US) for the past 40 years. A discussion of that care is provided in a companion article to this one. Several major societal issues of the 2020s, affecting the care provided in SBHCs, have taken place over the past 4 years. These issues, which will be discussed in this article, include the following: 1. The COVID pandemic had a major impact on utilization and services required at SBHCs, both at the peak of the pandemic, when schools were closed and since the peak of the pandemic, when schools reopened. 2. The transformation of mental health services, due both to increasing mental health needs of youth, as well as progression to new therapeutic modalities, has required expansion of services provided at SBHCs. 3. New immigrant health care needs and services have required a response by SBHCs to the substantial increase of new immigrants, most of whom are impacted by significant trauma, entering public schools nationally. 4. Telehealth integration into SBHC medical and mental health services, and its expansion to incorporate new technologies, have provided avenues for increased provision of services by SBHCs.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Emigrantes e Inmigrantes , Servicios de Salud Mental , Servicios de Salud Escolar , Telemedicina , Humanos , COVID-19/epidemiología , Telemedicina/organización & administración , Servicios de Salud Escolar/organización & administración , Adolescente , Estados Unidos , Servicios de Salud Mental/organización & administración , Niño , SARS-CoV-2 , Servicios de Salud Mental Escolar , Pandemias , Accesibilidad a los Servicios de Salud/organización & administración
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