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1.
Indian Dermatol Online J ; 15(3): 496-499, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38845663

RESUMO

Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative bacterial infection commonly seen in the tropics, caused by gram-positive, anaerobic bacilli of the genus Actinomyces. There are very few reported cases of primary cutaneous actinomycosis. It can mimic mycetoma, tuberculosis, nocardiosis, and botryomycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis in the absence of sinuses. Even with repeated attempts, cultures are mostly negative; and hence, histology reveals the diagnosis in most cases. Here, we report an unusual case of primary cutaneous actinomycosis in a 21-year-old female patient, following a road traffic accident (RTA). A positive Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and special stains demonstrated the ray fungus and helped us reach the diagnosis. The patient was started on oral penicillin G and showed good response.

2.
Clin Case Rep ; 12(6): e8984, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38845797

RESUMO

Bronchopulmonary sequestration, a rare congenital anomaly, involves a nonfunctioning lung tissue mass supplied by anomalous vessels. It is rarely infected by Actinomyces, further complicating the clinical presentation, with limited reported cases. This case highlights the distinctive clinical aspects, diagnostic challenges, and successful management strategies of such a rare clinical entity.

3.
Heliyon ; 10(10): e31562, 2024 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38826746

RESUMO

Background: The respiratory tract harbors a variety of microbiota, whose composition and abundance depend on specific site factors, interaction with external factors, and disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between COVID-19 severity and the nasopharyngeal microbiome. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study in Mexico City, collecting nasopharyngeal swabs from 30 COVID-19 patients and 14 healthy volunteers. Microbiome profiling was performed using 16S rRNA gene analysis. Taxonomic assignment, classification, diversity analysis, core microbiome analysis, and statistical analysis were conducted using R packages. Results: The microbiome data analysis revealed taxonomic shifts within the nasopharyngeal microbiome in severe COVID-19. Particularly, we observed a significant reduction in the relative abundance of Lawsonella and Cutibacterium genera in critically ill COVID-19 patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, these patients exhibited a marked enrichment of Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Peptostreptococcus, Atopobium, Granulicatella, Mogibacterium, Veillonella, Prevotella_7, Rothia, Gemella, Alloprevotella, and Solobacterium genera (p < 0.01). Analysis of the core microbiome across all samples consistently identified the presence of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and Streptococcus. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the disruption of physicochemical conditions and barriers resulting from inflammatory processes and the intubation procedure in critically ill COVID-19 patients may facilitate the colonization and invasion of the nasopharynx by oral microorganisms.

4.
Cureus ; 16(5): e59694, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38841036

RESUMO

Fungal rhino-orbital-cerebral infections present significant treatment challenges, especially in immunocompromised individuals, such as those with diabetes. These infections seldom occur with bacterial co-infections, which complicate their management. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old diabetic male with a long-standing history of left malar pain who experienced rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and confusion. Diagnostic imaging revealed angioinvasive fungal sinusitis, ultimately attributed to chronic mucormycosis (CM) with concurrent Actinomyces infection, a rarely reported occurrence. We employed a comprehensive treatment strategy, which resulted in a successful recovery after 24 days. Although CM is rare, accounting for approximately 5.6% of cases with mucormycosis, it requires thorough diagnostic evaluation and prolonged treatment. The rarity of co-infections like the one we describe underscores the need for an integrated management approach. Histopathological analysis serves as the gold standard for diagnosis, with treatment typically involving surgical and extensive antifungal interventions.

5.
Genes Genomics ; 2024 Jun 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847972

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Since most of the commonly known oral diseases are explained in link with balance of microbial community, an accurate bacterial taxonomy profiling for determining bacterial compositional network is essential. However, compared to intestinal microbiome, research data pool related to oral microbiome is small, and general 16S rRNA screening method has a taxonomy misclassification issue in confirming complex bacterial composition at the species level. OBJECTIVE: Present study aimed to explore bacterial compositional networks at the species level within saliva of 39 oral disease patients (Dental Caries group: n = 26 and Periodontitis group: n = 13) through comparison with public Korean-specific healthy oral microbiome data. METHODS: Here, we applied comprehensive molecular diagnostics based on qRT-PCR and Sanger sequencing methods to complement the technical limitations of NGS-based 16S V3-V4 amplicon sequencing technology. RESULTS: As a result of microbiome profiling at the genus level, relative frequencies of many nitrate-reducing bacteria within each oral disease group were found to be significantly low compared to the healthy group. In addition, the molecular diagnostics-based bacterial identification method allowed the determination of the correct taxonomy of screened primary colonizers (Streptococcus and Actinomyces unclassification clusters) for each oral disease. Finally, as with the results of microbiome profiling at the genus level, many core-species classified within the saliva of each oral disease group were also related to nitrate-reduction, and it was estimated that various pathogens associated with each disease formed a bacterial network with the core-species. CONCLUSION: Our study introduced a novel approach that can compensate for the difficulty of identifying an accurate bacterial compositional network at the species level due to unclear taxonomy classification by using the convergent approach of NGS-molecular diagnostics. Ultimately, we suggest that our experimental approach and results could be potential reference materials for researchers who intend to prevent oral disease by determining the correlation between oral health and bacterial compositional network according to the changes in the relative frequency for nitrate-reducing species.

6.
Heliyon ; 10(10): e31559, 2024 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38831830

RESUMO

Disturbances in the oral microbiota may be due to several mechanisms and factors, such as smoking. An imbalance in oral bacteria may result in changes to the innate immune system and the development of periodontal disease. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of oral microbiota in smokers and non-smokers in a South African population using subgingival plaque samples. From the 128 recruited participants, 57 were identified as smokers (serum cotinine: >15 ng/ml). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated significant differences between the two groups with a reduced abundance of Actinobacteria in smokers. Fusobacterium and Campylobacter were found in higher abundance, while a lower abundance of Leptotrichia, Actinomyces, Corynebacterium, and Lautropia were observed. This study highlighted significant differences in the oral microbiota of smokers, indicating an abundance of anaerobic gram-negative bacteria. These findings suggest that smoking allows certain oral microorganisms to gain dominance, thereby predisposing individuals to periodontal disease development and progression.

7.
Cancer Invest ; : 1-13, 2024 Jun 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38845533

RESUMO

Biliary dysbiosis is associated with gallbladder cancer (GBC). We aimed to look for biliary bacteria specifically detected in GBC patients. We used 16S rRNA-based metagenomic analysis to elucidate biliary microbiota in 30 GBC and 30 gallstones-associated chronic cholecystitis patients. Relative abundance of five genera, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Halomonas, Escherichia and Caulobacter was significantly associated with GBC. Of 15-species, 7 were detected significantly higher in GBC, Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, Actinomyces bowdenii, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces gerencseriae, and Escherichia fergusonii were biosafety level-2 infectious bacteria; other 8 species were biosafety level-1 bacteria. These bacterial species may be involved in pathogenesis of GBC.

8.
Eur J Med Res ; 29(1): 328, 2024 Jun 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38877601

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The use of probiotics could promote the balance of the subgingival microbiota to contribute to periodontal health. This study aimed to identify the potential of bacteria commonly associated with healthy periodontal tissues as probiotic candidates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines using the PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, ProQuest, and Ovid databases as well as the combination of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and non-MeSH terms. Based on the selection criteria, original studies published in English and identifying the microorganisms present in the periodontium of healthy individuals and patients with periodontitis using the high-throughput 16S ribosomal gene sequencing technique were included. RESULTS: Out of 659 articles, 12 met the criteria for this review. These articles were published from 2012 to 2020 and mainly originated from the United States, China, and Spain. Most of these studies reported adequate criteria for selecting participants, using standardized clinical criteria, and compliance with quality based on the tools used. In periodontal healthy tissue were identified species like Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus intermedius, and Prevotella nigrescens which have recognized strains with a capacity to inhibit periodontopathogens. CONCLUSIONS: S. sanguinis, S. oralis, S. mitis, and S. gordonii are among the bacterial species proposed as potential probiotics because some strains can inhibit periodontopathogens and have been reported as safe for humans.


Assuntos
Periodonto , Probióticos , Humanos , Probióticos/uso terapêutico , Periodonto/microbiologia , Periodontite/microbiologia , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Microbiota
9.
J Dent Res ; : 220345241251784, 2024 Jun 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38828615

RESUMO

Bacteria on the tongue dorsum (TD) form consortia tens to hundreds of microns in diameter organized around a core of epithelial cells. Whole-mount preparations have been instrumental in revealing their organization and specific microbial associations. However, their thickness and intricate 3-dimensional complexity present challenges for a comprehensive spatial analysis. To overcome these challenges, we employed a complementary approach: embedding in hydrophilic plastic followed by sectioning and postsectioning labeling. Samples were labeled by hybridization with multiplexed fluorescent oligonucleotide probes and visualized by spectral imaging and linear unmixing. Application of this strategy to TD biofilms improved the visualization of bacteria that were difficult to resolve in whole-mount imaging. Actinomyces, previously detected as patches, became resolved at the single-cell level. The filamentous taxa Leptotrichia and Lachnospiraceae, located at the core of the consortium, were regularly visualized whereas previously they were rarely detected when using whole mounts. Streptococcus salivarius, heterogeneously detected in whole mounts, were regularly and homogenously observed. Two-dimensional images provide valuable information about the organization of bacterial biofilms. However, they offer only a single plane of view for objects that can extend to hundreds of microns in thickness, and information obtained from such images may not always reflect the complexity of a 3-dimensional object. We combined serial physical sectioning with optical sectioning to facilitate the 3-dimensional reconstruction of consortia, spanning over 100 µm in thickness. Our work showcases the use of hydrophilic plastic embedding and sectioning for examining the structure of TD biofilms through spectral imaging fluorescence in situ hybridization. The result was improved visualization of important members of the human oral microbiome. This technique serves as a complementary method to the previously employed whole-mount analysis, offering its own set of advantages and limitations. Addressing the spatial complexity of bacterial consortia demands a multifaceted approach for a comprehensive and effective analysis.

10.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 668, 2024 Jun 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849764

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Crohn's disease (CD)-associated periodontitis is common. However, the role of periodontal pathogens in the Coexistence of CD and periodontal disease remains unclear. METHODS: To investigate the potential relationship mediated by periodontal pathogens between periodontitis and CD, we collected salivary samples from healthy participants (H group, n = 12), patients with CD (Ch group, n = 10), patients with periodontitis (Ps group, n = 12), and patients with Coexistence of CD and periodontal disease (Cp group, n = 12) and analyzed them by 16 S rRNA sequencing. RESULTS: Patients with Coexistence of CD and periodontal disease had increased levels of Fusobacterium, Actinomyces, Leptotrichia, and Prevotella, which correlated with the severity of periodontitis. Conversely, the levels of Streptococcus, Neisseria, Haemophilus, and Gemella, which decreased in Coexistence of CD and periodontal disease, were negatively correlated with the severity of periodontitis. To further investigate the role of periodontal pathogens in CD development, representative periodontal pathogens causing periodontitis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, were administered to mice. These pathogens migrate to, and colonize, the gut, accelerating CD progression and aggravating colitis, and even systemic inflammation. In vitro experiments using a Caco-2/periodontal pathogen coculture revealed that P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum increased intestinal permeability by directly disrupting the tight junctions of intestinal epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings strongly suggest that periodontal pathogens play a role in the relationship between periodontitis and CD. These results provide a basis for understanding the pathogenesis of Coexistence of CD and periodontal disease and may lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.


Assuntos
Doença de Crohn , Fusobacterium nucleatum , Periodontite , Porphyromonas gingivalis , Humanos , Doença de Crohn/microbiologia , Doença de Crohn/complicações , Periodontite/microbiologia , Periodontite/complicações , Animais , Camundongos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Fusobacterium nucleatum/isolamento & purificação , Células CACO-2 , Saliva/microbiologia , RNA Ribossômico 16S
11.
J Immunother Cancer ; 12(6)2024 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38844407

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The association between gut bacteria and the response to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been studied; however, multi-kingdom gut microbiome alterations and interactions in ICI-treated HCC cohorts are not fully understood. METHODS: From November 2018 to April 2022, patients receiving ICI treatment for advanced HCC were prospectively enrolled. Herein, we investigated the multi-kingdom microbiota characterization of the gut microbiome, mycobiome, and metabolome using metagenomic, ITS2, and metabolomic data sets of 80 patients with ICI-treated HCC. RESULTS: Our findings demonstrated that bacteria and metabolites differed significantly between the durable clinical benefit (DCB) and non-durable clinical benefit (NDB) groups, whereas the differences were smaller for fungi. The overall diversity of bacteria and fungi before treatment was higher in the DCB group than in the NDB group, and the difference in diversity began to change with the use of immunotherapy after 6-8 weeks. We also explored the alterations of gut microbes in the DCB and NDB groups, established 18 bacterial species models as predictive biomarkers for predicting whether immunotherapy is of sustained benefit (area under the curve=75.63%), and screened two species of bacteria (Actinomyces_sp_ICM47, and Senegalimassilia_anaerobia) and one metabolite (galanthaminone) as prognostic biomarkers for predicting survival in patients with HCC treated with ICI. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, the status and characterization of the multi-kingdom microbiota, including gut bacteria, fungi, and their metabolites, were described by multiomics sequencing for the first time in patients with HCC treated with ICI. Our findings demonstrate the potential of bacterial taxa as predictive biomarkers of ICI clinical efficacy, and bacteria and their metabolites as prognostic biomarkers.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Hepatocelular , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Inibidores de Checkpoint Imunológico , Neoplasias Hepáticas , Humanos , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/tratamento farmacológico , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/microbiologia , Carcinoma Hepatocelular/imunologia , Microbioma Gastrointestinal/efeitos dos fármacos , Neoplasias Hepáticas/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias Hepáticas/imunologia , Neoplasias Hepáticas/microbiologia , Inibidores de Checkpoint Imunológico/uso terapêutico , Inibidores de Checkpoint Imunológico/farmacologia , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Bactérias/efeitos dos fármacos , Bactérias/classificação , Estudos Prospectivos
12.
Access Microbiol ; 6(5)2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38868375

RESUMO

To isolate specific bacteria from samples constituting the microbiota, it is essential to employ selective media that suppress the growth of resident bacteria other than specific target bacteria. Selective media for clinically important Actinomyces (including Schaalia, which was previously taxonomically classified as part of the genus Actinomyces) have been limited because they have been designed for a limited range of species within the genus and require ingredients which are difficult to prepare and handle. This study aimed to develop a selective medium [referred to as Actinomyces and Schaalia Selective Medium (ASSM)] for the isolation of a broad range of Actinomyces and Schaalia species from samples mixed with resident bacteria. The composition of ASSM includes yeast extract, agar, brain heart infusion (BHI), levofloxacin (LVFX), fosfomycin (FOM), colistin (CL) and metronidazole (MNZ). Evaluation of the medium using 24 swab samples serially collected from the roots of the teeth of a healthy individual for whom metagenome sequencing data of a saliva sample are publicly available revealed that ASSM adjusted to concentrations of LVFX 0.5 mg l-1, FOM 5 mg l-1, CL 1 mg l-1 and MNZ 2 mg l-1 and cultured anaerobically at 35 °C for 7 days enabled the isolation of Actinomyces species from 37.5 % of the samples. The inclusion of CL and MNZ in ASSM can also be useful for samples harbouring other bacterial species. The selective isolation medium is expected to contribute to studies investigating the relationship between these bacteria and their pathogenesis or disease.

13.
Radiol Case Rep ; 19(8): 3334-3338, 2024 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38860267

RESUMO

Actinomycosis is a rare chronic suppurative granulomatous disease. Surgical biopsy is often performed in patients with chest actinomycosis because malignancy is suspected in most cases. A 62-year-old man presented to our hospital with fever and exertional dyspnea that had persisted for several months. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed an irregularly shaped mass with contrast enhancement in the anterior mediastinum and consolidation in the left upper lung lobe contiguous with this mass, as well as multiple nodules in both lungs. The pulmonary artery trunk was stenotic and surrounded by the mass, and the right heart system was enlarged. Thoracoscopic biopsy was performed but failed to yield a diagnosis. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography after one month revealed an increased mass and worsening right heart strain. 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography/computed tomography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging also suggested a malignant tumor, and an open chest biopsy was performed. No malignant cells were identified and actinomycetes were detected by histopathology and bacterial culture. The patient was treated with antibiotics, following which his contrast-enhanced computed tomography findings and general condition improved.

14.
Cureus ; 16(5): e60180, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38746489

RESUMO

Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous disease that can affect various parts of the body, including the head and neck, lungs, abdominal and pelvic cavities, and wounds. It is caused by different actinomycetes like Actinomyces sherdii, Actinomyces glasii, Actinomyces cariosa, Actinomyces zurichensis, and Actinomyces europaea. Reported infections caused by actinomycetes include pulmonary actinomycosis, pelvic and abdominal infections, bone or artificial joint infections, endocarditis, complicated urinary tract infections, and soft tissue abscesses. The combination of pulmonary actinomycosis with gastric cancer is exceptionally rare in clinical practice, and the presence of actinomycetal infection alongside tumors in elderly patients poses significant challenges in treatment. This article presents the diagnosis and treatment process of an elderly patient with pulmonary actinomycosis and gastric adenocarcinoma.

16.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 14: 1361206, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38800834

RESUMO

Introduction: Alveolar cleft (AC) is a common congenital defect in people with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Alveolar bone grafting (ABG) is typically performed during adolescence, resulting in the fissure remaining in the mouth for a longer length of time. Patients with AC have a greater rate of oral diseases such as dental caries than the normal population, and the precise characteristics of the bacterial alterations caused by AC are unknown. Methods: We recruited a total of 87 subjects and collected dental plaque samples from AC adolescents (AAP), post-operative ABG adolescents (PAP), healthy control adolescents (CAP), AC young adults (AYP), post-operative ABG young adults (PYP), and healthy control young adults (CYP). The sequencing of 16S rRNA genes was performed. Results: The microbial composition of plaque from alveolar cleft patients differed significantly from age-matched healthy controls. Linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) analysis revealed that AAP was enriched for Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium, Rhodococcus, Aggregatibacter, Gemella, and Porphyromonas, whereas AYP was enriched for Capnocytophaga, Rhodococcus, and Actinomyces-f0332. There were phenotypic differences in facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative, Gram-positive, and oxidative stress tolerance between the AYP group with longer alveolar cleft and the healthy control group according to Bugbase phenotypic predictions. Alveolar bone grafting did not alter the functional phenotype of alveolar cleft patients but reduced the number of differential genera between alveolar cleft patients and healthy controls at both ages. Conclusions: Our study systematically characterized the supragingival plaque microbiota of alveolar cleft patients, post-alveolar bone grafting patients, and matched healthy controls in two ages to gain a better understanding of plaque ecology and microbiology associated with alveolar clefts.


Assuntos
Bactérias , Fenda Labial , Fissura Palatina , Placa Dentária , Microbiota , RNA Ribossômico 16S , Humanos , Placa Dentária/microbiologia , Fissura Palatina/microbiologia , Adolescente , Microbiota/genética , RNA Ribossômico 16S/genética , Feminino , Masculino , Fenda Labial/microbiologia , Adulto Jovem , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética , Bactérias/isolamento & purificação , Enxerto de Osso Alveolar , Adulto
17.
Pharmaceutics ; 16(5)2024 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38794276

RESUMO

Ozone is increasingly utilized in dental caries treatment due to its antibacterial properties. In a context of limited studies and no consensus on protocols, this research aims to assess ozone's antibacterial efficacy on cariogenic bacteria and its potential adverse impact on dentin bond strength. Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Actinomyces naeslundii suspensions were exposed to 40 µg/mL of ozone gas and 60 µg/mL of ozonated water (80 s) via a medical ozone generator. Negative and positive control groups (chlorhexidine 2%) were included, and UFC/mL counts were recorded. To examine microtensile bond strength (µTBS), 20 human molars were divided into four groups, and class I cavities were created. After ozone application, samples were restored using an etch-and-rinse and resin composite, then sectioned for testing. The SPSS v. 28 program was used with a significance level of 5%. The µTBS results were evaluated using one-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD, and Games-Howell. Bacterial counts reduced from 106 to 101, but dentin µTBS was significantly impacted by ozone (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Despite ozone's attractive antibacterial activity, this study emphasizes its detrimental effect on dentin adhesion, cautioning against its use before restorative treatments.

18.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1407439, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38779669

RESUMO

Background: Increasing evidence indicates the microbial ecology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is intricately associated with the disease's status and severity, and distinct microbial ecological variations exist between COPD and healthy control (HC). This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to summarize microbial diversity indices and taxa relative abundance of oral, airway, and intestine microbiota of different stages of COPD and HC to make comparisons. Methods: A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases to identify relevant English articles on the oral, airway, and intestine microbiota in COPD published between 2003 and 8 May 2023. Information on microbial diversity indices and taxa relative abundance of oral, airway, and intestine microbiota was collected for comparison between different stages of COPD and HC. Results: A total of 20 studies were included in this review, involving a total of 337 HC participants, 511 COPD patients, and 154 AECOPD patients. We observed that no significant differences in alpha diversity between the participant groups, but beta diversity was significantly different in half of the included studies. Compared to HC, Prevotella, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, and Veillonella of oral microbiota in SCOPD were reduced at the genus level. Most studies supported that Haemophilus, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas were increased, but Veillonella, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Porphyromonas, and Atopobium were decreased at the genus level in the airway microbiota of SCOPD. However, the abundance of Haemophilus, Lactobacillus and Pseudomonas genera exhibited an increase, whereas Actinomyces and Porphyromonas showed a decrease in the airway microbiota of AECOPD compared to HC. And Lachnospira of intestine microbiota in SCOPD was reduced at the genus level. Conclusion: The majority of published research findings supported that COPD exhibited decreased alpha diversity compared to HC. However, our meta-analysis does not confirm it. In order to further investigate the characteristics and mechanisms of microbiome in the oral-airway- intestine axis of COPD patients, larger-scale and more rigorous studies are needed. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/), identifier CRD42023418726.


Assuntos
Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/microbiologia , Humanos , Boca/microbiologia , Microbiota , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/genética
19.
J Oral Microbiol ; 16(1): 2354148, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38766462

RESUMO

Actinomyces organisms reside on mucosal surfaces of the oropharynx and the genitourinary tract. Polymicrobial infections with Actinomyces organisms are increasingly being reported in the literature. Since these infections differ from classical actinomycosis, lacking of specific clinical and imaging findings, slow-growing Actinomyces organisms can be regarded as contaminants or insignificant findings. In addition, only limited knowledge is available about novel Actinomyces species and their clinical relevance. The recent reclassifications have resulted in the transfer of several Actinomyces species to novel genera Bowdeniella, Gleimia, Pauljensenia, Schaalia, or Winkia. The spectrum of diseases associated with specific members of Actinomyces and these related genera varies. In human infections, the most common species are Actinomyces israelii, Schaalia meyeri, and Schaalia odontolytica, which are typical inhabitants of the mouth, and Gleimia europaea, Schaalia turicensis, and Winkia neuii. In this narrative review, the purpose was to gather information on the emerging role of specific organisms within the Actinomyces and related genera in polymicrobial infections. These include Actinomyces graevenitzii in pulmonary infections, S. meyeri in brain abscesses and infections in the lower respiratory tract, S. turicensis in skin-related infections, G. europaea in necrotizing fasciitis and skin abscesses, and W. neuii in infected tissues around prostheses and devices. Increased understanding of the role of Actinomyces and related species in polymicrobial infections could provide improved outcomes for patient care. Key messages Due to the reclassification of the genus, many former Actinomyces species belong to novel genera Bowdeniella, Gleimia, Pauljensenia, Schaalia, or Winkia.Some of the species play emerging roles in specific infection types in humans.Increasing awareness of their clinical relevance as an established or a putative pathogen in polymicrobial infections brings about improved outcomes for patient care.

20.
BMC Microbiol ; 24(1): 185, 2024 May 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38802738

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Schaalia species are primarily found among the oral microbiota of humans and other animals. They have been associated with various infections through their involvement in biofilm formation, modulation of host responses, and interaction with other microorganisms. In this study, two strains previously indicated as Actinomyces spp. were found to be novel members of the genus Schaalia based on their whole genome sequences. RESULTS: Whole-genome sequencing revealed both strains with a genome size of 2.3 Mbp and GC contents of 65.5%. Phylogenetics analysis for taxonomic placement revealed strains NCTC 9931 and C24 as distinct species within the genus Schaalia. Overall genome-relatedness indices including digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH), and average nucleotide/amino acid identity (ANI/AAI) confirmed both strains as distinct species, with values below the species boundary thresholds (dDDH < 70%, and ANI and AAI < 95%) when compared to nearest type strain Schaalia odontolytica NCTC 9935 T. Pangenome and orthologous analyses highlighted their differences in gene properties and biological functions compared to existing type strains. Additionally, the identification of genomic islands (GIs) and virulence-associated factors indicated their genetic diversity and potential adaptive capabilities, as well as potential implications for human health. Notably, CRISPR-Cas systems in strain NCTC 9931 underscore its adaptive immune mechanisms compared to strain C24. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these findings, strain NCTC 9931T (= ATCC 17982T = DSM 43331T = CIP 104728T = CCUG 18309T = NCTC 14978T = CGMCC 1.90328T) represents a novel species, for which the name Schaalia dentiphila subsp. dentiphila sp. nov. subsp. nov. is proposed, while strain C24T (= NCTC 14980T = CGMCC 1.90329T) represents a distinct novel subspecies, for which the name Schaalia dentiphila subsp. denticola. subsp. nov. is proposed. This study enriches our understanding of the genomic diversity of Schaalia species and paves the way for further investigations into their roles in oral health. SIGNIFICANCE: This research reveals two Schaalia strains, NCTC 9931 T and C24T, as novel entities with distinct genomic features. Expanding the taxonomic framework of the genus Schaalia, this study offers a critical resource for probing the metabolic intricacies and resistance patterns of these bacteria. This work stands as a cornerstone for microbial taxonomy, paving the way for significant advances in clinical diagnostics.


Assuntos
Composição de Bases , Genoma Bacteriano , Boca , Filogenia , Humanos , Genoma Bacteriano/genética , Boca/microbiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma , DNA Bacteriano/genética , Ilhas Genômicas/genética , Hibridização de Ácido Nucleico
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