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1.
J Arthroplasty ; 2019 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31812483

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Previous reports on the outcomes of isolated head and liner exchange in revision total hip arthroplasty have found high rates of instability after these surgeries. Most reports have studied constructs using ≤28 mm femoral heads. The purpose of this study was to determine if modern techniques with the use of larger head sizes can improve the rate of instability after head and liner exchange. METHODS: We identified 138 hips in 132 patients who underwent isolated head and liner exchange for polyethylene wear/osteolysis (57%), acute infection (27%), metallosis (13%), or other (2%). All patients underwent revision with either 32 (23%), 36 (62%), or 40 (15%) mm diameter heads. Cross-linked polyethylene was used in all revisions. Lipped and/or offset liners were used in 104 (75%) hips. Average follow-up was 3.5 (1.0-9.1) years. Statistical analyses were performed with significance set at P < .05. RESULTS: Revision-free survivorship for any cause was 94.6% and for aseptic causes was 98.2% at 5 years. 11 (8%) hips experienced a complication with 7 (5%) hips requiring additional revision surgery. After revision, 4 (3%) hips experienced dislocation, 5 (4%) hips experienced infection, and 1 (1%) hip was revised for trunnionosis. No demographic or surgical factors significantly affected outcomes. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that isolated head and liner exchange using large femoral heads and modern liners provides for better stability than previous reports. The most common complication was infection. We did not identify specific patient, surgical, or implant factors that reduced the risk of instability or other complication.

2.
J Hand Surg Eur Vol ; 44(10): 1036-1040, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31550978

RESUMO

Ninety-six wrists (56 right and 40 left) in 96 patients (36 males and 60 females, mean age 38, range 15-77 years) underwent repair of ulnotriquetral ligament split tears between 2007 and 2016. Mayo wrist scores, visual analogue scale pain scores, and objective measures including grip strength and range of motion were obtained. Patients were assessed after a mean follow-up of 21 months (range 6-112 months). Ulnotriquetral split tear repair resulted in substantial improvements in pain and function. The mean Mayo wrist score improved from 57 preoperatively to 81 postoperatively, with 84% of patients achieving a good or excellent outcome. Pain scores decreased from 5.8 to 1.2. Grip improved from 25 kg to 29 kg. There was no significant change in range of motion of the wrist. Complications were noted in eight patients, with three experiencing continued pain, four with dysaesthesia of the dorsal sensory ulnar nerve, and one superficial infection. Arthroscopic ulnotriquetral split tear repair significantly reduced pain and improved Mayo wrist scores. Level of evidence: IV.

3.
J Wrist Surg ; 8(4): 268-275, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31404256

RESUMO

Objective The objective of this article is to evaluate the outcomes and complication rate for Adams-Berger anatomic reconstruction of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), in addition, to determine the role of sigmoid notch anatomy on failure. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review to evaluate adult patients that had undergone reconstruction of the DRUJ for instability with the Adams-Berger procedure between 1998 and 2015 within our institution with > 24 months follow-up. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics, mechanism of injury, outcome, and complications. Results Ninety-five wrists in 93 patients were included. Mean age at surgery was 37.3 years with 65.2 months follow-up. At the last follow-up, 90.8% had a stable DRUJ, 5.3% did not, and 3.4% had some laxity. Postoperatively, 75.9% described either no pain or mild pain. Grip strength increased while pronosupination decreased. Procedure success was 86.3%, as 12 patients underwent revision at 13.3 months postoperatively. Reconstructive failure was more common in females when an interference screw was utilized for tendon fixation. Age, timing of surgery, type of graft, sigmoid notch anatomy, and previous surgery did not affect revision or failure rate. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that Adams-Berger reconstruction of the DRUJ provides reliable long-term results with an overall success of 86% at > 5 years follow-up. Level of evidence/Type of study This is a Level IV, therapeutic study.

4.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(10): 2392-2397, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31178387

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients between 45 and 54 years old will be the fastest-growing cohort seeking total knee arthroplasty (TKA) over the next 15 years. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the clinical outcomes of TKA in patients less than 50 years old at a minimum of 10 years. We hypothesized that this patient population would have a high rate of survivorship that is similar to that of older patients. METHODS: We reviewed 298 consecutive TKAs on 242 patients at a minimum of 10 years postoperatively. Twenty patients died and 30 TKAs were lost to follow-up leaving 248 TKAs in 202 patients (91 male, 111 female) with a mean age of 45.7 years (range, 26-49) at the time of surgery. Patient-reported outcomes, survivorship, causes of reoperation, and initial postoperative radiographic parameters were collected. RESULTS: At a mean of 13.0 years, there were 9 revisions for tibial loosening (3.6%), 8 for deep infection (3.2%), 7 for polyethylene wear (2.8%), and 3 for failed ingrowth of a cementless femoral component (1.2%). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated 92.0% survivorship with failures defined as aseptic component revision and 83.9% survivorship for all-cause reoperation at 13 years. Patients with tibial alignment of 4° or more of varus or 10° or more of posterior slope were found to have increased rate of failure. CONCLUSION: While overall durability was good in this young patient population, tibial fixation and deep infection were relatively common causes of failure. In addition, increased tibial varus and slope were found to increase the rate of failure. Furthermore, the nearly 3% risk of revision for wear suggests that the use of more wear-resistant bearing surfaces may reduce the risk of failure in this patient population.

5.
JBJS Rev ; 7(5): e1, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31082935
6.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(7): 1307-1311, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31031153

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Rapid-pathway outpatient (OTJA) and one-night inpatient (ITJA) arthroplasty require close follow-up by the surgeon. We quantify and characterize the total perioperative touches required in the first 7 days, and compare OTJA and ITJA patients. METHODS: We reviewed 103 consecutive primary total joint arthroplasty (TJA) patients from April 2014 without exclusion; all patients were discharged either within 5 hours or the morning after surgery. All telephone and office visits during the first 7 days following surgery were studied. Specialized outpatient TJA education was included. We measured the frequency, duration, and subject matter of phone calls. Simple Poisson regression analysis and t-tests were used to determine significance. RESULTS: None of the 103 rapid pathway patients were lost to follow-up. Average age was 61.2 years (range 26.9-83.0), with 49 females (47.6%), 78 total knee arthroplasties, average Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 2.1, and average body mass index of 29.5 kg/m2. There were 253 touches required, averaging 2.5/patient. One hundred sixty were outgoing phone calls by the surgical team and 93 were incoming calls from patients. The average duration of each call was 4.74 minutes (SD 3.7). The entire group required 19 hours and 35 minutes of telephone contact. After including specialized education time, this cohort required 83.1 hours of clinical time, or 48.4 minutes per patient. CONCLUSION: Postoperative care after rapid pathway TJA requires a significant burden of resources, shifted from the hospital to the surgeon. We found that both rapid pathway groups require similar work by the surgeon's team. This additional work should be considered by policymakers.

7.
J Arthroplasty ; 34(5): 898-900, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30773356

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patients commonly report difficulty kneeling after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess patients' ability to kneel after TKA and to prospectively determine whether patients with reported difficulty can be taught to kneel. METHODS: Attempts were made to reach 307 consecutive TKAs in 255 adult patients who were 18-24 months after surgery. Patients were surveyed for their ability to kneel. Those who reported difficulty kneeling were offered participation in a kneeling protocol. At the conclusion of the protocol, participants were surveyed again for their ability to kneel. RESULTS: Of the 307 consecutive TKAs, 288 knees (94%) answered the survey. Of them, 196 knees (68%) could kneel with minor or no difficulty without any specific training. And 77 knees (27%) reported at least some difficulty kneeling and were eligible for participation in the protocol. Pain or discomfort was the most commonly reported reason for difficulty kneeling. Of these 77 knees, 43 knees (56%) participated. Thirty-six knees (84%) completed all or most of the protocol. All patients who completed all or most of the protocol were then able to kneel, and none reported significant difficulty kneeling. On average, participants improved 1.4 levels. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, 68% of knees could kneel after TKA without any specific training. Of those who had at least some difficulty kneeling, all who participated were able to kneel after a simple kneeling protocol, although 44% of eligible patients did not participate. This study suggests that kneeling should be included in postoperative TKA rehabilitation.

8.
J Hand Surg Am ; 44(7): 614.e1-614.e9, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30344019

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) prostheses designed as semiconstrained devices aiming to replace the function of the ulnar head, sigmoid notch of the radius, and triangular fibrocartilage complex have demonstrated the capacity to restore the functional status of the DRUJ. However, soft tissue complications including tendons, nerves, and wounds, although documented, have not been the primary focus of prior reports. This study investigated short- to medium-term soft tissue complications after DRUJ semiconstrained implant arthroplasty. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing semiconstrained DRUJ implant arthroplasty with clinical and radiological follow-up greater than 1 year. Data were reviewed with a focus on soft tissue complications after arthroplasty. RESULTS: Fifty DRUJ implant arthroplasties were performed over 10 years in 49 patients. Patients' average age was 47.8 years. Average duration of follow-up was 35.8 ± 3.7 months. A total of 46 patients underwent multiple operations before DRUJ arthroplasty. Postoperative pronosupination range of motion, grip strength, and visual analog scale pain scores were significantly improved after DRUJ arthroplasty. Wound-healing problems occurred in 11 arthroplasties; however, all wounds subsequently healed without operative intervention. Wound-related complications were significantly increased in patients with a history of rheumatoid arthritis or immunosuppression. Eighteen operations were required to address complications in 8 patients. Extensor tendinopathy was the most common indication for reoperation; 5 tenosynovectomy procedures were required in 4 wrists. A prominent screw requiring removal was identified in 3 cases of tenosynovitis. Periprosthetic fractures were identified in 3 wrists; 2 of these required reoperation for open treatment. Removal of hardware was required in 2 patients; these patients required 9 subsequent reoperations. CONCLUSIONS: Distal radioulnar joint arthrosis is a major problem and patients commonly undergo multiple reconstructive surgeries before DRUJ implant arthroplasty. No instances of wound-related complications or tendinopathy occurred in patients without previous surgeries, and wound-related complications occurred at a higher frequency with a history of rheumatoid arthritis or immunosuppression. TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic IV.

9.
J Arthroplasty ; 2019 Dec 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31924488

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to compare open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) to distal femoral replacement (DFR) for treatment of displaced periprosthetic distal femur fractures. METHODS: We identified 72 patients with minimum 2-year follow-up following a displaced periprosthetic distal femur fracture: 50 were treated with ORIF and 22 with DFR. Outcomes were assessed with multivariate regression analysis and include Knee Society Scores (KSS), infection rates, revision incidence, and mortality. RESULTS: Patients treated with DFR had a higher Charlson comorbidity index (5.2 vs 3.8; P = .006). The mean postoperative KSS were similar between groups, but the Knee Society Functional Scores were higher in the ORIF group (P = .01). Six ORIF patients (12%) and 3 DFR patients (14%) underwent a revision surgery (P = .1). In the ORIF group, 3 revisions were associated with periprosthetic infection, and 3 revisions occurred for aseptic nonunion. In the DFR group, 1 infection was treated with irrigation and debridement, and 2 cases of patellar maltracking resulted in 1 liner exchange with soft tissue release and 1 femoral revision for malrotation. More patients in the ORIF group required repeat revisions, with twice as many total revisions (P < .001). Six ORIF patients and 7 DFR patients died within 2 years (P = .26). CONCLUSION: The Knee Society Functional Score favored ORIF, but the total incidence of revision was higher in the ORIF cohort. Given the high mortality and the substantial risk of reoperation in both groups, additional studies are needed regarding the prevention of and optimal treatment for patients with periprosthetic distal femur fractures.

10.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 160(12): 2479-2484, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30377830

RESUMO

Superficial radial intraneural ganglion cysts are rare. Only nine previous cases have been described. We provide two examples with a wrist joint connection and review the literature to provide further support for the unifying articular (synovial) theory for the pathogenesis and treatment of intraneural ganglia.


Assuntos
Cistos Glanglionares/cirurgia , Punho/cirurgia , Adulto , Feminino , Cistos Glanglionares/diagnóstico por imagem , Cistos Glanglionares/patologia , Humanos , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Masculino , Punho/diagnóstico por imagem , Punho/patologia
11.
Arthroplast Today ; 4(2): 236-239, 2018 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29896560

RESUMO

Background: With the increasing interest in fast recovery and outpatient joint arthroplasty, short-acting local anesthetic agents and minimal narcotic use are preferred. Lidocaine is a fast-onset, short-duration local anesthetic that has been used for many years in spinal anesthesia. However, lidocaine spinal anesthesia has been reported to have a risk of transient neurologic symptoms (TNSs). The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and efficacy of single-dose lidocaine spinal anesthesia in the setting of outpatient joint arthroplasty. Methods: We performed a prospective study on 50 patients who received lidocaine spinal anesthesia in the setting of outpatient hip and knee arthroplasty. All patients received a single-shot spinal injection, with 2% isobaric lidocaine along with titrated propofol sedation. We evaluated demographic data, length of motor blockage, time to ambulation, time to discharge readiness, patient-reported symptoms of TNS. Results: Of the 50 patients studied, 11 had total hip arthroplasty, 33 total knee arthroplasty, 5 unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, and 1 underwent isolated polyethylene liner exchange in a total knee arthroplasty. The average total duration of motor blockade was 2.89 hours (range 1.73-5.17, standard deviation 0.65). Average time from postanesthesia care unit to return of motor function was 0.58 hours (range 0-1.5, standard deviation 0.48). None of the patients reported TNS. Conclusions: Isobaric lidocaine spinal anesthesia appears to be a safe and effective regimen for outpatient hip and knee arthroplasty. All patients were discharged on the day of surgery with isobaric lidocaine spinal injection. There were no reports of TNSs.

12.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(8): 2613-2615, 2018 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29636248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Early wound healing complications and persistent drainage are associated with an increased risk of infection following knee arthroplasty. However, the scenario in which a patient sustains an acute, traumatic wound dehiscence has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to determine the outcomes of an acute traumatic wound dehiscence following arthroplasty treated with an urgent irrigation and debridement and primary wound closure. METHODS: Using a single institution's arthroplasty registry, patients sustaining an acute, traumatic wound dehiscence within 30 days of undergoing a primary knee arthroplasty were identified. Patients experiencing chronic wound drainage without injury or a history of prior infection were excluded. Patients were followed for the occurrence of complications and clinical outcomes using the Knee Society Score. RESULTS: From 2006 to 2016, 14 of 25,819 eligible patients (0.05%) were identified as having a traumatic wound dehiscence. The mean time from arthroplasty to wound dehiscence was 9.3 days. All but one patient was treated operatively within 24 hours of dehiscence. Postoperative antibiotics were administered for a mean of 21 days. At a mean of 6.5 years, 6 patients were considered failures (43%) including 2 deep infections, 3 revisions for instability, and 1 patient with a Knee Society Score <60 points. CONCLUSION: Despite emergent incision and drainage and wound closure, patients experiencing an acute traumatic wound dehiscence following knee arthroplasty subsequently exhibit high rates of reoperation for instability, periprosthetic infection, and clinical failure. Further work is required to better understand the optimal modes of treatment for this complication.


Assuntos
Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Articulação do Joelho/cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Reoperação , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Drenagem , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Período Pós-Operatório , Sistema de Registros , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Ferida Cirúrgica , Cicatrização
13.
Hand (N Y) ; : 1558944718760031, 2018 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29504473

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study reviews long-term outcomes of partial wrist denervation focusing on need for and time to revision procedure. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of all patients undergoing partial wrist denervation between 1994 and 2014. At average latest follow-up of 6.75 years (range, 1-21 years), clinical and radiographic data and need for revision surgery were recorded. RESULTS: There were 100 wrists in 89 patients (61 male, 28 female) with average age at surgery of 54 years (range, 26-80). Principal diagnoses were arthritis (58%), inflammatory (19%), and posttraumatic arthritis (7%). Average flexion-extension arc was 83% and grip strength 75% of unaffected extremity. Average Mayo Wrist Scores improved from 48 preoperatively to 77 postoperatively. Sixty-nine percent of patients did not undergo other procedures during the time interval studied. Thirty-one percent underwent revision at an average of 26 months following denervation (range, 2-165). CONCLUSIONS: Partial wrist denervation is a motion-preserving procedure for patients with refractory wrist pain with 69% in this series requiring no further procedures. The remaining 31% experienced average symptom relief for 2 years prior to ultimately undergoing revision operation.

14.
J Arthroplasty ; 33(4): 1265-1274, 2018 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29224990

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hip and knee arthroplasties length of stay continues to shorten after advances in perioperative and intraoperative management, as well as financial incentives. Some authors have demonstrated good results with outpatient arthroplasty, but safety and general feasibility of such procedures remain unclear. Our hypothesis is that outpatient arthroplasty would demonstrate higher readmission and complication rates than inpatient arthroplasty. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of all publications on outpatient arthroplasty between January 1, 2000 and June 1, 2016. Included publications had to demonstrate a specific outpatient protocol and have reported perioperative complications and unplanned readmissions. Patient demographics, surgical variables, and protocol details were recorded in addition to complications, readmission, and reoperation. RESULTS: Ten manuscripts accounting for 1009 patients demonstrated that 955 (94.7%) were discharged the same day as planned, with the majority of failures to discharge being secondary to pain, hypotension, and nausea. There were no deaths and only 1 major complication. Only 20 patients (1.98%) required reoperation and 20 (1.98%) had readmission or visited the emergency room within 90 days of their operation. In the 2 series recording patient outcomes, 80% and 96% of patients reported that they would choose to undergo outpatient arthroplasty again. CONCLUSION: For carefully selected patients with experienced surgeons in major centers, outpatient arthroplasty may be a safe and effective procedure. Although our data is promising, further study is required to better elucidate the differences between inpatient and outpatient arthroplasty outcomes.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Readmissão do Paciente , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Artroplastia do Joelho/métodos , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Alta do Paciente , Reoperação/efeitos adversos
15.
Acad Med ; 93(1): 104-112, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28658022

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine the past experiences with, current use of, and anticipated use of online learning and simulation-based education among practicing U.S. physicians, and how findings vary by age. METHOD: The authors surveyed 4,648 randomly sampled board-certified U.S. physicians, September 2015 to April 2016, using Internet-based and paper questionnaires. Survey items (some optional) addressed past and current technology usage, perceived technology effectiveness, and anticipated future use of specific technology innovations. RESULTS: Of 988 respondents, 444 completed optional items. Of these, 429/442 (97.1%) had used online learning and 372/442 (84.2%) had used simulation-based education in the past five years. Desire for more online learning was modest (mean [standard deviation], 4.6 [1.5]; 1 = strongly disagree, 7 = strongly agree), as was desire for more simulation-based education (4.2 [1.7]). Both online learning and simulation-based education were perceived as effective (5.2 [1.4]; 5.0 [1.4]). Physicians believed they possess adequate skills for online learning (5.8 [1.2]) and that point-of-care learning is vital to effective patient care (5.3 [1.3]). Only 39.0% used objective performance data to guide their learning choices, although 64.6% agreed that such information would be useful. The highest-rated innovations included a central repository for listing educational opportunities and tracking continuing education credits, an app to award credit for answering patient-focused questions, 5-minute and 20-minute clinical updates, and an e-mailed "question of the week." Responses to most survey items were similar across age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Practicing physicians generally seem receptive and prepared to use a variety of educational technologies, regardless of age.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação a Distância , Educação Médica Continuada , Tecnologia Educacional , Médicos/psicologia , Treinamento por Simulação , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários
16.
Acad Med ; 92(9): 1335-1345, 2017 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28225460

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Professional development (PD)-both for-credit continuing medical education (CME) and informal self-directed or point-of-care learning-is vital to all physicians. The authors sought to understand physicians' PD perceptions and practices and how these vary by specialty and practice type. METHOD: The authors administered an Internet and paper survey, from September 2015 to April 2016, to randomly sampled U.S. physicians. Survey items addressed perceived PD needs and barriers and how physicians identify knowledge/skills gaps. RESULTS: Of 4,648 invitees, 988 (21.6%) responded. Respondents believed that they already know what they need to learn (mean 5.8 [1 = strongly disagree; 7 = strongly agree]), can answer clinical questions using available resources (5.9), and want credit for learning during patient care (5.1). They did not strongly desire help identifying learning gaps (4.0) or indicate difficulty accumulating CME credits (3.1). Most PD was done during personal time (5.5). Competencies regarding medical knowledge/skills, wellness, informatics, and practice/systems improvement were rated the highest priority, while research, teaching, and professionalism were rated the lowest. The most important sources used to identify knowledge/skills gaps were immediate patient care needs (4.1 [1 = not important; 5 = extremely important]), personal awareness (3.8), and practice updates (3.7). The most important barriers were time (3.5) and cost (2.9). Differences by specialty and practice type were generally small and not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians feel confident in identifying their own learning needs, perceive medical knowledge/skills as their highest-priority need, and desire more credit for learning during patient care.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação Médica Continuada/tendências , Médicos/psicologia , Adulto , Competência Clínica , Tomada de Decisões , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
17.
J Arthroplasty ; 32(5): 1426-1430, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28034481

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As outpatient total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasties (TKA) increase in popularity, concerns exist about the safety of discharging patients home the same day. The purpose of this study is to determine the complications associated with outpatient total joint arthroplasty (TJA) and to identify high-risk patients who should be excluded from these protocols. METHODS: We queried the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for all patients who underwent primary TKA or THA from 2011 to 2014. Demographic variables, medical comorbidities, and 30-day complication, readmission, and reoperation rates were compared between outpatient and traditional inpatient procedures. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed to identify independent risk factors of poor short-term outcomes. RESULTS: Of the total 169,406 patients who underwent TJA, 1220 were outpatient (0.7%). The outpatient and inpatient groups had an overall complication rate of 8% and 16%, respectively. Patients aged more than 70 years, those with malnutrition, cardiac history, smoking history, or diabetes mellitus are at higher risk for readmission and complications after THA and TKA (all P < .05). Surprisingly, outpatient TJA alone did not increase the risk of readmission (OR 0.652, 95% CI 0.243-1.746, P = .395) or reoperation (OR 1.168, 95% CI 0.374-3.651, P = .789), and was a negative independent risk factor for complications (OR 0.459, 95% CI 0.371-0.567, P < .001). CONCLUSION: With the resources available in a hospital setting, outpatient TJA may be a safe option, but only in select, healthier patients. Care should be taken to extrapolate these results to an outpatient facility, where complications may be more difficult to manage.


Assuntos
Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Alta do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Reoperação/efeitos adversos , Idoso , Comorbidade , Bases de Dados Factuais , Feminino , Hospitais , Humanos , Pacientes Internados , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Readmissão do Paciente , Melhoria de Qualidade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco
18.
J Wrist Surg ; 5(4): 306-310, 2016 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27777822

RESUMO

Background Scapholunate (SL) interosseus ligament injuries detected at an early stage could allow the surgeon to prevent progression through the spectrum of injury that leads to instability, and eventually osteoarthritis. We contend that early instability following injury can be detected by visualizing the relative motions and distances between the involved carpal bones (scaphoid and lunate) during wrist movement in vivo. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the utility of dynamic CT (i.e., 4DCT) in diagnosing SL interosseus ligament injuries in two patients with clinical suspicion of SL interosseus ligament injury during flexion-extension (FE), radial-ulnar (RU) deviation, and dart thrower's (DT) motions. Case Description 4DCT images obtained from two individual cases were analyzed to assess the proximity between the scaphoid and lunate during wrist motion using standard image processing techniques. Proximity maps representing the distances between the scaphoid and lunate bones during each phase of wrist motion were determined. These maps provide insight into the severity of diastasis (large separation) and location of diastasis at the SL joint. The patients' proximity maps indicated dorsal diastasis and subtle uniform diastasis. Literature Review Complex musculoskeletal abnormalities, such as wrist joint instabilities, elude diagnosis during 2D fluoroscopy due to the 3D geometry of the anatomy and the inherent 3D nature of the bony kinematics. Even the most recent advances with MR arthrography lack good correlation with wrist arthroscopy. Wrist arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis to assess for intercarpal laxity. However, arthroscopy is an invasive procedure subjecting patients to the risk of infection, nerve injury, pain, and stiffness. Clinical Relevance 4DCT allows noninvasive characterization of where ligament injuries likely occur; this may allow for a more selective surgical treatment directed at the specific location of the tear.

19.
Instr Course Lect ; 65: 547-51, 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27049219

RESUMO

Rapid recovery and early discharge after total joint arthroplasty are becoming more common. To develop a successful, safe, outpatient arthroplasty practice, surgeons must have the support of a multidisciplinary team, which includes an orthopaedic surgeon, an anesthesiologist, nurses, physical therapists, and a discharge planner. The authors of this chapter recommend surgeons start with healthier, motivated patients and focus on total hip replacements and unicompartmental knee replacements in the learning curve phase of the transition to outpatient total joint arthroplasty. It is important for orthopaedic surgeons to establish an outpatient joint arthroplasty protocol as well as ways to avoid complications and delays in discharge.


Assuntos
Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Ambulatórios/métodos , Artroplastia de Quadril , Artroplastia do Joelho , Artropatias/cirurgia , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Artroplastia de Quadril/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia de Quadril/métodos , Artroplastia do Joelho/efeitos adversos , Artroplastia do Joelho/métodos , Protocolos Clínicos , Humanos , Planejamento de Assistência ao Paciente , Seleção de Pacientes
20.
J Wrist Surg ; 5(1): 52-8, 2016 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26855837

RESUMO

Background Studies have established an increased risk of radiocarpal joint posttraumatic arthritis in patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius, although this phenomenon has yet to be evaluated in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Purpose We hypothesized that patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the sigmoid notch would have a higher prevalence of DRUJ arthritis and greater upper extremity dysfunction after operative treatment of distal radius fractures compared with fractures without sigmoid notch involvement. We also hypothesized that the degree of sigmoid notch incongruity would be correlated with the grade of DRUJ arthritis and the severity of upper extremity dysfunction. Patients and Methods A retrospective review was conducted on surgically treated patients with distal radius fractures with pre- and/or postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Patients were divided into groups based on presence or absence of fracture extension into the sigmoid notch. Within the sigmoid notch group, postoperative CT scans were used to measure sigmoid notch fracture step-off and diastasis (mm), as well as volar or dorsal DRUJ subluxation (%). Patients were administered Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires and radiographs were obtained to grade DRUJ arthritis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic criteria. Results Thirty-three patients were included (19 with sigmoid notch involvement and 14 without) with an average radiographic follow-up of 6.3 years (range: 3.5-10.1 years). DASH scores were available for all patients, and radiographic follow-up was available in 24 patients (73%). A trend toward higher grade of DRUJ arthritis and poorer average DASH was found in those with sigmoid notch involvement, but was not statistically different. In the sigmoid notch group there were poorer DASH scores in patients with coronal step-off > 1.0-mm (p < 0.05). There were no significant correlations between sigmoid notch step-off, diastasis or DRUJ subluxation and either KL grade of arthritis or DASH scores. Conclusion Fractures involving the sigmoid notch did not appear to have a greater prevalence of DRUJ posttraumatic arthritis in operatively treated patients at greater than 6 years of follow-up. Postoperative sigmoid notch step-off, diastasis or DRUJ subluxation had a minimal effect on upper extremity function, but fractures with a coronal step-off of > 1.0-mm exhibited higher levels of upper extremity dysfunction. Level of Evidence Prognostic, Level III-Case control.

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