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1.
BMJ Open ; 14(2): e083488, 2024 Feb 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38367965

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Endovenous therapy is the first choice management for symptomatic varicose veins in NICE guidelines, with 56-70 000 procedures performed annually in the UK. Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a known complication of endovenous therapy, occurring at a rate of up to 3.4%. Despite 73% of UK practitioners administering pharmacological thromboprophylaxis to reduce VTE, no high-quality evidence supporting this practice exists. Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis may have clinical and cost benefit in preventing VTE; however, further evidence is needed. This study aims to establish whether when endovenous therapy is undertaken: a single dose or course of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis alters the risk of VTE; pharmacological thromboprophylaxis is associated with an increased rate of bleeding events; pharmacological prophylaxis is cost effective. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A multi-centre, assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial (RCT) will recruit 6660 participants from 40 NHS and private sites across the UK. Participants will be randomised to intervention (single dose or extended course of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis plus compression) or control (compression alone). Participants will undergo a lower limb venous duplex ultrasound scan at 21-28 days post-procedure to identify asymptomatic DVT. The duplex scan will be conducted locally by blinded assessors. Participants will be contacted remotely for follow-up at 7 days and 90 days post-procedure. The primary outcome is imaging-confirmed lower limb DVT with or without symptoms or PE with symptoms within 90 days of treatment. The main analysis will be according to the intention-to-treat principle and will compare the rates of VTE at 90 days, using a repeated measures analysis of variance, adjusting for any pre-specified strongly prognostic baseline covariates using a mixed effects logistic regression. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by Brent Research Ethics Committee (22/LO/0261). Results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN18501431.


Assuntos
Embolia Pulmonar , Tromboembolia Venosa , Trombose Venosa , Humanos , Anticoagulantes/efeitos adversos , Tromboembolia Venosa/prevenção & controle , Tromboembolia Venosa/tratamento farmacológico , Medicina Estatal , Trombose Venosa/prevenção & controle , Trombose Venosa/tratamento farmacológico , Embolia Pulmonar/prevenção & controle , Embolia Pulmonar/tratamento farmacológico , Reino Unido
2.
BMJ Open ; 13(1): e069802, 2023 01 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36653057

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Hospital-acquired thrombosis (HAT) is defined as any venous thromboembolism (VTE)-related event during a hospital admission or occurring up to 90 days post discharge, and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and healthcare-associated costs. Although surgery is an established risk factor for VTE, operations with a short hospital stay (<48 hours) and that permit early ambulation are associated with a low risk of VTE. Many patients undergoing short-stay surgical procedures and who are at low risk of VTE are treated with graduated compression stockings (GCS). However, evidence for the use of GCS in VTE prevention for this cohort is poor. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A multicentre, cluster randomised controlled trial which aims to determine whether GCS are superior in comparison to no GCS in the prevention of VTE for surgical patients undergoing short-stay procedures assessed to be at low risk of VTE. A total of 50 sites (21 472 participants) will be randomised to either intervention (GCS) or control (no GCS). Adult participants (18-59 years) who undergo short-stay surgical procedures and are assessed as low risk of VTE will be included in the study. Participants will provide consent to be contacted for follow-up at 7-days and 90-days postsurgical procedure. The primary outcome is the rate of symptomatic VTE, that is, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism during admission or within 90 days. Secondary outcomes include healthcare costs and changes in quality of life. The main analysis will be according to the intention-to-treat principle and will compare the rates of VTE at 90 days, measured at an individual level, using hierarchical (multilevel) logistic regression. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by the Camden and Kings Cross Research Ethics Committee (22/LO/0390). Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN13908683.


Assuntos
Tromboembolia Venosa , Adulto , Humanos , Tromboembolia Venosa/prevenção & controle , Tromboembolia Venosa/etiologia , Meias de Compressão/efeitos adversos , Qualidade de Vida , Assistência ao Convalescente , Alta do Paciente , Hospitais , Anticoagulantes
3.
BMJ Open ; 11(4): e041748, 2021 04 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33811051

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Venous leg ulceration (VLU), the most common type of chronic ulcer, can be difficult to heal and is a major cause of morbidity and reduced quality of life. Although compression bandaging is the principal treatment, it is time-consuming and bandage application requires specific training. There is evidence that intervention on superficial venous incompetence can help ulcer healing and recurrence, but this is not accessible to all patients. Hence, new treatments are required to address these chronic wounds. One possible adjuvant treatment for VLU is human decellularised dermis (DCD), a type of skin graft derived from skin from deceased tissue donors. Although DCD has the potential to promote ulcer healing, there is a paucity of data for its use in patients with VLU. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a multicentre, parallel group, pragmatic randomised controlled trial. One hundred and ninety-six patients with VLU will be randomly assigned to receive either the DCD allograft in addition to standard care or standard care alone. The primary outcome is the proportion of participants with a healed index ulcer at 12 weeks post-randomisation in each treatment arm. Secondary outcomes include the time to index ulcer healing and the proportion of participants with a healed index ulcer at 12 months. Changes in quality of life scores and cost-effectiveness will also be assessed. All analyses will be carried out on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis. A mixed-effects, logistic regression on the outcome of the proportion of those with the index ulcer healed at 12 weeks will be performed. Secondary outcomes will be assessed using various statistical models appropriate to the distribution and nature of these outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by the Bloomsbury Research Ethics Committee (19/LO/1271). Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at national and international conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN21541209.


Assuntos
Perna (Membro) , Qualidade de Vida , Aloenxertos , Derme , Humanos , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
4.
Phlebology ; 36(3): 203-208, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33103957

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This survey study evaluates current management strategies for venous ulceration and the impacts of the EVRA trial results. METHODS: An online survey was disseminated to approximately 15000 clinicians, through 12 vascular societies in 2018. Survey themes included: referral times, treatment times and strategies, knowledge of the EVRA trial and service barriers to managing venous ulceration. Data analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel and SPSS. RESULTS: 664 responses were received from 78 countries. Respondents were predominantly European (55%) and North American (23%) vascular surgeons (74%). Responses varied between different countries. The median vascular clinic referral time was 6 weeks and time to be seen in clinic was 2 weeks. This was significantly higher in the UK (p ≤ 0.02). 77% of respondents performed surgical/endovenous interventions prior to ulcer healing, the median time to intervention was 4 weeks. 31% of participants changed their practice following EVRA. Frequently encountered barriers to implementing change were a lack of operating space/time (18%). CONCLUSION: Venous ulcers are not managed as quickly as they should be. An evaluation of local resource requirements should be performed to improve service provision for venous ulceration. When interpreting the results of this survey consideration should be given to the response rate.


Assuntos
Úlcera da Perna , Úlcera Varicosa , Combinação de Medicamentos , Etinilestradiol , Humanos , Perna (Membro) , Norgestrel/análogos & derivados , Úlcera , Úlcera Varicosa/terapia , Cicatrização
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