Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 87
Filtrar
1.
BMJ Paediatr Open ; 8(1)2024 Apr 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38569740

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Paediatric lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common experiences among school-aged children, with prevalence rates reaching as high as 20%. Paediatricians are often first-line stakeholders in providing treatment for these bothersome symptoms, yet there is no formal resource to support them with the treatment of LUTS. Evaluating paediatricians' experiences is an important step in informing health promotion efforts to improve health outcomes in children. This study aims to explore paediatricians' knowledge, beliefs, practice patterns, and perceived barriers and facilitators in providing LUTS care. METHODS: In this qualitative study, we conducted semistructured focus groups of paediatricians within California. Focus groups were conducted via Zoom, and participants were enrolled until thematic saturation was reached. Participants were asked about their current practices, knowledge and beliefs, barriers and facilitators to care, training and education, and responsibility for behaviour and action. Thematic analysis was performed using deductive and inductive approaches; themes were mapped through an iterative, team-based process. RESULTS: 15 paediatricians, aged 30-69 years, with 13 (86.7%) women, were interviewed. Most (11, 73.3%) practised in general outpatient settings. Interviewed paediatricians recognised paediatric LUTS as a common problem that can significantly impact children's well-being. In practice, paediatricians did not actively screen for LUTS beyond the potty-training milestone due to short visit duration and competing healthcare demands. Lack of guidelines, parental mistrust and inadequate clinical education were barriers identified by paediatricians. CONCLUSIONS: Paediatricians expressed a willingness to help patients but indicated several limitations to providing adequate LUTS care. Future professional development work can emphasise guideline development, early screening strategies to support timely intervention and better education for clinicians.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde , Pediatras , Humanos , Criança , Feminino , Masculino , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Grupos Focais
2.
Circulation ; 2024 Apr 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38583147

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The impact of routine clinic use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures on clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF) has not been well-characterized. We tested if clinic-based use of a disease-specific PRO improves patient-reported quality of life at 1 year. METHODS: PRO-HF was an open-label, parallel, patient-level randomized clinical trial of routine PRO assessment or usual care at an academic HF clinic between August 30, 2021, and June 30, 2022, with 1 year of follow-up. In the PRO assessment arm, participants completed the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-12 (KCCQ-12) at each HF clinic visit and results were shared with their treating clinician. The usual care arm completed the KCCQ-12 at randomization and 1 year later, which was not shared with the treating clinician. The primary outcome was the KCCQ-12 Overall Summary Score (OSS) between 12-15 months post-randomization. Secondary outcomes included domains of the KCCQ-12, hospitalization and emergency department visit rates, HF medication therapy, clinic visit frequency, and testing rates. RESULTS: Across 17 clinicians, 1,248 participants were enrolled and randomized to PRO assessment (n=624) or usual care (n=624). The median age was 63.9 (interquartile range [IQR] 51.8-72.8), 38.9% were women, and the median baseline KCCQ-12 OSS was 82.3 (IQR 58.3-94.8). Final KCCQ-12 (available in 87.9% of the PRO arm and 85.1% in usual care [p=0.16]) median OSS scores were 87.5 (IQR 68.8-96.9) in the PRO arm and 87.6 (IQR 69.7-96.9) in the usual care arm with a baseline-adjusted mean difference of 0.2 (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.0; p=0.85). The results were consistent across pre-specified subgroups. A post hoc analysis demonstrated a significant interaction with greater benefit among participants with baseline KCCQ-12 OSS scores of 60-80 but not in less or more symptomatic participants. No significant differences were found in 1-year mortality, hospitalizations, ED visits, medication therapy, clinic follow-up, or testing rates between arms. CONCLUSIONS: Routine PRO assessment in HF clinic visits did not impact patient-reported quality of life or other clinical outcomes. Alternate strategies and settings for embedding PROs into routine clinical care should be tested.

3.
J Patient Exp ; 11: 23743735241241179, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38515761

RESUMO

The use of telehealth, specifically virtual visits, has increased and adoption continues. Providers need effective training for how to communicate with patients to develop a connection during virtual visits. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a course called Mastering Presence in Virtual Visits. Results show that although providers perceive lack of time, technology issues, and lacking experiential knowledge as barriers to enacting course behaviors, the course was feasible and acceptable. Following the course, providers rated key course behaviors as helpful for practice, and 80.7% of providers were likely to recommend the course to a colleague. The course shifted provider perceptions of the purpose, patient experience, and procedures in virtual visits. Prior to the course, providers perceived virtual visits as fundamentally different than in-person visits. However, after the course, they recognized the importance of connection in virtual visits and how to foster that connection. Providers continue to require support in conducting high-quality virtual visits. Online, asynchronous courses, developed in partnership with providers, are feasible and effective for encouraging behavior change. Key findings: When asked on a needs assessment in 2020, communication strategies to connect with patients in virtual visits were a top provider need. Partnering with providers to create online, communication training content is effective for increasing the acceptability of courses about virtual visits. Asynchronous, online courses can meet provider needs for communication strategies to connect with patients in virtual visits.

4.
J Clin Transl Endocrinol ; 35: 100336, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38545460

RESUMO

Background: Post-operative fluid restriction after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for pituitary tumors may effectively prevent delayed hyponatremia, the most common cause of readmission. However, implementation of individualized fluid restriction interventions after discharge is often complex and poses challenges for provider and patient. The purpose of this study was to understand the factors necessary for successful implementation of fluid restriction and discharge care protocols following TSS. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with fifteen patients and four caregivers on fluid discharge protocols were conducted following TSS. Patients and caregivers who had surgery before and after the implementation of updated discharge protocols were interviewed. Data were analyzed inductively using a procedure informed by rapid and thematic analysis. Results: Most patients and caregivers perceived fluid restriction protocols as acceptable and feasible when indicated. Facilitators to the protocols included clear communication about the purpose of and strategies for fluid restriction, access to the care team, and involvement of patients' caregivers in care discussions. Barriers included patient confusion about differences in the care plan between teams, physical discomfort of fluid restriction, increased burden of tracking fluids during recovery, and lack of clarity surrounding desmopressin prescriptions. Conclusion: Outpatient fluid restriction protocols are a feasible intervention following pituitary surgery but requires frequent patient communication and education. This evaluation highlights the importance of patient engagement and feedback to effectively develop and implement complex clinical interventions.

5.
Patient Educ Couns ; 122: 108130, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38242012

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Patient mindsets influence health outcomes; yet trainings focused on care teams' understanding, recognizing, and shaping patient mindsets do not exist. This paper aims to describe and evaluate initial reception of the "Medicine Plus Mindset" training program. METHODS: Clinicians and staff at five primary care clinics (N = 186) in the San Francisco Bay Area received the Medicine Plus Mindset Training. The Medicine Plus Mindset training consists of a two-hour training program plus a one-hour follow-up session including: (a) evidence to help care teams understand patients' mindsets' influence on treatment; (b) a framework to support care teams in identifying specific patient mindsets; and (c) strategies to shape patient mindsets. RESULTS: We used a common model (Kirkpatrick) to evaluate the training based on participants' reaction, learnings, and behavior. Reaction: Participants rated the training as highly useful and enjoyable. Learnings: The training increased the perceived importance of mindsets in healthcare and improved self-reported efficacy of using mindsets in practice. Behavior: The training increased reported frequency of shaping patient mindsets. CONCLUSIONS: Development of this training and the study's results introduce a promising and feasible approach for integrating mindset into clinical practice. Practice Implications Mindset training can add a valuable dimension to clinical care and should be integrated into training and clinical practice.


Assuntos
Aprendizagem , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Humanos , São Francisco
6.
Learn Health Syst ; 8(1): e10364, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38249838

RESUMO

Introduction: Tracking adaptations during implementation can help assess and interpret outcomes. The framework for reporting adaptations and modifications-expanded (FRAME) provides a structured approach to characterize adaptations. We applied the FRAME across multiple health services projects, and developed an analytic approach to assess the impact of adaptations. Methods: Mixed methods analysis of research diaries from seven quality improvement (QI) and research projects during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the FRAME as a codebook, discrete adaptations were described and categorized. We then conducted a three-step analysis plan: (1) calculated the frequency of adaptations by FRAME categories across projects; (2) qualitatively assessed the impact of adaptations on project goals; and (3) qualitatively assessed relationships between adaptations within projects to thematically consolidate adaptations to generate more explanatory value on how adaptations influenced intervention progress and outcomes. Results: Between March and July 2020, 42 adaptations were identified across seven health services projects. The majority of adaptations related to training or evaluation (52.4%) with the goal of maintaining the feasibility (66.7%) of executing projects during the pandemic. Five FRAME constructs offered the most explanatory benefit to assess the impact of adaptations on program and evaluation goals, providing the basis for creating an analytic approach dubbed the "A-FRAME," analysis of FRAME data. Using the A-FRAME, the 42 adaptations were consolidated into 17 succinct adaptations. Two QI projects discontinued altogether. Intervention adaptations related to staffing, training, or delivery, while evaluation adaptations included design, recruitment, and data collection adjustments. Conclusions: By sifting qualitative data about adaptations into the A-FRAME, implementers and researchers can succinctly describe how adaptations affect interventions and their evaluations. The simple and concise presentation of information using the A-FRAME matrix can help implementers and evaluators account for the influence of adaptations on program outcomes.

7.
BMJ Open ; 14(1): e075920, 2024 01 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38216178

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Employee Occupational Health ('occupational health') clinicians have expansive perspectives of the experience of healthcare personnel. Integrating mental health into the purview of occupational health is a newer approach that could combat historical limitations of healthcare personnel mental health programmes, which have been isolated and underused. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to document innovation and opportunities for supporting healthcare personnel mental health through occupational health clinicians. This work was part of a national qualitative needs assessment of employee occupational health clinicians during COVID-19 who were very much at the centre of organisational responses. DESIGN: This qualitative needs assessment included key informant interviews obtained using snowball sampling methods. PARTICIPANTS: We interviewed 43 US Veterans Health Administration occupational health clinicians from 29 facilities. APPROACH: This analysis focused on personnel mental health needs and opportunities, using consensus coding of interview transcripts and modified member checking. KEY RESULTS: Three major opportunities to support mental health through occupational health involved: (1) expanded mental health needs of healthcare personnel, including opportunities to support work-related concerns (eg, traumatic deployments), home-based concerns and bereavement (eg, working with chaplains); (2) leveraging expanded roles and protocols to address healthcare personnel mental health concerns, including opportunities in expanding occupational health roles, cross-disciplinary partnerships (eg, with employee assistance programmes (EAP)) and process/protocol (eg, acute suicidal ideation pathways) and (3) need for supporting occupational health clinicians' own mental health, including opportunities to address overwork/burn-out with adequate staffing/resources. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational health can enact strategies to support personnel mental health: to structurally sustain attention, use social cognition tools (eg, suicidality protocols or expanded job descriptions); to leverage distributed attention, enhance interdisciplinary collaboration (eg, chaplains for bereavement support or EAP) and to equip systems with resources and allow for flexibility during crises, including increased staffing.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Saúde Ocupacional , Humanos , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde
8.
J Eval Clin Pract ; 30(1): 107-118, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37459156

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Exercise stress echocardiograms (stress echos) are overused, whereas exercise stress electrocardiograms (stress ECGs) can be an appropriate, lower-cost substitute. In this post hoc, mixed methods evaluation, we assessed an initiative promoting value-based, guideline-concordant ordering practices in primary care (PC) and cardiology clinics. METHODS: Change in percent of stress ECGs ordered of all exercise stress tests (stress ECGs and echos) was calculated between three periods: baseline (January 2019-February 2020); Period 1 with reduced stress ECG report turnaround time + PC-targeted education (began June 2020); and Period 2 with the addition of electronic health record-based alternative alert (AA) providing point-of-care clinical decision support. The AA was deployed in two of five PC clinics in July 2020, two additional PC clinics in January 2021, and one of four cardiology clinics in February 2021. Nineteen primary care providers (PCPs) and five cardiologists were interviewed in Period 2. RESULTS: Clinicians reported reducing ECG report turnaround time was crucial for adoption. PCPs specifically reported that value-based education helped change their practice. In PC, the percent of stress ECGs ordered increased by 38% ± 6% (SE) (p < 0.0001) from baseline to Period 1. Most PCPs identified the AA as the most impactful initiative, yet stress ECG ordering did not change (6% ± 6%; p = 0.34) between Periods 1 and 2. In contrast, cardiologists reportedly relied on their expertise rather than AAs, yet their stress ECGs orders increased from Period 1 to 2 to a larger degree in the cardiology clinic with the AA (12% ± 5%; p = 0.01) than clinics without the AA (6% ± 2%; p = 0.01). The percent of stress ECGs ordered was higher in Period 2 than baseline for both specialties (both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: This initiative influenced ordering behaviour in PC and cardiology clinics. However, clinicians' perceptions of the initiative varied between specialties and did not always align with the observed behaviour change.


Assuntos
Cardiologia , Teste de Esforço , Humanos , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Padrões de Prática Médica , Atenção Primária à Saúde
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(12): e2349937, 2023 Dec 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38153730

RESUMO

Importance: Physicians and medical students who desire to build families face significant barriers due to the structure and culture of medicine. Objective: To understand the barriers and facilitators to family building for all people in medicine-not only individuals who can become pregnant-through an open-ended, qualitative analysis of survey responses. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study used a survey conducted in April and May 2021 with a broad sample of physicians and medical students. Participants were recruited through social media, targeting physician and medical student communities. Physicians (residents, fellows, and physicians in independent practice) and medical students of all gender identities and sexual orientations were included. Informed by a postpositivist approach, coding reliability thematic analysis was performed on 3 open-ended survey questions on family-building experiences (what they would do differently, what advice they have for others, and anything else they wished to share). Main Outcomes and Measures: Identified themes were mapped to the social-ecological model, a model used in public health to examine how a spectrum of factors is associated with health outcomes. Results: A total of 2025 people (1860 [92%] women; 299 [15%] Asian, 151 [8%] Black, and 1303 [64%] White; 1730 [85%] heterosexual; and 1200 [59%] physicians who had completed training) responded to at least 1 of 3 open-ended questions. Themes mapped to social-ecological model levels included: (1) cultural, eg, medical training being at odds with family building; (2) organizational, eg, lack of institutional support for the range of family-building routes; (3) interpersonal, eg, impact of social support on family building; and (4) individual, eg, socioeconomic status and other individual factors that facilitate or inhibit family building. Recommendations to improve family-building experiences include implementing family-building curricula at medical schools, providing adequate parental leave for all physicians and medical students who become parents, and providing insurance coverage for all family-building routes. Conclusions and Relevance: In this qualitative study of physicians and medical students, self-reported barriers to family building were identified at each level of the social-ecological model. Addressing these barriers is critical to creating a more equitable family-building environment for physicians and medical students.


Assuntos
Características da Família , Médicos , Estudantes de Medicina , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Autorrelato
10.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 12(24): e030042, 2023 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38108253

RESUMO

The United States witnessed a nearly 4-fold increase in personal health care expenditures between 1980 and 2010. Despite innovations and obvious benefits to health, participants enrolled in clinical trials still do not accurately represent the racial and ethnic composition of patients nationally or globally. This lack of diversity in cohorts limits the generalizability and significance of results among all populations and has deep repercussions for patient equity. To advance diversity in clinical trials, robust evidence for the most effective strategies for recruitment of diverse participants is needed. A major limitation of previous literature on clinical trial diversity is the lack of control or comparator groups for different strategies. To date, interventions have focused primarily on (1) community-based interventions, (2) institutional practices, and (3) digital health systems. This review article outlines prior intervention strategies across these 3 categories and considers health policy and ethical incentives for substantiation before US Food and Drug Administration approval. There are no current studies that comprehensively compare these interventions against one another. The American Heart Association Strategically Focused Research Network on the Science of Diversity in Clinical Trials represents a multicenter, collaborative network between Stanford School of Medicine and Morehouse School of Medicine created to understand the barriers to diversity in clinical trials by contemporaneous head-to-head interventional strategies accessing digital, institutional, and community-based recruitment strategies to produce informed recruitment strategies targeted to improve underrepresented patient representation in clinical trials.


Assuntos
American Heart Association , Instalações de Saúde , Estados Unidos , Humanos , Política de Saúde , Assistência Médica , Diversidade Cultural , Estudos Multicêntricos como Assunto
12.
JMIR Cardio ; 7: e44732, 2023 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37930755

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is underdiagnosed, partially due to a high prevalence of atypical symptoms and a lack of physician and patient awareness. Implementing clinical decision support tools powered by machine learning algorithms may help physicians identify high-risk patients for diagnostic workup. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a novel machine learning-based screening tool for PAD among physician and patient stakeholders using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). METHODS: We performed semistructured interviews with physicians and patients from the Stanford University Department of Primary Care and Population Health, Division of Cardiology, and Division of Vascular Medicine. Participants answered questions regarding their perceptions toward machine learning and clinical decision support for PAD detection. Rapid thematic analysis was performed using templates incorporating codes from CFIR constructs. RESULTS: A total of 12 physicians (6 primary care physicians and 6 cardiovascular specialists) and 14 patients were interviewed. Barriers to implementation arose from 6 CFIR constructs: complexity, evidence strength and quality, relative priority, external policies and incentives, knowledge and beliefs about intervention, and individual identification with the organization. Facilitators arose from 5 CFIR constructs: intervention source, relative advantage, learning climate, patient needs and resources, and knowledge and beliefs about intervention. Physicians felt that a machine learning-powered diagnostic tool for PAD would improve patient care but cited limited time and authority in asking patients to undergo additional screening procedures. Patients were interested in having their physicians use this tool but raised concerns about such technologies replacing human decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: Patient- and physician-reported barriers toward the implementation of a machine learning-powered PAD diagnostic tool followed four interdependent themes: (1) low familiarity or urgency in detecting PAD; (2) concerns regarding the reliability of machine learning; (3) differential perceptions of responsibility for PAD care among primary care versus specialty physicians; and (4) patient preference for physicians to remain primary interpreters of health care data. Facilitators followed two interdependent themes: (1) enthusiasm for clinical use of the predictive model and (2) willingness to incorporate machine learning into clinical care. Implementation of machine learning-powered diagnostic tools for PAD should leverage provider support while simultaneously educating stakeholders on the importance of early PAD diagnosis. High predictive validity is necessary for machine learning models but not sufficient for implementation.

13.
Acad Pediatr ; 2023 Aug 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37659602

RESUMO

Systemic racism embedded within the US health care system results in disproportionately worse health outcomes for Black pediatric patients and their caregivers. One meaningful mechanism through which these health disparities persist is through discriminatory treatment and anti-Black bias from clinicians. Strengthening care provided to Black pediatric patients and their caregivers requires that clinicians adopt culturally tailored communication strategies that promote health equity and counter racism. We conducted a scoping review of evidence-based communication practices in the medical literature that improve care for Black pediatric patients. We mapped the specific practices to the Presence 5 for Racial Justice framework and identified cross-cutting themes to describe practices across the five domains. There are three cross-cutting themes that underlie the recommended practices: 1) promote unbiased implementation of clinician communication strategies (eg, providing equitable recommendations for preventive care), 2) tailor care to Black pediatric patients (eg, explore the importance of the family unit), and 3) address racism experienced by Black pediatric patients and their caregivers (eg, acknowledge any previous negative experiences with the health care system). This review highlights communication practices that clinicians can adopt to build trusting relationships, empower Black families, and promote racial justice in clinical care. Future opportunities include expanding to system level change and validating these practices with patients and clinicians.

14.
JMIR Dermatol ; 6: e43389, 2023 May 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37632927

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In-hospital dermatological care has shifted from dedicated dermatology wards to consultation services, and some consulted patients may require postdischarge follow-up in outpatient dermatology. Safe and timely care transitions from inpatient-to-outpatient specialty care are critical for patient health, but communication around these transitions can be disjointed, and workflows can be complex. OBJECTIVE: In this 3-phase quality improvement effort, we developed and evaluated an intervention that leveraged an electronic health record (EHR) feature, known as SmartPhrase, to enable a new workflow to improve transitions from inpatient care to outpatient dermatology. METHODS: Phase 1 (February-March 2021) included interviews with patients and process mapping with key stakeholders to identify gaps and inform an intervention: a SmartPhrase table and associated workflow to promote collection of patient information needed for scheduling follow-up and closed-loop communication between dermatology and scheduling teams. In phase 2 (April-May 2021), semistructured interviews-with dermatologists (n=5), dermatology residents (n=5), and schedulers (n=6)-identified pain points and refinements. In phase 3, the intervention was evaluated by triangulating data from these interviews with measured changes in scheduling efficiency, visit completion, and messaging volume preimplementation (January-February 2021) and postimplementation (April-May 2021). RESULTS: Preintervention pain points included unclear workflow for care transitions, limited patient input in follow-up planning, multiple messaging channels (eg, EHR based, email, and phone messages), and time-inefficient patient tracking. The intervention addressed most pain points; interviewees reported the intervention was easy to adopt and improved scheduling efficiency, workload, and patient involvement. More visits were completed within the desired timeframe of 14 days after discharge during the postimplementation period (21/47, 45%) than the preimplementation period (28/41, 68%; P=.03). The messaging workload also decreased from 88 scheduling-related messages sent for 25 patients before implementation to 30 messages for 8 patients after implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Inpatient-to-outpatient specialty care transitions are complex and involve multiple stakeholders, thus requiring multifaceted solutions. With deliberate evaluation, broad stakeholder input, and iteration, we designed and implemented a successful solution using a standard EHR feature, SmartPhrase, integrated into a standardized workflow to improve the timeliness of posthospital specialty care and reduce workload.

15.
JMIR Form Res ; 7: e43258, 2023 Aug 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37610798

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Innovative solutions to nursing care are needed to address nurse, health system, patient, and caregiver concerns related to nursing wellness, work flexibility and control, workforce retention and pipeline, and access to patient care. One innovative approach includes a novel health care delivery model enabling nurse-led, off-hours wound care (PocketRN) to triage emergent concerns and provide additional patient health education via telehealth. OBJECTIVE: This pilot study aimed to evaluate the implementation of PocketRN from the perspective of nurses and patients. METHODS: Patients and part-time or per-diem, wound care-certified and generalist nurses were recruited through the Stanford Medicine Advanced Wound Care Center in 2021 and 2022. Qualitative data included semistructured interviews with nurses and patients and clinical documentation review. Quantitative data included app use and brief end-of-interaction in-app satisfaction surveys. RESULTS: This pilot study suggests that an app-based nursing care delivery model is acceptable, clinically appropriate, and feasible. Low technology literacy had a modest effect on initial patient adoption; this barrier was addressed with built-in outreach and by simplifying the patient experience (eg, via phone instead of video calls). This approach was acceptable for users, despite total patient enrollment and use numbers being lower than anticipated (N=49; 17/49, 35% of patients used the app at least once beyond the orientation call). We interviewed 10 patients: 7 who had used the app were satisfied with it and reported that real-time advice after hours reduced anxiety, and 3 who had not used the app after enrollment reported having other resources for health care advice and noted their perception that this tool was meant for urgent issues, which did not occur for them. Interviewed nurses (n=10) appreciated working from home, and they reported comfort with the scope of practice and added quality of care facilitated by video capabilities; there was interest in additional wound care-specific training for nonspecialized nurses. Nurses were able to provide direct patient care over the web, including the few participating nurses who were unable to perform in-person care (n=2). CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation provides insights into the integration of technology into standard health care services, such as in-clinic wound care. Using in-system nurses with access to electronic medical records and specialized knowledge facilitated app integration and continuity of care. This care delivery model satisfied nurse desires for flexible and remote work and reduced patient anxiety, potentially reducing postoperative wound care complications. Feasibility was negatively impacted by patients' technology literacy and few language options; additional patient training, education, and language support are needed to support equitable access. Adoption was impacted by a lack of perceived need for additional care; lower-touch or higher-acuity settings with a longer wait between visits could be a better fit for this type of nurse-led care.

16.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 20(6): 570-584, 2023 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37302811

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore factors influencing the expansion of the peer-based technologist Coaching Model Program (CMP) from its origins in mammography and ultrasound to all imaging modalities at a single tertiary academic medical center. METHODS: After success in mammography and ultrasound, efforts to expand the CMP across all Stanford Radiology modalities commenced in September 2020. From February to April 2021 as lead coaches piloted the program in these novel modalities, an implementation science team designed and conducted semistructured stakeholder interviews and took observational notes at learning collaborative meetings. Data were analyzed using inductive-deductive approaches informed by two implementation science frameworks. RESULTS: Twenty-seven interviews were collected across modalities with radiologists (n = 5), managers (n = 6), coaches (n = 11), and technologists (n = 5) and analyzed with observational notes from six learning meetings with 25 to 40 recurrent participants. The number of technologists, the complexity of examinations, or the existence of standardized auditing criteria for each modality influenced CMP adaptations. Facilitators underlying program expansion included cross-modality learning collaborative, thoughtful pairing of coach and technologist, flexibility in feedback frequency and format, radiologist engagement, and staged rollout. Barriers included lack of protected coaching time, lack of pre-existing audit criteria for some modalities, and the need for privacy of auditing and feedback data. DISCUSSION: Adaptations to each radiology modality and communication of these learnings were key to disseminating the existing CMP to new modalities across the entire department. An intermodality learning collaborative can facilitate the dissemination of evidence-based practices across modalities.


Assuntos
Tutoria , Radiologia , Humanos , Mamografia , Ultrassonografia , Radiologistas
17.
JAMA Netw Open ; 6(5): e2313178, 2023 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37171816

RESUMO

Importance: Understanding of the interplay between the electronic health record (EHR), health care team relations, and physician well-being is currently lacking. Approaches to cultivate interpersonal interactions may be necessary to complement advancements in health information technology with high-quality team function. Objective: To examine ways in which the EHR, health care team functioning, and physician well-being intersect and interact. Design, Setting, and Participants: Secondary qualitative analysis of semistructured interview data from 2 studies used keyword-in-context approaches to identify excerpts related to teams. Thematic analysis was conducted using pattern coding, then organized using the relationship-centered organization model. Two health care organizations in California from March 16 to October 13, 2017, and February 28 to April 21, 2022, participated, with respondents including attending and resident physicians. Main Outcome and Measures: Across data sets, themes centered around the interactions between the EHR, health care team functioning, and physician well-being. The first study data focused on EHR-related distressing events and their role in attending physician and resident physician emotions and actions. The second study focused on EHR use and daily EHR irritants. Results: The 73 respondents included attending physicians (53 [73%]) and resident physicians (20 [27%]). Demographic data were not collected. Participants worked in ambulatory specialties (33 [45%]), hospital medicine (10 [14%]), and surgery (10 [14%]). The EHR was reported to be the dominant communication modality among all teams. Interviewees indicated that the EHR facilitates task-related communication and is well suited to completing simple, uncomplicated tasks. However, EHR-based communication limited the rich communication and social connection required for building relationships and navigating conflict. The EHR was found to negatively impact team function by promoting disagreement and introducing areas of conflict into team relationships related to medical-legal pressures, role confusion, and undefined norms around EHR-related communication. In addition, interviewees expressed that physician EHR-related distress affects interactions within the team, eroding team well-being. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, the EHR supported task-oriented and efficient communication among team members to get work done and care for patients; however, participants felt that the technology shifts attention away from the human needs of the care team that are necessary for developing relationships, building trust, and resolving conflicts. Interventions to cultivate interpersonal interactions and team function are necessary to complement the efficiency benefits of health information technology.


Assuntos
Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Médicos , Humanos , Comunicação , Pessoal de Saúde , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente
18.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes ; 16(5): e009677, 2023 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37114990

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) may improve care for patients with heart failure. The Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire-12 (KCCQ-12) is a patient survey that captures symptom frequency, symptom burden, physical limitations, social limitations, and quality of life. Despite the utility of PROs and the KCCQ-12, the implementation and routine use of these measures can be difficult. We conducted an evaluation of clinician perceptions of the KCCQ-12 to identify barriers and facilitators to implementation into clinical practice. METHODS: We conducted interviews with cardiologists from 4 institutions across the United States and Canada (n=16) and observed clinic visits at 1 institution in Northern California (n=5). Qualitative analysis was conducted in 2 rounds: (1) rapid analysis constructed around major themes related to the aims of the study and (2) content analysis with codes derived from the rapid analysis and implementation science. RESULTS: Most heart failure physicians and advanced practice clinicians reported that the KCCQ-12 was acceptable, appropriate, and useful in clinical care. Clinician engagement efforts, trialability, and the straightforward design of the KCCQ-12 facilitated its use in clinical care. Further opportunities identified to facilitate implementation include more streamlined integration into the electronic health record and comprehensive staff education on PROs. Participants highlighted that the KCCQ-12 was useful in clinic visits to improve the consistency of patient history taking, focus patient-clinician conversations, collect a more accurate account of patient quality of life, track trends in patient well-being over time, and refine clinical decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: In this qualitative study, clinicians reported that the KCCQ-12 enhanced several aspects of heart failure patient care. Use of the KCCQ-12 was facilitated by a robust clinician engagement campaign and the design of the KCCQ-12 itself. Future implementation of PROs in heart failure clinic should focus on streamlining electronic health record integration and providing additional staff education on the value of PROs. REGISTRATION: URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT04164004.


Assuntos
Insuficiência Cardíaca , Qualidade de Vida , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Insuficiência Cardíaca/diagnóstico , Insuficiência Cardíaca/terapia , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente , Canadá , Nível de Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf ; 49(3): 138-148, 2023 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36732115

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To understand neurologists' experiences and perspectives on patient satisfaction feedback and its impact on personal well-being and behavior. METHODS: From May to June 2021, the researchers conducted 19 semistructured interviews with neurologists from a large academic medical center. Clinical Performance Feedback Intervention Theory informed a combined inductive and deductive thematic analysis of the qualitative data, which focused on perceptions of current feedback practices, its impact on physician behavior, and recommendations for improvement. RESULTS: Participants tended to be female (n = 12/19, 63.2%), aged 30-39 (n = 8/19, 42.1%), white (n = 9/19, 47.4%), and were 10+ years into clinical practice (n = 18/19, 94.7%). Physicians were receptive to feedback overall, but perceptions varied by feedback type. Physicians preferred informal feedback (delivered unprompted directly by patients), given its tendency toward actionability. They disliked formal feedback (derived from anonymous surveys) due to low actionability, bias and validity issues, lack of contextual considerations, delivery through public reports, and links to financial incentives. Nearly all physicians reported formal feedback programs had the potential to negatively affect well-being and were not beneficial to their practice; a few reported adjusting their clinical practice to improve patient satisfaction performance. Five recommendations to improve patient satisfaction feedback programs emerged: Align on feedback intent, acknowledge survey limitations during program administration, increase actionability of feedback through specificity and control, support direct patient-physician feedback and problem resolution, and support empathetic integration of feedback. CONCLUSION: Understanding physician perceptions of current approaches to patient satisfaction feedback offers the opportunity to shape subsequent collection and distribution methods to improve physician performance and optimize professional fulfillment.


Assuntos
Neurologia , Médicos , Humanos , Feminino , Retroalimentação , Satisfação do Paciente , Relações Médico-Paciente
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...