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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38822753

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate tumor control and facial nerve outcomes after gross-total (GTR), near-total (NTR), and subtotal resection (STR) of sporadic vestibular schwannomas (VS). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched in August 2021 through inception following PRISMA guidelines. REVIEW METHODS: English language articles reporting tumor control and facial nerve outcomes of adults (≥18 years) with NTR and STR of VS were evaluated. Study characteristics, demographics data, tumor characteristics, type of surgical intervention, and outcome measures on tumor control and facial nerve function were collected. Pooled relative risk (RR) estimates for tumor recurrence and facial nerve outcomes were calculated and stratified by extent of resection. RESULTS: From an initial search of 2504 articles, 48 studies were included in the analysis. When comparing 1108 patients who underwent NTR to 3349 patients with GTR, the pooled RR of recurrence in the NTR cohort was 2.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65-5.24, P = .0002). When comparing 1016 patients who underwent STR to 6171 patients with GTR, the pooled RR of recurrence in the STR cohort was 11.50 (95% CI 6.64-19.92, P < .0001). Estimates for risk of tumor regrowth for less-than-complete resection are presented. There was no elevated risk of adverse facial nerve outcome (defined as House-Brackmann grade III and above) in each category of extent of resection compared to GTR. CONCLUSION: Extent of resection predicts risk of tumor recurrence/regrowth following microsurgical resection. Favorable facial nerve outcome should be weighed against the increased risk of regrowth and the potential need for further treatment.

2.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(5): e381-e384, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728553

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine patient preference after stapedotomy versus cochlear implantation in a unique case of a patient with symmetrical profound mixed hearing loss and similar postoperative speech perception improvement. PATIENTS: An adult patient with bilateral symmetrical far advanced otosclerosis, with profound mixed hearing loss. INTERVENTION: Stapedotomy in the left ear, cochlear implantation in the right ear. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Performance on behavioral audiometry, and subjective report of hearing and intervention preference. RESULTS: A patient successfully underwent left stapedotomy and subsequent cochlear implantation on the right side, per patient preference. Preoperative audiometric characteristics were similar between ears (pure-tone average [PTA] [R: 114; L: 113 dB]; word recognition score [WRS]: 22%). Postprocedural audiometry demonstrated significant improvement after stapedotomy (PTA: 59 dB, WRS: 75%) and from cochlear implant (PTA: 20 dB, WRS: 60%). The patient subjectively reported a preference for the cochlear implant ear despite having substantial gains from stapedotomy. A nuanced discussion highlighting potentially overlooked benefits of cochlear implants in far advanced otosclerosis is conducted. CONCLUSION: In comparison with stapedotomy and hearing aids, cochlear implantation generally permits greater access to sound among patients with far advanced otosclerosis. Though the cochlear implant literature mainly focuses on speech perception outcomes, an underappreciated benefit of cochlear implantation is the high likelihood of achieving "normal" sound levels across the audiogram.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Otosclerose , Percepção da Fala , Cirurgia do Estribo , Humanos , Otosclerose/cirurgia , Cirurgia do Estribo/métodos , Implante Coclear/métodos , Percepção da Fala/fisiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Perda Auditiva Condutiva-Neurossensorial Mista/cirurgia , Audiometria de Tons Puros , Preferência do Paciente , Feminino , Adulto
3.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(5): e406-e410, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728556

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the rare process of osteolytic labyrinthitis, previously referred to as labyrinthine sequestrum, which involves progressive obliteration of the bony and membranous labyrinth with eventual supplantation with soft tissue and, in some cases, bony sequestrum. PATIENTS: Three patients with diverse presentations of osteolytic labyrinthitis from two tertiary care academic medical centers. INTERVENTIONS: Case series report analyzing the relevant clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and surgical data on our patients with osteolytic labyrinthitis and comparing these index cases to the existing literature. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We describe the varying image findings seen in osteolytic labyrinthitis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Also, we report successful surgical intervention and hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation in patients with osteolytic labyrinthitis. RESULTS: Our three patients presented with profound sudden sensorineural hearing loss and vertigo consistent with labyrinthitis. None of the three patients had a history of chronic otitis media. Imaging workup revealed varying degrees of erosion to the otic capsule bone demonstrating the spectrum of disease seen in osteolytic labyrinthitis. Although two cases showed osteolytic changes to the semicircular canals and vestibule, the first case revealed frank bony sequestrum within the obliterated labyrinth. The three cases were taken for surgical debridement and cochlear implantation. CONCLUSIONS: We propose the new term, osteolytic labyrinthitis-previously referred to as labyrinthine sequestrum-to describe the rare spectrum of disease characterized by destruction of the osseous and membranous labyrinth and potential supplantation with bony sequestrum. Cochlear implantation is a viable option in selected patients with osteolytic labyrinthitis.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Labirintite , Humanos , Implante Coclear/métodos , Labirintite/cirurgia , Labirintite/complicações , Labirintite/diagnóstico por imagem , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/cirurgia , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/diagnóstico por imagem , Perda Auditiva Neurossensorial/etiologia , Adulto , Resultado do Tratamento , Osteólise/diagnóstico por imagem , Osteólise/cirurgia , Osteólise/complicações , Idoso , Vertigem/cirurgia , Vertigem/etiologia , Vertigem/diagnóstico por imagem
4.
World Neurosurg ; 2024 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38789032

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Radiation treatment, particularly at a young age, creates theoretical risk for long-term adverse radiation effects, including the development of malignancy. The literature is sparse on radiation-induced vestibular schwannomas (VSs). METHODS: A retrospective review was performed for cases of suspected radiation-induced VS at 2 high-volume centers. Only cases where radiation included coverage of the posterior fossa were included with those diagnosed within 3 years of radiation treatment being excluded. Patient and tumor characteristics were collected. A systematic literature review was also performed for any previously published series on radiation-induced VS. RESULTS: Eight cases of radiation-induced VS were identified with a median follow-up 125 months (range 7-131). The median age at incident radiation was 15 years (range 2-46). The median age at VS diagnosis was 57 years (range 26-83) with median interval from radiation to diagnosis of 51-years (range 15-66). The median tumor size was 6 mm (range 3-21). Two patients underwent surgical resection. Lesions were described as soft and highly vascular, with medium to high adherence to the facial nerve. Five articles with a total of 52 patients were identified, median age at VS diagnosis was 42-years (range 23-73) with a median interval from radiation to diagnosis of 19 years (range 15-23). CONCLUSIONS: The development of VS following radiation exposure appears rare and our understanding of the condition remains incomplete. Further studies are required to determine the best management of these patients and determine whether there is a causative relationship between radiation exposure and the development of VS.

5.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(5): 587-593, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728563

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe outcomes of patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS) who underwent repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after primary SRS failure. STUDY DESIGN: Multi-institutional historical cohort study. SETTING: Five tertiary care referral centers. PATIENTS: Adults ≥18 years old with sporadic VS. INTERVENTION: Primary and repeat treatment with SRS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Microsurgery-free survival after repeat SRS. RESULTS: Across institutions, 32 patients underwent repeat SRS after primary SRS. Most patients (74%) had tumors with cerebellopontine angle extension at primary SRS (median size, 13.5 mm [interquartile range, 7.5-18.8] mm). After primary SRS, patients underwent repeat SRS at a median of 4.8 years (interquartile range, 3.2-5.7 yr). For treatment modality, 30 (94%) patients received gamma knife for primary treatment and 31 (97%) patients received gamma knife as their repeat treatment. Median tumor volume increased from 0.970 cm3 at primary SRS to 2.200 cm3 at repeat SRS. Facial nerve function worsened in two patients after primary SRS and in two patients after repeat SRS. There were no instances of intracranial complications after repeat SRS. Microsurgery-free survival rates (95% confidence interval; number still at risk) at 1, 3, and 5 years after repeat SRS were 97% (90-100%, 24), 84% (71-100%, 13), and 68% (48-96%, 6), respectively. There was one occurrence of malignancy diagnosed after repeat radiosurgery. CONCLUSION: Overall, repeat SRS for sporadic VS has comparable risk profile, but lower rates of tumor control, compared with primary SRS.


Assuntos
Neuroma Acústico , Radiocirurgia , Reoperação , Falha de Tratamento , Humanos , Neuroma Acústico/cirurgia , Neuroma Acústico/radioterapia , Radiocirurgia/efeitos adversos , Radiocirurgia/métodos , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Masculino , Idoso , Adulto , Reoperação/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos de Coortes , Resultado do Tratamento , Microcirurgia/métodos
7.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 45(4): 104337, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38677145

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe an AI model to facilitate adult cochlear implant candidacy prediction based on basic demographical data and standard behavioral audiometry. METHODS: A machine-learning approach using retrospective demographic and audiometric data to predict candidacy CNC word scores and AzBio sentence in quiet scores was performed at a tertiary academic center. Data for the model were derived from adults completing cochlear implant candidacy testing between January 2011 and March 2023. Comparison of the prediction model to other published prediction tools and benchmarks was performed. RESULTS: The final dataset included 770 adults, encompassing 1045 AzBio entries, and 1373 CNC entries. Isophoneme scores and word recognition scores exhibited strongest importance to both the CNC and AzBio prediction models, followed by standard pure tone average and low-frequency pure tone average. The mean absolute difference between the predicted and actual score was 15 percentage points for AzBio sentences in quiet and 13 percentage points for CNC word scores, approximating anticipated test-retest constraints inherent to the variables incorporated into the model. Our final combined model achieved an accuracy of 87 % (sensitivity: 90 %; precision: 80 %). CONCLUSION: We present an adaptive AI model that predicts adult cochlear implant candidacy based on routine behavioral audiometric and basic demographical data. Implementation efforts include a public-facing online prediction tool and accompanying smartphone program, an embedded notification flag in the electronic medical record to alert providers of potential candidates, and a program to retrospectively engage past patients who may be eligible for cochlear implantation based on audiogram results.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Implantes Cocleares , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Feminino , Adulto , Estudos Retrospectivos , Implante Coclear/métodos , Idoso , Audiometria/métodos , Aprendizado de Máquina , Seleção de Pacientes , Adulto Jovem , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais
8.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 45(4): 104339, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38677146

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine current practices and opinions of cochlear implant (CI) providers with respect to post-implantation auditory training. METHODS: A survey was submitted to the American Cochlear Implant Alliance membership that reviewed current practice and opinions with respect to post-implantation auditory training for adult CI recipients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Review of respondent practice, center volume, role on CI team, and current usage and opinions surrounding auditory training, including resources used and schedule of use. RESULTS: Most (79 %) of the 79 CI providers surveyed reported working at academic centers, 34 % at high-volume centers (>150 CIs/year), and 38 % were surgeons. Nearly all (99 %) respondents recommend auditory training for new adult CI recipients. Just over half (52 %) provide auditory training resources to the patient in the form of a broad list of patient-directed exercises from which a patient could select. A specific training resource, generally a computer-based auditory training program (e.g., AngelSound™), is recommended to patients by 30 % of the respondents. Regarding timing of rehabilitation, median preferred start time was 0 months (interquartile range [IQR] 0-1) post-activation. Sessions were preferably performed for a median of 3 h per week (IQR 2-4) and continued for a median of 12 months (IQR 6-12). Recommendations for auditory training were fairly consistent between surgeon and non-surgeon providers and by center volume. Non-surgeons more often had specific recommendations on training resources, benefits of music, and training condition (e.g., contralateral ear plugged). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a lack of clinical guidelines for adult post-implantation auditory training, a cross-sectional survey of providers' current practices and opinions demonstrates that these services are widely recommended and regarded as valuable. Training is almost universally patient-directed and believed to be most beneficial if started soon after activation. Interestingly, specific recommendations for which training approaches to use are not common, suggesting a gap in provider knowledge of which resources are most efficacious.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Implantes Cocleares , Humanos , Adulto , Inquéritos e Questionários , Padrões de Prática Médica , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Masculino , Feminino
9.
Laryngoscope Investig Otolaryngol ; 9(2): e1246, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38596229

RESUMO

Objectives: Online educational platforms with open access have seen a growing adoption in the field of medical education. However, the extent of their global usage is still unclear. To fill this knowledge gap, our objective is to examine the usage patterns of two renowned open-access resources in Otolaryngology. This includes identifying the most sought-after topics and understanding the demographics of their users. Methods: Retrospective study of web analytics data between 2016 and 2021 extracted from the Headmirror.com and Mayo Clinic Otolaryngology YouTube channel platforms analyzing demographic and education topic trends via descriptive, geospatial, time-series, t-tests, and ANOVA analyses. Results: Viewership spanned 124 countries in 7 different geographic regions, with 72 countries comprising low- to middle-income countries, mostly represented ages of 25-34 years old, came from high-income countries rather than low-income (p < .001), and used mobile phones followed by computers for device access. Video-educational material comprised of subspecialty topics on Rhinology and Sinus Surgery (25%) at the highest end and Facial Trauma (1%) at the lowest. Controlling for the age of the video content, the most-accessed videos comprised of subspecialty topics on Head and Neck Surgery at the highest end and Laryngology at the lowest with significant differentiation across topics of interest (p < .044). Conclusions: This assessment of web-analytics platforms from two widely used otolaryngology free, online-access materials showed increasing global usage trends with significant differentiating factors along viewership demographics, as well as sought-after subspecialty topics of interest. In turn, our results not only lay the groundwork for characterizing the global otolaryngology audience but also for future development of targeted educational materials and accessibility initiatives aimed at ameliorating global educational disparities in the field.

10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38553015

RESUMO

Noninvasive tumor control of vestibular schwannomas through stereotactic radiosurgery allows high rates of long-term tumor control and has been used primarily for small- and medium-sized vestibular schwannomas. The posttreatment imaging appearance of the tumor, temporal patterns of growth and treatment response, as well as extratumoral complications can often be both subtle or confusing and should be appropriately recognized. Herein, the authors present an imaging-based review of expected changes as well as associated complications related to radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas.

11.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(5): 469-474, 2024 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38518765

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety of stapes prostheses. DATA SOURCES: Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched from inception to November 2021 following PRISMA guidelines. REVIEW METHODS: Studies reporting evidence of stapes prosthesis displacement or interaction in adult or pediatric implant recipients undergoing MRI. Cadaveric, animal, and basic studies with nonhuman data were also included. RESULTS: From an initial search of 123 articles, 42 full-text studies were evaluated for eligibility and 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria were included. Motion artifact was reported in a few stainless steel prosthesis types in vitro; however, such displacement was not observed in human cadaver temporal bone studies and had no adverse reported outcomes. A small subgroup of patients in the 1980s received a ferromagnetic stainless steel stapes implant that was recalled and has not been used since 1987. Patients with implants performed in the 1980s should be directed to 1.5T scanners from an abundance of caution. CONCLUSION: Modern (post-1987) stapes prostheses do not pose a risk in vivo when exposed to the magnetic fields of MRI scanners.


Assuntos
Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Prótese Ossicular , Cirurgia do Estribo , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/efeitos adversos , Cirurgia do Estribo/efeitos adversos
12.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(4): 430-433, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38437820

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience and results from coordinated and closely scheduled radiosurgery and cochlear implantation (CI) in a vestibular schwannoma (VS) cohort. PATIENTS: Patients with VS who underwent radiosurgery followed by CI on the same or next day. INTERVENTIONS: Interventions included sequential radiosurgery and CI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tumor control defined by tumor growth on posttreatment surveillance and audiometric outcomes including consonant-nucleus-consonant words and AzBio sentences in quiet. RESULTS: In total, six patients were identified that met the inclusion criteria, with an age range of 38 to 69 years and tumor sizes ranging from 2.0 to 16.3 mm. All patients successfully underwent radiosurgery and CI on the same or immediately successive day. Postoperatively, all patients obtained open-set speech recognition. Consonant-nucleus-consonant word scores ranged from 40 to 88% correct, and AzBio scores ranged from 44 to 94% correct. During posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging surveillance, which ranged from 12 to 68 months, all tumors were noted to be adequately visualized, and no tumor progression was noted. CONCLUSION: Coordinated radiosurgery and CI can be safely performed in patients with VS on the same or next day, serving to decrease burden on patients and increase access to this vital rehabilitative strategy.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Implantes Cocleares , Neuroma Acústico , Radiocirurgia , Percepção da Fala , Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Implante Coclear/métodos , Neuroma Acústico/cirurgia , Radiocirurgia/métodos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Audiometria , Resultado do Tratamento
13.
JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 150(4): 287-294, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38358763

RESUMO

Importance: Management of sporadic vestibular schwannoma with radiosurgery is becoming increasingly common globally; however, limited data currently characterize patient outcomes in the setting of microsurgical salvage for radiosurgical failure. Objective: To describe the clinical outcomes of salvage microsurgery following failed primary stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) among patients with sporadic vestibular schwannoma. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a cohort study of adults (≥18 years old) with sporadic vestibular schwannoma who underwent salvage microsurgery following failed primary SRS/FSRT in 7 vestibular schwannoma treatment centers across the US and Norway. Data collection was performed between July 2022 and January 2023, with data analysis performed between January and July 2023. Exposure: Salvage microsurgical tumor resection. Main Outcomes and Measures: Composite outcome of undergoing less than gross total resection (GTR) or experiencing long-term facial paresis. Results: Among 126 patients, the median (IQR) age at time of salvage microsurgery was 62 (53-70) years, 69 (55%) were female, and 113 of 117 (97%) had tumors that extended into the cerebellopontine angle at time of salvage. Of 125 patients, 96 (76%) underwent primary gamma knife SRS, while 24 (19%) underwent linear accelerator-based SRS; the remaining patients underwent FSRT using other modalities. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was seen in 15 of 126 patients (12%), hydrocephalus in 8 (6%), symptomatic stroke in 7 (6%), and meningitis in 2 (2%). Each 1-mm increase in cerebellopontine angle tumor size was associated with a 13% increased likelihood of foregoing GTR (64 of 102 patients [63%]) or long-term postoperative House-Brackmann grade higher than I (48 of 102 patients [47%]) (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23). Following salvage microsurgery, tumor growth-free survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 97% (95% CI, 94%-100%), 93% (95% CI, 87%-99%), and 91% (95% CI, 84%-98%), respectively. Conclusions: In this cohort study, more than half of patients who received salvage microsurgery following primary SRS/FSRT underwent less than GTR or experienced some degree of facial paresis long term. These data suggest that the cumulative risk of developing facial paresis following primary SRS/FSRT by the end of the patient's journey with treatment approximates 2.5% to 7.5% when using published primary SRS/FSRT long-term tumor control rates.


Assuntos
Paralisia Facial , Neuroma Acústico , Radiocirurgia , Adulto , Humanos , Feminino , Adolescente , Masculino , Radiocirurgia/efeitos adversos , Neuroma Acústico/complicações , Estudos de Coortes , Resultado do Tratamento , Microcirurgia , Paralisia Facial/etiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
14.
Neuroradiol J ; 37(3): 332-335, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38226489

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The vestibular ganglion, or Scarpa's ganglion, is a cluster of afferent vestibular neurons within the internal auditory canal (IAC). There is minimal literature describing enhancement of this region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its correlation to clinical symptoms. Here, we sought to find the prevalence of enhancement at Scarpa's ganglion, and determine whether such enhancement correlates with demographics or clinical symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of consecutive patients with an MRI of the IAC between 3/1/2021 and 5/20/2021. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed for T1 and FLAIR enhancement of the Scarpa's ganglion on post-contrast fat-saturated T1 and post-contrast FLAIR images. Discrepancies were agreed upon by consensus. Clinical variables (hearing loss, vestibular symptoms, tinnitus, and MRI indication) were gathered from a retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients were included (51 female); the mean age was 58 (range 19-85). The most common MRI indication was hearing loss (n = 53). FLAIR enhancement was present on the right in 7 patients, on the left in 7 patients, and bilaterally in 6 patients. No enhancement was seen on post-contrast T1 images. There was no statistically significant correlation between consensus FLAIR on at least one side and age (p = .74), gender (p = .29), hearing loss (p = .32), hearing loss side (p = .39), type of hearing loss (p = .87), vestibular symptoms (p = .71), or tinnitus (p = .81). CONCLUSIONS: Enhancement is present in the minority of patients on post-contrast FLAIR images. If seen, it should be considered an uncommon but not unexpected finding with no clinical significance.


Assuntos
Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Prevalência , Zumbido/diagnóstico por imagem , Adulto Jovem , Perda Auditiva/diagnóstico por imagem
15.
J Clin Oncol ; 42(10): 1102-1109, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38194613

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The Normal Risk Ovarian Screening Study (NROSS) tested a two-stage screening strategy in postmenopausal women at conventional hereditary risk where significantly rising cancer antigen (CA)-125 prompted transvaginal sonography (TVS) and abnormal TVS prompted surgery to detect ovarian cancer. METHODS: A total of 7,856 healthy postmenopausal women were screened annually for a total of 50,596 woman-years in a single-arm study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00539162). Serum CA125 was analyzed with the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) each year. If risk was unchanged and <1:2,000, women returned in a year. If risk increased above 1:500, TVS was undertaken immediately, and if risk was intermediate, CA125 was repeated in 3 months with a further increase in risk above 1:500 prompting referral for TVS. An average of 2% of participants were referred to TVS annually. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients were referred for operations detecting 15 ovarian cancers and two borderline tumors with 12 in early stage (I-II). In addition, seven endometrial cancers were detected with six in stage I. As four ovarian cancers and two borderline tumors were diagnosed with a normal ROCA, the sensitivity for detecting ovarian and borderline cancer was 74% (17 of 23), and 70% of ROCA-detected cases (12 of 17) were in stage I-II. NROSS screening reduced late-stage (III-IV) disease by 34% compared with UKCTOCS controls and by 30% compared with US SEER values. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 50% (17 of 34) for detecting ovarian cancer and 74% (25 of 34) for any cancer, far exceeding the minimum acceptable study end point of 10% PPV. CONCLUSION: While the NROSS trial was not powered to detect reduced mortality, the high specificity, PPV, and marked stage shift support further development of this strategy.


Assuntos
Neoplasias do Endométrio , Neoplasias Ovarianas , Humanos , Feminino , Neoplasias Ovarianas/diagnóstico por imagem , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Programas de Rastreamento , Ultrassonografia , Antígeno Ca-125
16.
Otol Neurotol ; 45(2): e84-e90, 2024 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38206062

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: A small number of cochlear implant (CI) users experience facial nerve stimulation (FNS), which can manifest as facial twitching. In some patients, this can be resolved by adjusting the electrical stimulation parameters. However, for others, facial stimulation can significantly impair CI outcomes or even prevent its use. The exact mechanisms underlying FNS are unclear and may vary among patients. DESIGN: Transimpedance measurements were used to assess lateral and longitudinal spread of current within 15 cochlea of nucleus CI recipients with FNS (13 unilateral recipients and 1 bilateral recipient). We compared the transimpedance measurements with programming parameters from clinical visits and pre- and postoperative temporal bone computed tomography (CT) scans to identify factors that may contribute to FNS in each CI ear. RESULTS: In nine ears, transimpedance curves showed inflection, which suggests a localized current sink within the cochlea. This indicates a low-impedance pathway through which current exits the cochlea and stimulates the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve canal. Electrodes near this current sink were disabled or underfit to minimize facial stimulation. In the other seven ears, current flow peaked toward the basal end of the cochlea, suggesting that current exits through the round window or other structures near the basal end of the cochlea, stimulating the tympanic segment of the facial nerve. CONCLUSIONS: Objective transimpedance measurements can be used to elucidate the mechanisms of FNS and to develop strategies for optimizing electrical stimulation parameters and speech coding to minimize or eliminate FNS in a small subset of CI users.


Assuntos
Implante Coclear , Implantes Cocleares , Humanos , Nervo Facial , Cóclea , Estimulação Elétrica
17.
J Clin Med ; 13(2)2024 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38256533

RESUMO

Objective: to review evidence on the efficacy of auditory training in adult cochlear implant recipients. Data Sources: PRISMA guidelines for a systematic review of the literature were followed. PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL databases were queried on 29 June 2023 for terms involving cochlear implantation and auditory training. Studies were limited to the English language and adult patient populations. Study Selection: Three authors independently reviewed publications for inclusion in the review based on a priori inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria encompassed adult cochlear implant populations, an analysis of clinician- or patient-directed auditory training, and an analysis of one or more measures of speech recognition and/or patient-reported outcome. Exclusion criteria included studies with only pediatric implant populations, music or localization training in isolation, and single-sample case studies. Data Extraction: The data were collected regarding study design, patient population, auditory training modality, auditory training timing, speech outcomes, and data on the durability of outcomes. A quality assessment of the literature was performed using a quality metric adapted from the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group guidelines. Data Synthesis and Meta-Analysis: Data were qualitatively summarized for 23 studies. All but four studies demonstrated significant improvement in at least one measured or patient-reported outcome measure with training. For 11 studies with sufficient data reporting, pre-intervention and post-intervention pooled means of different outcome measures were compared for 132 patients using meta-analysis. Patient-direct training was associated with significant improvement in vowel-phoneme recognition and speech recognition in noise (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively), and clinician-directed training showed significant improvement in sentence recognition in noise (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The literature on auditory training for adult cochlear implant recipients is limited and heterogeneous, including a small number of studies with limited levels of evidence and external validity. However, the current evidence suggests that auditory training can improve speech recognition in adult cochlear implant recipients.

18.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 170(1): 187-194, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37582349

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) image artifact and image distortion associated with the two transcutaneous bone conduction implants currently available in the United States. STUDY DESIGN: Cadaveric study. METHODS: Two cadaveric head specimens (1 male, 1 female) were unilaterally implanted according to manufacturer guidelines and underwent MR imaging (General Electric and Siemens 1.5 T scanners) under the following device conditions: (1) no device, (2) Cochlear Osia with magnet and headwrap, (3) Cochlear Osia without magnet, and (4) MED-EL Bonebridge with magnet. Maximum metal mitigation techniques were employed in all conditions, and identical sequences were obtained. Blinded image scoring (diagnostic vs nondiagnostic image) was performed by experienced neuroradiologists according to anatomical subsites. RESULTS: All device conditions produced artifact and image distortion. The Osia with magnet produced diagnostic T1- and T2-weighted images of the ipsilateral temporal bone, however, non-echo planar imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was nondiagnostic. The Osia without magnet scanned on the Siemens MR imaging demonstrated the least amount of artifact and was the only condition that allowed for diagnostic imaging of the ipsilateral temporal bone on DWI. The Bonebridge produced a large area of artifact and distortion with the involvement of the ipsilateral and contralateral temporal bones. CONCLUSION: In summary, of the three device conditions (Osia with magnet, Osia without magnet, and Bonebridge), Osia without magnet offered the least amount of artifact and distortion and was the only condition in which diagnostic DWI was available for the middle ear and mastoid regions on the Siemens MR imaging scanner.


Assuntos
Colesteatoma , Implantes Cocleares , Neuroma Acústico , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Neuroma Acústico/diagnóstico por imagem , Artefatos , Condução Óssea , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/métodos , Cadáver
19.
Clin Neuroradiol ; 34(1): 251-255, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38055090

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD), an osseous defect overlying the SSC, is associated with a constellation of audiovestibular symptoms. This study sought to compare conventional energy-integrated detector (EID) computed tomography (CT) to photon-counting detector (PCD)-CT in the detection of SSCD. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Included patients were prospectively recruited to undergo a temporal bone CT on both EID-CT and PCD-CT scanners. Two blinded neuroradiologists reviewed both sets of images for 1) the presence or absence of SSCD (graded as present, absent, or indeterminate), and 2) the width of the bone overlying the SSC (if present). Any discrepancies in the presence or absence of SSCD were agreed upon by consensus. RESULTS: In the study 31 patients were evaluated, for a total of 60 individual temporal bones (2 were excluded). Regarding SSCD presence or absence, there was substantial agreement between EID-CT and PCD-CT (k = 0.76; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.54-0.97); however, SSCD was present in only 9 (15.0%) temporal bones on PCD-CT, while EID-CT examinations were interpreted as being positive in 14 (23.3%) temporal bones. This yielded a false positive rate of 8.3% on EID-CT. The bone overlying the SSC was thinner on EID-CT images (0.66 mm; SD = 0.64) than on PCD-CT images (0.72 mm; SD = 0.66) (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The EID-CT examinations tend to overcall the presence of SSCD compared to PCD-CT and also underestimate the thickness of bone overlying the SSC.


Assuntos
Deiscência do Canal Semicircular , Humanos , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/métodos , Osso Temporal/diagnóstico por imagem , Imagens de Fantasmas
20.
Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown) ; 26(4): 452-462, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37976145

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The infratemporal fossa (ITF) is a complex region bounded by the temporal bone, maxilla, sphenoid, pterygoid plates, and mandibular ramus. Containing a high density of neurovascular and musculoskeletal structures, the ITF can house a number of pathologies, and access is challenging. The ITF approach and its variations can be challenging due to complex anatomy and unfamiliarity by many surgeons. The objective of this study was to present a step-by-step 3-dimensional anatomic dissection for the classic Fisch Type A and modified ITF approach from the surgeon's perspective. METHODS: Six sides of 3 formalin-fixed latex-injected specimens were dissected under microscopic magnification (JRD and AMN). Standard Fisch Type A and modified ITF approaches were performed on contralateral sides of each specimen. Representative high-quality 3-dimensional photography was performed for each key step. RESULTS: The ITF approach affords excellent access to the posterior ITF and jugular foramen. Modifications to this approach include preservation of the ear canal and limiting facial nerve transposition, thus limiting morbidity while generally still providing sufficient access to key anatomic structures. CONCLUSION: The ITF approach provides access to the lateral skull base for jugular foramen paraganglioma and other lesions. Modifications of the classic Fisch Type A technique can be used to access pathologies in this region without sacrificing conductive hearing or facial nerve function. Three dimensional operatively oriented neuroanatomy dissections provide surgeons with a valuable resource for learning this complex surgical approach.


Assuntos
Fossa Infratemporal , Forâmen Jugular , Humanos , Base do Crânio/anatomia & histologia , Dissecação , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos
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