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1.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0278576, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36455060

RESUMO

Research fellowship programs help medical graduates acquire research skills for an academic career. While our institution employed a large number of research fellows, it did not offer them a formal training program. This study aimed to assess the views of fellows and their mentors regarding the current research fellowship program, and to seek their suggestions for a formal training program at our medical center. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using both focus group discussions and individual interviews with research fellows, and individual interviews with their mentors. We recruited all eligible participants by email. We collected data in person and analyzed it thematically. We followed the consolidated criteria for reporting of qualitative research (COREQ) checklist. A total of 17 research fellows and 17 mentors participated in the study. Participants described the current non-formal program and proposed suggestions for a formal training program. The identification of available vacant positions and the recruitment process followed an unstructured approach, through networking with mentors and previous fellows. Although there is a formal contract, there is no job description, and no definition of roles, responsibilities and rights. Some fellows get the opportunity of being involved in all aspects of research and benefit from a favorable mentor-mentee relationship. Conversely, others struggle with authorship and with the projects allocated to them, some being "non-research" related. Not all fellows end up publishing their projects. Participants provided suggestions to shift into a formal training, including measures to improve on the recruitment process of fellows, defining roles and exposure to all aspects of research. Research fellows are eager to learn, but the currently available program is unstructured. They need a formal training program that meets their expectations, one that offers equitable learning opportunities and benefits to all.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Mentores , Instalações de Saúde , Autoria
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e15607, 2020 07 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32628113

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Academics in all disciplines increasingly use social media to share their publications on the internet, reaching out to different audiences. In the last few years, specific indicators of social media impact have been developed (eg, Altmetrics), to complement traditional bibliometric indicators (eg, citation count and h-index). In health research, it is unclear whether social media impact also translates into research impact. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on the impact of using social media on the dissemination of health research. The secondary aim was to assess the correlation between Altmetrics and traditional citation-based metrics. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that evaluated the use of social media to disseminate research published in health-related journals. We specifically looked at studies that described experimental or correlational studies linking the use of social media with outcomes related to bibliometrics. We searched the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases using a predefined search strategy (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews: CRD42017057709). We conducted independent and duplicate study selection and data extraction. Given the heterogeneity of the included studies, we summarized the findings through a narrative synthesis. RESULTS: Of a total of 18,624 retrieved citations, we included 51 studies: 7 (14%) impact studies (answering the primary aim) and 44 (86%) correlational studies (answering the secondary aim). Impact studies reported mixed results with several limitations, including the use of interventions of inappropriately low intensity and short duration. The majority of correlational studies suggested a positive association between traditional bibliometrics and social media metrics (eg, number of mentions) in health research. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified suggestive yet inconclusive evidence on the impact of using social media to increase the number of citations in health research. Further studies with better design are needed to assess the causal link between social media impact and bibliometrics.


Assuntos
Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/métodos , MEDLARS/normas , Mídias Sociais/normas , Humanos
3.
J Glob Health ; 8(2): 020411, 2018 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30410737

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess recent trends in medical research productivity in Arab countries. METHODS: We collected bibliometric data for the world countries, Arab countries, and Arab institutions for 2007-2016, using Essential Science Indicators, Journal Citation Reports, and Web of Science database. We collected the number of published papers overall and per year, citations per paper, and number of papers published in top quartile and top 10% journals. For the 10 most productive institutions, we additionally collected the number of papers with correspondence authors affiliated with the institution. RESULTS: The Arab world produced 189 papers per one million people, about a quarter of the value for other world countries. Four Arab countries (Qatar, Tunisia, Lebanon, and Kuwait) produced more than 695 papers per one million people, exceeding the world average. The average number of citations per paper was 9.2; it rose to more than 15 for papers with international collaboration. At the institutional level, the number of citations showed upward trends, with six institutions having an average citation per paper higher than that of all Arab countries. For the 10 most productive institutions in Arab countries, the percentage of papers involving international collaborations ranged from 42% to 79%; of these, 9% to 29% were led by authors from the same institution. For these 10 most productive institutions, the percentage of papers published in the top quartile journals and with a lead/corresponding author from the institution ranged from 7 to 32%; that percentage drops to 1% to 10% for papers published in top 10% journals. CONCLUSIONS: Although medical research output in Arab countries at both the country and the institution levels has increased over the past 10 years, it is still lagging behind the rest of the world. The percentage of papers involving international collaborations was relatively high, but the majority of these papers were led by authors from outside the local institution, particularly when published in the top 10% journals.


Assuntos
Mundo Árabe , Bibliometria , Pesquisa Biomédica/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisa Biomédica/tendências , Humanos
4.
J Acad Nutr Diet ; 118(2): 261-274, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29389509

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Stress and anxiety levels are elevated among university and college students. Although high stress levels can lead to an increase in adiposity, it is not clear whether stress and anxiety experienced when in university or college have an influence on students' weight. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systemic review was to investigate whether stress and anxiety levels encountered during university and college enrollment were associated with higher adiposity or weight changes among students. METHOD: A search strategy was used to identify peer-reviewed studies published between 1985 and March 2017 using the following databases: Medline using Ovid; PubMed, CINAHL using EBSCO, Embase using Ovid, PSYCHINFO, and Open Access Theses and Dissertation. Two reviewers independently assessed the title, abstract, and then the full article of the studies that met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and quality assessment was conducted for the included studies. RESULTS: Twenty-five observational studies were identified in this review (23 cross-sectional and two longitudinal); 11 found that there was no association between stress and body mass index or weight change. In addition, five studies did not find a significant association between anxiety and body mass index. A few studies revealed stress and anxiety might be associated with higher or lower weight status, thus there is a possibility that stress can increase or decrease weight, demonstrating that a bidirectional influence on body mass index may exist. CONCLUSIONS: The current data in this review are inadequate to draw firm conclusions about the role of stress on weight change in university and college students. The inconsistency of results in the literature reviewed for this article suggest that a focus on longitudinal studies with adequate sample size would better evaluate the relationship between stress or anxiety and its influence on weight status or weight change among college and university students.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/fisiopatologia , Estresse Psicológico/fisiopatologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Aumento de Peso/fisiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Índice de Massa Corporal , Peso Corporal , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários , Universidades , Adulto Jovem
5.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 14: 102, 2016 Jul 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27412354

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adopting technologies such as injection safety devices in healthcare settings can enhance injection safety. Developing guidelines for appropriate adoption of such technologies need to consider factors beyond evidence for their health effects. The objective of this study is to systematically review the published literature for evidence among healthcare workers and patients about knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, values, preferences, and feasibility in relation to the use of injection safety devices in healthcare settings. METHODS: We included both qualitative and quantitative studies conducted with the general public, patients, and healthcare workers, administrators, or policy makers. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL and CENTRAL. We used a duplicate and independent approach to title and abstract screening, full text screening, data abstraction and risk of bias assessment. RESULTS: Out of a total of 6568 identified citations, we judged fourteen studies as eligible for this systematic review. All these studies were surveys, conducted with healthcare workers in high-income countries. We did not identify any qualitative study, or a study of the general public, patients, healthcare administrators or policy makers. We did not identify any study assessing knowledge, or values assigned to outcomes relevant to injection safety devices. Each of the included studies suffered from methodological limitations, which lowers our confidence in their findings. Based on the findings of six studies, the injection safety devices were generally perceived as easy to use and as an improvement compared with conventional syringes. Some of these studies reported few technical problems while using the devices. In three studies assessing perceived safety, the majority of participants judged the devices as safe. Two studies reported positive perceptions of healthcare workers regarding patient tolerance of these injection safety devices. One study found that less than half the nurses felt comfortable using the insulin pens. Findings from four studies assessing preference and satisfaction were not consistent. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review identified evidence that injection safety devices are generally perceived as easy to use, safe, and tolerated by patients. There were few reports of technical problems while using the devices and some discomfort by nurses using the insulin pens.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Injeções , Equipamentos de Proteção , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Estudos de Viabilidade , Humanos , Preferência do Paciente , Satisfação do Paciente , Pesquisa Qualitativa
6.
Bone ; 56(2): 296-303, 2013 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23810841

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We have shown in a randomized controlled trial that vitamin D increases bone mass, lean mass and bone area in adolescent girls, but not boys. These increments may translate into improvements in bone geometry and therefore bone strength. This study investigated the impact of vitamin D on hip geometric dimensions from DXA-derived hip structural analyses in adolescents who participated in the trial. METHODS: 167 girls (mean age 13.1 years) and 171 boys (mean age 12.7 years) were randomly assigned to receive weekly placebo oil or vitamin D3, at doses of 1400 IU or 14,000 IU, in a double blind placebo-controlled 1-year trial. DXA images were obtained at baseline and one year, and hip images were analyzed using the hip structural analysis (HSA) software to derive parameters of bone geometry. These include outer diameter (OD), cross sectional area (CSA), section modulus (Z), and buckling ratio (BR) at the narrow neck (NN), intertrochanteric (IT), and shaft (S) regions. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine group differences for changes of bone structural parameters. RESULTS: In the overall group of girls, vitamin D supplementation increased aBMD (7.9% and 6.8% in low and high doses, versus 4.2% in placebo) and reduced the BR of NN (6.1% and 2.4% in low and high doses, versus 1.9% in placebo). It also improved aBMD (7.9% and 5.2% versus 3.6%) and CSA (7.5% and 5.1% versus 4.1%) of the IT and OD of the S (2.4% and 2.5% versus 0.8% respectively). Significant changes in the OD and BR of the NN, in the overall group of girls remained, after adjusting for lean mass, and were unaffected with further adjustments for lifestyle, pubertal status, and height measures. Conversely, boys did not exhibit any significant changes in any parameters of interest. A dose effect was not detected and subgroup analyses revealed no beneficial effect of vitamin D by pubertal stage. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D supplementation improved bone mass and several DXA-derived structural bone parameters, in adolescent girls, but not boys. This occurred at a critical site, the femoral neck, and if maintained through adulthood could improve bone strength and lower the risk of hip fractures.


Assuntos
Densidade Óssea/efeitos dos fármacos , Colecalciferol/uso terapêutico , Articulação do Quadril/efeitos dos fármacos , Adolescente , Feminino , Fêmur/efeitos dos fármacos , Humanos , Masculino , Ossos Pélvicos/efeitos dos fármacos
7.
J Clin Densitom ; 16(2): 223-30, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22704220

RESUMO

Bone mass and body composition traits are genetically programmed, but the timing and gender and site specificities of their heritability are unclear. Mother-child correlations of bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content, lean mass, and fat mass were studied in 169 premenopausal mothers and their 239 children. Heritability estimates of lean mass, fat mass, BMD, and area were derived for each gender and pubertal stage. There were significant correlations for most densitometry-derived variables at the spine, hip, femoral neck (FN), and total body (r=0.192-0.388) in mother-postmenarcheal daughter pairs, for bone areas at all sites in early puberty (r=0.229-0.508) and for volumetric-derived density at FN and spine (r=0.238-0.368) in mother-son pairs. Fat mass correlations were significant in both genders after puberty (r=0.299-0.324) and lean mass in postmenarcheal girls only (r = 0.299). Heritability estimates varied between 21% and 37% for mother-daughter and 18% and 35% for mother-son pairs for density-derived variables and between 26% and 40% for body composition variables. Maternal inheritance of bone traits is expressed in early-pubertal boys for several skeletal site traits but consistently involves most site traits in girls and boys by late puberty. Body composition inheritance is more variable.


Assuntos
Composição Corporal/genética , Osso e Ossos/fisiologia , Padrões de Herança , Adolescente , Adulto , Densidade Óssea/genética , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mães , Núcleo Familiar , Puberdade/fisiologia , Fatores Sexuais
8.
J Clin Densitom ; 14(3): 240-62, 2011.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21810532

RESUMO

Osteoporosis is a serious worldwide epidemic. Increased risk of fractures is the hallmark of the disease and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and economic burden. FRAX® is a web-based tool developed by the Sheffield WHO Collaborating Center team, that integrates clinical risk factors, femoral neck BMD, country specific mortality and fracture data and calculates the 10 year fracture probability in order to help health care professionals identify patients who need treatment. However, only 31 countries have a FRAX® calculator at the time paper was accepted for publication. In the absence of a FRAX® model for a particular country, it has been suggested to use a surrogate country for which the epidemiology of osteoporosis most closely approximates the index country. More specific recommendations for clinicians in these countries are not available. In North America, concerns have also been raised regarding the assumptions used to construct the US ethnic specific FRAX® calculators with respect to the correction factors applied to derive fracture probabilities in Blacks, Asians and Hispanics in comparison to Whites. In addition, questions were raised about calculating fracture risk in other ethnic groups e.g., Native Americans and First Canadians. In order to provide additional guidance to clinicians, a FRAX® International Task Force was formed to address specific questions raised by physicians in countries without FRAX® calculators and seeking to integrate FRAX® into their clinical practice. The main questions that the task force tried to answer were the following: The Task Force members conducted appropriate literature reviews and developed preliminary statements that were discussed and graded by a panel of experts at the ISCD-IOF joint conference. The statements approved by the panel of experts are discussed in the current paper.


Assuntos
Diagnóstico por Computador , Fraturas do Quadril/diagnóstico , Fraturas do Quadril/etnologia , Fraturas por Osteoporose/diagnóstico , Fraturas por Osteoporose/etnologia , Povo Asiático , População Negra , Densidade Óssea , Colo do Fêmur/diagnóstico por imagem , Colo do Fêmur/patologia , Hispânico ou Latino , Humanos , Radiografia , Medição de Risco
9.
Nat Rev Endocrinol ; 6(10): 550-61, 2010 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20852586

RESUMO

Hypovitaminosis D is a prevalent disorder in developing countries. Clinical manifestations of hypovitaminosis D include musculoskeletal disorders, such as nonspecific muscle pain, poor muscle strength and low BMD, as well as nonmusculoskeletal disorders, such as an increased risk of respiratory infections, diabetes mellitus and possibly cardiovascular diseases. In developing countries, the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D varies widely by and within regions; prevalence ranges between 30-90%, according to the cut-off value used within specific regions, and is independent of latitude. A high prevalence of the disorder exists in China and Mongolia, especially in children, of whom up to 50% are reported to have serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <12.5 nmol/l. Despite ample sunshine throughout the year, one-third to one-half of individuals living in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East have serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/l, according to studies published in the past decade. Hypovitaminosis D is also prevalent in children and the elderly living in Latin America. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D in developing countries are similar to those reported in Western countries and include extremes of age, female sex, winter season, dark skin pigmentation, malnutrition, lack of sun exposure, a covered clothing style and obesity. Clinical trials to assess the effect of vitamin D supplementation on classical and nonclassical clinical outcomes in developing countries are needed.


Assuntos
Deficiência de Vitamina D/epidemiologia , Países em Desenvolvimento/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Fatores de Risco , Vitamina D/análogos & derivados , Vitamina D/sangue , Vitamina D/uso terapêutico , Deficiência de Vitamina D/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/tratamento farmacológico , Deficiência de Vitamina D/patologia
10.
Bone ; 47(2): 408-12, 2010 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20452474

RESUMO

CONTEXT: It is unclear whether the relationship between 25-OHD and PTH is modulated by age or gender. OBJECTIVE: To assess the 25-OHD-PTH relationship in 340 adolescents (10-17 years) and 443 elderly (65-85 years) of the same ethnic group, and living in the same sunny country. ASSESSMENTS: Calcium intake was estimated. Serum calcium, phosphorus, 25-OHD and PTH were measured. Body fat was determined by DXA. RESULTS: 25-OHD levels were lower in the elderly in the overall group (p<0.001) and within genders. 25-OHD levels were lower in females in the overall group and within age subgroups (p<0.05). PTH levels were higher in the elderly in the overall population and in both genders (p<0.001). There were no gender differences in PTH levels within age subgroups. For the same 25-OHD level, PTH levels were comparable across genders but were 1.5-2 folds higher in the elderly compared to adolescents (p<0.001). PTH correlated positively with age (p<0.001), body fat (p=0.02), and negatively with calcium intake (p<0.001), and 25-OHD (p<0.001). The magnitude of the correlation with 25-OHD decreased after adjustment for age but not for gender. In multivariate analyses, age, 25-OHD and fat mass were independent predictors for PTH. In the elderly, after adjustment for serum creatinine, only 25-OHD and creatinine were independent predictors of PTH. CONCLUSION: The negative relationship between 25-OHD and PTH is modulated by age but not gender. Desirable 25-OHD levels derived from examining the 25-OHD-PTH relationship should therefore take into account the age of the population of interest.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/sangue , Hormônio Paratireóideo/sangue , Caracteres Sexuais , Vitamina D/sangue , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
11.
Eur J Nutr ; 49(8): 493-500, 2010 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-20396896

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to investigate whether a higher proportion of protein or fat is more favorable for optimal ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY) release in subjects consuming low carbohydrate meals. METHODS: Eight normal weight men received, on three separate occasions, high protein low fat (HPLF) (40% protein, 25% fat), low protein high fat (LPHF) (10% protein, 55% fat) or medium protein medium fat (MPMF) (25% protein, 40% fat) meals, with equal low carbohydrates content in all three meals (35% of energy). Postprandial blood samples were collected before and 15, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min following the ingestion of each meal. Plasma acylated ghrelin and PYY(3-36) as well as serum insulin, glucose and triglycerides were measured. RESULTS: Comparing meals and considering each time point separately, a trend for a statistically significant difference in acylated ghrelin was observed between HPLF and LPHF meals and a statistically significant change of PYY from baseline was noted between HPLF and LPHF meals as compared to the MPMF meal at certain time points. When data were pooled together, a statistically significant difference in acylated ghrelin change from baseline was observed between HPLF and LPHF meals, while both HPLF and LPHF meals resulted in a significantly higher PYY(3-36) release in comparison to MPMF meal. AUC data analysis for PYY(3-36) revealed significantly higher values following HPLF in comparison to MPMF meal. Correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between acylated ghrelin and insulin only with the HPLF meal. Postprandial glucose and triglyceride levels were not significantly different between the three meals. CONCLUSIONS: In subjects consuming low carbohydrate meals, higher concentrations of proteins to fat seem to have more favorable effects on postprandial appetite hormones.


Assuntos
Dieta com Restrição de Carboidratos , Gorduras na Dieta/administração & dosagem , Proteínas Alimentares/administração & dosagem , Grelina/sangue , Peptídeo YY/sangue , Adulto , Apetite , Área Sob a Curva , Biomarcadores/sangue , Glicemia/metabolismo , Índice de Massa Corporal , Grelina/metabolismo , Humanos , Insulina/sangue , Líbano , Masculino , Peptídeo YY/metabolismo , Período Pós-Prandial , Triglicerídeos/sangue , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Clin Densitom ; 12(4): 441-9, 2009.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-19766031

RESUMO

Children with malignancies have low bone mass. Pathways for metabolic bone disease were investigated in children with cancer by concomitantly assessing lifestyle, clinical, and biochemical predictors of bone mass. Forty-one children who were receiving cancer therapy for 61 weeks and 39 controls were studied. Data on lifestyle factors, biochemical and hormonal parameters, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry bone mass measurements, body composition, and bone age were obtained. Compared with controls, patients had higher weight percentile and fat mass, a 6-month delay in bone age, and lower estradiol levels. They also had higher parathyroid hormone levels and lower bone remodeling markers and bone mass. Age, height, lean mass, fat mass, and bone maturation correlated positively with several bone mass variables, so did serum estradiol, testosterone, and markers of bone remodeling. Conversely, corticosteroids, methotrexate (MTX), and intrathecal therapy negatively correlated with bone mass at the spine and hip (R = -0.33 to 0.40, p < 0.04). In the adjusted analyses, bone maturation, serum osteocalcin level, MTX, and intrathecal therapy were significant predictors of lumbar spine and total body Z-scores, bone maturation accounting for the largest proportion in Z-score variance. Chemotherapy-induced delay in bone maturation and suppression of bone modeling are major pathophysiologic pathways predicting bone mass in children with malignancies.


Assuntos
Absorciometria de Fóton/métodos , Densidade Óssea/fisiologia , Doenças Ósseas Metabólicas/diagnóstico , Remodelação Óssea/fisiologia , Modelos Teóricos , Neoplasias/complicações , Doenças Ósseas Metabólicas/etiologia , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos
13.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 93(7): 2693-701, 2008 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-18445674

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hypovitaminosis D is prevalent in youth worldwide, but the safety of vitamin D at doses exceeding 200 IU/d is unknown in this age group. We assessed the safety of high doses of vitamin D(3) administered to apparently healthy schoolchildren. METHODS: To assess short-term safety, 25 subjects randomly received placebo or vitamin D(3) at doses of 14,000 IU/wk for 8 wk. To assess long-term safety, 340 subjects randomly received placebo, vitamin D(3) as 1,400 IU/wk or 14,000 IU/wk for 1 yr. Biochemical variables were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 wk and 8 wk off therapy in the short-term study and at 0, 6, and 12 months in the long-term study. RESULTS: In both the short- and long-term studies, mean serum calcium and 1,25-hydroxyvitamin levels did not change in any group. In the short-term study, mean 25-hydroxyvitamin concentrations increased from 44 (+/- 11) to 54 (+/- 19) ng/ml in the treated groups (P = 0.033). In the long-term study, mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels increased from 15 +/- 8 to 19 +/- 7 ng/ml (P < 0.0001) in subjects receiving 1,400 IU/wk and from 15 +/- 7 to 36 +/- 22 ng/ml (P < 0.0001) in the group receiving 14,000 IU/wk. No subject developed vitamin D intoxication. CONCLUSION: Vitamin D(3) at doses equivalent to 2000 IU/d for 1 yr is safe in adolescents and results in desirable vitamin D levels.


Assuntos
Colecalciferol/administração & dosagem , Adolescente , Cálcio/sangue , Criança , Colecalciferol/efeitos adversos , Suplementos Nutricionais , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Vitamina D/análogos & derivados , Vitamina D/sangue
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