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1.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 2024 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38458855

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Professionals working with children, including nurses and midwives, are foundational to effectively safeguarding children from maltreatment. However, little is known about the full nature and scope of nurses' and midwives' roles in safeguarding children in Australia presenting barriers to effective workforce preparation and support. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study reports an inductive analysis of qualitative responses (n = 51 Round 1, n = 17 Round 2) from a two-round Delphi study. The Delphi study aimed to build consensus on the nature and scope of nursing and midwifery practice in safeguarding children, and this manuscript presents findings of an inductive analysis of qualitative responses beyond the scope of the Delphi study. Participants were Australian nurses and midwives (n = 51, n = 17) from diverse child-focussed settings. RESULTS: Nurses and midwives experienced many factors outside of their control that restricted their capacity to safeguard children. Influences included high workloads, burnout, lack of support, poor collaboration, structural barriers and inaccessible services for children. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses and midwives are advocates for children but experienced many factors preventing them from effectively safeguarding children. Future approaches to reducing child maltreatment must be underpinned by support for frontline professionals to promote workforce capacity and sustainability. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Despite nurses' and midwives' best intentions, their attempts to prevent and respond to child maltreatment were hampered by systemic factors beyond their control. This study highlighted the need to address broader influences on nursing and midwifery practice to reduce the impacts of child maltreatment and support children to thrive.

2.
Rural Remote Health ; 24(1): 8045, 2024 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38449108

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: This scoping review was undertaken to obtain conceptual clarification about how racism and cultural safety are understood by interdisciplinary health professionals globally in the aged care sector in regional, rural and remote areas. There is evidence in Australia and internationally that racism is a factor impacting significantly on the health of First Peoples and other racialised minorities. Recent policy changes in Australia have required health professionals to integrate cultural safety into their practice to mitigate racism and improve the health of older First Nations Australians and older people from diverse ethnic and cultural groups. METHODS: This review consisted of literature published in English from 1990, including published primary studies; systematic, integrative and narrative reviews; meta-analyses; theses; policy documents; guidelines; position statements; and government literature. Ovid (MEDLINE), CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Scopus, Proquest Nursing and Allied Health Database, and Informit were used in the full search. The most recent search of all databases was undertaken on 9 May 2022. Ten papers were included in the review, following the exclusion of 376 papers. A title and abstract search of the reference lists of papers included in the review identified no additional papers. RESULTS: Ten papers were included in the review from Australia, Canada, the US, Norway and England. The literature reviewed suggests that health professionals in the aged care sector in regional, rural and remote areas in Australia, Canada, the US, Norway and England use alternative terms to 'racism' and 'racist', such as 'institutional marginalisation'. DISCUSSION: The absence of explicit reference to racism aligns with critical race research that argues implicit bias and institutional racism are often separated from an individualised understanding of racism. That is, practitioners may understand racism as something that is perpetrated by individuals in an otherwise 'neutral' health setting. There is also a lack of clarity on how culturally safe care is understood, even though individual care plans are viewed as instrumental in establishing the needs and preferences of the consumers. Within the literature surveyed, barriers to providing quality and culturally inclusive care include disengaged management, insufficient human and material resources, language barriers and a lack of education focused on the needs of older individuals and groups with various cultural and spiritual needs. Additionally, the review does not clearly illuminate what health professionals understand to be racist thinking or behaviour and how it is responded to in practice. Likewise, there is limited information about health professionals' understanding of cultural safety and how to provide culturally inclusive care. CONCLUSION: While work is beginning on developing standards for cultural safety training in an Australian context, there are also opportunities to consider how these should be applied or adapted to residential and community aged care to best meet the needs of a diverse consumer base and workforce.


Assuntos
Racismo , Idoso , Humanos , População Australasiana , Austrália , Escolaridade , Povos Aborígenes Australianos e Ilhéus do Estreito de Torres
3.
Trauma Violence Abuse ; : 15248380231221279, 2024 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281156

RESUMO

Health and allied health professionals are uniquely positioned to collaborate in prevention, early intervention and responses to child maltreatment. Effective collaboration requires comprehensive interprofessional education (IPE), and inadequate collaboration across sectors and professions continually contributes to poor outcomes for children. Little is known about what interprofessional preparation health and allied health professionals receive before initial qualification (preservice) that equips them for interprofessional collaboration and provision of culturally safe care in child protection. This scoping review aimed to identify what is known internationally about IPE in child protection for preservice health and allied health professionals. Thirteen manuscripts reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Key characteristics of the educational interventions are presented, including target disciplines, core content and their learning objectives and activities. Findings demonstrated primarily low-quality methodologies and educational interventions that had not been replicated beyond their initial context. Many educational interventions did not provide comprehensive content covering the spectrum of prevention, early intervention and responses for all types of child maltreatment, and/or did not clearly indicate how IPE was achieved. Key challenges to delivering comprehensive interprofessional child protection include lack of institutional support and competing priorities across disciplines who must meet requirements of separate regulatory bodies. Consequently, there is a need for further development and robust evaluation of educational interventions to explore how interprofessional collaborative skills for child protection can be developed and delivered in preservice health and allied health professional education.

4.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 47(3): 100033, 2023 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37019817

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Drawing from a broader study exploring how New South Wales community members from racially minoritized backgrounds experienced living through a pandemic, this paper reports specifically on experiences of racism during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. METHODS: Using an in-depth, qualitative interpretive approach, 11 semi-structured interviews and one focus group hosting three participants (n=14) were held via an online videoconferencing platform from September to December 2020. Inductive thematic analysis was undertaken using QRS NVivo as a data management tool. RESULTS: Racism was heightened during the pandemic and experienced in various ways by racially minoritized peoples in New South Wales. All participants in this research cited experiences of racism that impacted their wellbeing during COVID-19. These experiences are represented by the following four themes: experiencing racism is common; how racisms are experienced; increased fear of racism during COVID-19; and ways of coping with racisms. CONCLUSIONS: Racism was heightened during the pandemic and generated fear and anxiety that prevented racially minoritized peoples from participating in everyday life. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: Messaging from broader public platforms must be harnessed to stop the spread of moral panic so that during times of pandemic, public health strategies need only confirmation, not creation.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Racismo , Humanos , Pandemias , Austrália , New South Wales , Pesquisa Qualitativa
5.
J Child Health Care ; : 13674935231153248, 2023 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36705058

RESUMO

Nurses and midwives can be instrumental to global efforts to address child abuse and neglect through a public health approach of prevention and early intervention. However, there is limited understanding of nurses' and midwives' roles, and no international or local guidelines to inform and evaluate their safeguarding practices. The aim of this modified Delphi study was to build consensus on the nature and scope of nursing and midwifery practice in safeguarding children in Australia. Sixty-four statements located within seven clusters were developed from a literature review and nursing and midwifery practice standards. Participants (N = 102) were nurses and midwives working with children in diverse contexts. They were asked to indicate the importance of each statement to their practice setting. Consensus (80%) was achieved on all statements in Round Two. Findings highlight that participating nurses and midwives agreed safeguarding children is a core component of their practice in diverse child-focussed settings. Findings can inform ongoing discussions about development of nursing and midwifery practice standards and guide effective workforce preparation, education, support and resourcing. Further research about ongoing development of nursing and midwifery roles in safeguarding children is essential to explore how to most effectively mobilise these professions to prevent child abuse and neglect.

6.
J Adv Nurs ; 79(2): 581-592, 2023 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36453452

RESUMO

AIM: The study aimed to measure and describe the mental health impact of COVID-19 on Australian pre-registration nursing students. BACKGROUND: The COVID -19 pandemic has had a swift and significant impact on nursing students across the globe. The pandemic was the catalyst for the closure of schools and universities across many countries. This necessary measure caused additional stressors for many students, including nursing students, leading to uncertainty and anxiety. There is limited evidence available to identify the mental health impact of COVID-19 on Australian pre-registration nursing students currently. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted across 12 Australian universities. METHODS: Using an anonymous, online survey students provided demographic data and self-reported their stress, anxiety, resilience, coping strategies, mental health and exposure to COVID-19. Students' stress, anxiety, resilience, coping strategies and mental health were assessed using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, the Brief Resilience Scale, the Brief Cope and the DASS-21. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted to investigate whether stress, anxiety, resilience and coping strategies explained variance in mental health impact. Ethical Approval was obtained from the University of New England Human Research Ethics Committee (No: HE20-188). All participating universities obtained reciprocal approval. RESULTS: Of the 516 students who completed the survey over half (n = 300, 58.1%) reported mental health concerns and most students (n = 469, 90.9%) reported being impacted by COVID-19. Close to half of students (n = 255, 49.4%) reported signs of post-traumatic stress disorder. Mental health impact was influenced by students' year level and history of mental health issues, where a history of mental health and a higher year level were both associated with greater mental health impacts. Students experienced considerable disruption to their learning due to COVID-19 restrictions which exacerbated students' distress and anxiety. Students coped with COVID-19 through focusing on their problems and using strategies to regulate their emotions and adapt to stressors. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably impacted pre-registration nursing students' mental health. Strategies to support nursing students manage their mental health are vital to assist them through the ongoing pandemic and safeguard the recruitment and retention of the future nursing workforce. IMPACT STATEMENT: This study adds an Australian understanding to the international evidence that indicates student nurses experienced a range of negative psychosocial outcomes during COVID-19. In this study, we found that students with a pre-existing mental health issue and final-year students were most affected. The changes to education in Australian universities related to COVID-19 has caused distress for many nursing students. Australian nursing academics/educators and health service staff need to take heed of these results as these students prepare for entry into the nursing workforce. PATIENT OR PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT: The study was designed to explore the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of undergraduate nursing students in Australia. Educators from several universities were involved in the design and conduct of the study. However, the study did not include input from the public or the intended participants.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Estudos Transversais , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/métodos , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Pandemias , Austrália
7.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 132, 2022 Dec 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36510198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Aboriginal women and their infants experience significant disadvantage in health outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Access to timely, effective, and appropriate maternal and child health care can contribute to reducing these existing health disparities. This research sought to explore factors that contribute to continuity of care for Aboriginal women and their infants living in metropolitan South Australia. This paper reports on the perspectives of health care workers in mainstream health services from the antenatal period to the end of an infants' second birthday. It explores health workers' perspectives of what contributes to positive care experiences and satisfaction with care provided to Aboriginal women and their infants in mainstream health. METHODS: Eight focus groups were held with 52 health professionals. Participants included Aboriginal Cultural Child and Family Support Consultants (n = 7), Aboriginal Maternal Infant Care Workers (n = 3), Midwives (n = 3) and Child and Family Nurses (n = 39). Data was inductively coded and thematically analysed. RESULTS: Three key themes emerged: the system takes priority, culture is not central in approaches to care, and 'we've got to be allowed to do it in a different way'. CONCLUSIONS: This research highlights a lack of continuity of care for Aboriginal families accessing mainstream health services from the antenatal period through to an infants' first 1000 days of life. This research has implications for communities, and it calls for strategies to enhance continuity, and healthcare services to provide appropriate and culturally safe care. Findings will inform and guide future changes to improve continuity of care for Aboriginal families and infants in the first 1000 days.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Serviços de Saúde Materna , Tocologia , Lactente , Criança , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Pessoal de Saúde
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1428, 2022 Nov 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36443783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Quality and safety in Australian healthcare is inequitably distributed, highlighted by gaps in the provision of quality care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Burns have potential for long-term adverse outcomes, and quality care, including culturally safe care, is critical to recovery. This study aimed to develop and apply an Aboriginal Patient Journey Mapping (APJM) tool to investigate the quality of healthcare systems for burn care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. STUDY DESIGN: Interface research methodology, using biomedical and cultural evidence, informed the modification of an existing APJM tool. The tool was then applied to the journey of one family accessing a paediatric tertiary burn care site. Data were collected through yarning with the family, case note review and clinician interviews. Data were analysed using Emden's core story and thematic analysis methods. Reflexivity informed consideration of the implications of the APJM tool, including its effectiveness and efficiency in eliciting information about quality and cultural safety. RESULTS: Through application of a modified APJM tool, gaps in quality care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families were identified at the individual, service and system levels. Engagement in innovative methodology incorporating more than biomedical standards of care, uncovered critical information about the experiences of culturally safe care in complex patient journeys. CONCLUSION: Based on our application of the tool, APJM can identify and evaluate specific aspects of culturally safe care as experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and be used for quality improvement.


Assuntos
Queimaduras , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Povos Indígenas , Criança , Humanos , Austrália , Instalações de Saúde , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Grupos Raciais
9.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 63: 103355, 2022 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35533537

RESUMO

AIMS: 1. To identify approaches and strategies that can build research capacity among academics from the disciplines of nursing and midwifery working in tertiary education institutions. 2. To identify evidence-informed strategies that enable academic transformation of professional identity from clinician to researcher. BACKGROUND: Nurses and midwives are core to leading health practice and system change through research. Despite manifold efforts to build research capacity among nurse academics over the past two decades, there is scant evidence about what specific strategies are effective and few robust evaluations of any capacity building strategies. DESIGN: This scoping review was guided by Arksey and O'Malley's framework to identify key concepts and map the available evidence specifically related to volume, nature and characteristics. METHODS: The authors followed a scoping review framework and used a PRISMA flowchart to report findings. Electronic data bases (CINAHL, ERIC, Medline and Scopus) were searched between April and June 2020. Literature published between 2000 and 2020 was searched. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used for data coding and extraction and all included papers were subsequently thematically analysed. RESULTS: Fourteen studies from seven countries met the inclusion criteria and were comprised of literature reviews (n = 4) case studies (n = 3) qualitative survey (n = 1) and intervention studies (n = 6). Four themes were identified as follows: academic identity, organisational changes, leadership and research skills development. CONCLUSIONS: Rigorous evaluation of research capacity building strategies for academics from the disciplines of nursing and midwifery is a significant gap in the literature. To promulgate research among nurse and midwife academics, strong, supportive leadership and a range of inclusive and targeted approaches are needed. Significant work remains in terms of negotiating with the broader university to operationalise supportive systems and structures. Clarifying how self-concept has an impact on building and maintaining a research identity for nurse and midwife academics is an area worthy of further study. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: Strong, supportive leadership with inclusive and targeted research skills development is key to reorienting academic nursing and midwifery research culture.


Assuntos
Tocologia , Escolas de Enfermagem , Fortalecimento Institucional , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Tocologia/educação , Gravidez , Instituições Acadêmicas
11.
Women Birth ; 35(2): 201-209, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33903041

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: High infant mortality remains a global health problem, particularly in less developed countries. Indonesia has one of the highest infant mortality rates in Southeast Asia. Known factors relate to documented medical conditions and do not necessarily explain their origin. AIM: To identify and explore factors that contribute to infant mortality in Papua, Indonesia, through the lens of health workers' perceptions. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach using semi-structured interviews was used. Twelve Indonesian health workers participated. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed, and then analysed thematically. FINDINGS: Five main themes were generated: beliefs and practices related to pregnancy, birth, and infants; infant health factors; maternal health factors; barriers to seeking, receiving and providing infant health care; and enablers and strategies for improving infant health. DISCUSSION: Cultural factors were perceived as contributing to poor health outcomes by shaping decisions, help seeking behaviour and health care access. Poverty, health literacy, road access and transport, shortage of health staffing, and health equipment and medicines exacerbate poor health outcomes. CONCLUSION: Cultural knowledge and sensitivity are central to the provision and acceptance of health care by local families in Papua, Indonesia. Recommendations include: improving cultural sensitivity and cultural safety of service; implementing community health promotion to enhance maternal and infant health; improving community participation in health care planning and delivery; and enhancing collaboration between national, provincial, regency and local governments.


Assuntos
Acessibilidade aos Serviços de Saúde , Mortalidade Infantil , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Indonésia , Lactente , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
J Child Health Care ; 26(3): 448-460, 2022 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34116592

RESUMO

Child and family health nurses (CFHNs) work in a variety of settings with families to promote optimal growth and development in infants and children from birth to 5 years. Literature is available about models of care that CFHNs use in their work, but there is limited information about how CFHNs enact care specifically for infants and children. The aim of this scoping review was to identify and contextualize existing knowledge of how CFHNs, both in Australia and internationally, care for infants and children. Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) framework was used to review 27 studies from Australia, Sweden, Finland, United Kingdom (UK), United States of America (USA), Ireland, Netherlands, Denmark and Canada. It was identified that CFHNs, equipped with a range of assessment tools for early intervention and health promotion, use a partnership approach when working with parents to promote the health and well-being of infants and children. The literature revealed the complexity of the roles undertaken by CFHNs when caring for infants and children. Review findings indicated that CFHNs' work is distinctive because it is conducted in home and community settings, is relational and salutogenic in nature and is also located in the domain of preventative health and early intervention.


Assuntos
Saúde da Família , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem , Criança , Saúde da Criança , Família , Humanos , Lactente , Pais
13.
Health Promot Int ; 37(2)2022 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34595531

RESUMO

This study aims to review articles reporting the perspectives and experiences of pandemic-related discrimination among racially minoritized peoples in high-income contexts. We searched online databases (Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and ProQuest) for peer-reviewed articles published between January 2002 and October 2020. Eligible studies reported either quantitative or qualitative accounts of pandemic-related discrimination from the perspectives of racially minoritized peoples in high-income contexts. Two authors screened 30% of titles/abstracts, and all full-text articles. Each article included for extraction underwent a quality assessment by two reviewers. Data were extracted and categorized thematically using NVivo 12, followed by a secondary analysis informed by critical race theory. Of the 1289 articles screened, 16 articles from five countries met the inclusion criteria. Racial discrimination is heightened during pandemic periods, due to the social association of specific racial groups with pandemic diseases including COVID-19, SARS (Asian), H1N1 (Hispanic) and Ebola (African). Fear based responses to racially minoritized peoples during pandemic periods included verbal/physical abuse, hypersurveillance, and avoidance, often occurring in public spaces. Pandemic-related racism had subsequent impacts on mental health and health care accessibility. Various coping strategies, including community support, avoidance, and problem solving, were documented in response to racial discrimination. Racialized discrimination and violence is a serious threat to the health and wellbeing of racially minoritized peoples, particularly due to its increase during pandemic periods. Racism must be recognized as a public health issue, and efforts to address its increased impact in pandemic contexts should be made, including ensuring that adequate representation of racially minoritized groups is present in policy, planning, and implementation.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H1N1 , Racismo , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Saúde Mental , Pandemias
14.
Prim Health Care Res Dev ; 22: e29, 2021 06 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34109935

RESUMO

AIMS: To collaboratively explore the cultural acceptance of the Pepi-Pod® program as an alternate safe sleep space and to explore the process of implementing the Pepi-Pod® program in a mainstream health service for Aboriginal families living in urban South Australia. BACKGROUND: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants continue to die from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) at rates three to four times greater than other infants born in Australia despite Council of Australian Governments commitment to halve the gap in the Indigenous infant mortality rate by 2018. The Pepi-Pod® program is evidenced in New Zealand and Queensland to provide a culturally appropriate safe sleep alternative that contributes to the reduction of SIDS and SUDI. We have no evidence of acceptability or feasibility when offered through mainstream services in metropolitan South Australia. METHODS: With a focus on decolonizing the research process through a two-way process for mutual learning between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal team members and community, a novel qualitative design was employed including photo elicited yarning sessions (n = 7), focus groups (n = 2), and field notes (n = 15). RESULTS: Four themes emerged: 'you don't have to worry'; 'a way of sharing knowledge'; 'it looks like a bread box?' and 'need for consistent safe sleep messages'. The findings suggest that participants believe the Pepi-Pod® program may enrich Aboriginal families' lives evoking feelings of comfort and safety; however, the design could be improved to make them more culturally appropriate. There was confusion around safe sleep processes and education with a call for streamlining safe sleep messaging.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Austrália , Humanos , Lactente , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/estatística & dados numéricos , Nova Zelândia , Projetos Piloto , Queensland , Austrália do Sul
15.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 45(3): 220-226, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34028905

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To better understand issues driving quality in burn care related to equity of outcomes and equality of provision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. METHODS: Seventy-six interviews with team members who provide care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in six paediatric burn units across five Australian jurisdictions were completed. Interface research methodology within a qualitative design guided data collection and analysis. RESULTS: Three themes were identified: i) Burn team members who identify the requirement to meet the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and deliver differential care; ii) Burn team members who believe in equal care, but deliver differential care based on the specific needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children; and iii) Burn team members who see little need for provision of differential care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and rather, value the provision of equal care for all. CONCLUSION: Burn team members conflate equitable and equal care, which has implications for the delivery of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. Equitable care is needed to address disparities in post-burn outcomes, and this requires clinicians, healthcare services and relevant system structures to work coherently and intentionally to reflect these needs. Implications for public health: Changes in health policy, the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander liaison officers in burn care teams and systems that prioritise critical reflexive practice are fundamental to improving care.


Assuntos
Queimaduras/etnologia , Competência Cultural , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/organização & administração , Acessibilidade aos Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/estatística & dados numéricos , Austrália/epidemiologia , Queimaduras/terapia , Criança , Equidade em Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33652719

RESUMO

Burns affect Australia's First Nations children more than other Australian children, they also experience longer lengths of stay in tertiary burns units and face barriers in accessing burn aftercare treatment. Data sets from two studies were combined whereby 19 families, 11 First Nations Health Worker (FNHW) and 56 multidisciplinary burn team members from across Australia described the actual or perceived role of FNHW in multidisciplinary burn care. Data highlighted similarities between the actual role of FNHW as described by families and as described by FNHW such as enabling cultural safety and advocacy. In contrast, a disconnect between the actual experience of First Nations families and health workers and that as perceived by multidisciplinary burn team members was evident. More work is needed to understand the impact of this disconnect and how to address it.


Assuntos
Queimaduras , Austrália , Unidades de Queimados , Queimaduras/terapia , Criança , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 20(1): 829, 2020 Sep 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32883268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Aboriginal women and their infants experience significant disadvantage in health outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts. Access to timely, effective and appropriate maternal and child healthcare can contribute to reducing these existing health disparities. However, accessing mainstream healthcare services often results in high levels of fear and anxiety, and low attendance at subsequent appointments among Aboriginal women, due to inefficient communication, poor service coordination and a lack of continuity of care. METHODS: This integrative literature review sought to explore factors that contribute to continuity of care and consider service features that contribute to positive care experiences and satisfaction with care received by Aboriginal women and their infants. In total, 28 studies were included in the review and were thematically analysed using Braun and Clarke's six steps of thematic analysis. This was followed by a collaborative, computer-assisted qualitative analysis, which resulted in the emergence of five key themes: lack of continuity of care, impact of lack of continuity of care, continuity of care interventions, impact of continuity of care interventions, and strategies to improve continuity of care. RESULTS: Most studies focused on health services in rural or remote Aboriginal communities and there was a lack of documented evidence of continuity of care (or lack thereof) for Aboriginal women living and birthing in regional and metropolitan areas. The majority of studies focused explicitly on continuity of care during the antenatal, birthing and immediate postnatal period, with only two studies considering continuity through to an infant's first 1000 days. CONCLUSION: The review highlights a lack of studies exploring continuity of care for Aboriginal families from the antenatal period through to an infants' first 1000 days of life. Included studies identified a lack of continuity in the antenatal, peri- and postnatal periods in both regional and metropolitan settings. This, along with identified strategies for enhancing continuity, have implications for communities, and healthcare services to provide appropriate and culturally safe care. It also marks an urgent need to incorporate and extend continuity of care and carer through to the first 1000 days for successful maternal and infant health outcomes for Aboriginal peoples.


Assuntos
Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Serviços de Saúde Materno-Infantil , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Adulto , Criança , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Feminino , Acessibilidade aos Serviços de Saúde , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Humanos , Lactente , Gravidez , População Rural
19.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 54: 1-9, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32473486

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Nurses working with children often encounter child maltreatment. Nurses' roles in mandatory reporting are well-documented, but less is known about additional ways nurses respond to child maltreatment. This is important because children experiencing less extreme maltreatment may have unmet needs without receiving a child protection intervention. OBJECTIVES: This paper reports one key finding from a qualitative study exploring nurses' perceptions and experiences of keeping children safe from maltreatment. Specifically, it reports nurses' perspectives of their relational skills used to support children experiencing maltreatment. DESIGN AND METHODS: Qualitative inductive thematic analysis followed by a secondary analysis using a social constructionist framework. Data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews and data saturation was achieved. Transcripts were inductively analysed with support of NVivo software. PARTICIPANTS: Registered nurses (n = 21) working with children in Australia. RESULTS: Nurses saw relational practice as core to addressing child maltreatment. Key themes were: 1) 'Walking the line': relationships in the context of surveillance, 2) 'You are a good mum': focusing on the positives and 3) Seeing and being the voice of the child. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses are uniquely positioned to identify and respond to child maltreatment through relational practices. Nurses maintained therapeutic relationships with parents to ensure ongoing access to vulnerable children. Although nurses recognised the importance of a child-centred approach, its enactment was varied and required ongoing critical reflection. This highlights the importance of supporting nurses to develop, maintain and continually improve their relational practices to enhance outcomes for children.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Infantis , Austrália , Criança , Maus-Tratos Infantis/diagnóstico , Maus-Tratos Infantis/prevenção & controle , Família , Humanos , Notificação de Abuso , Pesquisa Qualitativa
20.
Nurs Inq ; 27(2): e12342, 2020 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31899852

RESUMO

Nurses have an important role in preventing and responding to child abuse and neglect. This paper reports on nurses' perceptions of how organisational systems and hierarchies shaped their capacity to respond to child abuse and neglect. This is one of four key themes identified through an inductive analysis of data from a broader qualitative study that explored nurses' perceptions and experiences of keeping children safe. The study was guided by social constructionist theory, and data were collected through in-depth interviews with nurses working with children in Australia (n = 21). Key findings showed that nurses experienced many challenges to responding to child abuse, including difficulties sharing information, fear of making mistakes and inflexible systems of care. This was underpinned by an organisational 'rule-centred' culture of following policies at the expense of maintaining an explicit focus on children's needs. These findings demonstrate first the importance of creative and flexible thinking from individual professionals, so policies are enacted with a clear child focus. Second, they highlight the need for leadership to enact organisational and systemic cultural change that maintains a genuinely child-centred approach.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Infantis , Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde , Disseminação de Informação , Notificação de Abuso , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem , Percepção , Austrália , Criança , Maus-Tratos Infantis/prevenção & controle , Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Pesquisa Qualitativa
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