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1.
Women Birth ; 37(3): 101602, 2024 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38518577

RESUMO

PROBLEM: Although there is robust evidence for the benefits of midwifery group practice (MGP) caseload care, there are limited opportunities for women to access this model in Australia. There is also limited knowledge on how to sustain these services. BACKGROUND: MGP can benefit childbearing women and babies and improve satisfaction for women and midwives. However, sustainability of the model is challenging. While MGPs are often supported and celebrated, in Australia some services have closed, while others struggle to adequately staff MGPs. AIM: To investigate midwives and managers opinions on the management, culture, and sustainability of MGP. METHODS: A national survey of MGP midwives and managers was distributed (2021 and 2022). Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. RESULTS: A total of 579 midwives and 90 managers completed the survey. The findings suggest that many MGPs do not support new graduates and students to work in MGP. Over half (59.8%) the participants (midwives and managers) reported that the women and families were the best aspect about working in MGP, while 44.3% said the effects on midwives' lifestyle and families were the worst aspect. DISCUSSION: The relationship with women remains the major motivator for providing MGP care. However, work-life imbalance is a deterrent, exacerbated by staffing shortages. Staffing might be improved by adequate renumeration, strengthening orientation, and attracting new graduates and students through experience in MGP. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to attract midwives to MGP and improve work-life balance and sustainability.


Assuntos
Prática de Grupo , Tocologia , Enfermeiros Obstétricos , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Tocologia/métodos , Estudos Transversais , Austrália , Inquéritos e Questionários , Pesquisa Qualitativa
2.
Trauma Violence Abuse ; : 15248380231221279, 2024 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281156

RESUMO

Health and allied health professionals are uniquely positioned to collaborate in prevention, early intervention and responses to child maltreatment. Effective collaboration requires comprehensive interprofessional education (IPE), and inadequate collaboration across sectors and professions continually contributes to poor outcomes for children. Little is known about what interprofessional preparation health and allied health professionals receive before initial qualification (preservice) that equips them for interprofessional collaboration and provision of culturally safe care in child protection. This scoping review aimed to identify what is known internationally about IPE in child protection for preservice health and allied health professionals. Thirteen manuscripts reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Key characteristics of the educational interventions are presented, including target disciplines, core content and their learning objectives and activities. Findings demonstrated primarily low-quality methodologies and educational interventions that had not been replicated beyond their initial context. Many educational interventions did not provide comprehensive content covering the spectrum of prevention, early intervention and responses for all types of child maltreatment, and/or did not clearly indicate how IPE was achieved. Key challenges to delivering comprehensive interprofessional child protection include lack of institutional support and competing priorities across disciplines who must meet requirements of separate regulatory bodies. Consequently, there is a need for further development and robust evaluation of educational interventions to explore how interprofessional collaborative skills for child protection can be developed and delivered in preservice health and allied health professional education.

3.
Women Birth ; 37(1): 206-214, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37726186

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite robust evidence on the benefits of midwifery group practice (MGP), there remains difficulties with implementing and sustaining the model. However, contemporary data on the MGP workforce and how each model has been operationalised are limited. This constrains an understanding of the factors that help or hinder implementation and sustainability of MGP. AIM: To describe the characteristics of Australian MGPs and the factors that help or hinder sustainability. METHODS: A national cross-sectional survey was undertaken in Australia between March 2021 and July 2022, inclusive. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive analysis while qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. FINDINGS: Of 669 survey responses, 579 were midwives and 90 were managers. The mean years of experience for clinical midwives was eight years, and 47.8% (almost twice the national average) completed a Bachelor of Midwifery (BMid). Half (50.2%) the models provided care for women of all risk. Midwives resigned from MGP because of the MGP work conditions (30%) and how the service was managed or supported (12.7%). Managers resigned from MGP because of role changes, conflict with their manager, and limited support. Almost half (42.6%) of MGP managers also managed other areas, leading to heavy workloads, competing demands, and burnout. CONCLUSION: The BMid appears to be a common educational pathway for MGP midwives, and many MGP services are providing care to women with complexities. Flexible practice agreements, organisational support and appropriate workloads are vital for recruitment, retention, and sustainability of MGP.


Assuntos
Prática de Grupo , Tocologia , Enfermeiros Obstétricos , Gravidez , Feminino , Humanos , Austrália , Estudos Transversais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Recursos Humanos
4.
Psychiatry Res ; 327: 115363, 2023 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37523885

RESUMO

Hospitalisation is designed to protect patients from harm; however, patients have been reported to take their own lives during hospital admissions. While a significant healthcare concern, few studies have analysed inpatient suicides in general and psychiatric hospital units. Understanding these deaths is important for informing future prevention initiatives. Here we investigate a national sample (n = 367) of inpatient suicides in general (24%, n = 87) and psychiatric (76%, n = 278) hospital units. Patient characteristics, suicide location, timing, and suicide methods were assessed and compared. Patients who died from suicide were mostly male and admitted into psychiatric units. General hospital patients were less likely to have a known history of mental illness or previous self-harm and were often admitted for mental illness-related presentations. Suicides frequently occurred outside of the hospital by hanging. Patients in psychiatric units were more likely to be on approved leave at their death, and general patients were more likely to have absconded. These results indicate the need to identify risk factors relevant to each setting and address broader system-level factors. Removing obvious ligature points, preventing absconding, and assessing patients before episodes of leave, could contribute to preventing inpatient suicides.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais , Suicídio , Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Suicídio/psicologia , Pacientes Internados/psicologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , Hospitais Gerais , Unidades Hospitalares , Hospitais Psiquiátricos
5.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 23(1): 77, 2023 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36709265

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: With the impact of over two centuries of colonisation in Australia, First Nations families experience a disproportionate burden of adverse pregnancy and birthing outcomes. First Nations mothers are 3-5 times more likely than other mothers to experience maternal mortality; babies are 2-3 times more likely to be born preterm, low birth weight or not to survive their first year. 'Birthing on Country' incorporates a multiplicity of interpretations but conveys a resumption of maternity services in First Nations Communities with Community governance for the best start to life. Redesigned services offer women and families integrated, holistic care, including carer continuity from primary through tertiary services; services coordination and quality care including safe and supportive spaces. The overall aim of Building On Our Strengths (BOOSt) is to facilitate and assess Birthing on Country expansion into two settings - urban and rural; with scale-up to include First Nations-operated birth centres. This study will build on our team's earlier work - a Birthing on Country service established and evaluated in an urban setting, that reported significant perinatal (and organisational) benefits, including a 37% reduction in preterm births, among other improvements. METHODS: Using community-based, participatory action research, we will collaborate to develop, implement and evaluate new Birthing on Country care models. We will conduct a mixed-methods, prospective birth cohort study in two settings, comparing outcomes for women having First Nations babies with historical controls. Our analysis of feasibility, acceptability, clinical and cultural safety, effectiveness and cost, will use data including (i) women's experiences collected through longitudinal surveys (three timepoints) and yarning interviews; (ii) clinical records; (iii) staff and stakeholder views and experiences; (iv) field notes and meeting minutes; and (v) costs data. The study includes a process, impact and outcome evaluation of this complex health services innovation. DISCUSSION: Birthing on Country applies First Nations governance and cultural safety strategies to support optimum maternal, infant, and family health and wellbeing. Women's experiences, perinatal outcomes, costs and other operational implications will be reported for Communities, service providers, policy advisors, and for future scale-up. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australia & New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry # ACTRN12620000874910 (2 September 2020).


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Parto , Recém-Nascido , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Austrália , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Prospectivos , Grupos Populacionais
6.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 160(2): 653-660, 2023 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35869950

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between maternal asthma and adverse perinatal outcomes in an Australian Indigenous population. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all Indigenous mother and baby dyads for births from 2001 to 2013 in Western Australia (n = 25 484). Data were linked from Western Australia Births, Deaths, Midwives, Hospital, and Emergency Department collections. Maternal asthma was defined as a self-reported diagnosis at an antenatal visit or hospitalization or emergency visit for asthma during pregnancy or less than 3 years before pregnancy. Associations with birth, labor, and pregnancy outcomes were assessed using generalized estimating equations. Asthma exacerbation during pregnancy and stratification by remoteness was also assessed. RESULTS: Maternal asthma was associated with placental abruption (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.59 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-2.35]), threatened preterm labor (aOR, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.39-1.79]), and emergency cesarean sections (aOR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.13-1.44]). These risks increased further with an asthma exacerbation during pregnancy or if the mother was from a remote area. No associations were found for low birth weight, preterm birth, small for gestational age, or perinatal mortality. CONCLUSION: Maternal asthma in Indigenous women is associated with an increased risk of emergency cesarean sections, placental abruption, and threatened preterm labor. These risks may be mitigated by improved management of asthma exacerbations during pregnancy.


Assuntos
Descolamento Prematuro da Placenta , Asma , Trabalho de Parto Prematuro , Nascimento Prematuro , Gravidez , Feminino , Recém-Nascido , Humanos , Nascimento Prematuro/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Descolamento Prematuro da Placenta/epidemiologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Placenta , Resultado da Gravidez/epidemiologia , Asma/epidemiologia
7.
Women Birth ; 36(1): e36-e43, 2023 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35491383

RESUMO

PROBLEM: Complex physiological processes are often difficult for midwifery students to comprehend when using traditional teaching and learning approaches. Online resources for midwifery education are limited. BACKGROUND: Face to face instructional workshops using simulation have had some impact on improving understanding. However, in the 21st century new technologies offer the opportunity to provide alternative learning approaches. Virtual and artificial realities have been shown to increase confidence in decision making during clinical practice. AIM: Explore the impact of using three-dimensional (3D) visualisation in midwifery education, on student's application, when educating women about the birth of the placenta, and membranes. METHODS: Face to face individual interviews were performed, to collect deep, meaningful experiences of students, learning about the third stage of labour. FINDINGS: Prior clinical experiences impacted on student's ability to articulate how they would discuss birth of the placenta and membranes, and the process of haemostasis with women. DISCUSSION: The narrative findings of this pilot study identified ways that students traditionally learn midwifery, through theory, and clinical practice. Interview narratives illustrated how midwifery students who had previous experiences of witnessing birth, had superior ability to discuss the third stage of labour with women. While students with limited birth experiences, found the 3DMVR assisted them in their understanding of the physiology of the third stage of labour. CONCLUSION: In an environment of increasing technological advances, clinical placements remain an essential component of midwifery education.


Assuntos
Tocologia , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Gravidez , Humanos , Feminino , Tocologia/educação , Projetos Piloto , Aprendizagem , Escolaridade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
8.
Women Birth ; 36(1): 99-107, 2023 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35410848

RESUMO

PROBLEM/BACKGROUND: Strong international evidence demonstrates significantly improved outcomes for women and their babies when supported by midwifery continuity of care models. Despite this, widespread implementation has not been achieved, especially in regional settings. AIM: To develop a theoretical understanding of the factors that facilitate or inhibit the implementation of midwifery continuity models within regional settings. METHODS: A Constructivist Grounded Theory approach was used to collect and analyse data from 34 interviews with regional public hospital key informants. RESULTS: Three concepts of theory emerged: 'engaging the gatekeepers', 'midwives lacking confidence' and 'women rallying together'. The concepts of theory and sub-categories generated a substantive theory: A partnership between midwives and women is required to build confidence and enable the promotion of current evidence; this is essential for engaging key hospital stakeholders to invest in the implementation of midwifery continuity of care models. DISCUSSION: The findings from this research suggest that midwives and women can significantly influence the implementation of midwifery continuity models within their local maternity services, particularly in regional settings. Midwives' reluctance to transition is based on a lack of confidence and knowledge of what it is really like to work in midwifery continuity models. Similarly, women require education to increase awareness of continuity of care benefits, and a partnership between women and midwives can be a strong political force to overcome many of the barriers. CONCLUSION: Implementation of midwifery continuity of care needs a coordinated ground up approach in which midwives partner with women and promote widespread dissemination of evidence for this model, directed towards consumers, midwives, and hospital management to increase awareness of the benefits.


Assuntos
Tocologia , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Tocologia/educação , Teoria Fundamentada , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Austrália , Hospitais Públicos
9.
Women Birth ; 36(1): 11-16, 2023 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35410849

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The nutritional and health benefits of breastfeeding for infants and young children are well-established however rates of breastfeeding initiation and duration for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are lower than non-Indigenous children. AIM: To describe factors influencing breastfeeding practice amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. METHODS: A scoping narrative review was conducted using the Joanna Briggs Institute framework. A search was conducted in four online databases (PubMed, Scopus, ANU SuperSearch, and Science Direct). Findings were analysed using [30] narrative synthesis. FINDINGS: This review included 9 journal articles, a conference summary and a book. This review identified four factors influencing women's breastfeeding practice; sources of support, culturally appropriate care, intention to breastfeed and social determinants. CONCLUSION: Multiple social determinants resulting from colonization have interrupted traditional infant feeding practices and women's sources of support. Although Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have strong intention to breastfeed, their breastfeeding outcomes are impacted by lack of pro-breastfeeding support when encountering breastfeeding challenges as well as norms surrounding the use of infant formula milk. Culturally appropriate care is essential for identifying women's needs and avoiding stereotyping. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of breastfeeding interventions for this group of women.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Gravidez , Povos Aborígenes Australianos e Ilhéus do Estreito de Torres , Cuidado Pós-Natal
10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38276792

RESUMO

The inclusion of Indigenous cultures, known as the cultural determinants of health, in healthcare policy and health professional education accreditation and registration requirements, is increasingly being recognised as imperative for improving the appalling health and well-being of Indigenous Australians. These inclusions are a strengths-based response to tackling the inequities in Indigenous Australians' health relative to the general population. However, conceptualising the cultural determinants of health in healthcare practice has its contextual challenges, and gaps in implementation evidence are apparent. In this paper, we provide a case example, namely the Katherine Hospital, of how healthcare services can implement the cultural determinants of health into clinical practice. However, to be effective, health professionals must concede that Australia's Indigenous peoples' knowledges involving cultural ways of being, knowing and doing must co-exist with western and biomedical knowledges of health practice. We use the Katherine Hospital ABC Radio National Background Briefing interview, which was mentioned by two research participants in a 2020 study, as an example of good practice that we can learn from. Additionally, the six Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health actions contained in the 2nd Edition of the Australian National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards provide governance and accountability examples of how to enable Indigenous people's cultures and their knowledges in the provision of services. The role of non-Indigenous clinical allies and accomplices is imperative when embedding and enacting Indigenous Australians' cultures in service systems of health. When Indigenous Peoples access mainstream hospitals, deep self-reflection by allies and accomplices is necessary to enable safe, quality care, and treatment that is culturally safe and free from racism. Doing so can increase cultural responsiveness free of racism, thereby reducing the inherent power imbalances embedded within mainstream health services.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente , Atenção à Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Humanos , Austrália , Hospitais , Povos Aborígenes Australianos e Ilhéus do Estreito de Torres
11.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0276459, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36322517

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Maternity services around the world have been disrupted since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) representing one hundred and forty-three professional midwifery associations across the world sought to understand the impact of the pandemic on women and midwives. AIM: The aim of this study was to understand the global impact of COVID-19 from the point of view of midwives' associations. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional survey using an on-line questionnaire was sent via email to every midwives' association member of ICM. SURVEY INSTRUMENT: The survey was developed and tested by a small global team of midwife researchers and clinicians. It consisted of 106 questions divided into seven discreet sections. Each member association was invited to make one response in either English, French or Spanish. RESULTS: Data were collected between July 2020 and April 2021. All respondents fulfilling the inclusion criteria irrespective of whether they completed all questions in the survey were eligible for analysis. All data collected was anonymous. There were 101 surveys returned from the 143 member associations across the world. Many countries reported being caught unaware of the severity of the infection and in some places, midwives were forced to make their own PPE, or reuse single use PPE. Disruption to maternity services meant women had to change their plans for place of birth; and in many countries maternity facilities were closed to become COVID-19 centres. Half of all respondents stated that women were afraid to give birth in hospitals during the pandemic resulting in increased demand for home birth and community midwifery. Midwifery students were denied access to practical or clinical placements and their registration as midwives has been delayed in many countries. More than 50% of the associations reported that governments did not consult them, and they have little or no say in policy at government levels. These poor outcomes were not exclusive to high-, middle- or low-income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Strong recommendations that stem from this research include the need to include midwifery representation on key government committees and a need to increase the support for planned out of hospital birth. Both these recommendations stand to enhance the effectiveness of midwives in a world that continues to face and may face future catastrophic pandemics.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Tocologia , Enfermeiros Obstétricos , Feminino , Gravidez , Humanos , Tocologia/educação , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Pandemias , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1203, 2022 Sep 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36163048

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Midwifery group practice (MGP) has consistently demonstrated optimal health and wellbeing outcomes for childbearing women and their babies. In this model, women can form a relationship with a known midwife, improving both maternal and midwife satisfaction. Yet the model is not widely implemented and sustained, resulting in limited opportunities for women to access it. Little attention has been paid to how MGP is managed and led and how this impacts the sustainability of the model. This study clarifies what constitutes optimal management and leadership and how this influences sustainability. METHODS: This qualitative study forms part of a larger mixed methods study investigating the management of MGP in Australia. The interview findings presented in this study are part of phase one, where the findings informed a national survey. Nine interviews and one focus group were conducted with 23 MGP managers, clinical midwife consultants, and operational/strategic managers who led MGPs. Transcripts of the audio-recordings were analysed using inductive, reflexive, thematic analysis. RESULTS: Three themes were constructed, namely: The manager, the person, describing the ideal personal attributes of the MGP manager; midwifing the midwives, illustrating how the MGP manager supports, manages, and leads the group practice midwives; and gaining acceptance, explaining how the MGP manager can gain acceptance beyond group practice midwives. Participants described the need for MGP managers to display midwife-centred management. This requires the manager to have qualities that mirror what is generally accepted as requirements for good midwifery care namely: core beliefs in feminist values and woman-centred care; trust; inclusiveness; being an advocate; an ability to slow down or take time; an ability to form relationships; and exceptional communication skills. Since emotional labour is a large part of the role, it is also necessary for them to encourage and practice self-care. CONCLUSIONS: Managers need to practice in a way that is midwife-centred and mimics good midwifery care. To offset the emotional burden and improve sustainability, encouraging and promoting self-care practices might be of value.


Assuntos
Prática de Grupo , Tocologia , Gerenciamento da Prática Profissional , Austrália , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa
13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35564775

RESUMO

The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a model of care to embed cultural safety for Aboriginal children into paediatric hospital settings. The Daalbirrwirr Gamambigu (pronounced "Dahl-beer-weer gum-um-be-goo" in the Gumbaynggirr language means 'safe children') model encompasses child protection responses at clinical, managerial and organisational levels of health services. A review of scholarly articles and grey literature followed by qualitative interviews with Aboriginal health professionals formed the evidence base for the model, which then underwent rounds of consultation for cultural suitability and clinical utility. Culturally appropriate communication with children and their families using clinical yarning and a culturally adapted version of ISBAR (a mnemonic for Identify, Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation) for interprofessional communication is recommended. The model guides the development of a critical consciousness about cultural safety in health care settings, and privileges the cultural voices of many diverse Aboriginal peoples. When adapted appropriately for local clinical and cultural contexts, it will contribute to a patient journey experience of respect, dignity and empowerment.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Austrália , Criança , Competência Cultural , Hospitais , Humanos , Povos Indígenas , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico
14.
Women Birth ; 35(5): 475-483, 2022 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34688582

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused isolation, fear, and impacted on maternal healthcare provision. AIM: To explore midwives' experiences about how COVID-19 impacted their ability to provide woman-centred care, and what lessons they have learnt as a result of the mandated government and hospital restrictions (such as social distancing) during the care of the woman and her family. METHODS: A qualitative interpretive descriptive study was conducted. Twenty-six midwives working in all models of care in all states and territories of Australia were recruited through social media, and selected using a maximum variation sampling approach. Data were collected through in-depth interviews between May to August, 2020. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. FINDINGS: Two overarching themes were identified: 'COVID-19 causing chaos' and 'keeping the woman at the centre of care'. The 'COVID-19 causing chaos' theme included three sub-themes: 'quickly evolving situation', 'challenging to provide care', and 'affecting women and families'. The 'Keeping the woman at the centre of care' theme included three sub-themes: 'trying to keep it normal', 'bending the rules and pushing the boundaries', and 'quality time for the woman, baby, and family unit'. CONCLUSION: Findings of this study offer important evidence regarding the impact of the pandemic on the provision of woman-centred care which is key to midwifery philosophy. Recommendations are made for ways to preserve and further enhance woman-centred care during periods of uncertainty such as during a pandemic or other health crises.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Tocologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pandemias , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa
15.
Nurse Educ Today ; 108: 105184, 2022 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34717099

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Complex physiological processes are often difficult for midwifery students to comprehend when using traditional teaching and learning approaches. Face to face instructional workshops using simulation have had some impact on improving understanding. However, in the 21st century new technologies offer the opportunity to provide alternative learning approaches. AIM: To investigate the impact of using three-dimensional (3D) visualisation in midwifery education on student's experience of learning, and retention of knowledge at three points in time. DESIGN: A pilot study involving a two-armed parallel Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) comparing the retention of knowledge scores between the control and intervention groups. SETTING: An Australian University in the Northern Territory. PARTICIPANTS: The sample included second year Bachelor of Midwifery students (n = 38). All received traditional midwifery education before being randomly allocated to either the intervention (n = 20) or control (n = 18) group. METHODS: A new immersive virtual environment was introduced to complement existing traditional midwifery education on the third stage of labour. This intervention was evaluated using a demographic survey and multiple-choice questionnaire to collect baseline information via Qualtrics. To measure change in knowledge and comprehension, participants completed the same multiple-choice knowledge questionnaire at three time points; pre, immediately post and at 1 month post intervention. In addition, the intervention group completed a 3D student satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Baseline knowledge scores were similar between the groups. A statistically significant increase in knowledge score was evident immediately post intervention for the intervention group, however there was no significant difference in knowledge score at one month. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the creation of further three-dimensional visualisation teaching resources for midwifery education. However, a larger randomised controlled study is needed to seek generalisation of these findings to confirm enhanced student learning and retention of knowledge post 3DMVR, beyond the immediate exposure time.


Assuntos
Tocologia , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Projetos Piloto , Gravidez , Estudantes
16.
Women Birth ; 35(2): 172-183, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34049833

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Although there is high-level evidence supporting positive perinatal outcomes for midwifery group practice (MGP) care, not all women can access this model due to a failure to implement or sustain it. The way that MGPs are managed could be an important factor in whether they are successful in the long-term. AIM: To explore what determines optimal management of MGP in Australia, and the influence it has on sustainability of MGP. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with MGP midwives (n=8). Transcriptions of the audio recordings were analysed thematically and lexically for triangulation. FINDINGS: Following a thematic analysis of the data, an over-arching theme emerged - namely - being valued and supported, with three sub-themes: a nice little sweet spot, someone to stand up for you, and building relationships and support beyond the model. This revealed that value and support by all stakeholders, including the midwives themselves, was necessary to sustain an MGP. The lexical analysis revealed the themes: support, the system, and the caseload. This analysis highlighted the importance of the system - specifically, the impact of the institution on how MGP is operationalised. CONCLUSION: For MGP to be sustained in Australia, it needs to be prioritised, nurtured, and embraced by the whole maternity care system. Management plays an important role in ensuring the right people are employed to pivotal positions and that midwifery-led models of care are valued and supported throughout the system.


Assuntos
Prática de Grupo , Serviços de Saúde Materna , Tocologia , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Feminino , Humanos , Parto , Gravidez
17.
Women Birth ; 34(4): 303-305, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33935005

RESUMO

In this call to action, a coalition of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers from Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, United States and Canada argue for the urgent need for adequately funded Indigenous-led solutions to perinatal health inequities for Indigenous families in well-resourced settler-colonial countries. Authors describe examples of successful community-driven programs making a difference and call on all peoples to support and resource Indigenous-led perinatal health services by providing practical actions for individuals and different groups.


Assuntos
Acessibilidade aos Serviços de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Direitos Sexuais e Reprodutivos , Austrália , Colonialismo , Feminino , Humanos , Tocologia , Nova Zelândia , Direitos do Paciente , Gravidez , Estados Unidos
18.
Midwifery ; 98: 102986, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33774389

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Although midwifery-led continuity of care is associated with superior outcomes for mothers and babies, it is not available to all women. Issues with implementation and sustainability might be addressed by improving how it is led and managed - yet little is known about what constitutes the optimal leadership and management of midwifery-led continuity models. DESIGN: Following a systematic search of academic databases for relevant publications, 25 publications were identified. These were analysed, thematically to clarify (dis)similar themes, and lexically, to clarify how words within the publications travelled together. FINDINGS: The publications were replete with three key themes. First, leadership - important yet challenged. Second, management of organisational change; barriers and enhancers. Third, promotors of sustainable models of care. Complementarily, the lexical analysis suggests that references to midwives and leadership among the publications did not typically travel together, as reported in the publications and were distant to one another, although management was inter-connected to both and to change. Leadership and management were not closely coupled with midwives or relationships with women. KEY CONCLUSIONS: Midwifery leadership matters and can be enacted irrespective of position or seniority. Midwifery-led continuity of care models can be better managed via a multipronged approach. Improved leadership and management can help sustain such care. Although there was a perceived need for midwifery leadership, there did not seem to be an association between leadership and midwives in the lexical analysis. Many publications focused on the style theory of leadership and the transformational style theory. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Instead of focusing on leaders and the presumption of a leadership scarcity, it might be more beneficial to start focusing within, looking with a new lens on leadership within midwifery at all levels. It might also be constructive for the profession to investigate a more progressive form of leadership, one that is relational and focuses on leadership rather than on the leader.


Assuntos
Tocologia , Continuidade da Assistência ao Paciente , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Mães , Inovação Organizacional , Gravidez
19.
Public Health Res Pract ; 31(1)2021 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690783

RESUMO

Australia's local, state, territory and federal governments have agreed that the 10-year life expectancy gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians will be closed by 2031. However, annual Closing the Gap reports tabled by the various prime ministers in the Australian Parliament (for the past 12 years) have consistently indicated that the life expectancy gap continues to widen. Australia has seen more than three decades of government policies since the landmark 1989 National Aboriginal health strategy. What has been missing from these policy commitments is the genuine enactment of the knowledges that are held by Indigenous Australians relating to their cultural ways of being, knowing and doing. Privileging Indigenous knowledges, cultures and voices must be front and centre in developing, designing and implementing policies and programs. The sharing of power, provision of resources, culturally informed reflective policy making, and program design are critical elements. In this paper, we provide a conceptual model of practice, working at the cultural interface where knowledges are valued and innovations can occur. This model of practice is where knowledges and cultures can co-exist, and it could be the answer to Closing the Gap in life expectancy by 2031. Despite a growing willingness and need to consider these models, there remains a deep-seated resistance to identifying and addressing institutional and systemic racism and racist attitudes, including unconscious biases held by individuals. Further, western non-Indigenous worldviews of ways of being, knowing and doing continue to dominate the decisions and actions of governments - and consequentially dominate public health policies and practices. There is an unacceptable standard approach, for and about Indigenous health instead of with Indigenous peoples, resulting in the neglectful dismissal of Indigenous knowledges and Indigenous cultures of ways of being, knowing and doing.


Assuntos
Atenção à Saúde/etnologia , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Expectativa de Vida/etnologia , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico , Racismo , Austrália , Política de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos , Saúde Pública
20.
Women Birth ; 34(1): 69-76, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32115381

RESUMO

ISSUE: There is an underrepresentation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwives across Australia and an inadequate number of graduating midwives to redress this. A major pillar for the Birthing on Country Model is maternity care workforce development. AIM: The purpose of this review is to examine the enablers and barriers that Aboriginal students experience while undertaking the Bachelor of Midwifery degree in Australia. METHODS: A search of the literature was undertaken through electronic databases. When only three papers were found looking at the experiences of Aboriginal midwifery students the search was broadened to include Aboriginal undergraduate health students. FINDINGS: The literature review reported a strong need for cultural safety in both the clinical and education systems. Students with access to cultural supports, relationships with Aboriginal mentors and academics and Aboriginal clinical placements felt empowered and were able to navigate the 'two worlds' in a meaningful way. DISCUSSION: This review highlights a significant gap in the literature. Despite the expanded search terms to include Aboriginal health students, a relatively narrow range of papers were found. Interestingly, the combined search revealed similar themes: kinship, personal factors, and cultural issues. CONCLUSION: Empowering and supporting Aboriginal Peoples to become midwives is essential. While systems and societies aim for cultural safety, this review shows there is still a way to go. Further research is essential to decolonise higher education and health care systems, and provide strong, well supported pathways for Aboriginal midwifery students.


Assuntos
Educação em Enfermagem/organização & administração , Tocologia/educação , Havaiano Nativo ou Outro Ilhéu do Pacífico/estatística & dados numéricos , Enfermeiros Obstétricos/educação , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Estudantes de Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Austrália , Fortalecimento Institucional , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena , Humanos , Masculino , Serviços de Saúde Materna , Mentores , Gravidez
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