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1.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 3480, 2024 02 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38347058

RESUMO

The ability to parse sound mixtures into coherent auditory objects is fundamental to cognitive functions, such as speech comprehension and language acquisition. Yet, we still lack a clear understanding of how auditory objects are formed. To address this question, we studied a speech-specific case of perceptual multistability, called verbal transformations (VTs), in which a variety of verbal forms is induced by continuous repetition of a physically unchanging word. Here, we investigated the degree to which auditory memory through sensory adaptation influences VTs. Specifically, we hypothesized that when memory persistence is longer, participants are able to retain the current verbal form longer, resulting in sensory adaptation, which in turn, affects auditory perception. Participants performed VT and auditory memory tasks on different days. In the VT task, Japanese participants continuously reported their perception while listening to a Japanese word (2- or 3-mora in length) played repeatedly for 5 min. In the auditory memory task, a different sequence of three morae, e.g., /ka/, /hi/, and /su/, was presented to each ear simultaneously. After some period (0-4 s), participants were visually cued to recall one of the sequences, i.e., in the left or right ear. We found that delayed recall accuracy was negatively correlated with the number of VTs, particularly under 2-mora conditions. This suggests that memory persistence is important for formation and selection of perceptual objects.


Assuntos
Percepção da Fala , Humanos , Rememoração Mental , Sinais (Psicologia) , Cognição , Fala , Memória de Curto Prazo , Percepção Auditiva
2.
eNeuro ; 9(6)2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36351819

RESUMO

Visual accuracy is consistently shown to be modulated around the time of the action execution. The neural underpinning of this motor-induced modulation of visual perception is still unclear. Here, we investigate with EEG whether it is related to the readiness potential, an event-related potential (ERP) linked to motor preparation. Across 18 human participants, the magnitude of visual modulation following a voluntary button press was found to correlate with the readiness potential amplitude measured during visual discrimination. Participants' amplitude of the readiness potential in a purely motor-task was also found to correlate with the extent of the motor-induced modulation of visual perception in the visuomotor task. These results provide strong evidence that perceptual changes close to action execution are associated with motor preparation processes and that this mechanism is independent of task contingencies. Further, our findings suggest that the readiness potential provides a fingerprint of individual visuomotor interaction.


Assuntos
Variação Contingente Negativa , Eletroencefalografia , Humanos , Eletroencefalografia/métodos , Percepção Visual , Potenciais Evocados , Desempenho Psicomotor
3.
J Neurosci ; 42(47): 8817-8825, 2022 11 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36223998

RESUMO

It is well known that recent sensory experience influences perception, recently demonstrated by a phenomenon termed "serial dependence." However, its underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We measured ERP responses to pairs of stimuli presented randomly to the left or right hemifield. Seventeen male and female adults judged whether the upper or lower half of the grating had higher spatial frequency, independent of the horizontal position of the grating. This design allowed us to trace the memory signal modulating task performance and also the implicit memory signal associated with hemispheric position. Using classification techniques, we decoded the position of the current and previous stimuli and the response from voltage scalp distributions of the current trial. Classification of previous responses reached full significance only 700 ms after presentation of the current stimulus, consistent with retrieval of an activity-silent memory trace. Cross-condition classification accuracy of past responses (trained on current responses) correlated with the strength of serial dependence effects of individual participants. Overall, our data provide evidence for a silent memory signal that can be decoded from the EEG potential, which interacts with the neural processing of the current stimulus. This silent memory signal could be the physiological substrate subserving at least one type of serial dependence.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurophysiological underpinnings of how past perceptual experience affects current perception are poorly understood. Here, we show that recent experience is reactivated when a new stimulus is presented and that the strength of this reactivation correlates with serial biases in individual participants, suggesting that serial dependence is established on the basis of a silent memory signal.


Assuntos
Potenciais Evocados Visuais , Percepção Visual , Adulto , Masculino , Humanos , Feminino , Percepção Visual/fisiologia , Viés , Potenciais Evocados
4.
Eur J Neurosci ; 55(11-12): 3083-3099, 2022 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33559266

RESUMO

To maintain a continuous and coherent percept over time, the brain makes use of past sensory information to anticipate forthcoming stimuli. We recently showed that auditory experience of the immediate past is propagated through ear-specific reverberations, manifested as rhythmic fluctuations of decision bias at alpha frequencies. Here, we apply the same time-resolved behavioural method to investigate how perceptual performance changes over time under conditions of stimulus expectation and to examine the effect of unexpected events on behaviour. As in our previous study, participants were required to discriminate the ear-of-origin of a brief monaural pure tone embedded in uncorrelated dichotic white noise. We manipulated stimulus expectation by increasing the target probability in one ear to 80%. Consistent with our earlier findings, performance did not remain constant across trials, but varied rhythmically with delay from noise onset. Specifically, decision bias showed a similar oscillation at ~9 Hz, which depended on ear congruency between successive targets. This suggests rhythmic communication of auditory perceptual history occurs early and is not readily influenced by top-down expectations. In addition, we report a novel observation specific to infrequent, unexpected stimuli that gave rise to oscillations in accuracy at ~7.6 Hz one trial after the target occurred in the non-anticipated ear. This new behavioural oscillation may reflect a mechanism for updating the sensory representation once a prediction error has been detected.


Assuntos
Percepção Auditiva , Ritmo Teta , Estimulação Acústica/métodos , Encéfalo , Humanos , Ruído
5.
Curr Biol ; 29(24): 4208-4217.e3, 2019 12 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31761705

RESUMO

Perception is a proactive, "predictive" process, in which the brain relies, at least in part, on accumulated experience to make best guesses about the world to test against sensory data, updating the guesses as new experience is acquired. Using novel behavioral methods, the present study demonstrates the role of alpha rhythms in communicating past perceptual experience. Participants were required to discriminate the ear of origin of brief sinusoidal tones that were presented monaurally at random times within a burst of uncorrelated dichotic white noise masks. Performance was not constant but varied with delay after noise onset in an oscillatory manner at about 9 Hz (alpha rhythm). Importantly, oscillations occurred only for trials preceded by a target tone to the same ear, either on the previous trial or two trials back. These results suggest that communication of perceptual history generates neural oscillations within specific perceptual circuits, strongly implicating behavioral oscillations in predictive perception and with formation of working memory.


Assuntos
Ritmo alfa/fisiologia , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Memória de Curto Prazo/fisiologia , Estimulação Acústica/métodos , Adulto , Encéfalo , Feminino , Voluntários Saudáveis , Humanos , Masculino , Estimulação Luminosa/métodos , Tempo de Reação/fisiologia , Percepção Visual
6.
Neuroimage Clin ; 19: 640-651, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30013922

RESUMO

Evidence is accumulating that similar cognitive resources are engaged to process syntactic structure in music and language. Congenital amusia - a neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects music perception, including musical syntax - provides a special opportunity to understand the nature of this overlap. Using electroencephalography (EEG), we investigated whether individuals with congenital amusia have parallel deficits in processing language syntax in comparison to control participants. Twelve amusic participants (eight females) and 12 control participants (eight females) were presented melodies in one session, and spoken sentences in another session, both of which had syntactic-congruent and -incongruent stimuli. They were asked to complete a music-related and a language-related task that were irrelevant to the syntactic incongruities. Our results show that amusic participants exhibit impairments in the early stages of both music- and language-syntactic processing. Specifically, we found that two event-related potential (ERP) components - namely Early Right Anterior Negativity (ERAN) and Left Anterior Negativity (LAN), associated with music- and language-syntactic processing respectively, were absent in the amusia group. However, at later processing stages, amusics showed similar brain responses as controls to syntactic incongruities in both music and language. This was reflected in a normal N5 in response to melodies and a normal P600 to spoken sentences. Notably, amusics' parallel music- and language-syntactic impairments were not accompanied by deficits in semantic processing (indexed by normal N400 in response to semantic incongruities). Together, our findings provide further evidence for shared music and language syntactic processing, particularly at early stages of processing.


Assuntos
Córtex Auditivo/fisiopatologia , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/fisiopatologia , Potenciais Evocados Auditivos/fisiologia , Estimulação Acústica , Mapeamento Encefálico , Eletroencefalografia , Feminino , Humanos , Idioma , Masculino , Música , Adulto Jovem
7.
Curr Biol ; 27(23): 3643-3649.e3, 2017 Dec 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29153327

RESUMO

Many behavioral measures of visual perception fluctuate continually in a rhythmic manner, reflecting the influence of endogenous brain oscillations, particularly theta (∼4-7 Hz) and alpha (∼8-12 Hz) rhythms [1-3]. However, it is unclear whether these oscillations are unique to vision or whether auditory performance also oscillates [4, 5]. Several studies report no oscillatory modulation in audition [6, 7], while those with positive findings suffer from confounds relating to neural entrainment [8-10]. Here, we used a bilateral pitch-identification task to investigate rhythmic fluctuations in auditory performance separately for the two ears and applied signal detection theory (SDT) to test for oscillations of both sensitivity and criterion (changes in decision boundary) [11, 12]. Using uncorrelated dichotic white noise to induce a phase reset of oscillations, we demonstrate that, as with vision, both auditory sensitivity and criterion showed strong oscillations over time, at different frequencies: ∼6 Hz (theta range) for sensitivity and ∼8 Hz (low alpha range) for criterion, implying distinct underlying sampling mechanisms [13]. The modulation in sensitivity in left and right ears was in antiphase, suggestive of attention-like mechanisms sampling alternatively from the two ears.


Assuntos
Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Relógios Biológicos , Encéfalo/fisiologia , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
8.
PLoS One ; 12(6): e0179252, 2017.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28617864

RESUMO

Individuals with congenital amusia usually exhibit impairments in melodic contour processing when asked to compare pairs of melodies that may or may not be identical to one another. However, it is unclear whether the impairment observed in contour processing is caused by an impairment of pitch discrimination, or is a consequence of poor pitch memory. To help resolve this ambiguity, we designed a novel Self-paced Audio-visual Contour Task (SACT) that evaluates sensitivity to contour while placing minimal burden on memory. In this task, participants control the pace of an auditory contour that is simultaneously accompanied by a visual contour, and they are asked to judge whether the two contours are congruent or incongruent. In Experiment 1, melodic contours varying in pitch were presented with a series of dots that varied in spatial height. Amusics exhibited reduced sensitivity to audio-visual congruency in comparison to control participants. To exclude the possibility that the impairment arises from a general deficit in cross-modal mapping, Experiment 2 examined sensitivity to cross-modal mapping for two other auditory dimensions: timbral brightness and loudness. Amusics and controls were significantly more sensitive to large than small contour changes, and to changes in loudness than changes in timbre. However, there were no group differences in cross-modal mapping, suggesting that individuals with congenital amusia can comprehend spatial representations of acoustic information. Taken together, the findings indicate that pitch contour processing in congenital amusia remains impaired even when pitch memory is relatively unburdened.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/fisiopatologia , Memória , Percepção da Altura Sonora , Percepção Visual , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
9.
Sci Rep ; 7: 44285, 2017 03 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28287166

RESUMO

Research suggests that musical skills are associated with phonological abilities. To further investigate this association, we examined whether phonological impairments are evident in individuals with poor music abilities. Twenty individuals with congenital amusia and 20 matched controls were assessed on a pure-tone pitch discrimination task, a rhythm discrimination task, and four phonological tests. Amusic participants showed deficits in discriminating pitch and discriminating rhythmic patterns that involve a regular beat. At a group level, these individuals performed similarly to controls on all phonological tests. However, eight amusics with severe pitch impairment, as identified by the pitch discrimination task, exhibited significantly worse performance than all other participants in phonological awareness. A hierarchical regression analysis indicated that pitch discrimination thresholds predicted phonological awareness beyond that predicted by phonological short-term memory and rhythm discrimination. In contrast, our rhythm discrimination task did not predict phonological awareness beyond that predicted by pitch discrimination thresholds. These findings suggest that accurate pitch discrimination is critical for phonological processing. We propose that deficits in early-stage pitch discrimination may be associated with impaired phonological awareness and we discuss the shared role of pitch discrimination for processing music and speech.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/fisiopatologia , Conscientização/fisiologia , Música , Discriminação da Altura Tonal/fisiologia , Percepção da Altura Sonora/fisiologia , Estimulação Acústica , Adolescente , Transtornos da Articulação/diagnóstico , Transtornos da Articulação/fisiopatologia , Audiometria de Tons Puros , Transtornos da Percepção Auditiva/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Análise de Regressão , Testes de Articulação da Fala , Adulto Jovem
10.
Multisens Res ; 28(3-4): 351-70, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26288904

RESUMO

Following prolonged exposure to audiovisual asynchrony, an observer's point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) shifts in the direction of the leading modality. It has been debated whether other sensory pairings, such as vision and touch, lead to a similar temporal recalibration, and if so, whether the internal timing mechanism underlying lag visuotactile adaptation is centralised or distributed. To address these questions, we adapted observers to vision- and tactile-leading visuotactile asynchrony on either their left or right hand side in different blocks. In one test condition, participants performed a simultaneity judgment on the adapted side (unilateral) and in another they performed a simultaneity judgment on the non-adapted side (contralateral). In a third condition, participants adapted concurrently to equal and opposite asynchronies on each side and were tested randomly on either hand (bilateral opposed). Results from the first two conditions show that observers recalibrate to visuotactile asynchronies, and that the recalibration transfers to the non-adapted side. These findings suggest a centralised recalibration mechanism not linked to the adapted side and predict no recalibration for the bilateral opposed condition, assuming the adapted effects were equal on each side. This was confirmed in the group of participants that adapted to vision- and tactile-leading asynchrony on the right and left hand side, respectively. However, the other group (vision-leading on the left and tactile-leading on the right) did show a recalibration effect, suggesting a distributed mechanism. We discuss these findings in terms of a hybrid model that assumes the co-existence of a centralised and distributed timing mechanism.


Assuntos
Adaptação Fisiológica , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Julgamento/fisiologia , Percepção do Tempo/fisiologia , Tato , Percepção Visual/fisiologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estimulação Luminosa/métodos , Tempo de Reação , Adulto Jovem
11.
Front Psychol ; 6: 385, 2015.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25914659

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Congenital amusia is a disorder that is known to affect the processing of musical pitch. Although individuals with amusia rarely show language deficits in daily life, a number of findings point to possible impairments in speech prosody that amusic individuals may compensate for by drawing on linguistic information. Using EEG, we investigated (1) whether the processing of speech prosody is impaired in amusia and (2) whether emotional linguistic information can compensate for this impairment. METHOD: Twenty Chinese amusics and 22 matched controls were presented pairs of emotional words spoken with either statement or question intonation while their EEG was recorded. Their task was to judge whether the intonations were the same. RESULTS: Amusics exhibited impaired performance on the intonation-matching task for emotional linguistic information, as their performance was significantly worse than that of controls. EEG results showed a reduced N2 response to incongruent intonation pairs in amusics compared with controls, which likely reflects impaired conflict processing in amusia. However, our EEG results also indicated that amusics were intact in early sensory auditory processing, as revealed by a comparable N1 modulation in both groups. CONCLUSION: We propose that the impairment in discriminating speech intonation observed among amusic individuals may arise from an inability to access information extracted at early processing stages. This, in turn, could reflect a disconnection between low-level and high-level processing.

12.
J Cogn Neurosci ; 27(4): 798-818, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25269113

RESUMO

Recent findings on multisensory integration suggest that selective attention influences cross-sensory interactions from an early processing stage. Yet, in the field of emotional face-voice integration, the hypothesis prevails that facial and vocal emotional information interacts preattentively. Using ERPs, we investigated the influence of selective attention on the perception of congruent versus incongruent combinations of neutral and angry facial and vocal expressions. Attention was manipulated via four tasks that directed participants to (i) the facial expression, (ii) the vocal expression, (iii) the emotional congruence between the face and the voice, and (iv) the synchrony between lip movement and speech onset. Our results revealed early interactions between facial and vocal emotional expressions, manifested as modulations of the auditory N1 and P2 amplitude by incongruent emotional face-voice combinations. Although audiovisual emotional interactions within the N1 time window were affected by the attentional manipulations, interactions within the P2 modulation showed no such attentional influence. Thus, we propose that the N1 and P2 are functionally dissociated in terms of emotional face-voice processing and discuss evidence in support of the notion that the N1 is associated with cross-sensory prediction, whereas the P2 relates to the derivation of an emotional percept. Essentially, our findings put the integration of facial and vocal emotional expressions into a new perspective-one that regards the integration process as a composite of multiple, possibly independent subprocesses, some of which are susceptible to attentional modulation, whereas others may be influenced by additional factors.


Assuntos
Atenção/fisiologia , Encéfalo/fisiologia , Tomada de Decisões/fisiologia , Emoções/fisiologia , Potenciais Evocados/fisiologia , Expressão Facial , Voz , Estimulação Acústica , Adulto , Mapeamento Encefálico , Eletroencefalografia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reconhecimento Visual de Modelos , Estimulação Luminosa , Adulto Jovem
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