Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 9 de 9
Filtrar
1.
Int Nurs Rev ; 2024 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38683142

RESUMO

AIM: To understand clinicians' motivations to engage in mentoring to support newly graduated nurses and midwives working in hospital settings. BACKGROUND: Nursing and midwifery literature has established the benefits of mentoring and challenges that affect the effectiveness of formal mentoring programmes. No studies have explored hospital nurses' and midwives' motivations to mentor in the absence of the obligatory status and associated rewards of institutionalised mentoring. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study with 35 nurses and midwives working in three public hospitals in the western, northern and northwestern parts of Uganda. Data were collected using semistructured interviews. Reflexive thematic analysis was applied to interpret the data. We have adhered to COREQ reporting guidelines. RESULTS: The study revealed three salient themes that capture nursing and midwifery professionals' mentoring perspectives. Participants expressed confidence in their inherent mentoring capacities and were often motivated by a desire to reciprocate prior mentoring experiences. Their mentoring approaches varied between self-focused and other-focused motivations, with some overlap in perspectives on hierarchical versus relational mentoring. Across the board, there was a strong consensus on the need of mentoring for individual clinicians, healthcare institutions and the broader profession. The study highlights five opportunities that can be harnessed to design future mentoring programmes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings delineate a complex interplay between self-centred and altruistic mentoring motivations, aligning with hierarchical or mutually beneficial mentoring paradigms. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING POLICY: Nurse managers should tailor mentoring programmes to align with these intrinsic motivations, affirm the enduring need for mentoring, and leverage existing institutional resources to create both acceptable and efficient mentoring frameworks.

2.
Nurs Inq ; : e12641, 2024 Apr 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38606562

RESUMO

Mentoring literature explores the dark side of mentoring as factors such as gender and race and how they affect the overall mentoring experience. The sociocultural context of the nursing and midwifery professions presents unique characteristics warranting a qualitative exploration of negative mentoring experiences. We aimed to characterise the dark side of mentoring based on informal mentoring relationships occurring among nurses and midwives working in hospitals. Utilising semistructured interviews in a qualitative descriptive design and reflexive thematic analysis, we examined the perceptions of 35 nurses and midwives from three public hospitals located in the Western, Northern and North-western regions of Uganda. Findings emerged in four overarching themes mentoring process deficits, mentoring relational problems, organisational challenges in mentoring and implications of negative mentoring experiences. Our study findings underscore that, while mentoring is frequently beneficial, it can also be interspersed with negative experiences arising from relational dynamics, particular mentoring processes and the overarching hospital environment. Notably, nurses and midwives actively transformed these challenges into opportunities for growth and self-improvement, while introspectively examining their roles in contributing to these negative experiences. Such a proactive approach highlights their resilience and steadfast commitment to professional development, even in the face of adversity.

3.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 2024 Mar 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38458855

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Professionals working with children, including nurses and midwives, are foundational to effectively safeguarding children from maltreatment. However, little is known about the full nature and scope of nurses' and midwives' roles in safeguarding children in Australia presenting barriers to effective workforce preparation and support. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study reports an inductive analysis of qualitative responses (n = 51 Round 1, n = 17 Round 2) from a two-round Delphi study. The Delphi study aimed to build consensus on the nature and scope of nursing and midwifery practice in safeguarding children, and this manuscript presents findings of an inductive analysis of qualitative responses beyond the scope of the Delphi study. Participants were Australian nurses and midwives (n = 51, n = 17) from diverse child-focussed settings. RESULTS: Nurses and midwives experienced many factors outside of their control that restricted their capacity to safeguard children. Influences included high workloads, burnout, lack of support, poor collaboration, structural barriers and inaccessible services for children. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses and midwives are advocates for children but experienced many factors preventing them from effectively safeguarding children. Future approaches to reducing child maltreatment must be underpinned by support for frontline professionals to promote workforce capacity and sustainability. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Despite nurses' and midwives' best intentions, their attempts to prevent and respond to child maltreatment were hampered by systemic factors beyond their control. This study highlighted the need to address broader influences on nursing and midwifery practice to reduce the impacts of child maltreatment and support children to thrive.

4.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 75: 103909, 2024 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38308946

RESUMO

AIM: This project explored whether a nurse practitioner led mobile paediatric screening service in early learning centres could incorporate allied health and nursing students and develop their confidence in interprofessional collaboration. BACKGROUND: Interprofessional collaboration is essential for health professionals across all contexts of care, including early childhood screening and intervention that enables children to thrive. METHODS: This multi-methods study (pre-test/post-test design) was conducted with nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and nutrition and dietetics students attending clinical placement within the nurse practitioner led mobile paediatric service. Data were collected via pre and post placement surveys (ISVS-21) and post placement semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Twelve students participated from July to December 2022. Survey findings demonstrated students improved inter-professional socialisation and readiness, supported by qualitative findings that uncovered unique mechanisms for how positive experiences were achieved. Unique pedagogical elements included 1) the nurse practitioner's professional attributes and 2) the mobile nature of the service leveraging learning opportunities within the shared commute. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides proof-of-concept of a placement model that facilitates interprofessional collaboration in nursing and allied health students. Further research should explore longer-term outcomes and scalability.


Assuntos
Profissionais de Enfermagem , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Humanos , Educação Interprofissional , Aprendizagem , Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , Relações Interprofissionais
5.
Trauma Violence Abuse ; : 15248380231221279, 2024 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38281156

RESUMO

Health and allied health professionals are uniquely positioned to collaborate in prevention, early intervention and responses to child maltreatment. Effective collaboration requires comprehensive interprofessional education (IPE), and inadequate collaboration across sectors and professions continually contributes to poor outcomes for children. Little is known about what interprofessional preparation health and allied health professionals receive before initial qualification (preservice) that equips them for interprofessional collaboration and provision of culturally safe care in child protection. This scoping review aimed to identify what is known internationally about IPE in child protection for preservice health and allied health professionals. Thirteen manuscripts reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Key characteristics of the educational interventions are presented, including target disciplines, core content and their learning objectives and activities. Findings demonstrated primarily low-quality methodologies and educational interventions that had not been replicated beyond their initial context. Many educational interventions did not provide comprehensive content covering the spectrum of prevention, early intervention and responses for all types of child maltreatment, and/or did not clearly indicate how IPE was achieved. Key challenges to delivering comprehensive interprofessional child protection include lack of institutional support and competing priorities across disciplines who must meet requirements of separate regulatory bodies. Consequently, there is a need for further development and robust evaluation of educational interventions to explore how interprofessional collaborative skills for child protection can be developed and delivered in preservice health and allied health professional education.

6.
Int Nurs Rev ; 2023 Oct 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37822132

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Scales used to evaluate nurses' perspectives of mentoring programmes are mainly designed in developed countries, making them unsuitable for nurses and midwives working in resource-poor developing countries. AIM: To explore the psychometric properties of the perceived cost of mentoring (PCM) scale, negative mentoring experiences (NME) scale and relational mentoring index (RMI) for adaptation in hospital settings in Uganda. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used. In total, 303 hospital nurses/midwives in Ugandan participated in the study to evaluate the psychometric properties of the three mentoring scales. RESULTS: Revisions based on word choice were made in adapting the scales to the Ugandan context. The PCM showed three factors (risk to reputation, mentoring effort and nepotism) and had an intra-class correlation (ICC) of 0.609 (95% CI, 0.324-0.793) and Cronbach's alpha of 0.705. The NME scale had two factors (lack of mentor expertise and mismatch between the dyad) consistent with the original scale with an ICC of 0.568 (95% CI, 0.271-0.767) and Cronbach's alpha of 0.841. The RMI showed two factors (individual influence and relational quality) with an ICC of 0.664 (95% CI, 0.410-0.824) and Cronbach's alpha of 0.933. CONCLUSIONS: The initial psychometric assessment indicates satisfactory validity and reliability of the scales for implementation among nurses and midwives within Ugandan hospital contexts. Subsequent research is warranted to validate the factor structures of the scales on a different sample. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: In using mentoring programmes to develop the hospital workforce, nurse and midwifery policymakers need to use culturally adapted and validated PCM, NME, and RMI scales to evaluate the quality of these mentoring programmes to maximise the benefits while avoiding unintended consequences.

7.
Int Nurs Rev ; 69(2): 229-238, 2022 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34820833

RESUMO

AIMS: To explore the overall benefits and challenges for the mentee, the mentor, and the hospital (stakeholders) in hospital-sponsored mentoring programs. BACKGROUND: Formal mentoring programs are widely used to assist nurses to adapt to clinical practice, facilitate their career development, and improve workforce retention. However, the overall benefits and challenges for stakeholders involved in formal mentoring programs remain largely unknown due to a lack of systematic reviews to synthesize relevant studies in this important area. DESIGN: A systematic integrated review. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of six databases including CINAHL, Web of Science, MEDLINE, Scopus, Science Direct, and ProQuest was undertaken. REVIEW METHODS: Studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed for methodological quality using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools. Findings from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods studies were extracted and synthesized thematically using a convergent synthesis method. RESULTS: Twenty-two original studies were included in the review. Findings are presented under five themes: the benefits for mentees, the benefits for mentors, the benefits for the hospital, challenges perceived by mentees and mentors, and mismatched mentor-mentee pairs. CONCLUSION: Mentoring programs that build on reciprocal relationships among mentees and mentors generate substantial benefits for all if mentees are able to navigate the challenges of the complex and dynamic nature of the clinical practice environment. Organizational support is important in overcoming these challenges.


Assuntos
Tutoria , Mentores , Hospitais , Humanos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
8.
Nurs Health Sci ; 19(2): 244-249, 2017 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28276128

RESUMO

Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Recursos em Saúde/provisão & distribuição , Enfermeiros Administradores/psicologia , Melhoria de Qualidade/normas , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/normas , População Rural , Uganda
9.
Midwifery ; 28(3): 374-9, 2012 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-21601966

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: across Africa the prevalence of postpartum depression is a major health problem affecting mothers, their infants and families. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors associated with postpartum depressive symptoms (PDS) among women living in a rural Ugandan district. DESIGN: descriptive correlation design. SETTING: Young-Child's Clinic of a public hospital, providing postpartum care services to approximately 450 women and their babies per month in a rural district of Uganda. PARTICIPANTS: 202 postpartum women who have lived in the rural district both during pregnancy and postpartum period following birth of the current infant of age ≤12 weeks. MEASUREMENTS: PDS were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). FINDINGS: participants' mean age and number of children were 24±4.33 years and 2.85±1.26 children, respectively. Majority of participants were married (61%), delivered the current infant by normal vaginal delivery (91%) at a health facility (86%) and experienced no complications (80%). The mean EPDS score for the sample was 9.5±0.18 and 43% of the participants were found to have PDS (scores ≥10). Statistically significant relationships were found between PDS and factors such as number of female sexual partners the husband has (r=0. 28, p≤0.01); current problems in marriage (r=0.22, p≤0.01), participant's parity (r=-0.24, p≤0.05), infant's ability to breast feed (r=0.28, p≤0.05) and husband support during the postpartum period (r=0. 20, p≤0.05). CONCLUSION: male partners of postpartum women are a major source of factors associated with PDS in rural areas. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: midwifery practitioners in rural settings should emphasise psychosocial assessment and male involvement in postpartum care to increase opportunities of identifying mothers at risk of PDS and implementation of interventions targeting men.


Assuntos
Depressão Pós-Parto/diagnóstico , Depressão Pós-Parto/epidemiologia , Tocologia/métodos , Mães/estatística & dados numéricos , Relações Enfermeiro-Paciente , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Área Programática de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Acontecimentos que Mudam a Vida , Relações Mãe-Filho , Mães/psicologia , Papel do Profissional de Enfermagem , Avaliação em Enfermagem/estatística & dados numéricos , Gravidez , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Apoio Social , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Uganda/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...