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1.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 22(1-3): 103-113, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37978885

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The study aimed to evaluate health literacy, knowledge, household disposal, and misuse practices of antibiotics among the United Arab Emirates (UAE) residents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted between May 1st and August 31st, 2022. The study encompassed a sample of 1074 participants. RESULTS: Participants involved in a medical field (OR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.45-2.69, p < 0.001) were more likely to have adequate health literacy. Most participants rarely (n = 315; 29.33%) or sometimes (n = 292; 27.19%) sought help from a doctor or pharmacist with reading the instructions and leaflets of antibiotics. A bachelor`s degree was associated with a reduced odds ratio of self-medication with antibiotics (OR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.29-0.75, p = 0.002). Only 10.61% of unneeded antibiotics were returned to the pharmacy, 79.42% were disposed of at home and 10% were disposed of using other disposal practices. CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of adequate health literacy were observed in those involved in the medical field and those with higher educational levels. The prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics among the UAE population was low. These findings highlight the importance of improving health literacy, promoting responsible antibiotic use, and encouraging proper disposal practices among the population.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , Letramento em Saúde , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Emirados Árabes Unidos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Inquéritos e Questionários
2.
JMIR Med Educ ; 9: e45372, 2023 Nov 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37999954

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: YouTube is considered one of the most popular sources of information among college students. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the use of YouTube as a pathology learning tool and its relationship with pathology scores among medical students at Jordanian public universities. METHODS: This cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study included second-year to sixth-year medical students from 6 schools of medicine in Jordan. The questionnaire was distributed among the students using social platforms over a period of 2 months extending from August 2022 to October 2022. The questionnaire included 6 attributes. The first section collected demographic data, and the second section investigated the general use of YouTube and recorded material. The remaining 4 sections targeted the participants who used YouTube to learn pathology including using YouTube for pathology-related content. RESULTS: As of October 2022, 699 students were enrolled in the study. More than 60% (422/699, 60.4%) of the participants were women, and approximately 50% (354/699, 50.6%) were second-year students. The results showed that 96.5% (675/699) of medical students in Jordan were using YouTube in general and 89.1% (623/699) were using it as a source of general information. YouTube use was associated with good and very good scores among the users. In addition, 82.3% (575/699) of medical students in Jordan used YouTube as a learning tool for pathology in particular. These students achieved high scores, with 428 of 699 (61.2%) students scoring above 70%. Most participants (484/699, 69.2%) reported that lectures on YouTube were more interesting than classic teaching and the lectures could enhance the quality of learning (533/699, 76.3%). Studying via YouTube videos was associated with higher odds (odds ratio [OR] 3.86, 95% CI 1.33-11.18) and lower odds (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.09-0.8) of achieving higher scores in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system courses, respectively. Watching pathology lectures on YouTube was related to a better chance of attaining higher scores (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.08-3.57). Surprisingly, spending more time watching pathology videos on YouTube while studying for examinations corresponded with lower performance, with an OR of 0.46 (95% CI 0.26-0.82). CONCLUSIONS: YouTube may play a role in enhancing pathology learning, and aiding in understanding, memorization, recalling information, and obtaining higher scores. Many medical students in Jordan have positive attitudes toward using YouTube as a supplementary pathology learning tool. Based on this, it is recommended that pathology instructors should explore the use of YouTube and other emerging educational tools as potential supplementary learning resources.

3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 102(38): e34633, 2023 Sep 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37746954

RESUMO

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) long-term effect is the new challenge facing healthcare providers that should be further assessed. We aim to describe the characteristics and patterns of long-term consequences of COVID-19 among recovered patients. COVID-19 patients baseline data was extracted from hospital records and alive patients filled self-reported symptoms questionnaires. A follow-up chest X-ray (CXR) was then scored based on lung abnormalities and compared with baseline CXR images. Six hundred ninety-four patients were included for the questionnaire and final analysis. Patients who were categorized as critical or severe were more prone to develop at least one symptom than those who were categorized as moderate. The most newly diagnosed comorbidities after discharge were diabetes (40.9%), cardiovascular diseases (18.6%), and hypertension (11.9%). Most patients with prolonged symptoms after discharge had a significant decrease in the quality of life. Small number of CXR showed persistent abnormalities in the middle right, the lower right, and lower left zones with an average overall score during admission 13.8 ± 4.9 and 0.3 ± 1.01 for the follow-up images. Effects of COVID-19 were found to persist even after the end of the infection. This would add on to the disease burden and would foster better management.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Alta do Paciente , Humanos , Jordânia/epidemiologia , Qualidade de Vida , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Hospitais
4.
PLoS One ; 18(8): e0290946, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37651383

RESUMO

Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a frequent comorbidity in patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The risk of developing severe or critical COVID-19 and higher mortality was observed to be increased in diabetic patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. In this study we aimed to find out the impact of clinical characteristics, comorbidities, laboratory results, and complications on the outcomes of diabetic patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. This article is a retrospective cohort study that include diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19 infection. A definition of diabetes was based on the past history of diabetes or if the HbA1c was 6.5% or higher. Demographics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, laboratory results, and complications were extracted from the electronic medical records. The mortality rate increased with increasing age (from 5.56% in younger patients to 46% in the elderly) and with severity (from 25.71% in moderate cases to 43.77% in critical cases). We found that a critical severity on admission (OR: 5.26, 95% CI: 1.28-21.66, p = 0.0214), a history of stroke (OR: 8.37, 95% CI: 2.2-31.88, p = 0.0018), and low calcium levels on admission (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.01-4.91, p = 0.0475) were significant risk factors predicting higher COVID-19 mortality in diabetic patients. The findings of this study suggest that reduced calcium levels could potentially indicate higher mortality due to COVID-19 in patients with DM. Furthermore, careful monitoring of diabetic patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 infection, especially those with critical disease severity or those with a history of stroke, may improve their outcome and lessen mortality.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Idoso , Humanos , COVID-19/complicações , Cálcio , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia
5.
J Clin Med ; 12(13)2023 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37445345

RESUMO

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the primary contributor to global mortality rates, which significantly escalates healthcare expenditures. Risk factors for ASCVD (including dyslipidemia) frequently present in clusters rather than separately. Addressing these risk factors is crucial in the early initiation of a comprehensive management plan that involves both lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy to reduce the impact of ASCVD. A team of Jordanian professionals from various medical organizations and institutes took the initiative to create a set of guidelines for dyslipidemia screening and therapy. A detailed, comprehensive literature review was undertaken utilizing several databases and keywords. This consensus statement provides recommendations for dyslipidemia management in Jordanians on several issues including cardiovascular risk estimation, screening eligibility, risk categories, treatment goals, lifestyle changes, and statin and non-statin therapies. It is recommended that all Jordanian individuals aged 20 years old or older undergo lipid profile testing. This should be followed by determining the level of cardiovascular risk depending on the presence or absence of ASCVD and cardiovascular risk factors, eligibility for lipid-lowering therapy, and the target low-density cholesterol serum level to be achieved. In conclusion, prioritizing the management of dyslipidemia is of the utmost importance in improving public health and reducing the burden of cardiovascular diseases.

6.
Br J Clin Pharmacol ; 89(9): 2851-2866, 2023 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37160725

RESUMO

AIM: To evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the patterns of antimicrobial use and the incidence of pathogens in primary and secondary healthcare settings in Northern Ireland. METHODS: Data were collected on antibiotic use and Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens from primary and secondary healthcare settings in Northern Ireland for the period before (January 2015-March 2020) and during (April 2020-December 2021) the pandemic. Time series intervention analysis methods were utilized. RESULTS: In the hospital setting, the mean total hospital antibiotic consumption during the pandemic was 1864.5 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 1000 occupied-bed days (OBD), showing no significant change from pre-pandemic (P = .7365). During the pandemic, the use of second-generation cephalosporins, third-generation cephalosporins, co-amoxiclav and levofloxacin increased, there was a decrease in the percentage use of the hospital Access group (P = .0083) and an increase in the percentage use of Watch group (P = .0040), and the number of hospital Klebsiella oxytoca and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus cases increased. In primary care, the mean total antibiotic consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic was 20.53 DDDs per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID), compared to 25.56 DID before the COVID-19 pandemic (P = .0071). During the pandemic, there was a decrease in the use of several antibiotic classes, an increase in the percentage use of the Reserve group (P = .0032) and an increase in the number of community-onset Pseudomonas aeruginosa cases. CONCLUSION: This study provides details of both changes in antibiotic consumption and the prevalence of infections in hospitals and primary care before and during the COVID-19 pandemic that emphasize the importance of antimicrobial stewardship in pandemic situations.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , COVID-19 , Humanos , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Pandemias , Prevalência , Irlanda do Norte/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde , Cefalosporinas
7.
Biosci Rep ; 43(3)2023 03 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36876487

RESUMO

Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection can lead to extensive lung infiltrate, a significant increase in the respiratory rate, and respiratory failure, which can affect the acid-base balance. No research in the Middle East has previously examined acid-base imbalance in COVID-19 patients. The present study aimed to describe the acid-base imbalance in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, determine its causes, and assess its impact on mortality in a Jordanian hospital. The study divided patients into 11 groups based on arterial blood gas data. Patients in normal group were defined as having a pH of 7.35-7.45, PaCO2 of 35-45 mmHg, and HCO3- of 21-27 mEq/L. Other patients were divided into 10 additional groups: mixed acidosis and alkalosis, respiratory and metabolic acidosis with or without compensation, and respiratory and metabolic alkalosis with or without compensation. This is the first study to categorize patients in this way. The results showed that acid-base imbalance was a significant risk factor for mortality (P<0.0001). Mixed acidosis nearly quadruples the risk of death when compared with those with normal levels (OR = 3.61, P=0.05). Furthermore, the risk of death was twice as high (OR = 2) for metabolic acidosis with respiratory compensation (P=0.002), respiratory alkalosis with metabolic compensation (P=0.002), or respiratory acidosis with no compensation (P=0.002). In conclusion, acid-base abnormalities, particularly mixed metabolic and respiratory acidosis, were associated with increased mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Clinicians should be aware of the significance of these abnormalities and address their underlying causes.


Assuntos
Desequilíbrio Ácido-Base , Acidose Respiratória , Acidose , Alcalose , COVID-19 , Humanos , Acidose Respiratória/metabolismo , Desequilíbrio Ácido-Base/metabolismo , Alcalose/metabolismo , Acidose/metabolismo , Fatores de Risco
8.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 11(4)2023 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36833021

RESUMO

This is a single-center, retrospective, cohort study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of multi-drug resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii infections (MDR-AB) in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with or without a COVID-19 infection and risk factors for blood stream infection. A total of 170 patients with MDR-AB were enrolled in the study. Of these, 118 (70%) patients were admitted to the ICU due to a COVID-19 infection. Comparing the COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 groups, the use of mechanical ventilation (98.31% vs. 76.92%, p = 0.000), the presence of septic shock (96.61% vs. 82.69%, p = 0.002), and the use of steroid (99.15% vs. 71.15%, p = 0.000) and tocilizumab therapies (33.05% vs. 0%, p = 0.000) were more prevalent and statistically more significant in patients with COVID-19 infections. The average length of the ICU stay (21.2 vs. 28.33, p = 0.0042) was significantly lower in patients with COVID-19 infections. Survival rate was 21.19% for the COVID-19 group and 28.85% for non-COVID-19 group with a p-value = 0.0361. COVID-19 status was associated with significantly higher hazards of death (HR 1.79, CI 95% 1.02-3.15, p = 0.043). Higher SOFAB (15.07 vs. 12.07, p = 0.0032) and the placement of an intravascular device (97.06% vs. 89.71%, p = 0.046) were significantly associated with the development of a bloodstream infection. Our study has shown that critically ill patients with an MDR-AB infection, who were admitted due to a COVID-19 infection, had a higher hazard for death compared to non-COVID-19 infected patients.

9.
Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther ; 21(4): 477-487, 2023 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36843495

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess public understanding of antibiotics, self-medication, and drug disposal practices. METHODS: A cross-sectional self-administered online survey was undertaken in Jordan. RESULTS: The study was completed by 1,105 participants. When asked about their knowledge of antibiotics, rational antibiotic use, and disposal practices, 16% percent believed they should discontinue antibiotics once they felt better, and 12% agreed to take the same antibiotics prescribed to others for the same illness. Self-medication with antibiotics was practiced by 44% of the participants. Prior experience, healthcare costs, and pharmacy location were all major determinants of self-medication. Only 6.4% of unneeded antibiotics were returned to the pharmacy, 60% were kept at home, and 26.6% were disposed of at home. Almost half of those who kept the antibiotics said they would use them again, and one-third said they would give them to friends and family. Respondents who had used antibiotics within the previous 6 months (p = 0.052) and relied on medication leaflets (p = 0.031) and physician recommendations (p = 0.001) were less likely to self-medicate with antibiotics. CONCLUSIONS: The study highlighted areas of inappropriate use of antibiotics, self-medication and the improper antibiotic disposal that can inform antimicrobial stewardship.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Jordânia , Estudos Transversais , Automedicação
10.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 16(10): 1607-1613, 2022 10 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36332214

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The availability of evidence-based information sources for dentists is essential to influence antibiotic prescribing practices and we need to understand how dentists interact with such sources and how this influences their practice. The present study aimed to evaluate dentists' preferred sources of information and their awareness of available information and initiatives on prudent antibiotic prescribing practices in Jordan. METHODOLOGY: An online cross-sectional questionnaire was administered to dentists between July to September 2021. It was an adapted version of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) survey for antibiotic use and resistance. RESULTS: A total of 204 dentists responded to the survey. The main sources of information regarding avoiding unnecessary antibiotic prescribing were published guidelines (35.5%), the dental professional body (20.0%), colleagues or peers (18.6%), and scientific organizations (17.2%), with the influence of these sources on changing prescribers' views being 40.7%, 9.8%, 10.3%, and 14.2%, respectively. Of the surveyed dentists, 9.3%, 33.8%, and 56.9% were aware, unaware, and unsure of the presence of national action plans on antimicrobial resistance, respectively. Dentists reported their desire to receive more information about resistance to antibiotics (57.8%), medical conditions for which antibiotics are used (52.9%), how to use antibiotics (41.2%), prescribing of antibiotics (39.7%), and links between the health of humans, animals, and the environment (26.0%). CONCLUSIONS: The study provided insights into the information available to and used by dentists, which can inform effective antimicrobial stewardship strategies for improving antibiotic prescribing.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos , Padrões de Prática Odontológica , Humanos , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Estudos Transversais , Odontólogos , Jordânia
11.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0265797, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36399447

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals working at the frontline, dealing with COVID-19 patients or their samples, should know about variants of concern (VOCs) and their transmissibility, disease severity, and vaccine efficacy. Healthcare professionals' (HCPs) perceptions towards new VOCs affect their practice and attitudes towards their patients. Moreover, these perceptions might significantly impact their patients' perceptions of new COVID-19 variants and public vaccine acceptability. METHODS: Online and paper-based questionnaires were distributed among Healthcare professionals in Jordan between August 2021 and October 2021. RESULTS: Among 423 HCPs who participated in this study, a majority believe that when viruses mutate, they become more transmissible (77.8%), more deadly (61.7%), and pathogenic (64.8%). In addition, half of the respondents, perceived current treatments as partially effective against VOCs and current diagnostics to be efficient. However, all VOCs were perceived as more transmissible, more virulent, and related to higher mortality rates when compared to the original strain. Regarding immunity against VOCs, (57.4%) of respondents believe in partial immunity against re-infection, and most respondents were either unsure about the current vaccines' efficacy or agreed that available vaccines would be ineffective. However, respondents (44.4%) still believe that people previously infected should get vaccinated. Respondents referred to the Ministry of Health as the most reliable source of information (45.6%) and the party responsible for educating the public about COVID-19 VOCs (57.9%). Travel was not a source of worry among respondents. However, they were worried about their families getting the new COVID-19 VOCs from their work. Similar proportions agreed/disagreed on the efficacy of the precautions and infection control measures currently applied by the government for preventing the spread of the new COVID-19 VOCs. CONCLUSION: Campaigns, workshops, and webinars targeting vaccines are highly recommended among HCPs to increase public acceptance of the vaccine and further booster shots.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humanos , Jordânia/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Estudos Transversais , Pessoal de Saúde , Percepção
12.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(11)2022 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36358214

RESUMO

The present study aimed to survey medical, nursing and pharmacy students' knowledge, attitude and practice regarding antimicrobial use and resistance. Additionally, the study assessed the teaching and assessment activities received regarding antibiotic use. A cross sectional online survey was distributed to undergraduate students currently in clinical studies in their degree program. A total of 716 medicine, nursing and pharmacy undergraduate students were included. Respondents scored more than 76% on knowledge on effective use, unnecessary use and associated side effects of antibiotics, and 65.2% regarding knowledge on the spread of antibiotic resistance. Some participants (21.0%) agreed or strongly agreed that there has been good promotion of prudent antimicrobial use. Students were aware (13.1%), unaware (29.1%), or unsure (57.8%) that there is a national action plan relating to antimicrobial resistance. A total of 62.8% of the respondents strongly agreed or agreed that they have a key role in helping control antibiotic resistance. Participants reported that they require more information about resistance to antibiotics (53.9%), medical conditions for which antibiotics are used (51.7%) and how to use antibiotics (51.0%). Discussion of clinical cases and vignettes and small group teaching were reported as very useful or useful teaching strategies (79.9% and 74.2%, respectively). The findings from this study determined the current situation in relation to education on prudent antimicrobial use for undergraduates and highlighted areas for informing better curriculum design.

13.
Int J Clin Pract ; 2022: 9617319, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36072822

RESUMO

This study aimed to assess the risk factors for COVID-19 mortality among hospitalized patients in Jordan. All COVID-19 patients admitted to a tertiary hospital in Jordan from September 20, 2020, to August 8, 2021, were included in this study. Demographics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and laboratory results were extracted from the patients' electronic records. Multivariable logistic and machine learning (ML) methods were used to study variable importance. Out of 1,613 COVID-19 patients, 1,004 (62.2%) were discharged from the hospital (survived), while 609 (37.8%) died. Patients who were of elderly age (>65 years) (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.28-3.16), current smokers (OR, 1.61; 95%CI, 1.17-2.23), and had severe or critical illness at admission ((OR, 1.56; 95%CI, 1.05-2.32) (OR, 2.94; 95%CI, 2.02-4.27); respectively), were at higher risk of mortality. Comorbidities including chronic kidney disease (OR, 2.90; 95% CI, 1.90-4.43), deep venous thrombosis (OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.08-6.35), malignancy (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.46-3.38), diabetes (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.65), and heart failure (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.02-2.23) were significantly associated with increased risk of mortality. Laboratory abnormalities associated with mortality included hypernatremia (OR, 11.37; 95% CI, 4.33-29.81), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.42-2.31), hypoalbuminemia (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.37-2.25), and low platelets level (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.05-1.95). Several demographic, clinical, and laboratory risk factors for COVID-19 mortality were identified. This study is the first to examine the risk factors associated with mortality using ML methods in the Middle East. This will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of the disease and improve the outcome of the pandemic worldwide.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Idoso , Humanos , Oriente Médio , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Centros de Atenção Terciária
14.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 16(8): 945-952, 2022 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35929952

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To identify early indicators for invasive mechanical ventilation utilization among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated COVID-19 patients who were admitted to hospital from 20 September 2020, to 8 August 2021. Multivariable logistic regression and machine learning (ML) methods were employed to assess variable significance. RESULTS: Among 1,613 confirmed COVID-19 patients, 365 patients (22.6%) received invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Factors associated with IMV included older age >65 years (OR,1.46; 95%CI, 1.13-1.89), current smoking status (OR, 1.71; 95%CI, 1.22-2.41), critical disease at admission (OR, 1.97; 95%CI, 1.28-3.03), and chronic kidney disease (OR, 2.07; 95%CI, 1.37-3.13). Laboratory abnormalities that were associated with increased risk for IMV included high leukocyte count (OR, 2.19; 95%CI, 1.68-2.87), low albumin (OR, 1.76; 95%CI, 1.33-2.34) and high AST (OR, 1.71; 95%CI, 1.31-2.22). CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that there are several factors associated with the increased need for IMV among COVID-19 patients. These findings will help in early identification of patients at high risk for IMV and reallocation of hospital resources toward patients who need them the most to improve their outcomes.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Albuminas , COVID-19/terapia , Humanos , Jordânia/epidemiologia , Respiração Artificial , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Relig Health ; 61(5): 3777-3794, 2022 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35524937

RESUMO

Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. The current study aims to examine, analyze, and identify trends of health-related publications on Ramadan fasting. In total, 1468 documents retrieved from Scopus were analyzed. The mean number of authors per document was 3.7, with an average of 13.3 citations per document. The UK ranked first (12.3%, n = 181) regarding the number of documents, followed by Iran (10.4%, n = 153) and then Saudi Arabia (9.8%, n = 144). The most active journal was "Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice" (4.9%, n = 72). Publications related to diabetes and fasting constituted around 29.7% (n = 436) of the literature. The research volume on Ramadan fasting has been noticeably growing. More reliable research is required to aid healthcare professionals in providing patient-specific care.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Jejum , Bibliometria , Humanos , Irã (Geográfico) , Islamismo
16.
Sleep Sci ; 15(Spec 1): 65-73, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35273749

RESUMO

Introduction: This study aims to assess existing sleep apps for mobile phones to determine the perceived effect of these applications on user's attitudes, knowledge, willingness to change, and its likelihood to change behavior from a user's perspective. Material and Methods: A systematic search was conducted through Google play store and iTunes Apple store using terms related to sleep tracking. Apps were evaluated using Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) tool for assessing and classifying mobile health applications quality. Additionally, a convenience sample of subjects were asked to evaluate the included apps for perceived sleep behavior changes. Results: The average MARS app quality score on a 5-point scale was 3.3. Between 30-50% of participants believed that sleep tracker apps are likely to increase awareness about sleep patterns and sleep hygiene, infuence sleep hygiene habits, and are likely to encourage help seeking for sleep hygiene when required. Conclusion: Apps available for sleep self-management and tracking may be valuable tools for self-management of sleep disorder and/or improving sleep quality, yet they require improvement in terms of quality and content, highlighting the need for further validity studies.

17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35270333

RESUMO

This study investigates the changes in prevalence estimates, severity, and risk factors of anxiety among healthcare workers (HCWs) over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey was distributed among HCWs using snowball sampling, collecting their socio-demographics, occupation, and anxiety symptoms as measured by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scale. It was distributed one month after the pandemic's onset in Jordan between 15 and 30 April 2020 (onset group) and after one year between 15 and 30 March 2021 (one-year group). A total of 422 HCWs were included (211 in each group). The one-year group reported a higher risk of GAD (30.8% vs. 16.6%; p = 0.001), a higher mean (SD) GAD-7 score (7.94 (5.29) vs. 6.15 (4.15); p < 0.001), and more severe symptoms (p = 0.003). Univariate analyses showed that participants who were younger, women, unmarried, had lower monthly incomes, underwent testing for COVID-19, had higher contact with COVID-19 patients, did not receive special education, and were unsatisfied with the institutional COVID-19 preparedness scored higher on the GAD-7 scale and had more severe symptoms than their counterparts in both groups. Unlike the onset group, occupation as a physician, COVID-19 infection history, and perception of remarkable changes in work were associated with higher anxiety scores and severity among the one-year group. The COVID-19 vaccine was a relative protective action. Logistic regression analyses showed that the female gender was a risk factor for developing GAD at the pandemic onset, while poor satisfaction with institutional preparedness was a significant GAD risk factor in the one-year group. Low monthly income and lack of special education were the shared risk factors for GAD in both groups. This study reveals a significant rise in anxiety among HCWs over a year of the COVID-19 pandemic and shows the vulnerable sub-groups who likely need psychological interventions.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Ansiedade/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Teste para COVID-19 , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Jordânia/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Heliyon ; 8(3): e09115, 2022 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35342831

RESUMO

Background: Increased application of electronic health information systems led to the buildup of patient information and facilitated access to this data. Consequently, the confidentiality of this information became an ethical challenge to medical teams' members including pharmacists. However, no study has been conducted to assess pharmacists' knowledge or practices of data confidentiality. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the current practices and knowledge of pharmacists concerning data confidentiality. Methods: This was a cross sectional study that included clinical pharmacists in tertiary hospitals and health care centers in Jordan. Data was collected through phone or face to face interviews using a data collection sheet. All continuous data was presented as median ± interquartile range (IQR) and categorical data as frequency (%). One way Chi square was used to check significant differences among categorical groups. Predictors that may affect knowledge and behavior scores were screened using simple linear regression. Results: A total of 388 pharmacists were interviewed with a mean age of 39.59 ± 8.32 years, with an average experience of 12.55 ± 7.30 years. Pharmacists relied on their personal experience to resolve ethical dilemmas (n = 274, 70.3%), and when they seek advice, their work colleagues (n = 180, 46.4%) %), followed by the head of departments (144 n; 37.1%), were the main source of advice on ethical issues. The overall median knowledge score of pharmacists about data confidentiality was 2.0 out of 5.0 (IQR = 2.0). A considerable percentage of the pharmacists was willing to share information with family members without asking for permission from the patient (n = 98, 25.3%). Pharmacists had a median behavior score of 3.5 out of 4.0 (IQR = 0.4) regarding practices related to data confidentiality, where the majority of them handled medical information from the patient with great confidentiality (304 n, 78.4%), and 85.8% of them (n = 333) gave patient's sexual diseases-related medical information the highest confidentiality. However, based on univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, none of the examined sociodemographic variables significantly predicted pharmacists' knowledge or behaviors (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Pharmacists are aware of the importance of confidentiality issues of their patients. However, a number of gaps in their knowledge and practices of data confidentiality were identified. Training that targets these gaps in their knowledge, and rectifies incorrect practices is needed during university education and as part of their continuous medical education.

19.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(2)2022 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35203777

RESUMO

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a serious healthcare problem that affects public health globally. Appropriate understanding and knowledge of prudent antimicrobial use and resistance, along with providing evidence-based information sources, are needed for informed antibiotic prescribing practices. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, opportunity, motivation, behavior of pharmacists and their information sources regarding antibiotic use and resistance in Jordan. An online cross-sectional questionnaire was developed and administered to pharmacists during the period of July-September 2021. The survey is an adapted version of the validated European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) survey for antibiotic use and resistance. Pharmacists from all sectors (n = 384), of whom 276 (71.9%) were community pharmacists, completed an online questionnaire. While respondents scored highly (>87%) on knowledge on effective use, unnecessary use, and associated side effects of antibiotics, lower scores were recorded for knowledge on the spread of antibiotic resistance (52.9%). Pharmacists support easy access to guidelines on managing infections in 56% of cases, and easy access to materials advising prudent antibiotic use and resistance in 39.8% of cases. One-third of respondents (37.0%) reported no knowledge of any initiatives on antibiotic awareness and resistance. Pharmacists were aware (13.3%), unaware (36.2%), or unsure (50.5%) of the existence of a national antibiotic resistance action plan. Pharmacists indicated an interest in receiving more information on resistance to antibiotics (55.2%), medical conditions for which antibiotics are used (53.1%), how to use antibiotics (45.1%), prescribing of antibiotics (34.4%), and links between the health of humans, animals, and the environment (28.6%). Findings can inform antimicrobial stewardship with required interventions to improve antibiotic use.

20.
Int J Environ Health Res ; 32(9): 2027-2039, 2022 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34097535

RESUMO

Social media has become an essential source of information during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study aims to understand social media's effect on the general public's fear, degree of adopting precautionary behaviors, and compliance with health authorities' regulations during the pandemic. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in Jordan during the early period of COVID-19 pandemic. 827 individuals completed the questionnaire. Factors that had a significant association with increased fear included female gender (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.8-3.7), married status (OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-3.4), following medical pages on social media (OR 1.6, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.42), and sharing of COVID-19 information on social media (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.8-7.1). The variables that were significantly associated with higher levels of precautionary behaviors were knowledge score (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.07-1.3), feeling of fear (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.71-3.), and following medical pages on social media (OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.8-4.24). Regarding compliance with health officials' regulations, social media as a source of information and sharing information were significantly associated with lower odds of compliance with the Ministry of Health's regulations (OR 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13-0.5 and OR 0.46, 95% CI: 0.25-0.8, respectively). Social media is an essential platform for risk communication during pandemics. It plays a positive role in spreading knowledge and promotes certain preventive behaviors among the public. However, it may spread fear and encourage disruptive behaviors, which might be propagated by sharing the pandemic's news.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Mídias Sociais , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Medo , Feminino , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários
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