Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 24
Filtrar
1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38279658

RESUMO

WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT: Mental health wards can feel unsafe. We know that patients and staff have different ideas about what makes a hospital ward safe or unsafe. Patients are often the first to know when the atmosphere on a ward becomes tense, but often, no one asks them for their views. Patients and staff are experts and should be included in discussions about how to make wards safer. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE: We got together with some service users and staff, and made an app that helps patients to tell staff when they are not feeling safe on a mental health ward. We tried it out on six wards and we asked patients and staff what they thought. The app was easy to use and most people liked the look of it. Patients said staff did not talk with them enough and so they liked using the app. However, some staff said they could tell how patients were feeling without an app and so they did not need it. Ward managers told us that staff were often very busy and did not always have time to use the app. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: This app could help staff know straightaway when patients do not feel safe on the ward, so that they can act quickly to calm things down. To make the most of the app, staff need to get used to it and bring it into ward routines. ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Safety improvement on mental health wards is of international concern. It should incorporate patient perspectives. AIM: Implementation and evaluation of 'WardSonar', a digital safety-monitoring tool for adult acute mental health wards, developed with stakeholders to communicate patients' real-time safety perceptions to staff. METHOD: Six acute adult mental health wards in England implemented the tool in 2022. Evaluation over 10 weeks involved qualitative interviews (34 patients, 33 staff), 39 focused ethnographic observations, and analysis of pen portraits. RESULTS: Implementation and evaluation of the WardSonar tool was feasible despite challenging conditions. Most patients valued the opportunity to communicate their immediate safety concerns, stating that staff had a poor understanding of them. Some staff said the WardSonar tool could help enhanced ward safety but recognised a need to incorporate its use into daily routines. Others said they did not need the tool to understand patients' safety concerns. DISCUSSION: Foreseeable challenges, including staff ambivalence and practical issues, appeared intensified by the post-COVID-19 context. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The WardSonar tool could improve ward safety, especially from patients' perspectives. Future implementation could support staff to use the real-time data to inform proactive safety interventions.

2.
Health Soc Care Deliv Res ; 11(21): 1-117, 2023 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37953648

RESUMO

Background: Sexual assault referral centres have been established to provide an integrated service that includes forensic examination, health interventions and emotional support. However, it is unclear how the mental health and substance use needs are being addressed. Aim: To identify what works for whom under what circumstances for people with mental health or substance use issues who attend sexual assault referral centres. Setting and sample: Staff and adult survivors in English sexual assault referral centres and partner agency staff. Design: A mixed-method multistage study using realist methodology comprising five work packages. This consisted of a systematic review and realist synthesis (work package 1); a national audit of sexual assault referral centres (work package 2); a cross-sectional prevalence study of mental health and drug and alcohol needs (work package 3); case studies in six sexual assault referral centre settings (work package 4), partner agencies and survivors; and secondary data analysis of outcomes of therapy for sexual assault survivors (work package 5). Findings: There is a paucity of evidence identified in the review to support specific ways of addressing mental health and substance use. There is limited mental health expertise in sexual assault referral centres and limited use of screening tools based on the audit. In the prevalence study, participants (n = 78) reported high levels of psychological distress one to six weeks after sexual assault referral centre attendance (94% of people had symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder). From work package 4 qualitative analysis, survivors identified how trauma-informed care potentially reduced risk of re-traumatisation. Sexual assault referral centre staff found having someone with mental health expertise in the team helpful not only in helping plan onward referrals but also in supporting staff. Both sexual assault referral centre staff and survivors highlighted challenges in onward referral, particularly to NHS mental health care, including gaps in provision and long waiting times. Work package 5 analysis demonstrated that people with recorded sexual assault had higher levels of baseline psychological distress and received more therapy but their average change scores at end point were similar to those without sexual trauma. Limitations: The study was adversely affected by the pandemic. The data were collected during successive lockdowns when services were not operating as usual, as well as the overlay of anxiety and isolation due to the pandemic. Conclusions: People who attend sexual assault centres have significant mental health and substance use needs. However, sexual assault referral centres vary in how they address these issues. Access to follow-up support from mental health services needs to be improved (especially for those deemed to have 'complex' needs) and there is some indication that co-located psychological therapies provision improves the survivor experience. Routine data analysis demonstrated that those with sexual assault can benefit from therapy but require more intensity than those without sexual assault. Future work: Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of providing co-located psychological therapy in the sexual assault referral centres, as well as evaluating the long-term needs and outcomes of people who attend these centres. Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Health and Social Care Delivery Research programme (16/117/03) and is published in full in Health and Social Care Delivery Research; Vol. 11, No. 21. Trial registration: This trial is registered as PROSPERO 2018 CRD42018119706 and ISRCTN 18208347.


We undertook several studies including: Searching and examining published research (review). A survey that asked sexual assault referral centres how mental health and substance use are addressed. Questionnaires: survivors who had recently attended a sexual assault referral centre completed questionnaires on mental health, alcohol and drugs, and quality of life. Interviews with staff at sexual assault referral centres and survivors of assualts. Routine data: we analysed anonymous data from mental health services to compare how those with sexual assault benefit from psychological therapy. We combined the findings from all the aspects of the study to conclude that most people who attend sexual assault referral centres have significant mental health needs; however, the response to these needs is variable within sexual assault referral centres. Survivors report that the sexual assault referral centres offer a caring and supportive service, but many also reported difficulties in accessing the right support afterwards. Where there was co-located psychological therapy, there were benefits for both survivors and the wider team. We also showed that, despite high needs, people surviving sexual assault can benefit from therapies but may need more therapy than those who have not experienced sexual assault.


Assuntos
Delitos Sexuais , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Adulto , Humanos , Ansiedade , Estudos Transversais , Saúde Mental , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
3.
Health Soc Care Deliv Res ; 11(15): 1-161, 2023 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37837344

RESUMO

Background: Mental health crises cause significant disruption to individuals and families and can be life-threatening. The large number of community crisis services operating in an inter-agency landscape complicates access to help. It is unclear which underpinning mechanisms of crisis care work, for whom and in which circumstances. Aim: The aim was to identify mechanisms to explain how, for whom and in what circumstances adult community crisis services work. Objectives: The objectives were to develop, test and synthesise programme theories via (1) stakeholder expertise and current evidence; (2) a context, intervention, mechanism and outcome framework; (3) consultation with experts; (4) development of pen portraits; (5) synthesis and refinement of programme theories, including mid-range theory; and (6) identification and dissemination of mechanisms needed to trigger desired context-specific crisis outcomes. Design: This study is a realist evidence synthesis, comprising (1) identification of initial programme theories; (2) prioritisation, testing and refinement of programme theories; (3) focused realist reviews of prioritised initial programme theories; and (4) synthesis to mid-range theory. Main outcome: The main outcome was to explain context, mechanisms and outcomes in adult community mental health crisis care. Data sources: Data were sourced via academic and grey literature searches, expert stakeholder group consultations and 20 individual realist interviews with experts. Review methods: A realist evidence synthesis with primary data was conducted to test and refine three initial programme theories: (1) urgent and accessible crisis care, (2) compassionate and therapeutic crisis care and (3) inter-agency working. Results: Community crisis services operate best within an inter-agency system. This requires compassionate leadership and shared values that enable staff to be supported; retain their compassion; and, in turn, facilitate compassionate interventions for people in crisis. The complex interface between agencies is best managed through greater clarity at the boundaries of services, making referral and transition seamless and timely. This would facilitate ease of access and guaranteed responses that are trusted by the communities they serve. Strengths and limitations: Strengths include the identification of mechanisms for effective inter-agency community crisis care and meaningful stakeholder consultation that grounded the theories in real-life experience. Limitations include the evidence being heavily weighted towards England and the review scope excluding full analysis of ethnic and cultural diversity. Conclusions: Multiple interpretations of crises and diverse population needs present challenges for improving the complex pathways to help in a crisis. Inter-agency working requires clear policy guidance with local commissioning. Seamless transitions between services generate trust through guaranteed responses and ease of navigation. This is best achieved where there is inter-agency affiliation that supports co-production. Compassionate leaders engender staff trust, and outcomes for people in crisis improve when staff are supported to retain their compassion. Future work: Further work might explore inter-agency models of crisis delivery, particularly in rural communities. Future work could focus on evaluating outcomes across crisis care provider agencies and include evaluation of individual, as well as service-level, outcomes. The implementation and effect of mental health triage could be explored further, including via telehealth. Barriers to access for marginalised populations warrant a specific focus in future research. Study registration: The study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42019141680. Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Health and Social Care Delivery Research programme and will be published in full in Health and Social Care Delivery Research; Vol. 11, No. 15. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.


A mental health crisis can be traumatic for individuals and families. There are a lot of different agencies delivering crisis care. This can make getting the right help from services difficult, confusing and slow. It is not clear which services work best or who they work best for. This research explored community mental health crisis services for adults. We focused on what is working, who it is working for and in what situations it is working. Service users, carers, mental health professionals and service managers formed an 'expert stakeholder group' to guide the project by helping the researchers make sense of what we learned. We gathered information from research reports, other documents and interviews with experts (i.e. service users, carers, professionals, managers). We focused on three questions: How can services make sure that people in crisis can get the right help, quickly? What makes crisis care compassionate? Does it help if different crisis services work together? Community crisis services are most compassionate and effective when staff from different organisations share information. When leaders of crisis care help staff to work together across services, they find better ways to help people. Close working across teams gives professionals a better understanding of what other services do and makes it easier for them to give people the right help at the right time. When leaders are kind and supportive to staff, they feel better at work and provide better crisis care. It would be useful to explore if the most effective crisis services are the same ones that service users like best. We need to know more about mental health triage, inter-agency working and telehealth. Our project did not explore diversity, but this is an important topic to investigate.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Cuidados Paliativos , Humanos , Adulto , Inglaterra
4.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 32(6): 1636-1653, 2023 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37574714

RESUMO

Mental health crises cause significant distress and disruption to the lives of individuals and their families. Community crisis care systems are complex, often hard to navigate and poorly understood. This realist evidence synthesis aimed to explain how, for whom and in what circumstances community mental health crisis services for adults work to resolve crises and is reported according to RAMESES guidelines. Using realist methodology, initial programme theories were identified and then tested through iterative evidence searching across 10 electronic databases, four expert stakeholder consultations and n = 20 individual interviews. 45 relevant records informed the three initial programme theories, and 77 documents, were included in programme theory testing. 39 context, mechanism, outcome configurations were meta-synthesized into three themes: (1) The gateway to urgent support; (2) Values based crisis interventions and (3) Leadership and organizational values. Fragmented cross-agency responses exacerbated staff stress and created barriers to access. Services should focus on evaluating interagency working to improve staff role clarity and ensure boundaries between services are planned for. Organizations experienced as compassionate contributed positively to perceived accessibility but relied on compassionate leadership. Attending to the support needs of staff and the proximity of leaders to the front line of crisis care are key. Designing interventions that are easy to navigate, prioritize shared decision-making and reduce the risk of re-traumatizing people is a priority.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Mental , Saúde Mental , Avaliação de Processos e Resultados em Cuidados de Saúde , Adulto , Humanos
6.
Res Involv Engagem ; 8(1): 8, 2022 Feb 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35227330

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is a growing need to involve patients in the development of patient safety interventions. Mental health services, despite their strong history of patient involvement, have been slow to develop patient safety interventions, particularly in inpatient settings. METHODS: A systematic search was undertaken of both academic and grey literature. Whilst no lay member of the team worked directly on the review, they were part of the project steering group which provided oversight throughout the review process. This included people with lived experience of mental health services. From a research perspective the main focus for lay members was in co-producing the digital technology, the key project output. Smits et al.'s (Res Involv Engagem 6:1-30, 2020) Involvement Matrix was used to taxonomise levels of patient involvement. Studies were included if they were set in any inpatient mental health care context regardless of design. The quality of all selected studies was appraised using Mixed Methods Appraisal Methodology (MMAT). RESULTS: Fifty-two studies were classified, synthesised and their levels of patient involvement in the research and development of patient safety interventions were taxonomised. Almost two-thirds of studies (n = 33) researched reducing restrictive practices. Only four studies reported engaging patients in the research process as decision-makers, with the remaining studies divided almost equally between engaging patients in the research process as partners, advisors and co-thinkers. Just under half of all studies engaged patients in just one stage of the research process. CONCLUSION: Involvement of patients in researching patient safety and developing interventions in an inpatient mental health context seems diverse in its nature. Researchers need to both more fully consider and better describe their approaches to involving patients in safety research in inpatient mental health. Doing so will likely lead to the development of higher quality safety interventions.


We know that inpatient mental health settings are not safe. By getting patients to help us research and develop interventions to improve safety they are more likely to work. We searched for articles and papers which described doing this. By using a matrix we were able to understand how many research studies involved patients. We found 52 studies, but few really involved patients in the entire research and intervention development process. Most of the research focus was on helping staff to use less restrictive interventions like restraint and seclusion. Only four studies really treated patients as equals in terms of decision making in the research process, and about half of the studies involved patients in only one of the possible three stages of research. There have been lots of ways patients have been asked to be involved in research but we really need to improve the way we involve patients in order for our knowledge about patient safety and the interventions that follow from this to be truly co-produced.

7.
Child Soc ; 36(6): 1351-1401, 2022 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36588794

RESUMO

Restrictive practices are often used harmfully with children in institutional settings. Interventions to reduce their use do not appear to have been mapped systematically. Using environmental scanning, we conducted a broad-scope mapping review of English language academic databases, websites and social media, using systematic methods. Included records (N = 121) were mostly from the United States and contained details of 82 different interventions. Children's participation was limited. Reporting quality was inconsistent, which undermined claims of effectiveness. Overall, despite a multitude of interventions, evidence is limited. Leaders should consider the evidence, including children's perspectives, before introducing poorly understood interventions into children's settings.

8.
Psychother Res ; 32(4): 428-439, 2022 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34338165

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence of the effectiveness of a brief relapse prevention intervention using implementation intentions (Self-Management after Therapy, SMArT), following remission from depression and to identify effective relapse prevention strategies. METHOD: The SMArT intervention was provided to 107 patients who were recovered after psychological therapy for depression. Relapse events were calculated as reliable and clinically significant increases in PHQ-scores. Sixteen patients receiving the intervention and eight practitioners providing it were interviewed. Framework Analysis identified seven themes which highlighted effective relapse prevention strategies and effective implementation of the SMArT intervention. RESULTS: Relapse rates at the final SMArT session (four months after the end of acute stage therapy) were 11%. Seven themes were identified that supported effective self-management: (1) Relationship with the practitioner-feeling supported; (2) Support networks; (3) Setting goals, implementing plans and routine; (4) Changing views of recovery; (5) The SMArT sessions-mode, content, timing, duration; (6) Suitability for the person; and (7) Suitability for the service. CONCLUSION: The study provides some support for the effectiveness of the SMArT intervention, although a randomized controlled trial is required; and identifies important relapse prevention strategies.


Assuntos
Depressão , Intenção , Doença Crônica , Depressão/terapia , Humanos , Recidiva , Prevenção Secundária
9.
J Patient Exp ; 8: 23743735211060792, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34869845

RESUMO

Trichotillomania (TTM) is a poorly understood disorder with no consensus on aetiology or epidemiology; often overlooked due to high comorbidity rates. Cross-cultural qualitative research is sparse; therefore, an international qualitative study was conducted. A generic qualitative approach with thematic analysis was used to explore data from asynchronous email interviews. The aim of this article is to report participant experiences of seeking treatment. Using a sample of 20 adults (18-55 years) from 15 different countries, this article highlights lack of access and unmet healthcare needs signifying an inadequate supply of TTM expertise globally and the need for more robust clinical guidance.

10.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0231260, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32275695

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Specialist sexual assault services, which collect forensic evidence and offer holistic healthcare to people following sexual assault, have been established internationally. In England, these services are called sexual assault referral centres (SARCs). Mental health and substance misuse problems are common among SARC attendees, but little is known about how SARCs should address these needs. This review aims to seek and synthesise evidence regarding approaches to identification and support for mental health and substance misuse problems in SARCs and corresponding services internationally; empirical evidence regarding effective service models; and stakeholders' views and policy recommendations about optimal SARC practice. METHODS: A systematic review was undertaken. PsycINFO, MEDLINE, IBSS and CINAHL were searched from 1975 to August 2018. A web-based search up to December 2018 was also conducted to identify government and expert guidelines on SARCs. Quality assessment and narrative synthesis were conducted. RESULTS: We included 107 papers. We found that identification based on clinical judgement, supportive counselling and referral to other services without active follow-up were the most common approaches. Evaluations of interventions for post-rape psychopathology in attendees of sexual assault services provided mixed evidence of moderate quality. Very little evidence was found regarding interventions or support for substance misuse. Stakeholders emphasised the importance of accessibility, flexibility, continuity of care, in-house psychological support, staff trained in mental health as well as specialist support for LGBT groups and people with learning difficulties. Guidelines suggested that SARCs should assess for mental health and substance misuse and provide in-house emotional support, but the extent and nature of support were not clarified. Both stakeholders and guidelines recommended close partnership between sexual assault services and local counselling services. CONCLUSIONS: This review suggests that there is big variation in the mental health and substance misuse provision both across and within different sexual assault service models. We found no robust evidence about how sexual assault services can achieve good mental health and substance misuse outcomes for service users. Clearer guidance for service planners and commissioners, informed by robust evidence about optimal service organisations and pathways, is required. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42018119706.


Assuntos
Saúde Mental , Delitos Sexuais/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/psicologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/terapia , Feminino , Governo , Guias como Assunto , Diretrizes para o Planejamento em Saúde , Recursos em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Reino Unido
11.
Ethn Health ; 25(5): 732-746, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29514473

RESUMO

Introduction: Domestic violence and abuse has been recognised as an international public health problem. However, the pervasiveness of the problem is unknown due in part to underreporting, especially among women from ethnic minority populations. In relation to this group, this review seeks to explore: (1) the barriers to disclosure; (2) the facilitators of help-seeking; and (3) self-perceived impacts of domestic violence. Design: We systematically identified published qualitative studies conducted among women from ethnic minority populations in the UK. Data analysis was completed using thematic analysis approach. Result: 562 papers were identified and eight papers from four studies conducted among women from ethnic minority populations in the UK met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Barriers to disclosure include: Immigration status, community influences, problems with language and interpretation, and unsupportive attitudes of staff within mainstream services. Facilitators of help-seeking were: escalation of abuse and safety of children. Self-perceived impact of abuse includes: shame, denial, loss of identity and lack of choice. Conclusion: There is an on-going need for staff from domestic violence services to be aware of the complexities within which women from ethnic minority populations experience domestic violence and abuse.


Assuntos
Revelação , Violência Doméstica/etnologia , Etnicidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupos Minoritários/estatística & dados numéricos , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde/etnologia , População Negra , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Meio Social , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
12.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 43: 36-44, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30473155

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To explore how parents and health professionals view the concept and practice of collaboration in the management of childhood long-term conditions. DESIGNS AND METHODS: A qualitative research approach was adopted; sixteen parents and six health professionals participated in either individual or group interviews. Data analysis was underpinned by the Framework approach and involved an iterative process of reading the transcribed data, identifying and refining key themes until a coherent picture emerged. RESULTS: Two main concepts were identified: expectations of collaboration and mechanisms for collaboration. Health professionals' expectations of collaborative practice were influenced by their knowledge, experience and relative objectivity. They used relationship building with families as a key strategy for collaboration. Parents' expectations of collaboration varied and appeared to be influenced by their experience of living with their child's condition. Parents' needs were often unmet, particularly in relation to support with coordinating or accessing care on behalf of their child. Parents' strategies included resilience, assertiveness, determination and battling for what they needed. CONCLUSION: Parents and professionals valued collaboration as a concept but differed in their expectations of collaborative practice and adopted different mechanisms to foster meaningful collaboration. A better understanding of the unique needs and experiences of parents of a child with a long-term condition is key to developing positive collaborative practice. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Collaborative practice could be enhanced by health professionals' being more responsive to the full range of parent support needs, and being more pro-active about helping them work with the complexities of care systems.


Assuntos
Doença Crônica/enfermagem , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Assistência de Longa Duração/métodos , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/organização & administração , Relações Profissional-Família , Adaptação Psicológica , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde
13.
Nurs Child Young People ; 29(4): 23, 2017 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28485232

RESUMO

Latif et al's (2017) paper is a valuable addition to knowledge in this field. It highlights the need to improve the education of registered children's nurses in the care of children and young people (CYP) with physical health problems related to self-harm.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Mental/normas , Melhoria de Qualidade , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/normas , Adolescente , Criança , Currículo/normas , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/métodos , Bacharelado em Enfermagem/normas , Humanos , Transtornos Mentais/enfermagem , Recursos Humanos
14.
Emerg Med J ; 34(9): 593-598, 2017 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28500089

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As an important part of a pilot study to determine the feasibility of a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing use of the Manchester Acute Coronary Syndromes (MACS) decision rule with standard care, we aimed to explore patient attitudes and potential barriers to participation in a trial of this nature. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study nested within a pilot RCT comparing use of the MACS rule (which could enable some patients with chest pain to be discharged earlier) with standard care. Semi-structured interviews with consenting participants were conducted with reference to a bespoke topic guide. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the Framework method with an inductive approach. RESULTS: The 10 interviewees expressed that participation in the trial was generally acceptable. All but one recommended participation to others. Participants who were in pain or anxious at the time of arrival reported that the initial invitation to participate in the trial was sometimes made too early. The approach was welcome, providing they had been given time to settle. Interviewees welcomed the opportunity that trial participation offered for them to play a more active role in their healthcare and to reduce unnecessary waiting time. Participants appeared to like the fact that participation in the trial might mean they could return home sooner and welcomed the provision of follow-up. Although several participants described being generally sceptical of medical research, they were amenable to participation in this trial. This appears to be because they agreed with the need for research in this field and perceived the intervention as non-invasive. CONCLUSIONS: Patients were positive about their participation in this RCT comparing the MACS rule with standard care. A number of areas for improving trial design were identified and should be considered in the planning of future large trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 86818215 RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEE REFERENCE: 13/NW/0081 UKCRN REGISTRATION ID: 14334.


Assuntos
Síndrome Coronariana Aguda/diagnóstico , Satisfação do Paciente , Seleção de Pacientes , Projetos Piloto , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/psicologia , Síndrome Coronariana Aguda/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/normas
15.
Health Expect ; 20(1): 98-111, 2017 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26725547

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Young people with eating disorders are at risk of harm to their social, emotional and physical development and life chances. Although they can be reluctant to seek help, they may access social media for information, advice or support. The relationship between social media and youth well-being is an emotive subject, but not clearly understood. This qualitative study aimed to explore how young people used a youth-orientated, moderated, online, eating disorders discussion forum, run by an eating disorders charity. METHODS: We applied a netnographic approach involving downloading and thematically analysing over 400 messages posted August-November 2012. RESULTS: Data analysis generated five themes: Taking on the role of mentor; the online discussion forum as a safe space; Friendship within the online forum; Flexible help; and Peer support for recovery and relapse prevention. Forum moderation may have influenced the forum culture. DISCUSSION: Our findings are consistent with literature about youth preferences for mental health self-care support. A young person's decision to use this discussion forum can be construed as pro-active self-care. A moderated online discussion forum can make a positive contribution to support for youth with eating disorders, countering negative media perceptions of online groups. CONCLUSION: This study adds to knowledge about how young people access support via social media. Online discussion forums can be safe and acceptable spaces for youth to access help. Further research could provide insights into the impact of forum moderation.


Assuntos
Transtornos da Alimentação e da Ingestão de Alimentos/psicologia , Mídias Sociais , Apoio Social , Adolescente , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Jovem
16.
Nurs Child Young People ; 28(4): 61, 2016 May 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27214422

RESUMO

UNLABELLED: Theme: Complex health care and chronic disease management Introduction: Interactions between carers and health professionals often have a power imbalance; professionals seem reluctant to acknowledge carers' expertise and unwilling to relinquish control over the management of the child's condition. AIM: To explore parents' and professionals' perceptions of collaborative healthcare practice to manage childhood long-term conditions. METHODS: Qualitative study using focus groups to elicit carers' and health professionals' views of collaborative practice, with the framework approach underpinning data analysis. DISCUSSION: To facilitate parents' care-giving roles, health professionals must move from a position of care prescriber to collaborator. Yet collaboration is complex and difficult to operationalise in practice, partly because there is discordance between the views of health professionals and carers about the purpose of collaborating. CONCLUSION: Health professionals need to understand, value and respect carers' expertise and desire to be involved in care and find ways to integrate carer expertise into care and care planning.

17.
Emerg Med J ; 32(1): 15-20, 2015 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24366946

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Provision of prompt, effective analgesia is rightly considered as a standard of care in the emergency department (ED). However, much suffering is not 'painful' and may be under-recognised. We sought to describe the burden of suffering in the ED and explore how this may be best addressed from a patient centred perspective. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, we included undifferentiated patients presenting to the ED. We undertook two face to face questionnaires with the first immediately following triage. We asked patients: (a) if they were 'suffering'; (b) how they were suffering; and (c) what they hoped would be done to ease this. Prior to leaving the ED, we asked patients what had been done to ease their suffering. Data were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Of 125 patients included, 77 (61.6%) reported suffering on direct questioning and 92 (73.6%) listed at least one way in which they were suffering. 90 (72.0%) patients had a pain score >0/10 but only 37 (29.6%) reported that pain was causing suffering. Patients reported suffering from both physical symptoms (especially pain, nausea, vomiting and dizziness) and emotional distress (notably anxiety). Treatment (to ease physical and emotional symptoms), information (particularly diagnosis, reassurance and explanation), care (notably friendly staff) and closure (being seen, resolving the problem and going home) were the key themes identified as important for relief of suffering. CONCLUSIONS: In seeking to ease suffering in the ED, clinicians must focus not only on providing analgesia but on treating Emotional distress, Physical symptoms, providing Information, Care and Closure (EPICC).


Assuntos
Comunicação , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Relações Médico-Paciente , Estresse Psicológico/etiologia , Ansiedade , Emoções , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Medição da Dor , Estudos Prospectivos , Inquéritos e Questionários
19.
Child Adolesc Ment Health ; 19(3): 178-184, 2014 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32878370

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Little is known about high school students' perceptions of school-based pastoral support. This study aimed to explore this in the context of a high school-based emotional support project. METHODS: Qualitative interviews explored perspectives on help seeking of students (N = 23) and staff (N = 27) in three UK high schools where a pastoral project was introduced. Data were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Student peer groups perceived help seeking as a sign of weakness. However, students valued learning skills in managing emotions and friendships. Staff expressed concerns about students' ability to help seek proactively, and highlighted organisational influences on pastoral support. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing student control over the process, and involving trusted staff, could encourage help seeking in high school. It is possible to access the views of students who do not help seek, to improve understanding of help-seeking behaviour.

20.
Nurs Times ; 109(13): 26, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23621083
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...